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18 августа, 13:44

The Sarah Huckabee Sanders of the Philippines

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Harry Roque used to be a human rights lawyer. Now he speaks for a president who attacks the free press and is leading a brutal extrajudicial drug war.

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18 августа, 13:42

Palm Beach billionaire’s past legal fights haunt bid for governor

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Jeff Greene has a history of court tangles.

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18 августа, 13:40

Transgender students asked Betsy DeVos for help. Here's what happened.

The Trump administration 'has absolutely no clue' what families go through, one mother said.

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18 августа, 04:43

Former Iowa Rep. Leonard Boswell dies

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Former U.S. Rep. Leonard Boswell, an Iowa farmer and soldier turned politician who served 16 years in Congress, has died. He was 84.The Democrat and former state Senate president, died at a Des Moines hospital on Friday after suffering complications from a rare form of cancer, said family spokesman and former chief of staff Grant Woodard.Although he focused his political career on agriculture, securing services for veterans and their families and helping college students with financial aid, Boswell may have been best known for his plain-spoken, courtly demeanor. The civility he was known for in the state Senate initially carried over into his congressional campaigns, and he gained national attention when he and his first opponent stuck to their agreement not to launch personal attacks. Later campaigns, however, weren’t quite as gentlemanly.Boswell spent two decades in the U.S. Army before beginning his political career in 1985, when he was elected to the Iowa Senate. He was also a farmer who often said one of his proudest political accomplishments was serving on the board of the Farmers Co-op Elevator in Lamoni. He helped keep that elevator going during the Midwest farm crisis of the 1980s.Born in rural Missouri on Jan. 10, 1934, Boswell eventually settled in southern Iowa’s Decatur County and became a fixture in that community. His rural roots helped him in the Iowa Statehouse, where personal relationships often mean more than party affiliation.He was known for working with both Republicans and Democrats. As Senate president for four years before being elected to Congress, he insisted lawmakers of both parties adhere to the rules and traditions of the chamber.“He loved the Senate. He loved the style,” Democratic legislative staffer Ron Parker once said.When he ran for an open U.S. House seat against Republican Michael Mahaffey in 1996, both candidates stuck to their pledge to run a civil campaign even when national party leaders tried to intervene.That wasn’t always the case with Boswell’s campaigns, particularly in 2010 when Urbandale businessman Brad Zaun challenged him. That race featured a steady stream of negative television ads from both candidates. Boswell served eight terms in the House until he lost his re-election bid in 2012 to Republican Tom Latham.Woodard noted Boswell was born on a farm, raised on a farm and for much of his life, carved out a living from the land.“I don’t think you can get much more Iowan than that,” said Woodard.A centerpiece bill for Boswell in Congress was a federal law bearing the name of Joshua Omvig, an Army Reservist from Grundy Center who committed suicide in December 2005 after returning from Iraq. The measure called for Veterans Affairs to devise a comprehensive program to prevent suicide among veterans, and it has led the government to hire more counselors and create hotlines for troubled veterans.During his time in Washington, Boswell served as chairman of the House Agriculture Subcommittee on Livestock, Dairy and Poultry, and he helped in writing the 2007 Farm Bill. He also served on the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee and was named a member of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence in 2001.On education, Boswell supported expansion of the Pell Grant program, and he pushed for additional spending on student loan subsidies.Before becoming a legislator, Boswell served 20 years in the U.S. Army, rising from the rank of private to lieutenant colonel. He served two one-year tours of duty as an assault helicopter pilot in Vietnam and two NATO tours of duty in Europe. He also was an instructor at the Command and General Staff College in Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.Boswell was raised in Ringgold and Decatur counties and graduated from Lamoni High School. He received a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Graceland College in Lamoni.He met his wife, Dody, a teacher, during college and they were married for more than 50 years. They had three children and eight grandchildren.

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18 августа, 04:39

Mueller recommends sentence up to 6 months for Papadopoulos

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Special counsel Robert Mueller on Friday recommended that a federal judge sentence George Papadopoulos, a former Trump campaign aide, to up to six months in prison for lying to investigators in relation to Mueller’s Russia inquiry.“The government does not take a position with respect to a particular sentence to be imposed, but respectfully submits that a sentence of incarceration, within the applicable Guidelines range of 0 to 6 months’ imprisonment, is appropriate and warranted,” Mueller wrote in a government sentencing memorandum to the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia.“The defendant’s crime was serious and caused damage to the government’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election,” Mueller added. “The defendant lied in order to conceal his contacts with Russians and Russian intermediaries during the campaign and made his false statements to investigators on January 27, 2017, early in the investigation, when key investigative decisions, including who to interview and when, were being made.”Papadopoulos, a former foreign policy adviser in Donald Trump’s 2016 campaign, pleaded guilty in October to making false statements to the special counsel’s team, becoming the first person to admit guilt to Mueller’s federal prosecutors.POLITICO previously reported that Mueller asked U.S. District Court Judge Randy Moss to set Papadopoulos’ sentencing for Sept. 7. He faces a maximum possible sentence of five years in prison.Mueller wrote in Friday’s filing that Papadopoulos “was explicitly notified of the seriousness of the ongoing investigation,” and warned by the special counsel’s prosecutors “that lying to investigators was a ‘federal offense’ that could get him ‘in trouble.’”Instead, Mueller wrote, Papadopoulos “repeatedly lied throughout the interview in order to conceal the timing and significance of information the defendant had received regarding the Russians possessing ‘dirt’ on Hillary Clinton, as well as his own outreach to Russia on behalf of the campaign.”Mueller also maintained that Papadopoulos’ false statements “were intended to harm the investigation, and did so.”Papadopoulos‘ wife, Simona, told POLITICO on Wednesday that she was encouraging her husband to withdraw his plea deal with the FBI, and she has become more vocal in recent weeks, accusing U.S. intelligence officials of “entrapment.“ "The information that we have today makes me believe that George has committed no crime, absolutely," she said in a phone interview.Simona Papadpooulos has made a public request for pro bono legal representation about the prospect of rescinding her husband‘s plea deal, though it’s unclear whether her husband or his attorneys are supporting that effort.

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18 августа, 02:04

Scores of ex-spies join in rebuking Trump over security clearances

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An avalanche of retired senior intelligence officials and spies have joined more than a dozen of their former bosses in issuing a public rebuke of President Donald Trump’s decision to revoke the security clearance of John Brennan, the ex-CIA chief who has become a strong critic of the president. In a rare public campaign, a total of 60 former CIA station chiefs, analysts and operations officers — along with a former director of the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency and deputy director of the National Counterterrorism Center — declared on Friday afternoon their “firm belief that the country will be weakened if there is a political litmus test applied before seasoned experts are allowed to share their views.”“We believe equally strongly that former government officials have the right to express their unclassified views on what they see as critical national security issues without fear of being punished for doing so,” they added in a brief statement. The statement follows a similar one issued late Thursday by 11 former directors and deputy directors of the CIA and one director of national intelligence. They served in Democratic and Republican administrations, and decried the removal of the security clearance “as a political tool.”The back-to-back statements also follow a blistering op-ed by retired Navy Adm. William McRaven, who, in an act of solidarity with Brennan, appealed to Trump to revoke his security clearance, as well.Bill Harlow, a former CIA spokesman who helped coordinate the pair of statements from former officials, said on Friday that “in the process of putting out the first letter, we heard from a lot of people who were not directors of agencies but wanted to know, ‘How to we get in, as well?’”Harlow called it exceedingly rare for intelligence professionals who spent most of their careers in the shadows and who shy away from politically charged public disputes to insert themselves so directly.“There have been one or two other times where I recall a bunch of people speaking out, but not in this number and not at this speed,” Harlow told POLITICO. “They are trying to speak out against politicizing national security and security clearances. This is not about a person. It is about the practice of trying to regulate speech by former officials by tinkering with their security clearances.”“There are rules and regulations under which circumstances they should be removed,” he added. “None say they should be removed if the holder of the security clearance annoys the president.”In his first live TV appearance since being stripped of his security clearance, Brennan told MSNBC on Friday that the president's move was "an egregious act" that "flies in the face of traditional practice, as well as common sense, as well as national security."Brennan said it was for those reasons, and not professional solidarity, that so many former members of America's intelligence apparatus felt compelled to speak out."I think that's why there's been such an outcry from many intelligence professionals," he said. "Not to support me, but to support the principle that security clearances are something that's very, very solemn and sacred, and they never, ever should be used for political purposes — either to grant friends those clearances or to revoke clearances of your critics."After Brennan’s security clearance was revoked earlier this week, the White House said the former CIA chief was being punished because he “leveraged his status as a former high-ranking official with access to highly sensitive information to make a series of unfounded and outrageous allegations — wild outbursts on the internet and television — about this administration.”

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18 августа, 00:40

Trump administration charges Facebook with housing discrimination

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The Department of Housing and Urban Development on Friday charged Facebook Inc. with violating housing discrimination laws.The social media company allows advertisers to divert housing listings away from users who mention things such as “assistance dog,” “mobility scooter” or who live in certain zip codes, in violation of the Fair Housing Act, HUD alleged.The Fair Housing Act prohibits discrimination in housing transactions including print and online advertisement on the basis of race, religion or sex, among other things. Facebook allows advertisers to pinpoint certain potential tenants or homebuyers while filtering out others, HUD alleged.“When Facebook uses the vast amount of personal data it collects to help advertisers to discriminate, it's the same as slamming the door in someone's face,” said Anna Maria Farías, HUD's assistant secretary for fair housing and equal opportunity.A representative with the Menlo Park-based Facebook did not immediately respond to a request for comment.Additionally, HUD said the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York today filed a statement of interest, joined in by HUD, in U.S. District Court on behalf of a number of people challenging Facebook's advertising platform.

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18 августа, 00:24

Actually, Mr. President, D.C. Is Pretty Great

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President Trump picked the wrong week to throw down on Washington, D.C.

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17 августа, 22:04

Here’s how many women have won or lost so far

We track how women’s political representation is changing — or isn’t changing — in the 2018 midterm elections.

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17 августа, 22:01

Manafort judge alludes to ‘threats’ in not releasing jurors’ names

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The federal judge overseeing the Paul Manafort fraud trial signaled Friday afternoon a reluctance to publicly identify the jurors, saying they were “scared” and “afraid” and adding, “I’m not going to reveal any threats.” “I had no idea this case would incite this emotion,” U.S. District Court Judge T.S. Ellis III said in an open court hearing, responding to a motion from seven news organizations, including POLITICO, seeking access to sealed materials related to the trial.Ellis said he didn’t “feel right” releasing the names of the 12-person jury that has been deliberating since Thursday morning in Manafort’s trial on charges of bank and tax fraud.The three-week case in Alexandria, Virginia, against the former Trump campaign chairman is special counsel Robert Mueller’s first to reach trial, and it has drawn dozens of reporters from U.S. and international outlets each day to cover its every turn.Ellis earlier this week advised the jurors to be careful after they’d reached the verdict in revealing details about their deliberations when they are queried by the media.The exchange about the jurors came amid a hearing on Friday involving news organizations seeking several sealed transcripts from bench conferences during the trial, as well as other documents filed in the case that aren’t public.Ellis said much of the material would be released after the Manafort trial was finished and added that he was in “complete sympathy” with the media’s concerns — specifically about his repeated moves to hold private conferences with the attorneys in the case out of earshot of the public and with a white-noise machine blotting out their conversations.As he ended the hearing, however, Ellis convened a bench conference with Mueller’s prosecutors and Manafort’s defense attorneys.

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17 августа, 21:32

‘I know he’s frustrated’: GOP megadonor on staggering losing streak

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Richard Uihlein, one of the top donors of 2018, has dropped tens of millions of dollars only to watch most of his picks go down.