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22 сентября, 15:14

Oil attacks: What's next for Saudi Aramco and world oil markets? | Counting the Cost

It was the worst attack on Middle East oil facilities since Saddam Hussein set fire to Kuwait's oil wells in 1990. Drones - or possibly cruise missiles - travelling 500 kilometres (310 miles) across Saudi territory undetected hit at the heart of the kingdom's oil industry and knocked out five percent of the world's oil supply. As a result, oil prices spiked almost 20 percent. That is still lower than the recent high in October 2018 when tensions between the US and Iran were ratcheting up. Saudi Arabia believes it can have the facility back up and running in a matter of weeks, but if it takes more than six weeks to fix the plants and restore production, oil prices could head towards the $85 a barrel mark. So the situation reflects a real test for state-owned oil giant Saudi Aramco. The attack, claimed by the Houthi rebels with whom the Saudis have been at war in Yemen for the last four years, raises many questions about the kingdom's abilities to protect its own facilities and the billions it's paid for US defence systems. Iran, which supports the Houthis, has denied accusations that it had been involved in the attacks. "It is audacious, it's quite amazing that it was choreographed in such a way to have spokesmen from Yemen standing up and saying they [the Houthis] were the ones responsible for it and it now appears from all intelligence that it was Iranian, not only directed, but came from Iranian soil," James P Moore Jr, CEO of The Washington Institute, tells Al Jazeera. "And so the notion, for example, that billions of dollars have been spent on the defence of Saudi Arabia to avoid this sort of thing happening certainly has been concerning on everybody's part and what happens next is anybody's guess." So why did Saudi Arabia's billion-dollar defences fail to protect the country's oil facilities from attack? And what will happen next? From Jakarta to Borneo: The cost of building a new capital city As rising sea levels threaten Indonesia's capital Jakarta, Indonesia's President Joko Widodo is planning to relocate the capital city to the island of Borneo. His decision has also been said to aim at spreading the wealth of the nation more evenly across the 13,000 islands that make up the archipelago. Projected to cost $32bn, the relocation will be one of the world's largest single infrastructure projects. But as Raheela Mahomed reports, there are concerns that a move to Borneo would adversely impact the people who live there. "The new capital here will destroy the ecosystem," says environmental activist Pradarma Rupang. Borneo is known for its lush rainforest and wildlife and there are concerns the massive move will threaten conservation efforts and will force locals off land they have lived on for generations. Mining and logging have already damaged some parts of Borneo. "We don't need to ask people when we want to move the capital, it is up to the government to decide. As long as we don't destroy the environment or harm anybody," East Kalimantan governor Isran Noor, tells Al Jazeera. Argentina in crisis: A tale of two currencies In Argentina, the currency is the peso but the US dollar plays a crucial role in economic and political life. After President Mauricio Macri lost a primary election back in August, the peso lost a quarter of its value and now Argentina is burning through its foreign reserves to shore up the peso and to pay off dollar-denominated debt. "When the Macri administration took over, the expectation was to generate capital inflows and to generate growth through investment and what happened you had a lot of portfolio inflows but not as much investment," economist Esteban Medrano explains. "Macri was a bit too optimistic and it took too long to adjust the fiscal issues. He had to keep interest rates too high for too long and people already now mistrust the value of the pesos." According to writer Mariana Luzzi, the US dollar "is not only used by the elite in Argentina but all sectors who run to buy dollars as soon as they have some cash. It's how people try to preserve their cash". Calls to dollarise the economy are common in Argentina, but Luzzi says it won't work. "In 1991 and 2001, there was an attempt to tie the peso to the dollar. It was a convertibility at that time, not a dollarisation, but the state did not have a monetary policy. It controlled inflation but it devastated the economy," she says. The attempt ended in the crisis of 2001. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

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22 сентября, 14:51

India PM expected to get warm welcome in US state of Texas

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi is expected to get a warm welcome at an event in the US state of Texas. Tensions between the US and India have been fraught in recent months due to escalating tariffs. But with President Donald Trump confirming his attendance, the event is still expected to be a sign of strengthening ties. Al Jazeera's Kimberly Halkett reports from Washington, DC. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #India #Trump

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22 сентября, 13:55

Niger fighting: Tens of thousands flee violence

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Warning: There are some disturbing images in this report. Intense fighting in Niger has displaced around 70,000 people. The village of Inates in the Tillaberi region has become a ghost town after people fled fighting between ISIL and the Niger armed forces. With the violence in the area and landmines in their village, it is not clear when it will be safe to return. Al Jazeera's Laura Burdon-Manley reports. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #Niger #Violence

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22 сентября, 12:56

Amazon mining threat: Illegal work in French Guiana forest

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Ninety-eight percent of French Guiana in Amazonia is covered by rainforest, but unlike Brazil, it’s remained relatively unaffected by deforestation. But illegal gold mining is now threatening this spectacular environment. Al Jazeera's Nick Clark reports. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #FrenchGuiana #AmazonMining

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22 сентября, 12:51

Iran war museum showcases downed US drones

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Iran's powerful Revolutionary Guard Corps is warning that it's ready for combat and that any country launching an attack will become a battlefield. General Hossein Salami was speaking at the opening of a new exhibition showcasing Iranian military capability. And as Al Jazeera's Zein Basravi reports from Tehran, US drones, or at least pieces of them, are the stars of the show. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #Iran #USDrones

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22 сентября, 09:14

Youth across globe demand action on climate change

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Millions across the globe have taken part in the biggest climate change protest on record. Young people took the lead, skipping classes and work to demand governments do more to curb emissions. The week-long campaign aims to step up the pressure on world leaders gathering in New York for the United Nations General Assembly. Al Jazeera's Gabriel Elizondo reports. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #PlanetSOS #ClimateChange

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22 сентября, 09:06

'No Planet B': Millions take to streets in global climate strike

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Millions across the globe have taken part in the biggest protest against climate-change on record. Young people have taken the lead, skipping school and work to demand urgent action. The week-long campaign aims to step up the pressure on world leaders gathering in New York for the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA). The demonstrations started in the Pacific Islands before quickly getting started across Australia, Asia, Europe, Africa, the Middle East and North and South America. Al Jazeera's Emma Hayward reports from London. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #PlanetSOS #ClimateChange

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22 сентября, 08:30

Youth leaders at UN demand bold climate change action

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One day after leading the biggest climate protest in history, young activists have taken their calls for action to the UN. The Youth Climate Summit was opened by teenage campaigner Greta Thunberg, who inspired Friday's demonstrations. Al Jazeera's James Bays reports from the United Nations headquarters. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #GretaThunberg #ClimateChange

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22 сентября, 08:27

Rights group calls for 'immediate release' of Egyptian protesters

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Protests have broken out in Egypt for a second day, demanding the resignation of President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi. The new demonstrations came after dozens of people were arrested in rallies on Friday, which saw thousands take to the streets. It may be too early to predict how these protests will end, but it is clear that for many Egyptians the current status quo of poverty, corruption and oppression is not an option. Al Jazeera's Jamal ElShayyal reports. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #Egypt #Sisi

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22 сентября, 08:19

In rare protests, Egyptians demand President el-Sisi's removal

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There have been calls for more protests in Egypt after thousands joined rare nationwide rallies on Friday night. Security forces fired tear gas at crowds as demonstrators demanded the resignation of President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi. Human Rights Watch is calling for the immediate release of those detained during the unrest. Al Jazeera's Victoria Gatenby reports. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #Egypt #Sisi

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22 сентября, 08:15

Zimbabwe abductions: Dozens of protest leaders missing

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In Zimbabwe, doctors say they will continue to take strike action, despite the kidnapping of their union leader. Peter Magombeyi, who disappeared during a pay strike last week, has been found alive. Obert Masaraure, who runs a teachers’ union, told Al Jazeera he was also abducted three months ago, taken to a secluded area and beaten, for organising a teachers’ strike over pay. Activists say dozens of protesters have been abducted since January. Al Jazeera's Haru Mutasa reports from Harare. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #Zimbabwe #DoctorsStrike

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21 сентября, 19:49

Irish tech influx creates Dublin housing crisis

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The tech company Google is donating $1bn to create more affordable housing in San Francisco. There, highly paid tech workers have helped create a housing shortage by making rents unaffordable for many other Americans. A similar situation is unfolding in Ireland's capital, where the working poor can not afford to rent. Al Jazeera's Laurence Lee reports. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #Ireland #Dublin