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16 февраля, 07:00

India vs. Pakistan: Who Wins in a War (And How Many Millions Could Die)?

Kyle Mizokami Security, Asia It could be brutal.  For its part, the Indian army plans to immediately take the offensive under a doctrine called “Cold Start.” Cold Start envisions rapid mobilization followed by a major offensive into Pakistan before the country can respond with tactical nuclear weapons. Such an offensive—and Pakistan’s likely conventional defeat—could make the use of tactical nuclear weapons all the more likely. The Indian subcontinent is home to two of the largest armies on Earth. Not only are the armies of India and Pakistan both larger in personnel than the U.S. Army, but they have stood at alert facing one another since the dissolution of the British Indian Army in 1947. The two armies have clashed four times in the past seventy years, and may yet do so again in the future. (This first appeared in 2017 and is being reposted due to breaking events.) The Indian army is the primary land force of the Indian armed forces. The army numbers 1.2 million active duty personnel and 990,000 reservists, for a total force strength of 2.1 million. The army’s primary tasks are guarding the borders with Pakistan and China and domestic security—particularly in Kashmir and the Northeast. The army is also a frequent contributor to United Nations peacekeeping missions abroad. The army is structured into fourteen army corps, which are further made up of forty infantry, armored, mountain and RAPID (mechanized infantry) divisions. There is approximately one separate artillery brigade per corps, five separate armored brigades, seven infantry brigades and five brigade-sized air defense formations. Infantry and mountain divisions are mostly assigned to the mountainous North and Northeast regions, where manpower intensive counterinsurgency and mountain warfare forces are important, while infantry, RAPID, and armored formations sit on the border opposite Pakistan. Perhaps unusually the Indian army has only one airborne unit, the Parachute Regiment, which is actually an umbrella headquarters for army airborne and special forces. The Parachute Regiment controls seven special-forces battalions and three airborne brigades. Read full article

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16 февраля, 06:43

China-U.S. trade talks 'making a final sprint': state media

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Chinese state media on Saturday expressed cautious optimism over trade talks between the United States and China, a day after President Xi Jinping said a week of discussions had produced "step-by-step" progress.

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16 февраля, 06:43

China-U.S. trade talks 'making a final sprint': state media

Chinese state media on Saturday expressed cautious optimism over trade talks between the United States and China, a day after President Xi Jinping said a week of discussions had produced "step-by-step" progress.

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16 февраля, 06:37

Nigeria presidential election postponed to February 23: electoral commission chairman

Nigeria's presidential election, which was due to be held on Saturday, has been postponed to Feb. 23, the chairman of the country's electoral commission said on Saturday.

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16 февраля, 06:36

Nigeria presidential election postponed by a week

Nigeria's presidential election, which was due to be held on Saturday, has been postponed by a week, the chairman of the country's electoral commission said hours before polls were due to open.

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16 февраля, 06:27

Mexican president visits 'El Chapo's' home turf seeking reconciliation

Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador visited the birthplace of the country's most infamous drug trafficker, Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, on Friday, calling for peace and reconciliation days after a U.S. jury convicted the kingpin.

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16 февраля, 06:11

Mexican actor apologizes for racial slur against 'Roma' actress

A Mexican soap opera star apologized on Friday for using a racial slur to describe actress Yalitza Aparicio, whose performance in the critically acclaimed film "Roma" made her the first indigenous woman to be nominated for a best actress Oscar.

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16 февраля, 06:06

Shocker: North Korea Is Building More Nuclear Weapons (3 Reasons To Look Past the Headlines)

Daniel R. DePetris Security, Asia We ought to take a step back from the ledge and put all these reports in context. Here are three things we should keep in mind as we peruse the avalanche of negativity that will make its way into the media in the week ahead. The reports on North Korea’s nuclear and ballistic missile program keep on coming. First, in November 2018, the Middlebury Institute of International Studies in Monterrey, California discovered a new missile base with an underground compartment near the previously known Yeongjeo-dong facility close to the Chinese border. Then, in January 2019, the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, DC probed the undeclared Sino-ri missile operating facility, one of an estimated 20 missile facilities the North Koreans have yet to officially declare to the international community. Now, this week, we have a third report from Stanford University’s Siegfried Hecker, Robert Carlin, and Elliot Serbin concluding that Pyongyang’s nuclear weapons program remains highly active in the midst of denuclearization talks with the United States. The three nuclear experts observe that North Korea has likely produced an additional 5-8 kilograms of weapons-grade plutonium and about 150 kilograms of weapons-grade highly enriched uranium last year. “We also expect that the production of warheads most likely continued during the year,“ the report says, all of which occurred despite discussions U.S. and North Korean officials have been having since the middle of last year. With all of this information in our inboxes, should we be as alarmed as the headlines suggest? Is it time for President Donald Trump to just walk away from the diplomatic process entirely in protest of Kim’s supposed deviousness? Is Kim practicing the art of “grand deception,” as New York Times national security correspondent David Sanger hinted last month? Read full article

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16 февраля, 06:04

Canada Letter: The Strange Story Behind the SNC-Lavalin Affair

Eight months before the federal election, a cabinet minister’s resignation and allegations of improper influence have Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in a political crisis.

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16 февраля, 06:02

The U.S. Navy’s Big Mistake—Building Tons of Aircraft Carriers

War Is Boring Security, The Pentagon behaves as if aircraft carriers will rule forever … they won’t. “History,” it has been written, “does not repeat itself, but it rhymes.” Today it’s rhyming with Gen. Billy Mitchell. In the 1920s, Mitchell challenged conventional thinking by advocating air power at sea in the face of a naval establishment dominated by battleship proponents. The hubris of the “battleship Navy” was such that just nine days before Pearl Harbor, the official program for the 1941 Army-Navy game displayed a full page photograph of the battleship USS Arizona with language virtually extolling its invincibility. Of course, the reason that no one had yet sunk a battleship from the air — in combat — was that no one had yet tried. In fact, Mitchell sank a captured German battleship, the Ostfriesland, in an aerial demonstration back in 1921, but the Navy said that the test proved nothing. Two of the observers that day were officials from Japan. In addition, the architect of the Pearl Harbor attack, Isoroku Yamamoto, was a student at Harvard at the time and no doubt read accounts of the event that were widely reported in the newspapers. The aircraft carrier decisively replaced the battleship as the Navy’s sea control capital ship, but its reign in that capacity was, in reality, quite brief. The aircraft carrier established its ascendancy in the Battle of Midway and was the centerpiece of five major sea battles between 1942 and 1944. Yet, following the Battle of Leyte Gulf in 1944, the U.S. Navy repositioned the aircraft carrier as a platform to project power ashore. The United States did not lose a fleet carrier in the war after the Hornet went down in 1942, because Japan’s surface fleet had been devastated. Nor did Tokyo effectively use its submarines. That track record, just as the boast in the Army/Navy game program, however, is not an indication that a carrier cannot be sunk — or put out of commission — but rather the fact that since 1945, the U.S. Navy has never engaged another navy in battle that tried. “Projecting the past into the future is risky business — especially when we’re unsure what that past was,” James Holmes, a naval warfare expert at the U.S. Naval War College wrote. Read full article

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16 февраля, 05:59

New Poll Shows Increased Bipartisan Desire to Act on Climate Change

The results, released in December, also show widespread bipartisan support for a Green New Deal and renewable energy Visit https://therealnews.com for more stories and help support our work by donating at https://therealnews.com/donate.

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16 февраля, 05:56

Does Recognition of Parallel Gov't in Venezuela Violate International Law?

A recent study conducted by the German parliament's independent scientific research service found that international recognition of the self-proclaimed "interim president" Juan Guaidó probably constitutes a violation of international law. We discuss the study's implications with Andrej Hunko, who commissioned the study Visit https://therealnews.com for more stories and help support our work by donating at https://therealnews.com/donate.