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20 июня, 16:51

United Technologies' Wing F119 Engine Crosses Key Milestone

United Technologies Corporation's (UTX) business arm, Pratt & Whitney, recently declared that its F119 engine has exceeded 500,000 engine flight hours.

17 июня, 00:29

В особой экономической зоне «Липецк» открылось производство лакокрасочных материалов

Американская компания PPG Industries открыла в особой экономической зоне (ОЭЗ) «Липецк» свой первый в России завод по производству лакокрасочных материалов. Бюджет проекта составил 45 млн. евро. На производстве планируется создать около 200 новых рабочих мест. Завод будет выпускать 25 млн. литров лакокрасочных материалов в год. В состав нового промышленного комплекса входят производство автомобильных, промышленных, упаковочных, защитных и морских покрытий, а также технические лаборатории, административные и логистические распределительные зоны. Особая экономическая зона промышленно-производственного типа «Липецк» создана в 2005 году.  Инвестиционные проекты на территории ОЭЗ реализуют 50 компаний. В их числе швейцарская ABB, немецкие Viessmann и Otto Bettermann, китайская Lifan и другие. Уровень заявленных в ОЭЗ инвестиций составляет 146 млрд. рублей.

08 июня, 00:49

Pointing Out: How Walmart Unlawfully Punishes Workers For Medical Absences

By Dina Bakst, Co-Founder & Co-Director of A Better Balance, and Andrea Dehlendorf, Co-Director of Organization United for Respect Ashana* got disciplinary points for taking her son, who had pneumonia, to the hospital. His condition was so severe that he even stopped breathing at one point. Kevin* got disciplinary points for missing work to go to the emergency room for severe asthma. Katie had a miscarriage with serious complications. Walmart gave her points each day she was out and threatened to fire her. Unfortunately, for workers at Walmart, these are not isolated incidents. A new report by A Better Balance, “Pointing Out: How Walmart Unlawfully Punishes Workers for Medical Absences,” explains how Walmart’s absence control program is not only unfair but may also be illegal. The new report is based on conversations with Walmart employees, including a survey conducted by A Better Balance and the OUR Walmart project of the Organization United for Respect of more than 1,000 workers in April and May of this year, and it includes many heartbreaking stories like those above. Walmart operates on a point system, where workers are given a disciplinary “point” for every absence. They also get points for being tardy and for leaving a shift early. Workers are fired once they receive a certain number of points—no questions asked. So what’s the problem? Walmart routinely gives points to workers who are out for medical reasons, including those with disabilities who are medically advised to stay home from work. Workers who call out from work to care for their family members—even seriously ill children—also receive points. Once fired, workers call it “pointing out.” Giving workers points and disciplining them for medical absences is not only unjust, it is often a violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act and, in many circumstances, the Family and Medical Leave Act. These two federal laws, and many other similar state and local laws, protect precisely these types of workers—some of our most vulnerable workers who are simply trying to earn a living and support their families. The report comes on the heels of a charge of discrimination that A Better Balance (ABB) filed with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission alleging that Walmart has a nationwide pattern and practice of punishing employees with medical needs and disabilities, through enforcement of its point system. According to the ABB charge, Walmart has a consistent and widespread practice of refusing to consider doctor’s notes to excuse absences. Workers who attempt to bring in a statement from a doctor verifying that they were out because they were in the hospital or under similar circumstances are routinely told that Walmart does not accept notes or that it does not matter if they turn in the notes or not—they will still receive a point. The report calls this the “Ostrich Approach,” where Walmart tries to bury its head in the sand and close its eyes to the conditions of workers, likely in order to sidestep their legal obligations. These practices and policies can have a devastating effect on workers who rely on their Walmart paychecks to support their families. Even workers who are not fired can still suffer consequences from having points on their records—not only do they suffer from the anxiety that they are just one sick child or illness away from losing their jobs, they can also be denied promotions, raises, and transfer requests. Far too many Walmart workers are living in poverty and simply cannot afford to point out. Walmart’s point system should also be of public health concern to policymakers and advocates. Those who are too scared of receiving points may feel they have no choice but to go to work even when it is not medically advisable. They may risk spreading infectious diseases to coworkers and customers, or not fully recovering or healing from illness or injury. As America’s largest corporate employer—with 1.5 million employees—Walmart often sets the standard for the entire retail industry. With these tremendous resources, Walmart should change these discriminatory practices and ensure that no worker is given a point for a lawful medical absence. Walmart can, and must, do better. *Names were changed to protect privacy and confidentiality. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

02 июня, 20:54

Toxic Algal Blooms Are A Growing Threat. Trump’s Budget Cuts Won't Help.

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); It’s been a disturbing scene on a number of southern California beaches of late. In recent weeks, hundreds of dead and sick seabirds, sea lions and other marine mammals have been washing up on the beaches in Ventura and Santa Barbara counties. The cause of the die-off is believed to be domoic acid, a neurotoxin produced by a massive algal bloom that has formed in waters just off the coast. While algal blooms themselves aren’t unusual for the region, the current situation is so extreme it was described by one expert as the “worst year” for domoic poisonings he’d ever seen. The broader problem isn’t limited to the California coastline. Last summer, toxic algal blooms sprang up in more than 20 U.S. states, including South Florida, where the situation became so serious that authorities declared a state of emergency.  The main contributing factor to these blooms’ growth is nutrient runoff from both agricultural and residential lands. Though blooms across the country are made up of different types of cyanobacteria — also known as blue-green algae — the nutrients that feed them — namely phosphorous and nitrates — are the same. And experts believe blooms are becoming both more frequent and more intense due to climate change.  The blooms impact both local economies and public health to the tune of a conservatively-estimated $84 million annual price tag. In humans, algal blooms are known to cause rashes, stomach or liver issues and respiratory problems if ingested, swam in or even breathed in through mist.  The conditions are ripe for 2017 to see a similar number of the toxic blooms as last year. Pat Glibert, an environmental science professor at the University of Maryland, said the challenges contributing to the growing spread of the blooms are “only increasing.” The conditions are ripe for 2017 to see a similar number of the toxic blooms as last year. “I expect that we will have quite a number of blooms across the country, both in fresh waters and marine systems,” Glibert told HuffPost. “They will impact fisheries and they will impact jobs, so we need to be continuing to respond to these events.” And the blooms appear to be showing up earlier in the year, too. Back in California, Beverly Anderson-Abbs, a senior environmental scientist at the State Water Resources Control Board, said the agency has already seen 24 bloom events in freshwater bodies reported across the state so far this year. Because their portal that tracks the blooms was not up and running at this time last year, Anderson-Abbs said she couldn’t say for sure whether that marks a definite increase over the previous year, but that number is not typical.  “We certainly weren’t getting contacts from the various regions having problems that early in the year [last year],” Anderson-Abbs said. “Some lakes tend to bloom early, but we’re hearing about lakes that we hadn’t heard of previously that were in full bloom.” Close monitoring and more research can help determine which approaches to controlling the notoriously unpredictable blooms, or potentially preventing them altogether, are needed. Of course, that work doesn’t happen for free and a number of federal programs have supported both the monitoring of blooms and efforts to reduce bloom-feeding nutrient runoff have been slated for funding cuts under President Donald Trump’s spending plans. According to analyses of the president’s so-called skinny budget proposal, released earlier this year, the Environmental Protection Agency’s Great Lakes Restoration Initiative would face a 97-percent, $290-million funding cut. The Great Lakes program helps fund projects like one that is aiming to reduce phosphorous levels in Lake Erie, where blooms became so massive and so toxic in 2014 that they impacted the water supply of more than 400,000 people in Toledo, Ohio, leaving them without drinking water for several days. Other geographically-specific EPA initiatives that earmark funding for bodies of water that have struggled with toxic algal blooms in recent years, like the Gulf of Mexico and Chesapeake Bay programs, are slated to be essentially eliminated under the president’s skinny budget.  Similarly, as Mother Jones previously reported, programs at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) that similarly address algal blooms, like the NOAA’s Sea Grant College Program and satellite work, are also facing the prospect of funding reductions or outright elimination — cuts that were maintained in the administration’s latest budget document released last month.  Mae Wu, senior attorney of the Natural Resources Defense Council’s health program, said it is hard to see a scenario where the funding gap left behind by these cuts is filled by the states. “Rolling back the funding on this is not going to improve our algal bloom situation,” Wu said. “States need more assistance to do this work, not less.” Of course, the president’s budget is only a proposal and it is up to Congress to ultimately set the nation’s spending priorities. There appears to be some bipartisan sentiment for increased federal funding for algal bloom programs, too, particularly for lawmakers representing districts who have been most severely impacted by toxic blooms. In Florida, both Sen. Bill Nelson, a Democrat, and U.S. Rep. Brian Mast, a Republican, have proposed legislation aimed at addressing algal blooms. Nelson’s bill proposes additional funding for research into bloom control, while Mast’s bill calls for blooms to be added to the list of disasters that the Federal Emergency Management Agency can respond to. Glibert is hopeful for similarly bipartisan support for broader algal bloom efforts currently waiting to be appropriated for funding, such as the efforts laid out in the federal Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Research and Control Act, which was reauthorized in 2014. The alternative scenario is not pretty.  “We know there are more blooms occurring, so these budget cuts are devastating on multiple levels,” Glibert told HuffPost. “The economic effects of these blooms are enormous.” type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related... + articlesList=577d70cee4b0c590f7e7e3d2,58f9688be4b018a9ce59d965,58bdbc03e4b0d8c45f457055,59012b4ee4b0af6d718b4e75 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

02 июня, 20:54

Toxic Algal Blooms Are A Growing Threat. Trump’s Budget Cuts Won't Help.

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); It’s been a disturbing scene on a number of southern California beaches of late. In recent weeks, hundreds of dead and sick seabirds, sea lions and other marine mammals have been washing up on the beaches in Ventura and Santa Barbara counties. The cause of the die-off is believed to be domoic acid, a neurotoxin produced by a massive algal bloom that has formed in waters just off the coast. While algal blooms themselves aren’t unusual for the region, the current situation is so extreme it was described by one expert as the “worst year” for domoic poisonings he’d ever seen. The broader problem isn’t limited to the California coastline. Last summer, toxic algal blooms sprang up in more than 20 U.S. states, including South Florida, where the situation became so serious that authorities declared a state of emergency.  The main contributing factor to these blooms’ growth is nutrient runoff from both agricultural and residential lands. Though blooms across the country are made up of different types of cyanobacteria — also known as blue-green algae — the nutrients that feed them — namely phosphorous and nitrates — are the same. And experts believe blooms are becoming both more frequent and more intense due to climate change.  The blooms impact both local economies and public health to the tune of a conservatively-estimated $84 million annual price tag. In humans, algal blooms are known to cause rashes, stomach or liver issues and respiratory problems if ingested, swam in or even breathed in through mist.  The conditions are ripe for 2017 to see a similar number of the toxic blooms as last year. Pat Glibert, an environmental science professor at the University of Maryland, said the challenges contributing to the growing spread of the blooms are “only increasing.” The conditions are ripe for 2017 to see a similar number of the toxic blooms as last year. “I expect that we will have quite a number of blooms across the country, both in fresh waters and marine systems,” Glibert told HuffPost. “They will impact fisheries and they will impact jobs, so we need to be continuing to respond to these events.” And the blooms appear to be showing up earlier in the year, too. Back in California, Beverly Anderson-Abbs, a senior environmental scientist at the State Water Resources Control Board, said the agency has already seen 24 bloom events in freshwater bodies reported across the state so far this year. Because their portal that tracks the blooms was not up and running at this time last year, Anderson-Abbs said she couldn’t say for sure whether that marks a definite increase over the previous year, but that number is not typical.  “We certainly weren’t getting contacts from the various regions having problems that early in the year [last year],” Anderson-Abbs said. “Some lakes tend to bloom early, but we’re hearing about lakes that we hadn’t heard of previously that were in full bloom.” Close monitoring and more research can help determine which approaches to controlling the notoriously unpredictable blooms, or potentially preventing them altogether, are needed. Of course, that work doesn’t happen for free and a number of federal programs have supported both the monitoring of blooms and efforts to reduce bloom-feeding nutrient runoff have been slated for funding cuts under President Donald Trump’s spending plans. According to analyses of the president’s so-called skinny budget proposal, released earlier this year, the Environmental Protection Agency’s Great Lakes Restoration Initiative would face a 97-percent, $290-million funding cut. The Great Lakes program helps fund projects like one that is aiming to reduce phosphorous levels in Lake Erie, where blooms became so massive and so toxic in 2014 that they impacted the water supply of more than 400,000 people in Toledo, Ohio, leaving them without drinking water for several days. Other geographically-specific EPA initiatives that earmark funding for bodies of water that have struggled with toxic algal blooms in recent years, like the Gulf of Mexico and Chesapeake Bay programs, are slated to be essentially eliminated under the president’s skinny budget.  Similarly, as Mother Jones previously reported, programs at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) that similarly address algal blooms, like the NOAA’s Sea Grant College Program and satellite work, are also facing the prospect of funding reductions or outright elimination — cuts that were maintained in the administration’s latest budget document released last month.  Mae Wu, senior attorney of the Natural Resources Defense Council’s health program, said it is hard to see a scenario where the funding gap left behind by these cuts is filled by the states. “Rolling back the funding on this is not going to improve our algal bloom situation,” Wu said. “States need more assistance to do this work, not less.” Of course, the president’s budget is only a proposal and it is up to Congress to ultimately set the nation’s spending priorities. There appears to be some bipartisan sentiment for increased federal funding for algal bloom programs, too, particularly for lawmakers representing districts who have been most severely impacted by toxic blooms. In Florida, both Sen. Bill Nelson, a Democrat, and U.S. Rep. Brian Mast, a Republican, have proposed legislation aimed at addressing algal blooms. Nelson’s bill proposes additional funding for research into bloom control, while Mast’s bill calls for blooms to be added to the list of disasters that the Federal Emergency Management Agency can respond to. Glibert is hopeful for similarly bipartisan support for broader algal bloom efforts currently waiting to be appropriated for funding, such as the efforts laid out in the federal Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Research and Control Act, which was reauthorized in 2014. The alternative scenario is not pretty.  “We know there are more blooms occurring, so these budget cuts are devastating on multiple levels,” Glibert told HuffPost. “The economic effects of these blooms are enormous.” type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related... + articlesList=577d70cee4b0c590f7e7e3d2,58f9688be4b018a9ce59d965,58bdbc03e4b0d8c45f457055,59012b4ee4b0af6d718b4e75 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

23 мая, 18:04

«КУБОК ЭНЕРГЕТИКИ» ПО МИНИ-ФУТБОЛУ

3 июня 2017 года на поле «Академии «Спартак» им.Ф.Ф.Черенкова» в Москве, незадолго до Дня независимости страны, состоится ежегодный отраслевой турнир по мини-футболу «Кубок Энергетики 2017», при содействии «Союза Энергетиков» и «Российского Газового Общества». Представительное мероприятие среди энергетических, газовых, нефтяных и смежных предприятий Российской Федерации, а также их партнёров из стран СНГ. Постоянными участниками турнира являются компании […]

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16 мая, 19:11

IBM Watson оптимизирует процессы производства и логистики в режиме реального времени на предприятиях ABB

IBM Watson поможет избежать появления неожиданных проблем и авралов на производстве ABB — одна из крупнейших компаний, которая специализируется в области электротехники, энергетического машиностроения и информационных технологий. Ее офисы представлены в более, чем 100 странах мира, а производственные мощности располагаются в таких странах, как Германия, Швейцария, Швеция, Италия, Франция, Россия, Чехия, Индия, Китай, США, Португалия, Бразилия, Финляндия, Эстония и другие. Сейчас эта компания планирует использовать технологии IBM для того, чтобы работать еще более эффективно. В частности, на производстве планируется внедрить IBM Watson Internet of Things. Это поможет оптимизировать и сделать эффективной работу многих процессов производства, от изготовления товаров до логистики и продаж. Так, планируется улучшить контроль качества, снизить количество и время простоев, повысить производительность. В общем, все, что важно для бизнеса. Обычные средства оптимизации уже использованы на максимум, теперь предстоит поработать с новыми инструментами — когнитивными технологиями и «Интернетом вещей» от IBM. Читать дальше →

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15 мая, 10:35

"ВНИИР Гидроэлектроавтоматика" завершает строительство КРУЭ-220 кВ "под ключ" на Нижне-Бурейской ГЭС

Предприятие группы компаний «АБС Электро» — АО «ВНИИР Гидроэлектроавтоматика» завершает работы по сооружению КРУЭ — 220 кВ «под ключ» для нужд АО «Нижне-Бурейская ГЭС» (входит в ПАО «РусГидро»). На объекте стартовал завершающий этап комплексных испытаний — постановка под нагрузку. Станция в тестовом режиме выдает свои первые киловатты в Объединенную энергосистему (ОЭС) Дальнего Востока. Компания АО «ВНИИР Гидроэлектроавтоматика» в максимально сжатые сроки построила здание КРУЭ, обеспечила своевременную поставку основного электротехнического оборудования: КРУЭ-220 кВ и генераторных выключателей производства ABB, кабеля 220 кВ, а также оборудования релейной защиты и низковольтных комплектных устройств производства ОАО «ВНИИР» (входит в «АБС Электро»), ячейки КРУ-6 кВ производства ОАО &la...

05 мая, 17:17

South Africa 2017 - Achieving Inclusive Growth

http://www.weforum.org/ The Co-Chairs of the World Economic Forum on Africa highlight the imperatives for the year ahead and the implications for government, industry and society. This session was developed in partnership with CNBC Africa. - Winnie Byanyima, Executive Director, Oxfam International, United Kingdom; Co-Chair of the World Economic Forum on Africa - Siyabonga Gama, Group Chief Executive Officer, Transnet, South Africa; Co-Chair of the World Economic Forum on Africa - Frédéric Lemoine, Chairman of the Executive Board, Wendel, France; Co-Chair of the World Economic Forum on Africa - Rich Lesser, Global Chief Executive Officer and President, Boston Consulting Group, USA; Co-Chair of the World Economic Forum on Africa - Ulrich Spiesshofer, President and Chief Executive Officer, ABB, Switzerland; Co-Chair of the World Economic Forum on Africa Chaired by - Bronwyn Nielsen, Editor-in-Chief and Executive Director, CNBC Africa, South Africa

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04 мая, 20:15

South Africa 2017 - Press Conference: Meet the Co-Chairs of the World Economic Forum on Africa 2017

http://www.weforum.org/ The Co-Chairs Press Conference offers accredited media an opportunity to hear directly from the co-chairs about their expectations for meeting and their outlook for Africa. Speaker - Winnie Byanyima, Executive Director, Oxfam International, United Kingdom - Siyabonga Gama, Group Chief Executive Officer, Transnet, South Africa - Frédéric Lemoine, Chairman of the Executive Board, Wendel, France - Rich Lesser, Global Chief Executive Officer and President, Boston Consulting Group, USA - Adrian Monck, Head of Public and Social Engagement, Member of the Managing Board, World Economic Forum - Ulrich Spiesshofer, President and Chief Executive Officer, ABB, Switzerland

04 мая, 19:37

South Africa 2017 - Africa Economic Outlook

http://www.weforum.org/ What is the regional economic outlook in 2017? Dimensions to be addressed: - Bouncing back from a weak economic performance in 2016 - Responding to policy uncertainty in the US, Europe and China - Preparing for threat of reversal of capital flows to emerging markets This session was developed in partnership with CNBC Africa. - Abdourahmane Cisse, Minister in Charge of the Budget and State-Owned Entities of Côte d'Ivoire; Young Global Leader - Malusi Gigaba, Minister of Finance of South Africa - Frédéric Lemoine, Chairman of the Executive Board, Wendel, France; Co-Chair of the World Economic Forum on Africa - Wolfgang Schäuble, Federal Minister of Finance of Germany - Ulrich Spiesshofer, President and Chief Executive Officer, ABB, Switzerland; Co-Chair of the World Economic Forum on Africa Moderated by - Bronwyn Nielsen, Editor-in-Chief and Executive Director, CNBC Africa, South Africa

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02 мая, 22:19

Eaton Corp. (ETN) Beats Q1 Earnings, Revenue Estimates

Eaton Corporation's (ETN) first-quarter 2017 operating earnings per share of 96 cents beat the Zacks Consensus Estimate of 87 cents by 10.3%.

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28 апреля, 23:02

Key figure in Menendez corruption case convicted of fraud

Dr. Salomon Melgen, a key figure in the bribery and corruption case against Democratic Sen. Bob Menendez, was convicted on Friday of improperly billing the federal government for more than $100 million in medical insurance payments.After three days of deliberations, a jury in West Palm Beach, Fla. delivered 67 guilty verdicts against Melgen on charges that he submitted claims to Medicare for eye procedures and tests that were either unnecessary or never performed.During a seven-week trial, physicians serving as expert witnesses for the prosecution provided gruesome testimony that Melgen had performed lucrative eye injections on numerous patients whose eye conditions did not merit such treatment. Defense witnesses said the wealthy ophthalmologist provided care to patients whose cases were particularly difficult and did so without regard to their ability to pay.Menendez and Melgen were indicted in a separate case in federal court in Newarkin April 2015 over allegations that the New Jersey Democrat used his office to help Melgen in exchange for hundreds of thousands of dollars in gifts from the Florida doctor, a longtime friend and campaign donor. A joint trial for Menendez and Melgen on the corruption charges is set to open in New Jersey in August. The New Jersey Democrat has denied any wrongdoing.The slew of convictions means the 62-year-old Melgen now faces the possibility of what could effectively be a life sentence in the Florida case. A federal prosecutor said Friday that sentencing guidelines call for the doctor to receive 15 to 20 years behind bars. That prospect that seems certain to intensify pressure on him to offer testimony against Menendez in the New Jersey case.U.S. District Court Judge Kenneth Marra set sentencing for Melgen for July 14. He remains free on an $18 million bond.Menendez attorney Abbe Lowell insisted Friday that the guilty verdicts against Melgen would have no effect on the corruption case."The issues involved in Dr. Melgen's case in South Florida had no bearing on the allegations made against the senator, and this verdict will have no impact on him," Lowell said. "Dr. Melgen's case focused solely on the day-to-day operations of his medical practice and the private care of his patients — specifics of which the senator could not be aware, nor has it ever been suggested otherwise."Lowell's statement opened by indicating Menendez's concern for Melgen in the wake of Friday's verdicts."I have spoken to Senator Menendez and he is saddened for his long-time friend and is thinking of his family on this difficult day," the defense attorney said.While Menendez's defense maintains there is no connection between the cases, one of the favors the senator is accused of doing for Melgen as a result of his largess is intervening with federal officials — including those as senior as former Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius—in order to resolve Melgen's billing disputes with Medicare. Those interventions proved unsuccessful, as Melgen was forced to repay millions to the federal government and eventually was indicted for submitting dozens of false claims to the insurance program for the elderly.

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