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19 января, 06:10

For the Weekend: Matthew Arnold: Dover Beach

**Matthew Arnold**: _Dover Beach_ : >The sea is calm to-night. The tide is full, the moon lies fair Upon the straits;–on the French coast the light Gleams and is gone; the cliffs of England stand, Glimmering and vast, out in the tranquil bay. >Come to the window, sweet is the night-air! Only, from the long line of spray Where the sea meets the moon-blanch’d land, Listen! you hear the grating roar Of pebbles which the waves draw back, and fling, At their return, up the high strand, Begin, and cease, and then again begin, With tremulous cadence slow, and bring The eternal note of sadness in. >Sophocles long ago heard it on the AEgean, And it brought into his mind The turbid ebb and flow of human misery; We find also in the sound a thought, Hearing it by this distant northern sea. >The Sea of Faith Was once, too, at the full, and round earth’s shore Lay like the folds of a bright girdle furl’d. But now I only hear Its melancholy, long, withdrawing roar, Retreating, to the breath Of the night-wind, down the vast edges drear And naked shingles of the world. >Ah, love, let us be true...

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18 января, 22:35

Lecture Notes: The Solow Growth Model: The History of Economic Growth: Econ 135

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Jupyter (formerly iPython) notebook: ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- The Python code in the Solow growth model notebooks that are the lecture notes is static: it has been executed. But the best way to understand what is going on in the Python code—in the Solow growth model—is for you to play with the code and so conduct what-if simulation experiments with the model yourself. In the last cell of each notebnook there is a datahub link, something like . Clicking on that link _should_ send you to a Jupyter Notebook server authenticated by your CalNet account in which you can edit and play with the Python code—and thus with the model descriptions and simulations—to gain a deeper and better kind of knowledge. I strongly encourage you to do so. ---- #berkeley #economicgrowth #teaching #2020-01-18

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18 января, 18:35

0. Introduction: The History of Economic Growth: Econ 135

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### T Jan 21: Growth in Historical Perspective, Humans and Their Economies * **Read**: Gregory Clark (2005): _The Condition of the Working Class in England, 1209-2003_ * **Read**: Lant Pritchett (1997): _Divergence, Big Time_ * **Slides**: ---- #### Notes & Further Readings: * Reading Notes on Clark's _The Condition of the Working Class in England, 1209-2003_ * Reading Notes on Pritchett's _Divergence, Big Time_ ---- #econ_135 #berkeley #economicgrowth #economichistory #teaching #2020-01-18

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18 января, 17:57

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Melissa Dell's Calvo Lecture: **Melissa Dell**: _Persistence and Transformation in Economic Development_ : ---- #economicgrowth #economichistory #noted #2020-01-18

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18 января, 17:44

-1. Before Class Begins: The History of Economic Growth: Econ 135

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1. **Acquire**: An iClicker, and access to the course readings 2. **Read**: Course administration documents 3. **Read**: Partha Dasgupta (2007): _Economics: A Very Short Introduction_, Prologue & chapters 1-4 4. **Read**: Aristotle: _Politics_, Book I 5. **Do** Assignment 1 (3 pts) : Write & answer a syllabus FAQ question, due T Jan 21 9:00 am. ---- #### Notes & Further Readings: * Reading Notes on Book I of Aristotle's _Politics_ * Reading Notes on Dasgupta's _Economics: A Very Short Introduction_ ---- #econ_135 #berkeley #economicgrowth #economichistory #teaching #2020-01-18

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18 января, 17:43

The History of Economic Growth: Econ 135: Assignments

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**Suggested Question (and Answer) for Course FAQ List: Assignment 1**: Read the syllabus documents: Using the information in the syllabus, think up a question that should be on the FAQ—the Frequently Asked Question—list for the course. Answer the question you thought up. Upload your question and answer to your account at the course on canvas. ---- #econ_135 #berkeley #economicgrowth #economichistory #teaching #2020-01-18

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17 января, 19:28

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**Note to Self**: _Richard Dawkins's Existence Poses a Real Problem for the Darwinian Theory of Evolution!_ : 'The author… doesn’t care for “Pride and Prejudice”: “I can’t get excited about who is going to marry whom, and how rich they are.”' On a branch of the evolutionary tree as social as we are, genes that predispose you to such a mind state should have been wiped from the pool 50 million years ago… Just saying'... ---- #cognition #notetoself #publicsphere

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17 января, 17:35

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**Wikipedia**: _Turnspit Dog _ : 'According to John George Wood in _The Illustrated Natural History_ (Mammalia) (1853): "The services of the Turnspit Dog were brought into requisition. At one extremity of the spit was fastened a large circular box, or hollow wheel, something like the wire wheels which are so often appended to squirrel-cages; and in this wheel the Dog was accustomed to perform its daily task, by keeping it continually working. As the labour would be too great for a single Dog, it was usual to keep at least two animals for the purpose, and to make them relieve each other at regular intervals. The dogs were quite able to appreciate the lapse of time, and, if not relieved from their toils at the proper hour, would leap out of the wheel without orders, and force their companions to take their place, and complete their portion of the daily toil... ---- #noted #2020-01-17

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17 января, 17:31

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**Walter Jon Williams**: _Charging A Brick Wall_ : Arley Sorg: 'What can you tell us about your recent novels—the Quillifer books and the Praxis books—what is special about them to you, and what do you really want readers to know about them?' WJW: 'At some point in the Nineties, my books started to grow in scope and got longer and longer. Eventually I wised up and split the huge stories into multiple volumes, which allowed me as much scope as I wanted, and also to be paid multiple times. Win/win! I’ve only recently realized that I’ve had a single project over the last twenty years, which is to examine the artifacts and tropes of genre, take them apart, and reassemble them in ways that make sense to me. It’s a very science fiction thing to do.... ---- #books #noted #sciencefiction #2020-01-17

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17 января, 17:09

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**Matthew Arnold**: _Culture and Anarchy_ : 'This habit of ours is very well shown in that able and interesting work of Mr Hepworth Dixon’s, which we were all reading lately, _The Mormons, by One of Themselves_.... It seems enough for Mr Dixon that this or that doctrine has its Rabbi, who talks big to him, has a staunch body of disciples, and, above all, has plenty of rifles. That there are any further stricter tests to be applied to a doctrine, before it is pronounced important, never seems to occur to him. ‘It is easy to say,’ he writes of the Mormons, ‘that these saints are dupes and fanatics, to laugh at Joe Smith and his church, but what then? The great facts remain. Young and his people are at Utah; a church of 200,000 souls; an army of 20,000 rifles.’ But if the followers of a doctrine are really dupes, or worse, and its promulgators are really fanatics, or worse, it gives the doctrine no seriousness or authority the more that there should be found 200,000 souls—200,000 of the innumerable multitude with a natural taste for the bathos,––to hold it, and 20,000 rifles to defend it. And again, of...

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17 января, 17:08

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**Scott Cunningham**: _"This is basically what I wrote in my notes today. https://t.co/rPrCUyCwxa_ : Gray 'serial millennial myth debunker' Kimbrough: 'XKCD had it right: ---- #noted #2020-01-17

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17 января, 03:22

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I daresay I do not think Ross Douthat has read Matthew Arnold. I believe Douthat only quotes him. I think Matthew Arnold was thinking of Douthat's hero Michael Clune—and of Douthat himself—when Arnold cast maximum shade on "futile... bookmen" and noted that "from the faults and weaknesses of bookmen a notion of something bookish, pedantic, and futile has got itself... connected with the word culture...". Getting—from some source—"a fresh and free play of the best thoughts upon his stock notions and habits" was called by Henry Rosovsky "learning approaches to knowledge". And Ross Douthat has no time for Henry Rosovsky: **Matthew Arnold**: _Culture and Anarchy_ : '[I] recommend culture as the great help out of our present difficulties; culture being a pursuit of our total perfection by means of getting to know, on all the matters which most concern us, the best which has been thought and said... and, through this knowledge, turning a stream of fresh and free thought upon our stock notions and habits.... From the faults and weaknesses of bookmen a notion of something bookish, pedantic, and futile has got itself more or less connected with the word culture.... Yet futile as are many bookmen... a man's...