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29 января 2014, 09:00

The project Macro Stability for Competitiveness in Ghana is now in the pipeline.

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The project Macro Stability for Competitiveness in Ghana is now in the pipeline. To see more information, see the project information in the World Bank project database

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28 января 2014, 09:00

The project Senegal: Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative Implementation is now in the pipeline.

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The project Senegal: Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative Implementation is now in the pipeline. To see more information, see the project information in the World Bank project database

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28 января 2014, 09:00

The project Lagos Eko Secondary Education Project Additional Financing has changed to Active

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The project Lagos Eko Secondary Education Project Additional Financing has changed to Active. To see more information, see the project information in the World Bank project database The development objective of the Additional Financing for the Lagos Eko Secondary Education Project for Nigeria is to improve the quality of public junior and senior secondary education in Lagos State. This additional financing also entail the following: (i) changes in the results framework; (ii) minor modifications in the project components; and (iii) an update of existing implementation arrangements, and disbursement estimates. The changes being proposed relate to: (1) extending school development grants to 667 schools for improving education quality and student learning under the original project up to 2015; (2) continuing professional development of teachers, principals and vice-principals, enhanced capability of Lagos State to undertake standardized testing; and (3) strengthening monitoring and evaluation. Expected outcomes include (a) increased performance in student learning achievement under the Basic Education Certificate Examination (BECE) and the West Africa Senior Secondary Certificate Examination (WASSCE); (b), enhanced system of student assessment; and (c) strengthened institutional capacity within the Lagos State educational system, particularly at district and school level.

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28 января 2014, 09:00

The project IMPROVING LEARNING IN UGANDA is now in the pipeline.

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The project IMPROVING LEARNING IN UGANDA is now in the pipeline. To see more information, see the project information in the World Bank project database

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28 января 2014, 09:00

The project Financial Management, Transparency, and Accountability Project (FIMTAP) has changed to Pipeline

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The project Financial Management, Transparency, and Accountability Project (FIMTAP) has changed to Pipeline. To see more information, see the project information in the World Bank project database

27 января 2014, 09:00

The project Sierra Leone Commercial Debt Reduction Preparation Grant is now in the pipeline.

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The project Sierra Leone Commercial Debt Reduction Preparation Grant is now in the pipeline. To see more information, see the project information in the World Bank project database

22 января 2014, 09:00

The project Commercial Agriculture and Value Chain Management Project is now in the pipeline.

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The project Commercial Agriculture and Value Chain Management Project is now in the pipeline. To see more information, see the project information in the World Bank project database

16 января 2014, 23:45

One Person Really Can Change the World: Farewell Madiba

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.links li { display:block } WASHINGTON, January 16, 2014—I was extremely happy to hear that the World Bank Group would organize a memorial for our great leader Nelson Mandela. On the day I was deeply touched by all the contributions, the sincerity of Jim Yong Kim, the humor of Leonard McCarthy, the strength of Mansur Muhtar, and the emotion in all the other contributions. When the floor was opened for us to recall our memories, I took the opportunity to give my thanks to Madiba. Here’s what I said: “Thank you very much for this opportunity. Mandela’s life is certainly one to celebrate. My name is Max Thabiso Edkins and the best way I know how to celebrate Madiba is for me to tell my story. I am a South African German who was born in Lesotho. Lesotho, that beautiful mountain kingdom completely surrounded by South Africa? Why Lesotho? I have often been asked. I would blame Apartheid – Apartheid forced my parents to stay away from South Africa. My father is a South African filmmaker. He gave up on his studies because he could not tolerate the lies being taught under Apartheid. He fled mandatory army service and when they came looking for him he had to flee the country. He met my mother in Germany and together they lived in different parts of North and South America. At the time, with a South African passport, it was difficult staying anywhere much longer than three months and when it came to having me, my parents had made their way to Lesotho. In the 80s, Lesotho was an exciting place. The anti-Apartheid revolutionary movement was strong. South African raids were a regular occurrence. The parties were good. And there was a real sense of taking action. From the beginning I suppose I have been anti-Apartheid. I remember when I was 7, then in Germany, I took part in a demonstration wearing a black T-shirt with a big red STOP sign on it. It read “STOP APARTHEID”. I also remember somebody asking me whether I knew what it meant – of course I didn’t, but I soon found out. After Mandela’s release in 1990 we could finally make our way back to South Africa, something we had been trying to do for years. Though only by 1994, when we had the first democratic election, did I come to realize the full meaning of Mandela’s release. I have always enjoyed working with photography and film and to me the transition in South Africa felt a bit like moving from black-and-white television to Technicolor. The rainbow nation had arrived, the euphoria was amazing, and there was a real sense of freedom. While I cannot say that I was fortunate enough to have met directly with Mandela, I was lucky enough to have had him smile at me. He came to the funeral of King Moshoeshoe II in Lesotho in 1996. My brother and I joined the parade by horse and when Mandela arrived he walked right in front of us and gave us a big smile. The Mandela smile – I will never forget it. I try to carry it with me and try to copy it whenever I can. My Sotho name, Thabiso, after all does mean Happiness. But it is not only his smile that we remember Mandela for, it is his leadership, his dedication, his strength, his belief and his ability to forgive and to work with all to unite South Africa. He is certainly a ‘giant of our history’. And in 2010 we realized that we had to celebrate Mandela’s 20 years of freedom, so we organized a film festival in his honor. At the opening we celebrated as only South Africans could, as South Africans now living in a country where no race was superior to another. Now that Madiba has left us, we bid him Farewell, and the message I take with me is that ‘one person really can change the world.’ This is the message I would love to take forward to the next challenge of our generation – that challenge in my opinion is Climate Change. But I really wonder whether there will ever be another Mandela, so for the climate challenge I would rather say that we can all change the world, each one of us. And let’s take Madiba’s legacy and let it guide us. Madiba, I love and thank you for all you have done, may you rest in peace. And to remember you I say Amandla! Awethu!”  

Выбор редакции
16 января 2014, 23:45

One Person Really Can Change the World: Farewell Madiba

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.links li { display:block } WASHINGTON, January 16, 2014—I was extremely happy to hear that the World Bank Group would organize a memorial for our great leader Nelson Mandela. On the day I was deeply touched by all the contributions, the sincerity of Jim Yong Kim, the humor of Leonard McCarthy, the strength of Mansur Muhtar, and the emotion in all the other contributions. When the floor was opened for us to recall our memories, I took the opportunity to give my thanks to Madiba. Here’s what I said: “Thank you very much for this opportunity. Mandela’s life is certainly one to celebrate. My name is Max Thabiso Edkins and the best way I know how to celebrate Madiba is for me to tell my story. I am a South African German who was born in Lesotho. Lesotho, that beautiful mountain kingdom completely surrounded by South Africa? Why Lesotho? I have often been asked. I would blame Apartheid – Apartheid forced my parents to stay away from South Africa. My father is a South African filmmaker. He gave up on his studies because he could not tolerate the lies being taught under Apartheid. He fled mandatory army service and when they came looking for him he had to flee the country. He met my mother in Germany and together they lived in different parts of North and South America. At the time, with a South African passport, it was difficult staying anywhere much longer than three months and when it came to having me, my parents had made their way to Lesotho. In the 80s, Lesotho was an exciting place. The anti-Apartheid revolutionary movement was strong. South African raids were a regular occurrence. The parties were good. And there was a real sense of taking action. From the beginning I suppose I have been anti-Apartheid. I remember when I was 7, then in Germany, I took part in a demonstration wearing a black T-shirt with a big red STOP sign on it. It read “STOP APARTHEID”. I also remember somebody asking me whether I knew what it meant – of course I didn’t, but I soon found out. After Mandela’s release in 1990 we could finally make our way back to South Africa, something we had been trying to do for years. Though only by 1994, when we had the first democratic election, did I come to realize the full meaning of Mandela’s release. I have always enjoyed working with photography and film and to me the transition in South Africa felt a bit like moving from black-and-white television to Technicolor. The rainbow nation had arrived, the euphoria was amazing, and there was a real sense of freedom. While I cannot say that I was fortunate enough to have met directly with Mandela, I was lucky enough to have had him smile at me. He came to the funeral of King Moshoeshoe II in Lesotho in 1996. My brother and I joined the parade by horse and when Mandela arrived he walked right in front of us and gave us a big smile. The Mandela smile – I will never forget it. I try to carry it with me and try to copy it whenever I can. My Sotho name, Thabiso, after all does mean Happiness. But it is not only his smile that we remember Mandela for, it is his leadership, his dedication, his strength, his belief and his ability to forgive and to work with all to unite South Africa. He is certainly a ‘giant of our history’. And in 2010 we realized that we had to celebrate Mandela’s 20 years of freedom, so we organized a film festival in his honor. At the opening we celebrated as only South Africans could, as South Africans now living in a country where no race was superior to another. Now that Madiba has left us, we bid him Farewell, and the message I take with me is that ‘one person really can change the world.’ This is the message I would love to take forward to the next challenge of our generation – that challenge in my opinion is Climate Change. But I really wonder whether there will ever be another Mandela, so for the climate challenge I would rather say that we can all change the world, each one of us. And let’s take Madiba’s legacy and let it guide us. Madiba, I love and thank you for all you have done, may you rest in peace. And to remember you I say Amandla! Awethu!”

16 января 2014, 22:00

Reimbursable Advisory Services (RAS); Lessons from MENA, LAC and ECA

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.links li { display:block } WASHINGTON, January 16, 2014—The AFR Development Effectiveness Seminar Series resumed this week with two half-day, cross regional staff knowledge sharing workshops that drew on Bank experiences in the use of Reimbursable Advisory Services (RAS) to address development challenges, especially in situations where the demand for financial aid is diminishing and the need for knowledge services is increasing. It was highlighted that despite being a late starter, there is growing demand for RAS in the Africa Region. For instance, in FY10 RAS revenue barely surpassed $100K In FY13 it surged to $3.3m with a potential growth of between $8m and $10m in FY14 and FY15 respectively. “There is no doubt that there is growing demand for knowledge products and services that contribute to Sub Saharan Africa’s potential for growth and poverty reduction,” said Bruce Courtney, AFR Development Effectiveness Sector Manager and organizer of the seminar series. “In the past few years, the World Bank Group has gained the trust of its clients in the ECA, LAC and MENA regions as a knowledge provider through RAS’s.  So this week’s workshop where staff from several regions in the Bank share their experiences with RAS’s to address development challenges is very relevant.” Client Interaction with the Bank In day one’s opening presentation, WBCKO Senior Operations Officer Nicolaus Von Der Goltz, the point person for RAS, noted that evidence from the field indicates that clients value the Bank’s ability to address relevant development issues based on its long experience and technical expertise. He said clients also trust the Bank as an able institution in conveying international best practice and customizing knowledge to the local context. The Bank, he said, acts as an independent and trusted knowledge broker offering multi-sector development solutions. “The RAS allows the Bank to do more, stay engaged in countries even when their demand for financial services declines, meet the needs of a more diverse client, gain additional knowledge and transfer this knowledge to our lower-income clients, raise additional revenues in a resource constraint environment and achieve bigger impact,” Von Der Goltz said. Erik von Uexkull, Country Economist for Gabon and Equatorial Guinea, shared a case in the Africa Region where RAS provided a flexible tool to engage with Gabon and Equatorial Guinea based on their specific needs and characteristics. He said the Bank delivered several important pieces of technical assistance (TAs) and Economic Sector Work (ESW) that responded directly to client needs, and that the clients were in the end satisfied with the Bank’s work, which led to an expansion in their engagement with the Bank, in some cases despite the availability of ‘pro bono’ alternatives. von Uexkull noted, however, that RAS was not rolled out in these countries without internal and external challenges that included uncertainties in costing and pricing, the ongoing overhaul of RAS procedures, the lack of business development funds and coordination. He also emphasized the need to understand and work with client processes, respond to urgencies and changing demands and managing requests that the Bank may not be able to do. Lessons from MENA Sharing the MENA experience, Jamal Al-Kibbi cited three instances during which the need for RAS can be identified: (i) Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) discussions, (ii) regular operational dialogue between government officials and Bank staff, workshops, conferences, visits by the World Bank management and staff to the country, etc. and (iii) programmatic RAS discussions with countries not eligible for financial lending. “Once the client identifies a program or an individual activity to be implemented through RAS, the client sends an official request to the Bank and the request triggers the following actions on the Bank’s part: (i) identifying a TTL and key team members, (ii) determining whether a scoping mission is needed, preparing a Proposal, (iii) determining the structure of engagement or if possible number of tasks, sectors involved, etc., and (iv) identifying funding for preparation activities,” said Al-Kibbi. According to Al-Kibbi, RAS has been a unique Analytic and Advisory Activity (AAA) tool undertaken by the Bank but requested and paid for by a client country. The Bank has had long years of experience in using RAS as an aid instrument to address the knowledge needs of client countries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), including in Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and UAE, which are oil producing countries with high per capita income, thus ineligible for Bank financial aid. But these countries, although developing, have weak institutional and human capacity; unsatisfactory education and human development capabilities; labor market inefficiencies and infrastructure bottlenecks; etc. In a similar vein, RAS has been recently used to respond to requests for knowledge aid in two African countries – Gabon and Equatorial Guinea – both small oil rich countries with high income, low capacity, ambitious development agendas and limited previous Bank engagement. Costing and Billing The second day of the Seminar was devoted to drawing lessons from RAS experience in ECA and LAC. A Sector Manager and a RAS TTL shared their perspective on how RAS was developed in several countries were lending was decreasing virtually to zero. In the presentations it was made clear that RAS, despite being a different instrument, has very similar processes to the preparation of other lending instruments and AAA. Staff was able to get a more detailed view of how to go about this new line of business. The final session was developed to provide staff hands-on experience on how to do costing and billing, how to prepare legal agreements, and enter data in the portal for RAS operations. As the topic has a growing demand in the Africa region, it was agreed that there will be other hands-on clinics on billing and costing and other procedural topics in the coming months. 

Выбор редакции
16 января 2014, 22:00

Reimbursable Advisory Services (RAS); Lessons from MENA, LAC and ECA

  • 0

.links li { display:block } WASHINGTON, January 16, 2014—The AFR Development Effectiveness Seminar Series resumed this week with two half-day, cross regional staff knowledge sharing workshops that drew on Bank experiences in the use of Reimbursable Advisory Services (RAS) to address development challenges, especially in situations where the demand for financial aid is diminishing and the need for knowledge services is increasing. It was highlighted that despite being a late starter, there is growing demand for RAS in the Africa Region. For instance, in FY10 RAS revenue barely surpassed $100K In FY13 it surged to $3.3m with a potential growth of between $8m and $10m in FY14 and FY15 respectively. “There is no doubt that there is growing demand for knowledge products and services that contribute to Sub Saharan Africa’s potential for growth and poverty reduction,” said Bruce Courtney, AFR Development Effectiveness Sector Manager and organizer of the seminar series. “In the past few years, the World Bank Group has gained the trust of its clients in the ECA, LAC and MENA regions as a knowledge provider through RAS’s.  So this week’s workshop where staff from several regions in the Bank share their experiences with RAS’s to address development challenges is very relevant.” Client Interaction with the Bank In day one’s opening presentation, WBCKO Senior Operations Officer Nicolaus Von Der Goltz, the point person for RAS, noted that evidence from the field indicates that clients value the Bank’s ability to address relevant development issues based on its long experience and technical expertise. He said clients also trust the Bank as an able institution in conveying international best practice and customizing knowledge to the local context. The Bank, he said, acts as an independent and trusted knowledge broker offering multi-sector development solutions. “The RAS allows the Bank to do more, stay engaged in countries even when their demand for financial services declines, meet the needs of a more diverse client, gain additional knowledge and transfer this knowledge to our lower-income clients, raise additional revenues in a resource constraint environment and achieve bigger impact,” Von Der Goltz said. Erik von Uexkull, Country Economist for Gabon and Equatorial Guinea, shared a case in the Africa Region where RAS provided a flexible tool to engage with Gabon and Equatorial Guinea based on their specific needs and characteristics. He said the Bank delivered several important pieces of technical assistance (TAs) and Economic Sector Work (ESW) that responded directly to client needs, and that the clients were in the end satisfied with the Bank’s work, which led to an expansion in their engagement with the Bank, in some cases despite the availability of ‘pro bono’ alternatives. von Uexkull noted, however, that RAS was not rolled out in these countries without internal and external challenges that included uncertainties in costing and pricing, the ongoing overhaul of RAS procedures, the lack of business development funds and coordination. He also emphasized the need to understand and work with client processes, respond to urgencies and changing demands and managing requests that the Bank may not be able to do. Lessons from MENA Sharing the MENA experience, Jamal Al-Kibbi cited three instances during which the need for RAS can be identified: (i) Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) discussions, (ii) regular operational dialogue between government officials and Bank staff, workshops, conferences, visits by the World Bank management and staff to the country, etc. and (iii) programmatic RAS discussions with countries not eligible for financial lending. “Once the client identifies a program or an individual activity to be implemented through RAS, the client sends an official request to the Bank and the request triggers the following actions on the Bank’s part: (i) identifying a TTL and key team members, (ii) determining whether a scoping mission is needed, preparing a Proposal, (iii) determining the structure of engagement or if possible number of tasks, sectors involved, etc., and (iv) identifying funding for preparation activities,” said Al-Kibbi. According to Al-Kibbi, RAS has been a unique Analytic and Advisory Activity (AAA) tool undertaken by the Bank but requested and paid for by a client country. The Bank has had long years of experience in using RAS as an aid instrument to address the knowledge needs of client countries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), including in Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and UAE, which are oil producing countries with high per capita income, thus ineligible for Bank financial aid. But these countries, although developing, have weak institutional and human capacity; unsatisfactory education and human development capabilities; labor market inefficiencies and infrastructure bottlenecks; etc. In a similar vein, RAS has been recently used to respond to requests for knowledge aid in two African countries – Gabon and Equatorial Guinea – both small oil rich countries with high income, low capacity, ambitious development agendas and limited previous Bank engagement. Costing and Billing The second day of the Seminar was devoted to drawing lessons from RAS experience in ECA and LAC. A Sector Manager and a RAS TTL shared their perspective on how RAS was developed in several countries were lending was decreasing virtually to zero. In the presentations it was made clear that RAS, despite being a different instrument, has very similar processes to the preparation of other lending instruments and AAA. Staff was able to get a more detailed view of how to go about this new line of business. The final session was developed to provide staff hands-on experience on how to do costing and billing, how to prepare legal agreements, and enter data in the portal for RAS operations. As the topic has a growing demand in the Africa region, it was agreed that there will be other hands-on clinics on billing and costing and other procedural topics in the coming months.

Выбор редакции
16 января 2014, 22:00

Reimbursable Advisory Services (RAS); Lessons from MENA, LAC and ECA

  • 0

.links li { display:block } WASHINGTON, January 16, 2014—The AFR Development Effectiveness Seminar Series resumed this week with two half-day, cross regional staff knowledge sharing workshops that drew on Bank experiences in the use of Reimbursable Advisory Services (RAS) to address development challenges, especially in situations where the demand for financial aid is diminishing and the need for knowledge services is increasing. It was highlighted that despite being a late starter, there is growing demand for RAS in the Africa Region. For instance, in FY10 RAS revenue barely surpassed $100K In FY13 it surged to $3.3m with a potential growth of between $8m and $10m in FY14 and FY15 respectively. “There is no doubt that there is growing demand for knowledge products and services that contribute to Sub Saharan Africa’s potential for growth and poverty reduction,” said Bruce Courtney, AFR Development Effectiveness Sector Manager and organizer of the seminar series. “In the past few years, the World Bank Group has gained the trust of its clients in the ECA, LAC and MENA regions as a knowledge provider through RAS’s.  So this week’s workshop where staff from several regions in the Bank share their experiences with RAS’s to address development challenges is very relevant.” Client Interaction with the Bank In day one’s opening presentation, WBCKO Senior Operations Officer Nicolaus Von Der Goltz, the point person for RAS, noted that evidence from the field indicates that clients value the Bank’s ability to address relevant development issues based on its long experience and technical expertise. He said clients also trust the Bank as an able institution in conveying international best practice and customizing knowledge to the local context. The Bank, he said, acts as an independent and trusted knowledge broker offering multi-sector development solutions. “The RAS allows the Bank to do more, stay engaged in countries even when their demand for financial services declines, meet the needs of a more diverse client, gain additional knowledge and transfer this knowledge to our lower-income clients, raise additional revenues in a resource constraint environment and achieve bigger impact,” Von Der Goltz said. Erik von Uexkull, Country Economist for Gabon and Equatorial Guinea, shared a case in the Africa Region where RAS provided a flexible tool to engage with Gabon and Equatorial Guinea based on their specific needs and characteristics. He said the Bank delivered several important pieces of technical assistance (TAs) and Economic Sector Work (ESW) that responded directly to client needs, and that the clients were in the end satisfied with the Bank’s work, which led to an expansion in their engagement with the Bank, in some cases despite the availability of ‘pro bono’ alternatives. von Uexkull noted, however, that RAS was not rolled out in these countries without internal and external challenges that included uncertainties in costing and pricing, the ongoing overhaul of RAS procedures, the lack of business development funds and coordination. He also emphasized the need to understand and work with client processes, respond to urgencies and changing demands and managing requests that the Bank may not be able to do. Lessons from MENA Sharing the MENA experience, Jamal Al-Kibbi cited three instances during which the need for RAS can be identified: (i) Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) discussions, (ii) regular operational dialogue between government officials and Bank staff, workshops, conferences, visits by the World Bank management and staff to the country, etc. and (iii) programmatic RAS discussions with countries not eligible for financial lending. “Once the client identifies a program or an individual activity to be implemented through RAS, the client sends an official request to the Bank and the request triggers the following actions on the Bank’s part: (i) identifying a TTL and key team members, (ii) determining whether a scoping mission is needed, preparing a Proposal, (iii) determining the structure of engagement or if possible number of tasks, sectors involved, etc., and (iv) identifying funding for preparation activities,” said Al-Kibbi. According to Al-Kibbi, RAS has been a unique Analytic and Advisory Activity (AAA) tool undertaken by the Bank but requested and paid for by a client country. The Bank has had long years of experience in using RAS as an aid instrument to address the knowledge needs of client countries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), including in Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and UAE, which are oil producing countries with high per capita income, thus ineligible for Bank financial aid. But these countries, although developing, have weak institutional and human capacity; unsatisfactory education and human development capabilities; labor market inefficiencies and infrastructure bottlenecks; etc. In a similar vein, RAS has been recently used to respond to requests for knowledge aid in two African countries – Gabon and Equatorial Guinea – both small oil rich countries with high income, low capacity, ambitious development agendas and limited previous Bank engagement. Costing and Billing The second day of the Seminar was devoted to drawing lessons from RAS experience in ECA and LAC. A Sector Manager and a RAS TTL shared their perspective on how RAS was developed in several countries were lending was decreasing virtually to zero. In the presentations it was made clear that RAS, despite being a different instrument, has very similar processes to the preparation of other lending instruments and AAA. Staff was able to get a more detailed view of how to go about this new line of business. The final session was developed to provide staff hands-on experience on how to do costing and billing, how to prepare legal agreements, and enter data in the portal for RAS operations. As the topic has a growing demand in the Africa region, it was agreed that there will be other hands-on clinics on billing and costing and other procedural topics in the coming months.