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10 апреля, 04:24

Transcript of Pelosi Interview on CNBC's Mad Money with Jim Cramer

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San Francisco – Speaker Nancy Pelosi joined Jim Cramer on CNBC’s Mad Money for an interview discussing the latest in the ongoing efforts to respond to the coronavirus pandemic.  Below are the Speaker’s remarks: Jim Cramer.  This morning, Republicans tried to add $250 billion to the program, but it was blocked by Democrats who want more money for states and for hospitals.  You know, I think there's a lot of room for compromise here because everybody does need more money.   Let's go right to the source with Nancy Pelosi.  She's the Democratic Speaker of the House because this is her ball game. Speaker Pelosi, welcome back to ‘Mad Money.’ Speaker Pelosi.  Good to be here. Jim Cramer.   Madam Speaker, why wouldn't we want all the money to go to the workers, but also to the hospitals which are clearly running out of money, and to the states because in 2009 we starved the states and it turned out that everybody's taxes were raised.  It took much longer to come back.  What's the resistance here? Speaker Pelosi.  That's a question you'll have to ask the Republicans because we put in the money for state and local government and for hospitals, which are hemorrhaging money and paying for the coronavirus cost. But let me make another distinction as to why we were objecting to what was put on the Floor today.  First of all, like about 48 hours ago, two days ago, the Secretary of the Treasury called me, he said, ‘I need a quarter of a trillion dollars in the next 48 hours.’   I said, ‘Well, we'd like to see some data. Let me get back to you on that.’  What we got back to him was that we’d bring the program to $600 billion, and we're saying we want ten percent of that to go for community development financial institutions: institutions that are there to meet the needs of those who do not have banking relationships but nonetheless are viable small businesses, whether they're in rural america, veterans, women, farmers, small businesses that say the banks might not be as enthusiastic about lending to, even though it's all guaranteed by the SBA and off the books by the Fed. So, that's all we're saying.  We actually took some of the money and said we need more money for the direct grants, $10,000 for a small business, and more money for the disaster loans, which are, all of the businesses are participating in. So this was all for the same purpose.  It's just to make sure that everyone was included, and actually the banks are our friends in all this.  We want to make sure that they can participate to the fullest.  At the same time, we take off their hands a need for us to reach into the, shall we say, the underbanked community and small businesses. Jim Cramer.  But I do think there's more common ground here than I’ve seen in a long time because the enemy is COVID-19, and there have been 4,000 community banks that have applied for money.  I thought that was a really good thing that there's that many community banks that are in there fighting for their own clients. Speaker Pelosi.  That's right.  And we want community banks to have some, shall we say, expedited procedures so that they can participate in a strong way to the communities, many of which of these – beyond the banks, there are other institutions like micro-lending programs, the Small Business Administration and the rest, other initiatives that can be very helpful as well.  So, again, we all have a common purpose.  We just don't want it to have to trickle down, we want some of it to be directly for the small business, rural America, Indian Country, places like that which don't have a loan with the bank, don't have a relationship. Jim Cramer.  Right. Speaker Pelosi.  And we’ve said we want to bank, we want you to know your borrower and we want your borrower to know your bank.  But, if you don't, we want you to still be able to participate in this initiative that is what this was about.   And I do think that it was a small ask, and plenty room for negotiation here. Jim Cramer.  I think so too.   Now, Madam Speaker, you are a person of great common sense, not just of great leadership.  You understand the common person, and you're worried about them, and I know this.  When can we re-open America for business without putting them in jeopardy for their health? Speaker Pelosi.  Well, testing, testing, testing, three-word answer.  What we really have to do is take inventory of actually what the challenge is.  We're flying blind without that and we’re long overdue.  We passed three bipartisan bills in March.  The first one, March 4th, and that was about testing, testing, testing. Jim Cramer.  Right. Speaker Pelosi.  More than a month ago – we still have to do that in order for us to have an idea of the extent of this terrible disease.  But also, so that we have data, racial – collection of racial data so that we know how this is affecting different communities.   So, when we know what the challenge is, we can more clearly understand when we've overcome it and, of course, we want it the sooner the better.  We want a cure.  That would be the best answer.  A vaccine, a little further up, but hopefully soon.  But the shelter-in-place is making a big difference, but we really don't have an evaluation until we know the extent of the problem: testing, testing, testing. Jim Cramer.  So, let's say we got the community-based leaders – lenders –  and I know California has community-based lending, disaster assistance.  Do you think there is a possibility we should roll out the opening?  Governor Newsom did an unbelievable job with the lockdown, just incredible.  It seems like California is so far ahead of where New York is.  Should – maybe we can do it in stages.  Maybe it doesn't have to be one grand day that the country opens. Speaker Pelosi.  Well, would you like somebody in one of the states that doesn't have shelter-in-place right now crossing the border into where you live? Jim Cramer.   No.  We wouldn't. Speaker Pelosi.   I’ll tell you what.  Let's make it – let's do something original in Washington.  Let's have it be science-based.  Let's have it be science-based, based on testing so we know what the challenge is, that we have an idea of – we don't know, even though they say they do, but scientists tell me we do not know that if you have contracted this virus and you recover from it, whether you are immune to it in the future.  We just don't have those facts.  So if somebody has had it, is that person immune?  Is that a person we can use as a resource for prevention of others?  Or is that a person who is contagious, again, infectious? So, again, all of us – everybody wants out, that's for sure: we all want to be able to go to work, we want everyone to go to work and we want those who are working to be less at risk of their lives as they try to save other lives.  We want them to have the equipment that they need and we want those who are in need to have ventilators and the rest.  So as soon as we attack it scientifically with the equipment that we need, with the measure of what the challenge is – the sooner we do that and not just talk about it, but do that – the better off we will be.  That's on the health side.   And the health side will have a direct relationship to how we open up the economic side, and the economic side assault, is a big one.  And one that we should use as an opportunity to say, we will use this opportunity of the coronavirus challenge to our economy to be one that does not solidify or ossify the disparity and access to capital, but one that alleviates that, and that would be real progress for our country.   I have to, though, measure who is infected by this, and that will be by testing.  So, again, data, data, data, evidence, science.  That is the answer to when we can go back. Jim Cramer.  You are a natural optimist.  If we can get this additional money, which I think is certainly warranted, and we get some breaks in science, do you think – is it possible to say, I know you don't want to put a date on it, but we can’t stay closed.  Is it possible that May – could enough people in May, enough younger people, enough people who have already had it, enough people who tested, tested, tested, get the country moving?  I'm getting worried about, not a recession, but a depression. Speaker Pelosi.  Well, we could have a depression because so many people are out of work.  And that is why we have to get the system really energized and working.  Let's get out those unemployment checks.  Let's get out those direct payments.  Let's get these loans freed up, let the banks be the friends to this whole system that they are.   This is an era of entrepreneurship like none we've ever seen before because of the challenge to small businesses.  Let's recognize what that is, that optimism is to America.  I don't think anybody can tell you a date unless we just take – we get a time.  But let's be hopeful that it will be soon. Jim Cramer.  But, I love the spirit of compromise.  I know Secretary Mnuchin thinks the world of you, I'm just an intermediary, but I'm saying he does and you're doing a fantastic job. Speaker Pelosi.  And I think we should get more credit for working together because we, in the last four months – I was thinking that, in the last four months, we were able to come together on a bipartisan budget to keep government open in the end of July – excuse me, the end of December.  At the same time, we came to terms with the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Free Trade Agreement.  Since then, we've had three bills that are bipartisan to address the coronavirus crisis, but we do have our differences. Jim Cramer.  Right, but there is mutual respect.  There’s definitely – but there's mutual respect, which is what we want, right?  He differs with you, of course, but it’s mutual respect. Speaker Pelosi.   Yes, it’s mutual respect.  But we were very happy with the bill, the CARES Act because what we did was turn upside-down a proposal by some for a corporate, trickle-down bill to a workers-first, bubble-up bill and that enabled us to embrace it fully and want to work very closely with the Administration to implement it as soon as possible. Jim Cramer.   Let's leave it at that.  And I want to wish you a very Happy Easter, Madam Speaker. Speaker Pelosi.   This week is a very important holy one for us to pray for the recovery of those who are sick, for the families who have lost their loved ones, for our great country, that it recovers, personally, as well. Jim Cramer.   I know we can all agree with that.  That's House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.  We all hope that this country gets strong and better,  that the health of this country gets better.   ‘Mad Money’ is back after the break.

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10 апреля, 02:28

Pelosi Statement on the Passing of Phyllis Lyon

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San Francisco – Speaker Nancy Pelosi issued this statement on the passing of civil rights champion Phyllis Lyon: “Today, I was heartbroken to hear of the passing of Phyllis Lyon: an icon of San Francisco, a trailblazer in the fight for civil rights and a dear friend to so many in our city and to me.  Phyllis dedicated her entire life to advancing equality for the LGBTQ community and in the process delivered extraordinary progress for all Americans. “Phyllis, together with her beloved late wife Del Martin, was on the vanguard in the fight to make real the promise of equality for LGBTQ Americans since the earliest days of this struggle.  As a journalist, community organizer and clarion voice for justice, Phyllis fought always to hold our nation accountable to its Founding values – whether working to decriminalize homosexuality, promote women’s health, outlaw employment discrimination in San Francisco or ensure that our city respected the dignity of all people. “Phyllis was a tireless champion for the most vulnerable among us.  I was proud to appoint her to the 1995 White House Conference on Aging, where she was a powerful force in defending of the rights of lesbian seniors and all women.  The Lyon-Martin Health Services, named in honor of Phyllis and Del’s dedication to the health and well-being of women, continues to be a model for community-based health care and provides life-saving services and care for all women, no matter who they are or whom they love.  It is a fitting tribute to Phyllis’s beautiful legacy of service.    “All those who were blessed to know Phyllis and Del remember the extraordinary love that they had for each other and the great joy we felt watching them becoming the first same-sex marriage recognized in San Francisco.  As we mourn the loss of our dear Phyllis, we find peace in knowing that she and Del are together again.  May it be a comfort to Phyllis’s daughter Kendra, sister Patricia, grandchildren Lorri and Kevin and her entire family that so many mourn their loss and pray for them at this sad time.”

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10 апреля, 02:15

Pelosi Statement Calling for Immediate Investigation into Abuse and Mistreatment of Pregnant Women in DHS Custody

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San Francisco – Speaker Nancy Pelosi issued this statement calling on the Department of Homeland Security’s Inspector General to conduct an investigation into recent reports of severe mistreatment of pregnant women legally seeking asylum in the United States: “The reports of abuse and neglect inflicted by U.S. immigration agents on a pregnant Guatemalan woman in labor during asylum processing insist that we investigate this unacceptable behavior.    “Very sadly, the appalling and inhumane situation that this woman faced is not an isolated case.  There is a pattern of U.S. officials denying and delaying medical treatment to pregnant women and subjecting them to prolonged detention and inappropriate treatment in inadequate facilities.  This mistreatment is more disturbing and dangerous, as the coronavirus crisis threatens the health and lives of the most vulnerable among us. “As Speaker of the House, I join Senator Blumenthal and other Senators in calling on the Department of Homeland Security’s Inspector General to immediately conduct an investigation into reports of abuse and mistreatment of pregnant people in their custody.   “As we observe Holy Week, Passover and Ramadan, we pray for all who are suffering during this heartbreaking time.  We also pray that those in power will remember their moral responsibility to ensure that all people are treated with compassion and dignity.”

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09 апреля, 18:26

Washington Post: Pelosi urges GOP to ‘come to the table’ and continue talks on small-business funds

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi held her ground Wednesday and refused to buckle to the Trump administration’s demand for swift congressional approval of $250 billion in additional funds for small businesses, urging Republicans to continue negotiations on more relief to minority-owned companies and others struggling to secure loans during the coronavirus pandemic. Pelosi’s remarks, in an interview with The Washington Post, left the request by Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin in jeopardy, with the speaker prepared to wait on action in the House until Republicans move closer to her position. She is calling for changes to the GOP proposal plus an additional $250 billion that would benefit hospitals and states as they seek to increase testing and buy supplies. Pelosi (D-Calif.) also expressed outrage about President Trump’s ousting of two inspectors general in the past week, a pattern that the president’s critics say is a direct assault on one of the pillars of good governance. “He dishonors the Constitution. He degrades the environment of what our country is,” Pelosi said of Trump’s shattering of norms and use of executive power, including his dismissal of Michael Atkinson, the intelligence community inspector general, and removal of Glenn Fine, the chairman of the federal panel Congress created to oversee the administration’s handling of the $2 trillion coronavirus stimulus package. But her work this week has been dominated by the political tug-of-war with Republicans over support for small businesses. “I have said very clearly: What they are proposing will not get unanimous consent in the House. There is no reason why they cannot come to the table and see the value of what we are offering,” Pelosi said, speaking by phone from San Francisco and referring to the Democrats’ counter to Mnuchin. “You cannot expect us to ossify inequality in access to capital as we try to fight the coronavirus.” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) nonetheless plans to move ahead on Thursday and will attempt to approve Mnuchin’s plan by unanimous consent, a dynamic by which legislation can pass as long as individual senators do not object. When asked whether Senate Democrats should object, Pelosi said she always avoids meddling in the affairs of the other congressional chamber but reiterated that she finds Mnuchin’s request deeply flawed. “I’m just telling you what the House will do,” she said. While many Republicans spent much of Wednesday pressuring Pelosi to pass the $250 billion in additional funds as outlined by Mnuchin, Pelosi insisted that there is time in the coming days to broker a broader bipartisan agreement. “They have a couple — several hundred billions of dollars to get through this, if they don’t do it by Easter Sunday,” she said, referring to the $349 billion fund known as the Paycheck Protection Program, a key element of the $2 trillion economic rescue package passed by Congress last month that has been inundated with implementation problems and overwhelming demand. “Friday to Monday, or Tuesday, is not dispositive of whether this works or not,” Pelosi said. She then noted that as a practicing Catholic, she does not plan to be engaged in negotiations on Easter. “Easter is a glorious occasion — the article of faith, Christ is risen,” Pelosi said. “I don’t intend to spend Sunday on something that should be so evident to them — to respect everybody in this country and how they aspire to meet their financial needs.” On a conference call with House Democrats earlier Wednesday, Pelosi and Majority Leader Steny H. Hoyer (D-Md.) suggested a deal could be reached by Friday. Trump said on Tuesday that banks had processed $70 billion in taxpayer-backed loans for 250,000 small businesses since Friday. He did not say, though, how many of those loans had been approved or how many firms had received any of the money. And his data suggests the program has reached a small fraction of U.S. companies: There are 30 million small businesses in the United States that employ 60 million people. “We’ll be running out of money pretty quickly, which is a good thing in this case, not a bad thing,” Trump told reporters. Pelosi and Sen. Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.), the minority leader, unveiled their own list of demands on Wednesday, which included asking for half of the $250 billion sought by the administration to go through community-based financial institutions serving farmers and family-, women-, minority- and veteran-owned small businesses and nonprofits. Their list also included $100 billion for hospitals, community health centers and other health systems to increase testing and needed protective gear and equipment; $150 billion more for state and local governments; and a 15 percent increase in food stamp benefits. The federal government spent $55.6 billion on these nutrition assistance benefits last year. The sums Democrats are seeking for hospitals and cities and states are similar to how much they got in the recent emergency package, which would double the overall federal funding commitment in those areas. Pelosi — who has sustained a solid negotiating rapport with Mnuchin in recent months as she and Trump have clashed and not spoken since October — said she has told the treasury secretary directly that his plan is unacceptable without changes, and she remains optimistic that he will eventually come around on parts of her proposal. “I don’t know why they wouldn’t,” she said. “The discussion has to continue because the community-based financial institutions” support minority-owned businesses and other enterprises that need capital. “They should welcome this. This gives them a pass to help many more businesses.” Looking ahead to another round of talks on follow-up legislation to the Cares Act, the largest economic rescue package in U.S. history, Pelosi said she will keep pushing to include funds and provisions for voting by mail in that bill, which some liberals have pleaded with her to make an ultimatum. That clamor has only increased after Tuesday’s primary election in Wisconsin, where the state Supreme Court blocked Democratic Gov. Tony Evers’s executive order suspending in-person voting. “Shameful. Shameful and discouraging,” Pelosi said of what happened in Wisconsin this week. “We would want it to have some of what we had in our first bill, which was same-day registration, direct mailing of the ballot to everyone who is registered to vote — issues like that, that facilitate vote by mail. Again, that’s the discussion for the next bill, which we’re by and large ready for.” Turning to oversight of the Trump administration, Pelosi said the select committee she launched last week to scrutinize the Trump administration’s response to the coronavirus pandemic, and its management of the rescue law, is getting ready to begin its work. Amid the pandemic and a limited congressional schedule, the committee, which would have subpoena power, has not yet been formally approved by the House. Trump has removed Fine, who had been the acting Pentagon inspector general, and informed him Monday that he was being replaced at the Defense Department by Sean W. O’Donnell, currently the inspector general at the Environmental Protection Agency. Late last month, Fine was selected by the head of a council of inspectors general to lead the Pandemic Response Accountability Committee, created by the March 27 law. “The president is undermining it,” Pelosi said. “We’re going to have to make sure the public understands why he would do that.” Trump also notified Congress on Friday that he was ousting Atkinson as the inspector general of the intelligence community, a sign that Trump’s conduct on this front is “bigger than the coronavirus,” Pelosi said. “This is about a unitary view of government where the president’s voice is the only voice that matters,” she said. When asked whether she would seek to pass new protections for inspectors general, Pelosi was encouraging but did not get into specifics. She called related legislation proposed Wednesday by Carolyn B. Maloney (D-N.Y.), chairwoman of the House Oversight Committee, and Gerald E. Connolly (D-Va.), chairman of the government operations subcommittee, a “good idea” but said it would be difficult to get Trump to sign any law that would curtail his power. In closing, Pelosi, who has effectively served as her party’s leader in the Trump era, praised Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), who ended his presidential campaign on Wednesday, for his efforts and his ability to excite young people. Sanders’s decision leaves former vice president Joe Biden as the presumptive Democratic nominee. “I really salute Senator Sanders for his values, his commitment to making sure everyone in our country has a fair shake,” Pelosi said, especially on promoting “access to quality and affordable health care.” Pelosi said she and Sanders “may have a different thought on the viability right now of Medicare-for-all,” but she called him “boundless in terms of stamina and energy” and an ally to her and all Democrats. Pelosi, however, declined to endorse Biden on the spot.   “Not on this call,” she said, with a chuckle. “This is Bernie’s day.”

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09 апреля, 04:52

Transcript of Pelosi Interview on NPR's All Things Considered

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San Francisco – Speaker Nancy Pelosi joined Ari Shapiro and Kelsey Snell on NPR's All Things Considered for an interview to discuss the latest in the ongoing efforts to respond to the coronavirus pandemic, including the new bipartisan House Select Committee on the Coronavirus Crisis and Congressional Democrats’ move to pass interim emergency coronavirus relief.  Below are the Speaker’s remarks: Ari Shapiro.  Congress has barely begun to spend the record $2 trillion in relief money that were signed into law almost two weeks ago, and already there’s an intense debate over how big the next package should be.  House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is one of the leaders of that debate, and she joins us now.  Madam Speaker, thanks for being here. Speaker Pelosi.  My pleasure, always.  Thank you. Ari Shapiro.  We also have NPR Congressional Correspondent Kelsey Snell on the line to join in the questioning.  And Kelsey why don’t you kick this off. Kelsey Snell.  Yes, hi Madam Speaker.  Let's start with the Administration's move to add $250 billion to the pot for small business relief.  That's on top of the $350 billion in loans that Congress already approved.  Democrats are asking for another $250 billion for hospitals and local governments as well. My question is, does the White House support this and, if the Senate passes the business aid alone as they plan to, can that pass the House without the added money you’ve asked for? Speaker Pelosi.  Well, let me say thank you for calling attention, currently, to what is happening.  Yesterday morning, I got a call from Secretary Mnuchin saying we need $250 billion more on top of the $350 [billion].  We are very proud of the program: the Paycheck Protection Program that is there.  Our Chair of the Small Business Committee, Nydia Velázquez, is an expert on all of this and made her imprint on so many things that affect small business in the legislation. What we said – what I said to the Secretary is, ‘I’ll have to get back to you,’ because one of the concerns that we have about the original 350 is that a lot of money – first come, first serve and many unbanked people who are under-banked are unserved on that basis.  So, they don't have banking relationships sophisticated in a way that others do.  So, we said for the next 250 we really need to have a percentage of that, $60 billion, that would go to something called community development financial institutions and that – that includes a number of things that they would open the way for others to participate. It’s really important because we cannot solidify the inequalities in access to capital that exist in our economy at a time when we are addressing the coronavirus crisis.   Ari Shapiro.  Madam Speaker, if I could ask you about the $2 trillion spending package that Congress passed almost two weeks ago.  Some of the money has been slow to reach people.  State governments are complaining they don't have information they need to increase unemployment checks.  Small businesses reporting problems applying for loans.  No individual has seen a check from the IRS yet.  So, there's this massive need and a massive sum of money to address the need.  But do you think you underestimated the amount of work it would take to connect cash with people who need it? Speaker Pelosi.  No.  I – we’ve encouraged the Administration.  We want this to work.  You know we passed three bills in the month of March to address this.  March 4th: our first bill about testing, testing, testing.  I’m still not satisfied about how that has been implemented.  The next bill was about masks, masks, masks and all that that implied.  All of it addressing the emergency.  The third bill, which is the second phase, is about mitigation.  Mitigating for the damage to the lives and the livelihood of the American people.  And we are proud of that product.  We turned it from a Republican, corporate, trickle-down bill to a workers-first, bubble up bill. Ari Shapiro.  But in terms of the actual infrastructure to get the money to the people who need it urgently? Speaker Pelosi.  That’s right and that’s what we're encouraging the Administration to do.  We passed the legislation.  They need to implement the law.  The Secretary says that the checks will be there next week.  We say to transfer them electronically.  Don’t worry about putting them in the mail.  Transfer them electronically.  And they claim to us, and I believe them, that they are trying to do that.  It won’t cover everybody and so they are trying to mitigate for that as well. The small business issues, hopefully people will get their answers.  They started on Friday.  Again, this is a massive $2 trillion program affecting millions of small businesses, tens of millions of small – tens of millions of Americans could get the direct payment. And we are proud of what we've got in the bill.  We wanted more frankly for the direct payments, and that’s for the next bill. Ari Shapiro.  Well, as you know, states are already saying there’s not enough money to meet demand.  Here’s Gavin Newsom from your state in an interview I did on this program yesterday: ‘We're going to need substantial increase in a fourth stimulus, above and beyond what they're currently offering, in order to protect the state and the most vulnerable citizens in the state, and to protect cities and counties that have been entrusted to do the same.’  Madam Speaker how do you respond to that? Speaker Pelosi.  I think he’s absolutely right.  In the bill that we just passed, the CARES bill, we had $200 billion.  We thought we needed more, but that was a doable figure.  They did $150, and that just said this is a down-payment.  I said it at the time, ‘This is a down-payment.’ And so that’s why, when they came back and asked for the $250, we said, ‘If you want to go to the Floors of the House and the Senate, then let’s go with $150 billion more for Senate – excuse me, for states and localities.’  We have to do that. They don’t want to do that now and I don't know why, but we’ll – you know, the White House says they don’t support that, but we do.  And, again, whether we get it in the next couple of days, which hopefully we will, even at that we will need more in the CARES 2 legislation.  The states and localities are bearing a tremendous, tremendous burden in all of this.  And one of the things that I’m especially happy about that we will have in this next legislation is to compensate states and cities for what they have already spent, so there is a relationship to where the money goes as to where the challenge is very significant. Kelsey Snell.  To follow on that, would you block the bill coming out of the Senate if it doesn't include that additional money and the additional controls you're asking for?  Polls are showing that people don't want to see partisan fighting right now, and I wonder if you can address that in this package? Speaker Pelosi.  Well, let me say two things about that, Kelsey, and I appreciate your question.  First of all, the bill that they put forth doesn’t have – will not get unanimous support in the Caucus in the House.  It just won’t.  So, we’re saying to them, why do you have an objection to lower – smaller businesses, who have, again – want to participate in this program – need to participate in this program – that you want to participate in this program, because you don’t want them going onto unemployment.  Why wouldn’t you give them an avenue to participate?  We’re talking about $60 billion of that kind of community development resources to go to helping community banks, micro-lending, issues like that – that $60 billion of the 250. The rest of the money in that small business piece goes to something that is already in the bill and that is to increase the number of – the amount of money toward direct grants to small business – $15 billion.  The next is for disaster loans, which are very, very popular and small businesses participate in them to add $50 billion to that.  So, most of it is to reinforce what they have already, accept for $60 billion, which was saying, has to go to the under-banked or unbanked or however you want to term – Ari Shapiro.  Madam Speaker, these figures you’re listing off underscore that we're talking about inconceivable sums of money that you're turning over to the Executive Branch to distribute, and yesterday, the President fired the Inspector General who was chosen to give the spending some level of accountability.  What are you and the Congress going to do about that? Speaker Pelosi.  Well, the point is, is that’s why we’re saying in the bill that we want to spell out how the money is spent and not leave it to them when they say, ‘Well, we intend to do that.  We’ll just make an announcement.’  No, that doesn't count.  We want it codified as to the – Ari Shapiro.  But as to the $2 trillion bill that was already passed, how do you impose accountability at this point?  Speaker Pelosi.  Well, I have put a Committee alliance – you know we have several in the Committee – in the bill itself, we have the five member Committee that the Congress appoints.  And then we have the Committee that the President is trying to undermine.  And what he is doing is so very, very wrong, but we cannot, again, we cannot allow this to happen without a bright light shining on it.  And that's why I appointed the Committee to investigate – the committee for the – to oversee the coronavirus challenge that we face.  Mr. Clyburn is the Chair of that. And that’s based on something Harry Truman did when he was a Senator in a Democratic Administration.  He was a Senator, 1941 the start of the war, he said: after World War I, there were 116 committees to investigate the spending of World War I.  I would rather have one committee in the course of the war to spend it, not after the war, and that is to make sure there's not waste, fraud and abuse, profiteering, price gouging and the rest of that.  Kelsey Snell.  Madam Speaker, on that, knowing that these huge bills, as Ari said, have a very hard to conceive numbers.  They will have a long-term impact on the deficit.   Do you see any limits on how much should be spent on relief? Speaker Pelosi.  No, I think we have to what we need.  By the way, let me just say, since you mentioned how large the $2 trillion bill was, it was around the same size as the Republicans did in a tax cut for the high end – 83 percent of the benefits going to the top one percent, with adding – with interest adding nearly $2 trillion to the deficit with no benefit for America’s working families.   Ari Shapiro.  You’re talking about the tax cut there. Speaker Pelosi.  This is a similar amount of money, with a much better purpose, and we have to do it with a bright light of scrutiny shining on how is this money spent, where is it going.  And this is not an offense to the President.  It’s about how big money attracts some kind of profiteering and price gouging and the rest.  So, we will be looking at how it is spent and again, protecting the taxpayer and of course those whose lives and livelihoods are affected, which is everybody in our country – are affected by this.  Ari Shapiro.  House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.  I’m afraid we have to leave it there, but thank you so much for your time today.  I appreciate it. Speaker Pelosi.  Let me just say that, again, the bill the President put forth does not have enforcement.   Ari Shapiro.  I’m afraid I’m going to end.  That is Speaker Nancy Pelosi with Kelsey Snell, and this is NPR News. 

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08 апреля, 21:59

Pelosi Statement on Amicus Brief in Supreme Court Contraception Case

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San Francisco – Speaker Nancy Pelosi issued this statement after joining a bicameral amicus brief in the United States Supreme Court in the cases of Trump v. Pennsylvania and Little Sisters of the Poor v. Pennsylvania arguing against the Trump Administration’s expansive rule allowing private employers to opt out of providing contraceptive coverage for their employees, in violation of the Affordable Care Act’s contraceptive-coverage requirement: “The Trump Administration’s despicable rule allowing private employers and health plans to deny women coverage for contraception is an outrageous attack on women’s health, women’s pocketbooks and women’s independence.  “While our nation faces an unprecedented health crisis, the Administration continues to fight to take away every woman’s right to the critical, comprehensive care that they and their families need.  At the same time, the Trump Administration continues to support the outrageous GOP lawsuit to dismantle the entirety of the Affordable Care Act including lifesaving protections for 130 million Americans with pre-existing conditions.  And as coronavirus poses a growing threat to all Americans, the Administration is ignoring the health experts by refusing to reopen ACA enrollment of health coverage to millions of uninsured workers and families. “House Democrats are committed to upholding the ACA and its critical protections for women and families.  We will continue to oppose any actions by the Trump Administration that jeopardizes the safety and well-being of the American people as we work tirelessly to combat this deadly virus and ensure that everyone receives the care and support needed to stay healthy.”

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08 апреля, 14:13

Pelosi and Schumer Joint Statement on Interim Emergency Coronavirus Relief

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Washington, D.C. – Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer issued this statement on Democrats’ priorities for small businesses and working families in an interim emergency coronavirus package: “The heartbreaking acceleration of the coronavirus crisis demands bold, urgent and ongoing action from Congress to protect Americans’ lives and livelihoods.  As Democrats have said since Day One, Congress must provide additional relief for small businesses and families, building on the strong down-payment made in the bipartisan CARES Act. “Congressional Democrats are calling for: $250 billion in assistance to small businesses, with $125 billion channeled through community-based financial institutions that serve farmers, family, women, minority and veteran-owned small businesses and nonprofits in rural, tribal, suburban and urban communities across our country, and improvements to ensure all eligible small businesses can access this critical funding and are not turned away by banks;  $100 billion for hospitals, community health centers and health systems, providing desperately needed resources to the frontlines of this crisis, including production and distribution of national rapid testing and Personal Protective Equipment (PPE); $150 billion for state and local governments to manage this crisis and mitigate lost revenue, doubling down on the investment secured in the CARES Act; Strong additional support for families with a 15 percent increase to the maximum SNAP benefit to help put food on the table. “After we pass this interim emergency legislation, Congress will move to pass a CARES 2 Act that will extend and expand the bipartisan CARES Act to meet the needs of the American people.  CARES 2 must provide transformational relief as the American people weather this assault on their lives and livelihoods.  “The American people need to know that their government is there for them in their time of great need.”

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07 апреля, 22:12

Pelosi Statement on Sudden Removal of Head of CARES Act Oversight

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San Francisco – Speaker Nancy Pelosi issued this statement on the abrupt demotion of Acting Defense Department Inspector General Glenn Fine and removal from his position as head of the Pandemic Response Accountability Committee created in the CARES Act, less than a week after his appointment: “The sudden removal and replacement of Acting Inspector General Fine is part of a disturbing pattern of retaliation by the President against independent overseers fulfilling their statutory and patriotic duties to conduct oversight on behalf of the American people. “Since Day One, the President has tried to marginalize and exercise ultimate control over independent Inspectors General.  Yet again, he is doubling down on his signing statement promise to disregard critical oversight provisions that hold the Administration accountable to the law.  The removal of Acting Inspector General Fine takes place just days after his shameful late-night firing of Intelligence Community Inspector General Atkinson and his nomination of one of his own lawyers to oversee the Treasury Department’s implementation of the CARES Act. “The President’s violation of oversight appears to be a reaction to Congressional Democrats transforming the CARES Act from corporations-focused to workers-first, requiring that taxpayer dollars given to industry go to workers’ paychecks and benefits, not be used for CEO bonuses, stock buybacks or dividends.  We will continue to exercise our oversight to ensure that this historic investment of taxpayer dollars is being used wisely and efficiently to help workers and families.” 

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07 апреля, 21:44

Pelosi Statement Calling for Removal of Acting Secretary of the Navy Modly

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San Francisco – Speaker Nancy Pelosi issued this statement calling for the removal of Acting Navy Secretary Thomas Modly following his abrupt decision to relieve Captain Brett Crozier from his command and his highly inappropriate comments made after the firing: “Our oath of office is to protect and defend the Constitution, and therefore our first responsibility is to protect and defend the American people.  To that end, our priority is force protection of our men and women in uniform who sacrifice to keep Americans safe.  That is exactly what Captain Crozier was doing when he called for help for the men and women in his charge.  “Sadly, Acting Secretary Modly’s actions and words demonstrate his failure to prioritize the force protection of our troops.  He showed a serious lack of the sound judgment and strong leadership needed during this time.  Acting Secretary Modly must be removed from his position or resign.”

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06 апреля, 19:51

Dear Colleague to All Members on Electronic Submission of Floor Documents

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Dear Colleague, During this time of crisis, House leadership and institutional staff continue to examine all possible steps to protect the health and safety of Members and our staffs, so that we are best able to serve our constituents. In that spirit, in consultation with the Rules Committee, Committee on House Administration, Office of the Clerk and Office of the Parliamentarian and in accordance with current social distancing guidelines, the House will soon take additional action to reduce the physical presence of Members and staff in the Capitol, by formalizing a new system for submission of documents related to Floor action.  Beginning Tuesday, staff must electronically submit all Floor documents – including bills, resolutions, co-sponsors and extensions of remarks – to a dedicated and secure email system, rather than deliver these materials by hand to staff in the Speaker’s Lobby or Cloakrooms.  At this time, Members may still drop off materials in person.  Electronic submissions will be accepted when the House is in pro forma session, as well as 15 minutes immediately before and after.  This upcoming week’s pro forma sessions will be held Tuesday at 11:30 AM E.T. and Friday at 9:00 AM E.T.  Pro forma sessions for the remainder of the month are expected to follow a similar schedule.  Later today, the Clerk’s Office will send out detailed guidance on where and how to submit materials. Please be advised that this policy will be effective through April 19 and may be extended if continued disruption of House operations remains necessary due to the pandemic.  Normal practice for Floor submissions will resume once the House returns full-time to the Capitol for regular business.  During this Holy Season for people of many faiths, let us pray for those families who have lost a loved one, those who are sick and those who are ministering to their needs. Take care, be well and stay strong. Sincerely,

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05 апреля, 02:28

Dear Colleague to All Members on Next Steps on CARES Act and CARES 2

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Dear Colleague, As you know, our nation faces a crisis of staggering proportions, with a deadly virus and a battered economy.  The numbers are devastating: more than 300,000 confirmed coronavirus cases, more than 8,000 tragically dead, 6.6 million initial unemployment claims and 700,000 jobs lost in the March jobs report. Working together, we took strong steps to address this crisis by passing three bipartisan bills in the month of March, starting with testing, testing, testing.  The CARES Act signed by the President on March 28 is an historic relief package putting Workers First by providing desperately-needed support for working families and small businesses across America. As we do so, the American people expect Congress to ensure that the over $2 trillion investment of their taxpayer money is spent wisely and effectively.  For that specific purpose, the House is establishing the bipartisan House Select Committee on the Coronavirus Crisis.  This narrowly-tailored Committee will be laser-focused on taxpayer money going to workers’ paychecks and benefits, not being exploited by profiteers and price-gougers.  Just as the Truman Committee saved lives and billions of taxpayer dollars by preventing waste, fraud and abuse during World War II, the Select Committee will provide the accountability and transparency that the American people demand and deserve. At the same time, the acceleration of the coronavirus crisis demands that we continue to legislate.  We must double down on the down-payment we made in the CARES Act by passing a CARES 2 package, which will extend and expand this bipartisan legislation to meet the needs of the American people.  CARES 2 must go further in assisting small businesses including farmers, extending and strengthening unemployment benefits and giving families additional direct payments.  We must also provide the desperately needed resources for our state and local governments, hospitals, community health centers, health systems and health workers, first responders and other providers on the frontlines of this crisis. Our communities cannot afford to wait, and we must move quickly.  It is my hope that we will craft this legislation and bring it to the Floor later this month.  The American people have hearts full of love for the health care workers, first responders and all others risking their lives to save lives, who desperately need Personal Protective Equipment to protect themselves and ventilators and drugs to heal.  Thank you for your leadership during this sad and challenging time for our country, over which we will prevail.  Please accept my warmest personal wishes to you and your families as we approach Holy Week and Easter, Passover and Ramadan. Sincerely,

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04 апреля, 20:02

Pelosi Statement on Nomination of White House Lawyer as Inspector General for Treasury Department Implementation of CARES Act

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San Francisco – Speaker Nancy Pelosi issued this statement after President Trump nominated Brian Miller, a senior associate counsel in the Office of the White House and former GSA Inspector General, to oversee the Treasury Department’s implementation of the $2 trillion CARES Act: “Congressional Democrats transformed the CARES Act from corporations-first to workers-first, ensuring that taxpayer dollars given to industry go to workers’ paychecks and benefits, not be used for CEO bonuses, stock buybacks or dividends.  “The Inspector General providing oversight of the federal response of this historic relief package for workers and families must be independent from politics.  The President’s nomination of one of his own lawyers clearly fails that test.  “Clearly and sadly, the President intends to double down on his signing statement promise to disregard key oversight provisions that hold the Administration accountable to the law.  This nomination makes even more urgent the need for the bipartisan House Select Committee on the Coronavirus Crisis, which will ensure that taxpayer dollars are being used wisely and efficiently to help workers and not to be exploited by profiteers and price-gougers.”