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31 января 2014, 09:00

Procurement plan for Mahmoudia

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30 января 2014, 09:00

The project Djibouti: Governance for Private Sector Development Project is now in the pipeline.

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The project Djibouti: Governance for Private Sector Development Project is now in the pipeline. To see more information, see the project information in the World Bank project database

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30 января 2014, 09:00

Jordan - Integrated Ecosystem Management in the Jordan Rift Valley Global Environment Facility (GEF) Project

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The Integrated Ecosystem Management in the Jordan Rift Valley Global Environment Facility (GEF) Project for Jordan had an overall moderately satisfactory outcome, with the performances of the Bank and the borrower being deemed moderately satisfactory as well. The global environment objectives indicator was partially achieved, while the project development objectives indicator was fully achieved and exceeded the target. Of the fourteen intermediate outcome indicators, three were partially achieved, while the remaining indicators were fully achieved. The following significant lessons were learned during the implementation of the project: 1) readiness for implementation is key to effective start up and participatory planning needs to be started at the preparatory stage; 2) a non-governmental organization with strong technical capacity, a clear mandate, and proven experience in nature conservation makes it a feasible implementing agency for this project; 3) the development of sustainable socio-economic and conservation projects as an entry point to strengthening relationships with local communities prior to protected area designation; 4) identifying priority needs in the targeted areas as parallel activities to finance in order to gain community support for the designation of the sites; 5) the need to address land tenure complexities at the time of project design; 6) setting up a results-oriented monitoring and evaluation system that serves as a dynamic management tool, with precise objective and indicators that adequately reflect results achieved on the ground; 7) the qualifications of the project teams and their adequate staffing and presence on the ground, as well as their close and regular contact with beneficiaries promote confidence and credibility of the project and its institutions; and 8) a conjunction of mechanisms and initiatives tailored to the local conditions and context specific demands is needed to engage communities in conservation management.

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30 января 2014, 09:00

Improving accessibility to transport for People with Limited Mobility (PLM) : a practical guidance note

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This document aims to provide practical guidance on how best to include consideration of accessibility for People with Limited Mobility (PLM). While disabled people are a primary focus, the definition of PLM considered within this guidance note therefore also encompasses this broader range of users with mobility constraints and needs. Barriers to addressing the needs of PLM are often a product of a lack of information for transport professionals and facility designers, combined with limited resources. To assist client countries with implementing the principles and binding obligations of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD), it is clear that World Bank Task Team Leaders (TTLs) need to understand how to build in accessibility for disabled people in the design and implementation of transport projects. This guidance note therefore aims to aid World Bank TTLs when specifying and managing Bank funded transport projects in order to improve the accessibility of transport systems for PLM. It is intended to serve primarily as a point of reference for TTLs on how to include, and improve; the accessibility of PLM in Bank supported transport operations, as well as being useful for other organizations and government agencies. Following this introductory chapter, chapter two provides concise technical descriptions of different transport accessibility measures, of their costs, benefits and implementation issues, and of relevant standards and sources of further detailed design guidance. In chapter three these accessibility features are gathered into ranked lists to which TTLs may refer in order to see which measures represent low cost options, and those which are likely to have the best benefit/cost relationships. Chapter four sets out information on relevant regulatory and institutional framework issues. Chapter five summarizes potential funding sources and mechanisms for providing accessibility improvements for people with limited mobility. Finally, chapter six (operational road map) provides guidance on the process for designing accessibility into World Bank transport projects.

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30 января 2014, 09:00

Jordan - Integrated Ecosystem Management in the Jordan Rift Valley Global Environment Facility (GEF) Project

  • 0

The Integrated Ecosystem Management in the Jordan Rift Valley Global Environment Facility (GEF) Project for Jordan had an overall moderately satisfactory outcome, with the performances of the Bank and the borrower being deemed moderately satisfactory as well. The global environment objectives indicator was partially achieved, while the project development objectives indicator was fully achieved and exceeded the target. Of the fourteen intermediate outcome indicators, three were partially achieved, while the remaining indicators were fully achieved. The following significant lessons were learned during the implementation of the project: 1) readiness for implementation is key to effective start up and participatory planning needs to be started at the preparatory stage; 2) a non-governmental organization with strong technical capacity, a clear mandate, and proven experience in nature conservation makes it a feasible implementing agency for this project; 3) the development of sustainable socio-economic and conservation projects as an entry point to strengthening relationships with local communities prior to protected area designation; 4) identifying priority needs in the targeted areas as parallel activities to finance in order to gain community support for the designation of the sites; 5) the need to address land tenure complexities at the time of project design; 6) setting up a results-oriented monitoring and evaluation system that serves as a dynamic management tool, with precise objective and indicators that adequately reflect results achieved on the ground; 7) the qualifications of the project teams and their adequate staffing and presence on the ground, as well as their close and regular contact with beneficiaries promote confidence and credibility of the project and its institutions; and 8) a conjunction of mechanisms and initiatives tailored to the local conditions and context specific demands is needed to engage communities in conservation management.