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19 апреля, 17:58

Judge firm on July trial for Flynn partner Kian

“We’re going to keep our July 15 trial date,” U.S. District Court Judge Anthony Trenga said emphatically.

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19 апреля, 17:52

Track the 2020 election fundraising and campaign finance reports

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Follow the money in the 2020 Democratic presidential race with the latest FEC data on each candidate.

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19 апреля, 17:38

Sarah Huckabee Sanders stands by 'sentiment' of misleading comments revealed in Mueller report

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White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders on Friday defended the "sentiment" of her characterization of President Donald Trump's decision to fire former FBI Director James Comey as "100 percent accurate," even though she conceded to special counsel Robert Mueller that her comments at the time were not based on any facts.In the wake of Trump's 2017 decision to fire Comey, Sanders told reporters “the rank and file of the FBI had lost confidence in their director,” citing the testimony of “countless” agents. Mueller's report, completed last month and released to the public on Thursday, said the White House press secretary “acknowledged to investigators that her comments were not founded on anything."Across multiple TV interviews Friday morning, Sanders offered a somewhat scattershot defense of her explanation of Comey's firing, insisting that it was Mueller who characterized the entire exchange about the dismissal as lies. She said she told investigators that her use of the word “countless” had been a slip of the tongue and her comment about agents’ loss of confidence was made in “the heat of the moment.”“The big takeaway here is that the sentiment is 100 percent accurate,” Sanders told "CBS This Morning." "The FBI is a better place without James Comey. He disgraced himself, and he undermined the agency that he was supposed to be in charge of.”Although Sanders insisted that her use of the word "countless" had been an unintentional slip, the press secretary used the same word one day later to characterize the number of FBI agents she claimed to have personally heard from who said morale had dipped at the bureau under Comey's leadership.“I can speak to my own personal experience,” she said in 2017. “I’ve heard from countless members of the FBI that are grateful and thankful for the president’s decision.”Even before Sanders's admission to Mueller's team, the press secretary's explanation of Comey's dismissal had been undercut by the president himself, who contradicting his own communications team's messaging when he told NBC News in an interview that he had fired the FBI director over concerns with the bureau's Russia investigation.Mueller’s team honed in on Trump’s decision to fire Comey as part of its probe to determine whether the president intended to obstruct justice. The report said investigators found “substantial evidence” that Trump dismissed the FBI director for his “unwillingness to state that the president was not personally under investigation” by the special counsel.The report also said after her briefing on Comey, Sanders spoke with the president, “who told her she did a good job and did not point out any inaccuracies in her comments.”On Friday, Sanders said Trump never asked her to say something she knew not to be true.“The president isn't asking people to break the law, isn't asking them to do anything that is dishonest,” she said. “If the president wants to fire somebody, he does.”In a separate Friday morning interview with ABC's "Good Morning America," Sanders also pushed back against the idea that she misled the press in a separate instance described in Mueller’s report, when she told reporters in 2017 that the president “certainly didn’t dictate” a misleading statement Donald Trump Jr. provided to the New York Times about his meeting with a Russian lawyer who had promised damaging information on Hillary Clinton sourced from the Russian government.The president’s personal lawyers told special counsel investigators several months later that Trump did dictate his son’s statement, according to Mueller’s report.Sanders told “Good Morning America” that, to her knowledge, the president only “weighed in” on Trump Jr.’s statement. She also repeated her claims that only her use of the word “countless” had been a “slip of the tongue,” repeatedly pivoting quickly to the White House’s no collusion, no obstruction talking points.“I'm sorry that I wasn't a robot like the Democratic party that went out for two-and-a-half years and stated time and time again that there was definitely Russian collusion between the president and his campaign,” she said in response to a question on why she would not admit to having made untrue statements. “They were the ones that were creating the greatest scandal in the history of our country.”Article originally published on POLITICO Magazine

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19 апреля, 15:50

Trump calls ‘total bulls---' on damaging info aides gave Mueller

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The president is staying fixated on the Mueller probe, calling it an 'Illegally Started Hoax that never should have happened.'

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19 апреля, 15:22

George Conway: Impeach Trump

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Conservative lawyer George Conway on Thursday called for President Donald Trump to be impeached, entrenching himself even deeper in opposition to his wife, senior counselor to the president Kellyanne Conway, in the wake of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report. In an op-ed in The Washington Post, George Conway, who has made his distaste for the president widely known, asserted that though Mueller cleared Trump on the issue of collusion and declined to recommend charges on obstruction of justice, the special counsel’s findings are nevertheless “damning” and make a convincing case for impeachment. While his wife on Thursday said that Mueller’s nearly two-year investigation was a “political proctocology exam and the president has been given a clean bill of health,” George Conway called Trump a “cancer on the presidency” that Congress must “excise … without delay.”George Conway took issue with the defense of Trump’s allies that obstruction cannot occur without an underlying crime, reiterating a point made by Mueller that it's not a valid excuse in a court of law. In comparison with Richard Nixon, who resigned as president rather than face impeachment for obstructing an investigation into his coverup of the Watergate burglary, what Trump is accused of doing was arguably worse, Conway wrote. And where Nixon had the assistance of his aides, Conway argued, Trump was a "one-man show" whose aides thwarted his attempts to curtail the investigation according to Mueller. “The investigation that Trump tried to interfere with here, to protect his own personal interests, was in significant part an investigation of how a hostile foreign power interfered with our democracy. If that’s not putting personal interests above a presidential duty to the nation, nothing is,” he added.He also rebutted Trump and his allies who have put forward the argument that in the case of obstruction, Trump had the authority to fire his investigators like FBI Director James Comey and even Mueller himself.“The president may have the raw constitutional power to, say, squelch an investigation or to pardon a close associate. But if he does so not to serve the public interest, but to serve his own, he surely could be removed from office, even if he has not committed a criminal act,” Conway wrote. But, he added, by “these standards, the facts in Mueller’s report condemn Trump even more than the report’s refusal to clear him of a crime.”Conway repeated his assertion that the moral bar of a president should be much higher than not being “provably a criminal.”“The ultimate issue shouldn’t be — and isn’t — whether the president committed a criminal act,” he wrote. But while Conway was clear in his call for Congress to impeach Trump, Democrats have continued to tread lightly on the issue. Democrats in the House have pledged to continue their bevy of investigations into Trump, with some arguing that Mueller’s findings on obstruction serve as a road map of sorts for them. Others have concluded Mueller intended to leave the question of obstruction up to Congress, but party leaders have notably stopped short of saying they’ll pursue impeachment. Without a smoking gun in Mueller’s 448-page report, it will be nearly impossible to reach a widespread bipartisan consensus on the issue, a prerequisite that top Democrats have laid out multiple times. Still, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Thursday signaled some sort of action, writing to her caucus that "Congress will not be silent."Article originally published on POLITICO Magazine

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19 апреля, 15:20

Nadler subpoenas DOJ for full version of the Mueller report

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House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler said Friday that he will subpoena the Justice Department for an unredacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report, as well as the underlying grand jury evidence and testimony, “in the next few hours.”Nadler (D-N.Y.) told “Good Morning America" anchor George Stephanopoulos that it is imperative his committee see the full report, including its underlying information, to make “informed decisions” about whether or not to pursue impeachment against President Donald Trump, though he said “we’re not there now.” The congressman’s announcement that he plans to issue a subpoena for the unredacted report comes less than 24 hours after a redacted version of Mueller’s findings were made public. Although the special counsel declined to bring charges on the issues of obstruction of justice or collusion between the Trump campaign and the Russian government, the probe's findings painted a damning picture of the president's harried efforts to hinder Mueller's investigation.Nadler is one of a select group of congressional leaders who will be allowed to view a less-redacted version of the report, though that version will not include grand jury evidence. While the president and his allies have insisted Mueller’s report exonerates the president, Democrats have raged that Attorney General William Barr painted a far rosier picture for the president than what is laid out by the special counsel. They have accused the attorney general of acting as a de facto defense attorney for the president, first with a four-page summary of the Mueller report release last month and again on Thursday with his press conference ahead of the report's public release.Democrats have also taken issue with Barr’s conclusion that the president did not obstruct justice, arguing that Mueller's report indicates that the issue should be taken up by Congress."Because Barr misled the country, we have to hear from Barr, which we will on May 2. We have to hear from Mueller and ask him a lot of questions," Nadler said Friday. "We have to hold hearings and hear from other people both on the question of obstruction of justice, whereas I said the special prosecutor invited Congress to look into that, not the attorney general. We have to look into all that. We need the entire report, unredacted, and the underlying documents in order to make informed decisions."Article originally published on POLITICO Magazine

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19 апреля, 13:55

Kremlin claims there's no proof in Mueller’s report of Russian meddling

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MOSCOW (AP) — The Kremlin says that Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s 400-page report has not offered any credible evidence of Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.The redacted report presented on Thursday said that there was no collusion between the Donald Trump campaign and Russian officials but it did document Russian efforts to meddle in the presidential vote.Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters on Friday that there is “no evidence substantiated by any facts” that Russia interfered in the election and said Moscow rejects the accusations.Peskov pointed out that President Vladimir Putin has repeatedly rejected the accusations of interference “because there was none.” and said that the report proved that.Article originally published on POLITICO Magazine

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19 апреля, 12:53

POLITICO Playbook: The Trumpiest thing ever

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And Trump allies who spoke freely to special counsel Robert Mueller now face an awkward position.

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19 апреля, 12:09

‘When Deported, You Become Nothing’

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New York has been a refuge for many fleeing the violence and poverty of Puebla, Mexico. Here’s what it’s like to have to go home.

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19 апреля, 12:04

The nation's cartoonists on the week in politics

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Every week political cartoonists throughout the country and across the political spectrum apply their ink-stained skills to capture the foibles, memes, hypocrisies and other head-slapping events in the world of politics. The fruits of these labors are hundreds of cartoons that entertain and enrage readers of all political stripes. Here's an offering of the best of this week's crop, picked fresh off the Toonosphere. Edited by Matt Wuerker.

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19 апреля, 12:02

Buttigieg plans aggressive fundraising push in California

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Democrat Pete Buttigieg is planning a series of 11 fundraisers over three days in California next month, as the rising presidential candidate looks to seize on interest from eager donors to power his campaign.Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Ind., will appear at two events in San Diego on May 8, three in Los Angeles the next day, and six in the San Francisco Bay Area the day after that, according to a schedule obtained by POLITICO.The fundraisers range from more casual gatherings — a “happy hour grassroots fundraiser” in Los Angeles and a “coffee and chat with Mayor Pete Buttigieg” in Palo Alto, with guests pledging $100 to $1,000 — to a meeting of Buttigieg’s “national investment circle” in San Francisco on May 10. Donors at that level also gathered with Buttigieg in South Bend the weekend that he launched his presidential campaign, according to the schedule.The fundraising swing sends Buttigieg into Sen. Kamala Harris’ California territory just days after Harris, a 2020 rival, is scheduled to headline a fundraiser for her campaign in Chicago, not far from Buttigieg’s hometown. The Buttigieg campaign has placed a handful of staffers in Chicago and mined the city’s deep Democratic donor base for early support.The geographic overlap goes both ways. Susie Tompkins Buell, a top Democratic donor based in California, was an early backer of Harris but recently sent out invitations for a fundraiser benefiting Buttigieg as well. Buttigieg also held three fundraisers in New York City this week, with one sold-out invitation telling viewers that the campaign will be announcing return visits “in the coming weeks.” Buttigieg will then raise money in Chicago early next week before holding two events in Minnesota in the first two days of May.Article originally published on POLITICO Magazine

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19 апреля, 08:16

Breaking down the 140 pages detailing how Trump fought Mueller

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Over more than two years, Trump tried to pressure law enforcement officials, back-channel to witnesses and deter inquiries into his murky relationship with Russia.