• Теги
    • избранные теги
    • Компании2093
      • Показать ещё
      Разное1099
      • Показать ещё
      Международные организации65
      • Показать ещё
      Страны / Регионы427
      • Показать ещё
      Формат57
      Издания58
      • Показать ещё
      Показатели65
      • Показать ещё
      Люди101
      • Показать ещё
27 марта, 08:35

Ольга Скоробогатова вошла в экспертный совет акселератора «Финтех Лаб»

Ольга Скоробогатова, заместитель председателя Банка России, возглавила экспертный совет первого отраслевого финтех-акселератора Финтех Лаб . В экспертный совет также вошли заместитель министра связи А. Козырев, проректор РАНХиГС С. Мясоедов, директор Банковского института ГИУ ВШЭ В. Солодков, представители финансовых институтов-участников программы. Прием заявок в акселератор продолжается до начала апреля. Десять команд, отобранных финансовых интститутов-участниками, пройдут трехмесячную программу очной акселерации в Москве. Акселератор проводится совместно банками ВТБ24, АК Барс , банком Санкт-Петербург , банком Хоум Кредит и платежной системой MasterCard. Стратегическим консультантом программы выступает компания Accenture.

24 марта, 17:10

Company News for March 24, 2017

Companies in the News are: CTAS,ACN,CAG,FIVE

24 марта, 15:00

What Initial Coin Offerings Are, and Why VC Firms Care

The venture capital industry is beginning to take a good, hard look at a new financial instrument coming out of the bitcoin community — Initial Coin Offerings, or ICOs. Also known as “token sales,” this new fundraising phenomenon is being fueled by a convergence of blockchain technology, new wealth, clever entrepreneurs, and crypto-investors who are backing blockchain-fueled ideas. ICOs present both benefits and disadvantages, as well as threats and opportunities, to the traditional venture capital business model. Here’s how an ICO typically works: A new cryptocurrency is created on a protocol such as Counterparty, Ethereum, or Openledger, and a value is arbitrarily determined by the startup team behind the ICO based on what they think the network is worth at its current stage. Then, via price dynamics determined by market supply and demand, the value is settled on by the network of participants, rather than by a central authority or government. Insight Center Business in the Era of Blockchain Sponsored by Accenture How technology is transforming transactions. Venture capitalists, who generally have been standoffish to the ICO phenomenon, are now becoming more interested in it for a number of reasons. One is profits — cryptocurrency investors made some massive returns in 2016, with cryptocurrencies from Blockchain startups Monero and NEM both seeing 2,000% increases in value. For example, the cryptocurrency used for the Ethereum network, called Ether, saw its value double in just a few days in March 2017. Yes, in three days, people who invested in Ether doubled their investment. Those investors can opt to cash out to a fiat-backed currency, or wait for the cryptocurrency to continue to rise (or fall). Volatility is a two-way street. While the price of Ether has been rising, Bitcoin has dropped 20% to $1,000 dollars from a record $1,290 on March 3, 2017. The second reason VCs are becoming more interested in ICOs is because of the liquidity of cryptocurrencies. Rather than tying up vast amounts of funds in a unicorn startup and waiting for the long play — an IPO or an acquisition — investors can see gains more quickly, and can pull profits out more easily, via ICOs. They simply need to convert their cryptocurrency profits into Bitcoin or Ether on any of the cryptocurrency exchanges that carry it, and then it’s easily converted to fiat currency via online services such as Coinsbank or Coinbase. What traditional investors don’t like about any of this is the regulatory uncertainty; the high valuations and over-capitalization; the lack of control over financials, strategy, and operations; and the lack of business use-cases. And like any industry, the ICO arena has had its fair share of outright scams, pump and dumps, and blatant Ponzi schemes. However, much of the criminal activity is now being mitigated by self-organized, crowdsourced due diligence in the community, as well as by external parties such as Smith and Crown, a research group focused on cryptofinance, and ICO Rating, a ratings agency that issues independent analytical research on blockchain-based companies. At least one VC firm is moving into cryptocurrencies. Blockchain Capital is set to raise its third fund via a digital token offering in the first-ever liquidity-enhanced venture capital fund (where people can invest without locking their money up for years on end) via a digital token called BCAP. ICOs are the Wild West of financing — they sit in a grey zone where the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and many other regulatory bodies are still investigating them. The main problem is, though, that most ICO’s don’t actually offer equity in start-up ventures; instead, they only offer discounts on cryptocurrencies before they hit the exchanges. Therefore, they don’t fit into the current definition of a security, and are technically outside of traditional legal frameworks. Secondly, they are global instruments — not national ones — and they are funded using bitcoin, ether and other cryptocurrencies that are not controlled by any central authority or bank. Anyone can invest, and they can even do so pseudo-anonymously (it’s not impossible to find out who people are, but it’s not easy, either). Currently, there’s no Anti-Money Laundering (AML) law or Know Your Customer (KYC) framework, though some companies are working on that. One example is Tokenmarket, a marketplace for tokens, digital assets and blockchain-based investing, that has teamed up with the Stock Market of Gibraltar to offer KYC- and AML-compliant ICOs. Detractors of these new funding schemes scream for structure and protection, point out the scams, demand more control, and say that without equity, investors don’t have enough skin in the game. Meanwhile, proponents retort that there’s a real need for freedom to invest outside the accredited system, which sees the wealthy getting wealthier. They argue that the door needs to close on the domination of Sand Hill Road in Silicon Valley and other VCs and investors in the tech industry who have been making massive returns on the backs of entrepreneurs for far too long. How Blockchain WorksHere are five basic principles underlying the technology. 1. Distributed Database Each party on a blockchain has access to the entire database and its complete history. No single party controls the data or the information. Every party can verify the records of its transaction partners directly, without an intermediary. 2. Peer-to-Peer Transmission Communication occurs directly between peers instead of through a central node. Each node stores and forwards information to all other nodes. 3. Transparency with Pseudonymity Every transaction and its associated value are visible to anyone with access to the system. Each node, or user, on a blockchain has a unique 30-plus-character alphanumeric address that identifies it. Users can choose to remain anonymous or provide proof of their identity to others. Transactions occur between blockchain addresses. 4. Irreversibility of Records Once a transaction is entered in the database and the accounts are updated, the records cannot be altered, because they’re linked to every transaction record that came before them (hence the term “chain”). Various computational algorithms and approaches are deployed to ensure that the recording on the database is permanent, chronologically ordered, and available to all others on the network. 5. Computational Logic The digital nature of the ledger means that blockchain transactions can be tied to computational logic and in essence programmed. So users can set up algorithms and rules that automatically trigger transactions between nodes. For blockchain startups, ICOs are a win-win — they allow startups to raise funds without having equity stakeholders breathing down their necks on spending, prioritizing financial returns over the general good of the product or service itself.  And there are many in the blockchain community who feel that ICOs are a long-awaited solution for non-profit foundations that want to build open-source software to raise capital. Non-profits usually hold about 10-20% of the total cryptocurrency they issue; as Ethereum did in their ICO in 2014,  with 20% going to the development fund and the remaining going to the Ethereum Foundation. This is so they have a vested interest in building more value, as well as having reserves for growth in the future. (As of March 2017, the market capitalization of the ether token was more than $4 billion.) The market cap for bitcoin is now close to $20 billion, and half of that is allegedly owned by less than one thousand people, who are called “bitcoin whales.” Many of them are in China, but there are also hedge funds and bitcoin investment funds who hold massive amounts of bitcoin. Most made their money early on by buying or mining bitcoin when it was still under $10 (in the early days of 2011-2013). It’s now worth approximately $1,1200 per bitcoin. These “bitcoin whales” are currently the ones who make or break many of the ICOs. Some of the enormous profits they have made in bitcoin are being channeled back into innovation, as many of them seek to diversify holdings, as well as support the ecosystem in general. More than $270 million has been raised in ICOs since 2013, according to Smith and Crown (not including the $150 million raised in The DAO scandal, which was returned to investors). Since 2013, there’s been about $2 billion invested in blockchain and bitcoin startups from the VC community. ICOs are becoming more and more popular for startups seeking to get out of self-funding, bootstrapping starvation mode and avoid being locked in by venture capitalists, watching their own equity drown in a sea of financing rounds. ICOs are dominating the overall crowdfunding charts in terms of funds raised, with half of the top 20 raises coming from the crypto-community. In a recent conversation, MIT scientist and author John Clippinger described the vast potential of this new movement to me as such: One way of thinking about a crypto-asset is as a security in a startup, which begins with a $10 million valuation and becomes a $10 billion dollar entity. Instead of stock splits, the founding crypto-asset gets denominated in smaller and smaller units; in this case 1,000 to one. Here, everyone in the network is an equity holder who has an incentive to increase the value of the network. All of this depends upon how well the initial crypto-asset and its governance contract are designed and protected. In this instance, good governance, e.g. oversight, yields predictability, security, and effectiveness, which in turn creates value for all token holders. Just as venture capitalists are taking a hard look at this new phenomenon, so should we all. It’s not just about the money that can be made; it’s also about funding blockchain projects and, in the near future, other startups and even networks, as Clippinger noted. We now have a way to easily fund open source software, housed under foundations rather than corporations, that can truly drive faster innovation. Right now, blockchain technology is at the stage where the internet was in 1992, and it’s opening up a wealth of new possibilities that have the promise to add value to numerous industries, including finance, health, education, music, art, government, and more.

24 марта, 14:14

Эксперты: блокчейн сотрет границы в мировых финансах

При этом, отмечают эксперты, отсутствие регулирования тормозит процесс

24 марта, 11:54

Your feet may give away as much information as your face

FOR those who are worried that the face-recognition cameras at every street corner may invade their privacy, there could be another cause for concern -- a camera that keeps track of people's feet. Amid

Выбор редакции
Выбор редакции
23 марта, 18:16

От электросамолета до трекера для коров: выбор ведущих инвесторов Кремниевой долины

Главная мировая фабрика стартапов Y Combinator представила проекты своих выпускников

23 марта, 16:20

Accenture plc' (ACN) Tops On Q2 Earnings Estimate

Accenture Plc (ACN) reported mixed second-quarter fiscal 2017 results wherein bottom-line came ahead of the Zacks Consensus Estimate while top-line misses the same.

Выбор редакции
Выбор редакции
23 марта, 13:16

CORRECT: Accenture Q2 revenue $8.76 bln vs. $8.40 bln a year ago; FactSet consensus $8.77 bln

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news.

Выбор редакции
23 марта, 13:11

Accenture sees 2017 adj. EPS $5.70-$5.87 vs. previous outlook $5.64-$5.87

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news.

Выбор редакции
23 марта, 13:11

Accenture to record $425 mln charge in May in connection with termination of U.S. pension plan

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news.

Выбор редакции
23 марта, 13:10

Accenture sees 2017 revenue growth 6%-8% vs. previous outlook 5%-8%

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news.

Выбор редакции
23 марта, 13:07

Accenture Q2 FactSet EPS consensus $1.30

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news.

Выбор редакции
23 марта, 13:07

Accenture Q2 EPS $1.33 vs. $2.08 a year ago

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news.

23 марта, 13:00

How Utilities Are Using Blockchain to Modernize the Grid

In New York state, neighbors are testing their ability to sell solar energy to one another using blockchain technology. In Austria, the country’s largest utility conglomerate, Wien Energie, is taking part in a blockchain trial focused on energy trading with two other utilities. Meanwhile in Germany, the power company Innogy is running a pilot to see if blockchain technology can authenticate and manage the billing process for autonomous electric-vehicle charging stations. Blockchain has grabbed the attention of the heavily regulated power industry as it braces for an energy revolution in which both utilities and consumers will produce and sell electricity. Blockchain could offer a reliable, low-cost way for financial or operational transactions to be recorded and validated across a distributed network with no central point of authority. As in the financial services industry, this capability has prompted some people to explore whether blockchain may one day replace a portion of utilities’ businesses by doing away with the need for intermediaries altogether. But that view is too extreme and simplistic. Insight Center Business in the Era of Blockchain Sponsored by Accenture How technology is transforming transactions. What is more likely to happen is that blockchain will become part of the answer to updating and improving centralized, legacy systems with a distributed hybrid system made up of a patchwork of both large power plants and microgrids powered by distributed energy resources such as solar power. Such a decentralized energy system would be capable of delivering efficient, reliable, and, in many cases, renewable energy. This coming shift is prompting the industry to focus on blockchain’s potential to make peer-to-peer energy trading a reality, though it’s unclear how soon the nascent technology can be scalable. For example, in a blockchain microgrid project in Brooklyn, N.Y., each participant trading electricity had to invest in a computer with a blockchain “node” in order for their homes with solar panels to be able to sell power to neighbors. The blockchain network manages and records the transactions with little human interaction. The “nodes” in the computers are needed to validate and share the information to minimize the possibility of downtime or interference with the data. The more data that needs to be bundled into “blocks” and passed along, the more computing power they need. But it’s possible that blockchain may one day enable the development of an integrated trading system that would permit businesses to trade their option to use electricity during a given time frame. For example, a factory could sell five minutes of unused power during a down time to a different factory that needs the additional power. Trading grid flexibility in this way could provide large efficiency benefits for grid operators. How Blockchain WorksHere are five basic principles underlying the technology. 1. Distributed Database Each party on a blockchain has access to the entire database and its complete history. No single party controls the data or the information. Every party can verify the records of its transaction partners directly, without an intermediary. 2. Peer-to-Peer Transmission Communication occurs directly between peers instead of through a central node. Each node stores and forwards information to all other nodes. 3. Transparency with Pseudonymity Every transaction and its associated value are visible to anyone with access to the system. Each node, or user, on a blockchain has a unique 30-plus-character alphanumeric address that identifies it. Users can choose to remain anonymous or provide proof of their identity to others. Transactions occur between blockchain addresses. 4. Irreversibility of Records Once a transaction is entered in the database and the accounts are updated, the records cannot be altered, because they’re linked to every transaction record that came before them (hence the term “chain”). Various computational algorithms and approaches are deployed to ensure that the recording on the database is permanent, chronologically ordered, and available to all others on the network. 5. Computational Logic The digital nature of the ledger means that blockchain transactions can be tied to computational logic and in essence programmed. So users can set up algorithms and rules that automatically trigger transactions between nodes. Another area where blockchain could take hold is in enabling customers to switch power suppliers more quickly. Companies are conducting pilots to explore blockchain’s potential to make existing processes, such as meter registration, more efficient and less costly. British startup Electron is developing a blockchain platform that could allow British customers to switch power suppliers reliably within a day without having to rely on the Data Communications Company, the UK’s centralized meter data agency, where a switchover can take much longer. Finally, blockchain may make existing electric industry processes more efficient by serving as the backbone for utilities’ “smart grid” management systems that automatically diagnose network emergencies and problems and reconfigure in reaction to them. Austrian startup Grid Singularity is using blockchain technology to develop a decentralized energy exchange platform that can host applications ranging from validating electricity trades to monitoring grid equipment, in part because such a platform has the potential to prolong the life of equipment, improving both large and small power-generation system operators’ earnings. To be sure, as with any new technology, blockchain remains largely unproven, and significant barriers remain. Use cases will need to be more highly developed to convince government-backed programs and regulators that there will not be multiple program delays and possible cost overruns if they agree to adopt the new technology. Common industry standards will also need to be established. Nevertheless, if it proves reliable and scalable, blockchain technology may ultimately accelerate the transition to what the energy industry calls a “distributed world” made up of both large and smaller power-generation systems for homes, businesses, and communities. To succeed in maximizing the potential of distributed generation and managing less predictable and more volatile renewable power sources, the industry’s infrastructure first must become nimbler and less centralized. So while blockchain may at first appear to be a form of technological disruption that the power industry should avoid, it could prove to be exactly what is required to keep up with evolving demand for electricity in smaller, lower value blocks and at higher frequency. While there’s always room for startups to move in and disrupt this industry, established utilities are best placed to evaluate and make strategic bets on blockchain technology’s potential applications. If they can seize the moment, centralized incumbents may turn out to be the true disruptors, ushering in a new era of decentralized power.

22 марта, 16:20

Why Invest in MFS Massachusetts Investors Growth Stock R4 Fund (MIGKX)?

MFS Massachusetts Investors Growth Stock R4 Fund (MIGKX) seeks to long-term growth of capital

22 марта, 16:00

Blockchain Could Help Artists Profit More from Their Creative Works

Anyone who follows the cultural industries — art, music, publishing, theater, cinema — knows of the tussles between artists and those who feed off of their talents. The traditional food chain in movie-making, for example, is a long one: Between those who create a film and those who pay for it — movie goers, cable subscribers, pay-per-viewers, advertisers, rights licensees, and institutional sponsors such as the National Endowment for the Arts — is a multitude of middlemen: online retailers (Amazon, Walmart), streaming video services (Netflix, YouTube, Hulu), theatre venues (Wanda’s AMC, Regal, Cinemark),  product placement and media agencies (Propaganda GEM, Omicom’s OMD), film producers (Columbia Pictures, Marvel Studios, Disney-Pixar), movie distributors (Sony Pictures, Universal, Warner Bros.), home marketers (Fox, HBO), cable and satellite services (Comcast, DirectTV), video syndicators (PMI, TVS), film libraries and archives (Eastman House, Getty Images), and talent agencies (WME, CAA, ICM), each with its own contracts and accounting systems. That’s a staggeringly long list. Each of these middlemen takes a cut of the revenues and passes along the rest, with the leftovers typically reaching the artists themselves months later, per the terms of their contracts. Insight Center Business in the Era of Blockchain Sponsored by Accenture How technology is transforming transactions. So concentrated is the power in this feeding frenzy that many actors have taken themselves off the menu by launching their own companies within the existing industry model. The same is true in music, too. For example, Grammy-award winning singer-songwriter Imogen Heap has been a pioneer in the field with the launch of Mycelia, a think-and-do-tank whose goal is “to empower a fair, sustainable and vibrant music industry ecosystem involving all online music interaction services,” using blockchain. Artlery, a company founded by technologists and artists, is attempting the same thing for physical art such as sculptures and paintings.  But for most artists and creators, that’s not an option. How Blockchain WorksHere are five basic principles underlying the technology. 1. Distributed Database Each party on a blockchain has access to the entire database and its complete history. No single party controls the data or the information. Every party can verify the records of its transaction partners directly, without an intermediary. 2. Peer-to-Peer Transmission Communication occurs directly between peers instead of through a central node. Each node stores and forwards information to all other nodes. 3. Transparency with Pseudonymity Every transaction and its associated value are visible to anyone with access to the system. Each node, or user, on a blockchain has a unique 30-plus-character alphanumeric address that identifies it. Users can choose to remain anonymous or provide proof of their identity to others. Transactions occur between blockchain addresses. 4. Irreversibility of Records Once a transaction is entered in the database and the accounts are updated, the records cannot be altered, because they’re linked to every transaction record that came before them (hence the term “chain”). Various computational algorithms and approaches are deployed to ensure that the recording on the database is permanent, chronologically ordered, and available to all others on the network. 5. Computational Logic The digital nature of the ledger means that blockchain transactions can be tied to computational logic and in essence programmed. So users can set up algorithms and rules that automatically trigger transactions between nodes. Enter blockchain-based platforms and programmable templates called smart contracts. Blockchain is a new technology platform, running on millions of devices and open to anyone, where not just information but anything of value — money, titles, and deeds, but also music, art, scientific discoveries, and other intellectual property — can be moved and stored securely and privately, where trust is established not by powerful intermediaries like movie studios, streaming services, banks, or other companies, but rather through mass collaboration and clever code. Combine this powerful new technology with an artistic community that values inclusion; integrity; transparency in deal making; respect of rights; privacy; security; and fair exchange of value, and you’ve got yourself a new ecosystem for motion pictures, video games, and other creative pursuits. “A lot of untapped creative energy is wasted on the practicalities that living in a centralized paradigm foster,” writes Zach LeBeau, CEO of SingularDTV, a blockchain-based digital content management and distribution platform. His vision is to decentralize the entertainment industry so that creative individuals can profit from the films, videos, games, and art they help to make. He expects decentralization to “realize a world that utilizes the greatest potential of every person.” LeBeau’s vision is not a pipedream. Various companies are already collaborating on the blockchain to develop an ecosystem with artist-friendly features, such as: Value templates to construct deals that respect the artist as an entrepreneur and equal partner in any venture. LeBeau considers the engine of SingularDTV to be its smart contract system, which continually directs the flow of funding to, and revenues from, projects per the automated terms of agreement. Funding mechanisms whereby artists can raise venture capital. For example, actor Mitzi Peirone plans to use WeiFund, a blockchain-based crowdsale platform, to fund part of her debut thriller, Braid. Unlike Kickstarter or Indiegogo, WeiFund turns supporters into investors who share in the profits, should a film become profitable. Inclusive revenues that use self-executing smart contracts to divide profits fairly and without delays according to each person’s contribution to the creative process. This benefits not just actors, screenwriters, and directors, for example, but also other artists and engineers. Transparent ledgers distributed on the blockchain so that everyone can see how much revenue a film is generating and who is getting what percentage. Micrometering and micromonetizing functionality to stream the revenues immediately to the artists and contributors, the way a film itself streams to online viewers. For example, filmmakers can monetize their content directly by making it available through Wiper, an encrypted messaging app that comes with a bitcoin wallet. Consumers can view films on their mobile devices in exchange for bitcoin. Usage data analytics in the hands of artists at last, to attract the right merchandisers and distributors, plan promotions, and crowdfund resources for future creative collaborations with other artists. Digital rights management (DRM) — that is, the deployment of smart contracts to maximize the value of digital rights in a database. For example, SingularDTV represents film, television and software projects on the blockchain as SNGLS tokens. Piracy protection though public key infrastructure, which enables artists to exchange their assets securely with consumers over networks. For example, Custos Media Technologies, a South African startup, has deployed the bitcoin blockchain to track media piracy by incentivizing the file-sharing community to police pirated content. Dynamic pricing mechanisms to experiment with promotions and auction-style schemes that could even tie pay-per-view and advertising rates to the online demand for a film. Reputation systems that cull data from a token address’s transaction history and social media, to create a reputation score for that address. Artists will be able to establish their own credibility as well as that of prospective partners and refrain from doing deals with entities that fall short of reputational standards or lack necessary funding in their accounts. In this new ecosystem, we see a place for Netflix and YouTube; a place for studio curation; and a place for fan-generated content. The film industry will still need people to sift through the hundreds of millions of hours of video created every day all over the planet. The key point is that the artists themselves will finally be feasting at the center of their own ecosystem, not starving at the edges of many others.

Выбор редакции
21 марта, 13:25

Accenture stock price target raised to $138 from $128 at Stifel Nicolaus

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news.

25 октября 2014, 16:10

В США заявили, что их устраивает цена в $57 за баррель нефти

Даже если цена черного золота упадет до $57 за баррель, добыча сланцевой Нефти будет рентабельна. Сообщает российское издание «Вести» со ссылкой на аналитический отчет компании IHS, передает информационный ресурс OnPress.info. Еще год назад американским компания нужна была цена в $70, чтобы добыча сланцевой нефти была рентабельна, но с прогрессивным ростом технологий уже на сегодняшний день даже цена в $57 является приемлемой. В свою очередь в США заявили, что падение цен на нефть не пугают нефтяные компании страны, которые только за этот год просверлили 18 тысяч скважин. Как заявил генеральный директор компании Halliburton на данном этапе их цель — снижение цены за баррель нефти. Но это еще не все, согласно просчетов американской компании Accenture, запас повышения эффективности добычи нефти который существует на данный момент может привести к понижению стоимости добычи на 40%. Напомним, что главная смета Российской Федерации на 2015 год рассчитана исходя из цены на баррель нефти на отметке в $96. А один из нефтедобывающих гигантов РФ компания Лукойл в свой бюджет заложила стоимость черного золота на отметке в $80-85 за баррель. http://onpress.info/v-ssha-zayavili-chto-ix-ustraivaet-cena-v-57-za-barrel-nefti0015866?_utl_t=fb