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20 июня, 12:20

🇩🇪 🇫🇷 Germany and France call for joint EU immigration policy | Al Jazeera English

France and Germany have called for a joint European approach to migration. The German Chancellor, Angela Merkel, is under pressure over the issue. Her coalition partner, the Christian Social Union (CSU), has given her two weeks to reach an EU-wide deal, or it will withdraw its support. Al Jazeera's Dominic Kane reports from Berlin. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

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20 июня, 10:46

🇾🇪 Saudi, UAE coalition enters airport compound of Yemen's Hudaida | Al Jazeera English

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Saudi-Emirati coalition forces have taken control of parts of Yemen's Hudaida airport as they fight Houthi rebels. Meanwhile, the Yemeni army is blocking the road between Hudaida province and the capital. This move would cut Houthi supply lines and stop reinforcements from Sanaa. Al Jazeera's Mohammed Adow reports from Djibouti. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

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20 июня, 09:13

🇺🇸 Republican senators urge Trump to end 'zero tolerance' policy | Al Jazeera English

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US Republicans have agreed to work on legislation to end President Donald Trump's controversial policy of separating migrant families at the southern border. But Democrats are not willing to support it, instead saying Trump can act alone. "The president alone can fix it," US Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer said, urging Trump to sign an order "to end the agonising screams of small children who have been separated from their parents". Al Jazeera's Alan Fisher reports from Washington, DC. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

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20 июня, 08:41

🇺🇸 🇺🇳 US withdraws from UN Human Rights Council | Al Jazeera English

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"A cesspool of political bias" is how the United States describes the United Nations Human Rights Council, and that is why it has decided to pull out of the UN body. President Donald Trump had been threatening to quit the council if it was not reformed. Al Jazeera's Rosiland Jordan reports from Washington, DC. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

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19 июня, 22:00

🇱🇧 Lebanon: Single By Choice | Al Jazeera World

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When she catches up with long lost female friends, Tarfa Itani usually anticipates their first question: "Are you married?" "I answer 'no'," says the thirty-something jewellery designer and boutique owner in Beirut. And then they usually follow-up with, 'Why, you're pretty?' Her eyes sparkle as she talks to filmmaker Simon El Habre who is on his own personal quest to discover why, at 40, he hasn't yet found the woman he feels he wants to commit the rest of his life to. Finding time for a personal life has not been easy and though Itani's had several relationships, she hasn't yet found a life partner. She feels that women's expectations finding the perfect man are unrealistic, but also believes that many Lebanese women these days no longer feel pressure to see marriage as the be all and end all. It's not a burden or a responsibility. It's about companionship, love and beautiful moments together. It's unfair to link marriage to all these negative thoughts. Tarfa Itani, jewellery designer and owner of Falamank Boutique "It's not a burden or a responsibility," she says standing in her jewellery boutique where she supplies a growing Arab and international market. She's referring to social pressures and growing divorce rates. "It's about companionship, love and beautiful moments together. It's unfair to link marriage to all these negative thoughts." El Habre comes across a number of factors contributing to increasing numbers of single, thirty-plus women in Lebanon. Women outnumber men by more than 2 percent in the country of six million. It's a situation that becomes more pronounced as people enter their late thirties and early forties and is exacerbated by the sometimes rigid roles imposed by Lebanese society, across religious and cultural boundaries. Getting work has become an increasing problem following the end of the Lebanese Civil War, in 1990. Unemployment hovers around seven percent today, so many men now work abroad, marrying foreign wives. Educated Lebanese women, tied to the more traditional expectations of parents and extended family, have tended to remain in Lebanon. For 40-year-old Adriana Lubos who works in advertising, that's simply the way that it is. "Men with qualifications leave Lebanon to get married, because there are no opportunities here for them to achieve their ambitions," she says. To try and better understand the situation, Adriana has been writing a blog, candidly sharing her experiences with online dating and relationships. "People usually marry in their early thirties. But if they reach their mid-thirties, something must be wrong," she says. "That's the rule and you become the exception. So you try to understand why." Accurate statistics are hard to come by but informally Adriana believes that for every single, eligible man in Beirut, there may be six or more single women. After living on her own and forging her own successful career in local government - and becoming the first female president of her municipality - Fadia Abo Ghanem Maalouf has finally settled into marriage. But when she met her future husband, it wasn't all plain sailing. "After we had many clashes, we suddenly fell in love. It's the most beautiful thing. Life is shared between two, not one." In contrast to 10-hour work days and nights with as little as two hours sleep, Fadia has found fulfilment in a more traditional role. "It's nice to go back home and find someone waiting for you, someone who loves you, is kind, respects you and completes your ambitions," she says. El Habre concludes that, in today's Lebanon, perhaps being single is becoming the new norm. Women are taking more control of their lives in ways that much of society has not yet adjusted to. The consequences for Lebanon - and potentially the Arab world as a whole - may be an increasing shift away from traditional family structures. But, as yet, no one quite has the answers as to what will replace them. More from Al Jazeera World on: More from Al Jazeera World on: YouTube - http://aje.io/aljazeeraworldYT Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/AlJazeeraWorld Twitter - https://twitter.com/AlJazeera_World Visit our website - http://www.aljazeera.com/aljazeeraworld Subscribe to AJE on YouTube - http://aje.io/YTsubscribe - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

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19 июня, 21:57

🇰🇪 🇨🇺 Kenyans lose appeal to block deployment of Cuban doctors | Al Jazeera English

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Kenyan doctors have lost their appeal to the Employee and Labour Relations Court after attempting to block the deployment of Cuban doctors across Kenya. About 100 Cuban specialist doctors are in Kenya, following an agreement between the Cuban and Kenyan governments. The Kenyan doctors' union has opposed the hiring of foreign doctors, saying there are 171 local specialists without jobs. The Kenyan government say they resorted to this move due to the doctors' protest in 2017 that lasted for over three months, which caused a massive crisis in a shortage of working doctors during that period. Al Jazeera's Catherine Soi reports from Nairobi. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

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19 июня, 21:09

🇲🇿 HRW: Mozambique unrest displaces more than 1,000 people | Al Jazeera English

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Human Rights Watch (HRW) says more than 1,000 people in northeast Mozambique have been left homeless by armed attacks in recent months. The army launched a response to these attacks, but HRW has criticised the heavy-handed approach. Local people say they are equally afraid of the gangs behind the attacks and the army response. Al Jazeera's Nadim Baba reports. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

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19 июня, 20:30

🇺🇸 Will the US reform immigration laws? | Inside Story

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Donald Trump is under fire for his "zero tolerance" approach to migrants who cross the border without proper documents. His policy is simple: jail the parents, take their kids away. But he blames the Democrats for that and says the law's at fault. Congress is expected to discuss two bills this week. Will the outrage and international condemnation prompt changes. Presenter: Sami Zeidan Guests: Joe Watkins, Republican Political Strategist Lincoln Mitchell, political analyst David Ward, retired border patrol officer Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AJEnglish Find us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/

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19 июня, 19:55

UN: Record 68.5m people displaced worldwide | Al Jazeera English

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War, violence and persecution have forced more people to become refugees than ever before. The latest UN Refugee Agency report finds more than 68.5 million people are displaced worldwide as of last year. Al Jazeera's Mereana Hond takes a closer look at the numbers. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

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19 июня, 19:22

🇪🇸 Over 1,500 refugees and migrants reach Spain | Al Jazeera English

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Boats full of refugees and migrants continue to brave the treacherous waters of the Mediterranean in search of safety. More than 1,500 arrived in southern Spain over the weekend. These arrivals are in addition to 629 people who had been on board the charity boat Aquarius, which was denied entry by Italy and Malta and accepted by Spain. It is the largest single influx of migrants to the area in four years. Al Jazeera's Karl Penhaul reports from Almeria on the southeast coast of Spain. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

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19 июня, 15:26

France's plastic revolution - earthrise

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It is estimated that 300 million tonnes of plastic are produced annually, with at least eight million tonnes ending up in our oceans. Each piece of plastic will take hundreds of years to decompose, taking up space in landfills, poisoning bodies of water, land, and both marine and land-based animals alike. The European Union (EU) is allegedly working on a ban of all single-use plastics, including straws, takeaway cups, balloons, plates and even cotton buds, in order to tackle the issue of plastic-based waste. France has already embraced this ban, aiming to completely banish the production of these single-use plastics by 2020. "Here in France, we have approximately one to five billion [tonnes of plastic]. That's huge," says environmental campaigner Arash Derambarsh. "We passed a law in France in 2015, that supermarkets aren't allowed to sell plastic bags of a certain size in supermarkets and certain shops. Why? Because we're trying to generate an ecological revolution." Across the country, startups are now capitalising on the opportunity to fill this niche with a whole range of bio-plastics. These include plastic produced from seaweed and algae, sugarcane and even milk - designed to try and replace harmful oil-based plastics. Using biological materials allows these new plastic products to decompose over shorter time periods after use, in some cases, cutting decomposition time from more than 500 years to a mere four months. Although it remains early days for many of these developments, this signals the start of an alternative plastic revolution where plastics can be created from a surprisingly unusual array of natural materials. Nicholas Moufflet is an engineer who developed a "vegan bottle" made from sugarcane. The bottles have been a success, with orders for two million in 2017 alone, and higher expectations for 2018. While production prices - the bottles cost 25 percent more to produce than traditional plastics - remain a concern and a challenge for Moufflet and other natural plastics producers in France and worldwide, the end result is worth it. But is it realistic to think we can stop using plastic completely? "Yes, but it's going to take time," says Derambarsh. "For that to happen it's going to have to be a global movement of citizens and policymakers and also businesses because the lobbyists have a lot of influence. So it is necessary for policymakers to tell the lobbyists, 'no, but we will help you to do something else'." For more on earthrise: https://www.aljazeera.com/programmes/earthrise/ https://www.facebook.com/AJearthrise/ - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

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19 июня, 15:06

The cost of chocolate and the unjust underbelly of supply chains | Counting the Cost

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The Ivory Coast and Ghana are the world's first and second-biggest cocoa producers. Yet, many people there are so poor that they can never afford the final product, a bar of chocolate. In the Ivory Coast, more than half of the farmers and workers in the cocoa industry were living in poverty in 2017, as per reports from the International Cocoa Organisation(ICCO). This is partly due to an ongoing surplus in the global production of cocoa that resulted in a 58 percent price drop between August 2016 and May 2017. Both countries are still struggling to recover. The governments of the two countries have now decided to team up and attempt to secure a bigger share of the global chocolate profits with plans to coordinate production levels and sales policies. This may result in a price increase for the glossy end product and maybe even a potential dip in the net annual sales of global confectionary giants like Ferrero and Mars. Antonie Fountain is the managing director of the Voice Network, a group of NGOs and trade unions working together on sustainability in cocoa. He says that this recent announcement is no surprise: "Farmers [in the Ivory Coast] have seen their incomes reduced by 37 percent overnight. These farmers were already desperately poor and measures need to be taken to address the extreme poverty. The price crash was due - to a large extent - to overproduction and so the two major cocoa producing nations should work together to ensure that there is a higher cocoa price and managing the supply." But how much power can cocoa producers wrangle in an industry dominated by some of the world's biggest names in chocolate? "Ghana and the Ivory Coast together produce two-thirds of all the cocoa in the world. If they wanted to, if they make the right interventions, they could very much impact the situation of the world's cocoa market - at least in the short to medium term," says Fountain. The two countries are taking the first crucial steps towards making a difference by seeing each other as collaborators as opposed to competitors, with a long road to business integrity, trust and a better life for their cocoa farmers as the end goal.