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19 июля, 20:56

Statement on Workforce Development Executive Order

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WASHINGTON—House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) released the following statement on President Trump’s workforce development executive order: “We need to prepare more Americans for jobs in the modern economy, but we’ve been stuck using 20th-century tools to address 21st-century problems. Companies know the skills needed to fill their open jobs. By encouraging public-private collaboration to provide apprenticeships, education, and training, we can better match workers with the opportunities that abound in such a strong economy. This is the right place to be focusing our workforce development efforts, and today’s actions are a promising step.” NOTE: Last week in his speech to The Economic Club of Washington, D.C., Speaker Ryan emphasized the need for workforce development, and discussed the partnership between Gateway Tech and Foxconn in Wisconsin as an example of this type of training program.

Выбор редакции
19 июля, 17:31

Statement on Passage of Interior, Environment and Financial Services Funding Bills

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WASHINGTON—House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) today released this statement on the passage of the Interior,  Environment, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act and the Financial Services and General Government Appropriations Act: “With these critical funding bills, the House is taking action to make government work more effectively for communities. This Interior and Environment Appropriations bill provides vital resources to firefighters battling wildfires throughout the West. It empowers local governments to provide services in their communities and it reins in needless regulation, including fully repealing the harmful Obama-era Waters of the United States Rule. Our natural resources and federal lands are part of America’s unique heritage, and this funding will help continue their preservation. “The Financial Services Appropriations bill provides much-needed funding. It continues Congress’s relentless efforts against the opioid epidemic by providing funding for the Office of National Drug Policy. It puts resources in the hands of law enforcement so they can continue keeping our communities safe and cracks down on terror financing globally. And it promotes business formation and economic growth by funding loan programs for small businesses and programs for veterans and women entrepreneurs. With these bills, the House is continuing its work to carry out responsible funding while maintaining accountability to the American taxpayer.”    Additional information on these bills is available here, here, and below: They maintain the overall funding levels from fiscal year 2018—a total of $23.4 billion for Financial Services and $35.3 billion for Interior and Environment. The Financial Services Appropriations bill promotes long-term fiscal responsibility, setting aside $585 million for a new Fund for America’s Kids and Grandkids, which can only be spent when there is no longer a budget deficit. This bill also makes important financial services industry reforms to promote transparency and accountability, including bringing the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection into the appropriations process. The Interior and Environment Appropriations bill invests in critical infrastructure projects, including funding directed specifically at updating our nation’s water infrastructure. 

Выбор редакции
18 июля, 21:27

Speaker Ryan Names Farm Bill Conference Committee Members

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WASHINGTON—House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) today named Republican lawmakers to the House-Senate conference committee on the Farm Bill. Last month, the House passed H.R. 2, the Agriculture and Nutrition Act, which includes critical reforms to close the skills gap and help more Americans move from welfare to work. “We see this Farm Bill as pivotal for building a sturdier ladder of opportunity in America,” Speaker Ryan said. “With all this momentum in our economy, there could not be a better time to help more people move from welfare to work. This is a chance to close the skills gap, better equip our workforce, and support much-needed development in rural communities. I look forward to working with Chairman Conaway and all of these lawmakers on these vital reforms.” Earlier today, the Speaker’s office released an overview of how the House Farm Bill helps more Americans move from welfare to work. This represents the last plank of our Better Way agenda. House Agriculture Committee 1. Chairman Mike Conaway (R-TX) 2. Rep. Glenn Thompson (R-PA) 3. Rep. Bob Goodlatte (R-VA) 4. Rep. Frank Lucas (R-OK) 5. Rep. Mike Rogers (R-AL) 6. Rep. Austin Scott (R-GA) 7. Rep. Rick Crawford (R-AR) 8. Rep. Vicky Hartzler (R-MO) 9. Rep. Rodney Davis (R-IL) 10. Rep. Ted Yoho (R-FL) 11. Rep. David Rouzer (R-NC) 12. Rep. Roger Marshall (R-KS) 13. Rep. Jodey Arrington (R-TX) House Education and the Workforce Committee  1. Chairwoman Virginia Foxx (R-NC) 2. Rep. Rick Allen (R-GA) House Energy and Commerce Committee 1. Rep. John Shimkus (R-IL) 2. Rep. Kevin Cramer (R-ND) House Financial Services Committee  1. Chairman Jeb Hensarling (R-TX) 2. Rep. Sean Duffy (R-WI) House Foreign Affairs Committee 1. Chairman Ed Royce (R-CA) 2. Rep. Steve Chabot (R-OH) House Oversight and Government Reform Committee 1. Rep. Mark Walker (R-NC) 2. Rep. James Comer (R-KY) House Natural Resources Committee 1. Chairman Rob Bishop (R-UT) 2. Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-AR) House Science, Space, and Technology Committee 1. Rep. Ralph Abraham (R-LA) 2. Rep. Neal Dunn (R-FL) House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee 1. Rep. Jeff Denham (R-CA) 2. Rep. Bob Gibbs (R-OH)

Выбор редакции
18 июля, 16:35

Today: Moving Forward on the Farm Bill

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Today, the House will take the next step toward critical reforms to help more Americans move from welfare to work. We will vote to establish a conference committee with the Senate to develop a final Farm Bill—a main plank of our workforce development agenda. Here are three reasons this is so important: 1) More Americans are looking for work and more companies are looking for workers. Last month, more than 600,000 people joined the workforce. That is great news. We have 6.6 million jobs open right now in our country—at least one job for every American in search of one. But our labor participation rate still remains relatively low. “Between 1965 and 2015, the number of prime-age men neither working nor looking for work grew more than three times faster than the number in the workforce,” resulting in 7 million men missing from the labor force. One in seven 16-24 year olds in the U.S. are neither in school nor working, totaling more than 5.5 million “disconnected” youth nationwide. 2) Our federal benefits framework is not doing enough to incentivize work. The growth of federal programs provides some color—the last time the unemployment rate was at  4 percent, there were 17 million Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients. Today, with that same unemployment level, there are more than 42 million. We need to make reforms so that these programs encourage work and provide training for those who are work-capable but may not have the adequate skills to secure a good-paying job. 3) The House Farm Bill ties work requirements to work supports, empowering people to get back into the workforce, find a career path, and fulfill their true potential. It’s a model that works. A new Council of Economic Advisers report noted, “evidence suggests that welfare programs that require work in return for benefits increase adult employment and may improve child outcomes.” The report, which looks at welfare reform during the 1990s, uses the shift to the work-focused Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program as one of the factors in improved outcomes among the program’s recipients. “Between 1996 and 2000, TANF receipt by single mothers fell by 53 percent, their employment rate increased by 10 percent, and their poverty rate fell by 20 percent.” The report also notes the effectiveness of work-promoting incentives like the Earned Income Tax Credit. Work requirements for SNAP may act as a complement to these credits, pulling even more people out of poverty and onto a path to prosperity. As The Wall Street Journal editorialized earlier this year,  “Paying people to make it easy not to work—and thus languish for a lifetime in poverty—is not compassionate. It’s destructive of human dignity and leads to more inequality. Republicans are right that welfare reform will assist American upward mobility, and they should take the case to the public.” Americans are better off now in this booming economy, and this is one way we can make things even better for more families. “If we can get these things right—helping more students get into good jobs and careers, and helping more people get out of poverty into the workforce—those are big changes,” Speaker Ryan said last week, “Those are things that will help restore intergenerational mobility for families and communities.”

Выбор редакции
17 июля, 23:08

Speaker Ryan Welcomes Czech Speaker Vondráček to the U.S. Capitol

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WASHINGTON—House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) issued the following statement after meeting with Speaker Radek Vondráček of the Czech Chamber of Deputies:“This year marks a major milestone—100 years—in relations between the United States and the Czech Republic. The deep ties between our countries, grounded in common values, are represented in the Václav Havel bust in Freedom Foyer of the U.S. Capitol. It was Havel who said to Congress in 1990, ‘Our freedom, independence and our newborn democracy have been purchased at great cost, and we shall not surrender them.’ “In this spirit of solidarity, it was my honor to welcome Speaker Vondráček to the Capitol, and repay his hospitality of earlier this spring. We continued our dialogue on the critical issues we discussed in March, including the importance of the NATO alliance and regional security cooperation. As I said when I was in Prague, it is more vital than ever for our countries to be united in our commitment to Western ideals and interests.” NOTE: In March, Speaker Ryan made an official visit to Prague to mark the centennial of U.S.-Czech relations. In an address to the Czech Parliament, he called for solidarity in the defense of freedom and democratic institutions, and stronger economic and defense ties among Western allies.  

Выбор редакции
17 июля, 22:43

Statement on Passage of JOBS and Investor Confidence Act

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WASHINGTON—Following the overwhelmingly bipartisan passage of the JOBS and Investor Confidence Act, House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) issued this statement:“This is a big day for American entrepreneurship and job creation. During this Congress, we’ve lifted burdensome regulations off the backs of small banks, credit unions, and small businesses, removing barriers to lending and expansion. It is one reason Americans are better off now.“This bill builds on that progress by making it easier for small businesses and start-ups to access capital markets for the financing they need. It also updates the process for public offerings, encouraging companies to tap into a pool of potential investors in public markets. These reforms enable innovators to raise capital and serve as catalysts for job creation and growth—igniting an already accelerating economy. I want to thank Chairman Jeb Hensarling for his leadership, and we look forward to the Senate taking action on this consequential bipartisan legislation.”

Выбор редакции
12 июля, 19:16

Better Off Now: Speaker Ryan Discusses Building on Economic Growth at Leadership Press Conference

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Summary: At the weekly Republican Leadership press conference, Speaker Ryan discussed a package of bills the House will consider today to promote capital formation and job creation, to build even further upon recent economic success. “The American people are better off now,” Speaker Ryan said, and “we need to keep it going.” Opening Statement: “Morning. I recently had the chance to visit a couple manufacturers up in Minneapolis-St.Paul. “And the story there is very similar to what we are seeing all around the country. “More people are finding work. Companies are expanding. Confidence is surging. “Our policies have helped create this climate. This is a climate of growth. “The American people are better off now. And we need to keep it going. “This week, we’ll consider legislation to make it easier for small companies to access the capital markets—it’s a key source of financing. “This is where most new jobs come from: new companies.   “It will cut down on regulations that are holding back small businesses and start-ups. “It’s the third piece in a line of critical bipartisan bills aimed at creating jobs, unlocking innovation, and driving growth. “This will help us sustain the positive growth that we are already seeing. “And this all gets us back to creating an environment where entrepreneurs can succeed and workers can get ahead. “I want to commend Chairman Jeb Hensarling, and I want to commend Mia Love, from the Financial Services Committee, for their efforts in bringing this really critical bipartisan legislation to the floor. “One thing I heard about in the Twin Cities is the need for more workers and especially workers with the right skills. “This is a new, sort of good problem that we have these days: We have jobs, but we need workers with skills to fill those jobs. “Soon, we will be taking the next step on the Farm Bill. “Our version would retool the SNAP program to focus on encouraging recipients to enter the workforce. “This is a model that we should be moving to—helping more Americans reach their potential, moving from welfare to work, getting on the ladder of life. “In this economy, there is no better time to do this. “Just go to better.gop to learn more.”

Выбор редакции
12 июля, 15:57

Better Off Now: Speaker Ryan’s Remarks to The Economic Club of Washington, D.C.

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WASHINGTON—In a speech to The Economic Club of Washington, D.C., House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) spoke about how the policies of House Republicans have put the country back on a brighter path to prosperity and how Americans are Better Off Now. Following are Speaker Ryan’s remarks, as prepared for delivery: Thank you, David, and thank you all for being here this morning. I am grateful for the chance to share a few thoughts about the state of our economy. What guides me, what guides us, in this work is growth. Economic growth does not solve all of our problems, but it certainly makes our problems easier to solve. Growth is the beating heart of a free economy. The stronger it is, the more opportunity there is, the more mobility there is. Growth is what gives us momentum, gives us room to run. In our lives, it is the difference between being stuck and moving ahead on the path of life. For our country, it is the difference between leading in the world, and lagging behind. Yet, not too long ago, we were on a very different, and dangerous, path. People were working harder to get ahead only to fall further behind. Economic anxiety and uncertainty blanketed our country. We were drifting toward a low-wage, low-growth future. As growth slowed, an economist at Northwestern wrote a paper titled, “Is Economic Growth Over?” That path—which many so-called experts were saying was the best we could hope to achieve—was leading us straight to stagnation. It was leading us to a class-based society where we view life and society as a zero-sum game. Our tax code had become the embodiment of this drift, a delivery device for managed decline. It held back families living paycheck-to-paycheck, while stockpiling loopholes and carve outs for the well-connected. It enabled foreign competitors to overtake us, and brazenly take our jobs and our capital. Around the world, countries began to take advantage of our drift, making their own systems more attractive for investment and lowering their tax rates. In the UK, they went down to 19 percent. Ireland, 12 and a half. In 2017 alone, 8 OECD countries reduced their corporate rate. In Wisconsin, as in so many places, companies with loyal workers and long lineages, like Johnson Controls—where they make thermostat parts—moved their headquarters overseas. It just didn’t make sense to be based in America anymore. We had lost our edge, and lost our way. This prospect of imminent decline—it is what spurred us to take a positive agenda to the country in 2016. We called it ‘A Better Way,’ and its economic centerpiece was a plan for pro-growth tax reform. In 2017, we began to implement this agenda, as promised. We started with regulatory reform, to help lift the tangle of red tape that was suffocating small businesses. To revitalize Main Street, we provided relief to community banks and credit unions. We jumpstarted long-overdue improvements to our infrastructure—our roads, bridges, and railways. And, for the first time in 31 years, we overhauled our tax code. To help workers, we lowered rates and nearly doubled the standard deduction, so you can keep more money in the first place. To help families, we doubled the child tax credit. To help our businesses, we allowed full expensing to promote expansion. We brought the corporate tax rate in line with our competitors, leap-frogging many of them. And to help attract investment and level the playing field, we transitioned to a territorial tax system like the rest of the world. As we gather here, it has been a little more than 200 days since the enactment of tax reform. Here is what we know. After years of stagnation, our economy is finally on the rise. By just about any economic measure, the American people are better off now. About 9 out of 10 workers are keeping more of what they make. More than 5.5 million workers have already received bonuses, raises, or better benefits, as a direct result of tax reform. More money is coming back to our shores—more than $300 billion was repatriated in the first quarter, the most on record. Unemployment rolls are at historically low levels. Job openings have reached record highs. Wages are up, income is up. Confidence has come roaring back. Consumer confidence. Small business confidence. Manufacturer confidence. All at or near record highs. We all love a good comeback story. Well, this may be the biggest one around. Tax reform is working. It is improving people’s lives. To be clear, it is not the singular reason for this boom. But it was vital to ensuring American preeminence in the 21st century. Indeed, tax reform has helped dramatically improve our country’s path. Our businesses and manufacturers are competing again, expanding again. Families are spending more again. Retail sales are up. Home sales are up. And for our workers, there has been a real sea change. Now employers are having to actually compete for workers. More people are quitting their jobs to go for better opportunities—at rates we haven’t seen in years. More than 600,000 people came off the sidelines and joined the labor force last month. Our economy is on a roll, and the American people are better off now. We are getting back to risk-taking, back to growth. We are getting back our edge. But, of course, this is not the end of the story. Yes, our economy is finally hitting its stride, but too many families are still struggling. We need to get more people on the path of life. We need to keep our economy on the path of growth. To do that, we have to get some important things right. We have to get at those problems which growth makes it easier to solve. Here are just a few challenges I would like for you to think about. The first one is workforce development. This is really the final piece of our economic agenda. We need to recognize that the competitiveness of our economy is inextricably linked to the competitiveness of our workforce. Go to just about any factory in the Midwest right now, and the CEO is likely to tell you something along the lines of: ‘The good news is, we have the jobs. The problem is, we’re having trouble finding workers with the right skills.’ Our education system is still not properly equipped to help people adjust to a changing economy. This is one of those areas where we can’t expect to fix 21st-century problems with 20th-century tools. We have a growing shortage—really, an alarming shortage—of skilled workers. Right now, there are actually more job openings in America than there are job seekers. This may be a good problem to have, but it is a problem we need to solve. We need to close this skills gap. This Congress has boosted resources for apprenticeships. We have boosted resources for workforce development programs in high-growth fields. And the House has passed a great bipartisan bill to expand career and technical education. Basically, the way I see this is: We need to make two-year school cool again. You shouldn’t have to pile up mountains of debt for college just to get the skills you need for a career. We can and should make it much easier for students to achieve proficiency in their chosen vocation. This will smooth their entry into the workforce. Here’s one good idea that is catching on: More companies are partnering with local schools on programs to better match students with the skills they need for in-demand jobs. Take Gateway Tech in Southeastern Wisconsin. They are working with Foxconn to develop a special curriculum for what the company’s needs will be. In fact, they are building a campus right at the Foxconn location, to train and equip the incoming workforce. We should be encouraging more of these partnerships. That’s what this legislation is about. In this economy, with all of the opportunities available, there could not be a better time to help more people move from welfare to work. As part of this year’s Farm Bill, the House advanced initiatives to better connect food stamp recipients with meaningful jobs. If you are work-capable, and you don’t have young children, you are guaranteed help finding a job or getting the right training for a job. It is a balance of work requirements and work supports, with a case management-based approach, going person to person. This is all about empowering the individual. If we can get these things right—helping more students get into good jobs and careers, and helping more people get out of poverty into the workforce—those are big changes. Those are things that will help restore intergenerational mobility for families and communities. That brings me to my second point. If we want to make this resurgence real and lasting, we need to do a better job of reconnecting distressed communities to the greater economy. The country as a whole went through a weak recovery, but there are areas which have still seen next to no recovery at all. The most recent study done by the Economic Innovation Group found that more than 52 million Americans still live in economically distressed communities. That is far too many people being left behind, and feeling forgotten. We owe it to those communities to go bold, and get right at the underlying disparities. So we are putting to work some ideas to really open up access to opportunity and jumpstart economic development.   Through tax reform, all 50 states have now designated opportunity zones in their lowest-income census tracts. States worked with local leaders to identify the areas with the biggest need. This, in and of itself, is promising, because we have taken the decision-making out of Washington. All told, there are more than 8,000 of these zones across the country. You may remember an earlier iteration of these as enterprise zones, something I worked on for Jack Kemp at the start of my career. With these opportunity zones, we are essentially offering private investors a set of incentives. The longer you maintain your investment in these areas, the more tax benefits you receive. If you invest for at least a decade, you won’t pay capital gains taxes on that investment. We want to encourage investors to sustain their commitment, and form a long-term relationship with the community. Think about it this way. Right now, we have $6 trillion of unrealized capital that can be deployed to help alleviate poverty in distressed communities and improve people’s lives. The potential here is just incredible. Another idea this Congress has put into effect is social impact-bonds. This is another way to leverage private capital for the public good under a performance-based framework. Through these bonds, state and local governments place a value on a specific outcome—it could be anything from helping the homeless to reducing recidivism. Investors fund and evaluate these programs, and they are repaid only if the program works, only if it gets results. Both the risk and the reward is shifted to the private sector. This will help unlock new and innovative solutions to fix some of the persistent problems plaguing low-income communities. The third and final issue I want to talk about gets back to our overall competitiveness and growth. Just as our standing was threatened as countries around the world made their tax codes more competitive, we similarly risk being left behind in global trade if we don’t lead here, as well. The final Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement was flawed, to be sure, but its broader intent was correct: opening up American-made goods and services to new markets, while providing a counter to China, in a critical region, with the United States writing the rules of the road. Now, the president has made clear that he prefers bilateral trade agreements over multinational ones like TPP. That view is reasonable, so long as reaching those direct pacts remains a priority. Since America dropped out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership, the other TPP nations have moved forward with that agreement. Any day now, the European Union will sign a new trade agreement with Japan. The EU also recently initiated negotiations with Australia and New Zealand. The world is moving ahead. So we must continue to pursue new agreements while we strengthen our existing ones. Otherwise, we risk having American products locked out of new markets, jobs moved overseas, and a decline in American influence. This matters. As our generals will tell you, these agreements are just as important for our national security as they are for our economy. This administration has been vocal about trade abuses taking place. It is right to be. There are unquestionably bad actors, most notably China. But I’ve made my view clear: New tariffs are not the solution. For me, all of this is secondary to a bigger, more fundamental question about the future of the economy and our standing in it. Today, emerging economies and old allies alike are making a choice. As we settle into the 21st century, will they follow what I would call the Chinese model, with centralized power, state-owned enterprises, cronyism, even outright theft? Or will they choose a system based on markets, the rule of law, transparency, and the kind of potential only human capital can produce? I believe most of these counties want the latter, but they need to know that the United States will be there to partner with them. The rule book for the global economy in the 21st century is being written now. The question is whether the United States will be holding the pen, or will we cede that authority to illiberal, undemocratic regimes. We must be there, to set the tone and set the pace. More so, we must continue to demonstrate that our way of doing things still has juice. That we can still do the most good for the most people. This is another reason why tax reform was so important. It is why, on the day I became Speaker, I said that I did not believe all that talk about America being done, about our best days being behind us. Remember how, not too long ago, we were being told to just get used to stagnation, get used to the new normal. Well, that narrative’s sell-by date has now come and gone. We have shown what we can achieve when we reapply our founding principles, when we renew our aspirational spirit. We have retold the story of the American Idea. Let us continue with this work. Let us continue on the path of growth and opportunity. Thank you all for having me.

Выбор редакции
12 июля, 00:57

Statement on Russia

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WASHINGTON—House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) today issued the following statement: "There is no question that Russia interfered in our election and continues attempts to undermine democracy here and around the world. That is not just the finding of the American intelligence community but also the House Committee on Intelligence. The president must appreciate that Russia is not our ally. There is no moral equivalence between the United States and Russia, which remains hostile to our most basic values and ideals. The United States must be focused on holding Russia accountable and putting an end to its vile attacks on democracy."

Выбор редакции
11 июля, 21:29

Speaker Ryan: ‘Positive Results That Are Improving People’s Lives’

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Summary: “The American people are better off now,” Speaker Ryan said today at his weekly press conference. Building on remarks he made this morning to The Economic Club of Washington, D.C, Speaker Ryan discussed the revitalized economy, improved opportunities for workers, and other ways the country is on a better path now. Opening Statement: “This morning, a little ways down the road, I talked about the economic resurgence that’s going on in our country right now. “After struggling to get ahead for so long, this has been a breakthrough year for America’s workers. “Unemployment has fallen to historic lows, job openings have reached record highs. “After tax reform, paychecks are growing. Wages are rising. Confidence is returning. “The American people are better off now. “We’re building a stronger economy, and we’re also building a stronger military, as well—a military that is finally getting the resources that it needs to rebuild. “We’re providing better pay for our service members. We’re providing better care for our veterans. “We’re building stronger and safer communities, through: “An historic effort to combat the opioid epidemic. “Taking on human trafficking. “Targeting gangs and dangerous criminals. “Making schools safer. “I could go on and on, but if you go to better.gop, you can see the progress that we are making. “More work remains, of course, especially when it comes to getting people into good-paying jobs and good careers. “That’s what our workforce development agenda is all about. “But Americans have proven, once again, that we can achieve great things when we raise our sights, when we reapply our founding principles to the problems of the day. “That is the story that is going on right now in America.   “We delivered on a positive agenda, and now we are seeing positive results that are improving people’s lives.  “The American people are better off now. “So just go to better.gop to learn more.”

Выбор редакции
11 июля, 18:07

Video: The American People Are Better Off Now

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After years of struggling to get ahead, the American people are seeing jobs, opportunity, and confidence come roaring back.   Two years ago, House Republicans laid out a bold policy agenda called A Better Way to tackle some of the biggest challenges of the day. Republicans are delivering on our promises. As a result, America is stronger at home and abroad, with a booming economy, safer communities, and a revived military. After historic tax reform, unemployment is at historic lows, job openings are at record highs, paychecks are growing, and wages are rising, right along with economic optimism. We have made significant investments to combat the opioid crisis, end human trafficking, target dangerous criminals, and make schools safer. We have launched a historic rebuilding of our military, raised pay for our troops, and reformed the VA to provide better care to our veterans. More work remains, but this economy is soaring, and Republican policies are helping to improve people’s lives and making it easier for families to get ahead, with a renewed sense of confidence for the future. The American people are better off now.  Learn more by going to better.gop.  

Выбор редакции
11 июля, 18:07

Speaker Ryan: ‘The American People Are Better Off Now’

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Summary: Today, Republican leaders talked about how the American people are Better Off Now because of the House Republican agenda that has ushered in an economic resurgence and strengthened communities. While there is more work to be done, Speaker Ryan shared how policies passed during this speakership have put the country back on the path to a future full of promise. Speaker Ryan’s Opening Statement: “This is a really, really good story to tell. It’s about hard work and the resilience of the American people. “In 2016, we offered the American people a positive agenda. We offered, in 2016, the American people A Better Way. “We said, here is what we need to do to get the country back on track. “And we have delivered on these promises. And the American people are better off now. The country is on a better path now. “At home, tax reform has opened the door for an economic resurgence that we are now witnessing. “Unemployment is at historic lows. Just yesterday, we saw that new hires hit the highest level in 17 years. “Wages are growing. Workers are seeing more money in their paychecks. All of this fuels more confidence and it fuels more economic growth. “We’re encouraging people to come off the sidelines and join the workforce. “We are making communities safer and stronger as well. “We have put unprecedented resources toward fighting the opioid epidemic from all sides. “We have worked to end human trafficking. We have worked to end—the target of human trafficking because this is modern slavery in the 21st century. “We are targeting dangerous criminals, we’re making schools safer. “And, after years of being hollowed out, our military is finally getting the resources that it needs to rebuild itself. “This also means recognizing the sacrifice of service: from giving our troops the biggest pay raise they’ve received in over nine years, to giving our veterans better care through the much-needed VA reforms that are now the law of the land. “More work remains, and we will continue to work on our agenda, to help get people on a better path, on the path of their lives, so that they can reach their destinies. “The American people are better off now. And we have a good reason to be optimistic that better days are ahead. “So I’m pleased to be able to say, just go to better.gop and learn more. “You’ve heard us talk about this website before—it was when we were proposing these ideas. Now that these ideas are the law of the land, we are seeing the results of these ideas. “The country is better off, people are better off. Go to better.gop.”