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12 декабря 2016, 22:44

CEO Talk: Sebastian Siemiatkowski

Sebastian Siemiatkowski is the CEO and co-founder of Swedish giant Klarna, a payment solutions provider. He has eight years of experience in sales, including being former Head of Sales at Djuice Uppsala. Siemiatkowski has received multiple awards for his leadership including runner up in the 2015 Global EY Entrepreneur of the Year Award, Leader of the Year by Adecco, and European Entrepreneur of the Year Award by TechTour. Siemiatkowski holds a Master's economics degree from Stockholm School of Economics. What were your early years like? I was born in Sweden of Polish immigrants. Both of my parents were intellectual and had capacity for greatness, but in Sweden my father ended up as cab driver and as a food inspector checking in on restaurants. My mother had a problem with her back and retired early. She couldn't go to work, so instead she became a painter and sculptor. My parents divorced when I was 11 years old. Back then, I thought that money could solve any problem in life, but over the years I learned that this is not necessarily the case; money doesn't always bring happiness. There was something about becoming financially successful that intrigued me. As a kid, I used to spend a lot of time coming up with business ideas, and I read a lot of business books about successful entrepreneurs like Richard Branson. I started working early in life--my first job was flipping burgers at a Burger King fast food outlet. Then I worked in telesales, making cold calls and selling products. At age 21, I was promoted to become the manager of the sales team. It was the first time I started to learn about managing a team. What has been your biggest challenge? When we started Klarna we were only 3 people--now we employ more than 1500 people. The scaling infrastructure changed massively and grew to much greater heights than we could have foreseen. My challenge is to consistently push myself and set high expectations. At each stage of my career I've questioned my ability to succeed in new and challenging environments. I ask myself if I'm good enough, if I'm growing and changing fast enough, if I am adapting to changes. I've had to push myself to take new steps. I think it is important to lead by example. I can't expect something from others that I wouldn't expect from myself. I consistently reflect on what is it that I could do to improve in my roles, and to me this reflection is crucial in order to feel that I am doing a good job. What are some important leadership lessons you've learned over the years? Early on, I learned that if I wanted to build a large and successful company, I would need to go out and find the right people to work with--people who have the ambition and skills to help me achieve my ultimate vision. It is important to establish a world-class team. As a manager, I was sitting in a position in which I was consistently chasing goals. A year before I started Klarna, me and my co-founder, Niklas, travelled around the world for half a year without flying, moving from one place to another. When I came back from that trip I felt like I was twice the age I was when I left. My brain was stuffed with as many memories from that trip alone as I probably had from the rest of my life. Because our environment changed daily, I still vividly remember unique events from each day. Through this experience, I came to realize that it's not the destination, but the journey that matters. While I do have high ambitions for Klarna, I make sure to enjoy the journey and the challenges that we are facing. How would you describe your leadership style? As a leader, I am quite tough. I think that all people are driven by different things; many are driven by the prospects of making a career, achieving financial success, promoting change in the work environment, or by social aspects. All people have different motivators, and these differences are important. Over my working years, I have realized that I strongly desire to build a great company that has a positive impact on the world. For me, my company's impact is my most important driving factor. Therefore, I strive to create an environment in which my company can achieve this purpose. How do you motivate your team? I like to surround myself with people who are highly motivated. To a large degree, many people are self-motivated and good at what they do. Their motivation often surfaces when they are placed in an environment where they can make an impact that can move mountains. Therefore, employers must ensure that their employees work in an environment in which they can fly. What is the key to your company's success? The key to our success has been our ability to deliver for our customers. I think a lot of companies get caught in their ambition to change the world. But what should really be driving companies is the potential to make their service even more attractive and better for their customers. The most important thing to a company should be to build an awesome product; once that is achiever, the rest will fall into place. The product should be something that the consumers truly appreciate, and that helps to make their daily lives easier. This is the purpose that we strive to achieve. How do you hire? I am very keen to understand people's backgrounds, including where they are coming from. To a large degree, I am looking for their motivating factor--I want to see that they have the drive and hunger to accomplish great things. To this end, I'll often ask the following questions: "Tell me about yourself? In your last job, what were your responsibilities? What changes have you made since leaving your previous organization, if any? And why?" How a person answers these questions helps me to determine his or her real character. Should you yell at someone at work? It is not acceptable to yell. In trying situations, I would first need to identify and understand what the problem is and why it isn't working itself out. Does the problematic person not have the abilities or resources to completed the job, or are they having other difficulties? The best way to solve these problems is to sit down and try to understand what's going on. When I see that an area isn't functioning effectively, I try not to jump to the conclusion that people are not performing or that the problem is their fault; I look at all possible explanations for the problem. What advice do you give to young people? If you are having a bad experience then it is likely that you can change it, and if you want to better something then you may need to change your own behavior. Success comes from having new experiences, testing ideas, and analyzing outcomes by asking yourself what you did right or wrong in a particular situation, and what you learned from it. When I advise young entrepreneurs, I tell them, "It's not about figuring out the best business ideas, and it's not about solving problems theoretically, but it's about testing your ideas. It's about coming up with an idea, and then trying it and learning from it." Building a successful business is about your ability and about how often you can conduct these self-evaluations. This interview has been condensed and edited for clarity. This post is part of "CEO Talk" series, which features leaders around the world speaking about their journeys. What does it take to become a successful entrepreneur or CEO? What is the path to success? What challenges did people face and how did they overcome them? Lan Anh and her guests answer all these questions and much more. To view the entire series, visit here. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

18 октября 2016, 12:07

India 2016 - Get Up, Skill Up

http://www.weforum.org/ By 2025, over 250 million young people will enter the Indian workforce. What new skills will be needed to thrive in an increasingly global, digital and innovation-driven economy? Dimensions to be addressed: - Creating an agile and entrepreneurial workforce - Leveraging technical skills in manufacturing - Prioritizing digital literacy · Akshay Kothari, Managing Director, LinkedIn Corporation, India · Sergio Picarelli, Regional Head, Italy, Eastern Europe, Middle East and North Africa, and India, Adecco Group, Switzerland · Shikha Sharma, Managing Director and Chief Executive Officer, Axis Bank, India Moderated by · Shekhar Shah, Director-General, National Council of Applied Economic Research (NCAER), India

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10 августа 2016, 13:44

Чистая прибыль Adecco увеличилась во втором квартале на 7% г/г

Крупнейшая в мире рекрутинговая компания Adecco Group зафиксировала 7%-ное увеличение чистой прибыли во втором квартале, которая составила 190 млн евро ($211,9 млн). Выручка, тем временем, возросла на 4% г/г до 5,67 млрд евро.

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10 августа 2016, 11:10

Чистая прибыль Adecco увеличилась во втором квартале на 7% г/г

Крупнейшая в мире рекрутинговая компания Adecco Group зафиксировала 7%-ное увеличение чистой прибыли во втором квартале, которая составила 190 млн евро ($211,9 млн). Выручка, тем временем, возросла на 4% г/г до 5,67 млрд евро.

07 июля 2016, 20:38

China 2016 - China’s New Business Context

http://www.weforum.org/ What are the technological advances, industry challenges and policy shifts transforming the nature and pace of growth in China? Dimensions to be addressed: - Transitioning from state-owned to mixed-ownership enterprises - Rebalancing from industrial to service sector - Expanding from e-commerce to digital finance Speakers: -Liu Zhen, Senior Vice-President and Head, Strategy, China, Uber, USA. -Long Guoqiang, Vice-President, Development Research Center of the State Council (DRC), People's Republic of China. -Ma Weihua, President, China Entrepreneur Club, People's Republic of China. -Ni Ying, Chief Executive Officer, Fesco Adecco, People's Republic of China. -Wang Jianzhou, Chairman, China Association for Public Companies, People's Republic of China. -Xu Jinghong, Chairman, Tsinghua Holdings, People's Republic of China. Moderated by Wang Boming, Editor-in-Chief, Caijing Magazine, People's Republic of China.

24 июня 2016, 10:29

Ten firms honored Panda d’Oro Award

THE seventh edition of the Panda d’Oro Award recorded ten awarded firms and marked a record of participations, with over 500 guests registered. The time-honored Panda Award was conferred to Magneti Marelli,

15 июня 2016, 20:46

Temp Jobs: 6 Pros and Cons of Short-Term Gigs

The number of temp jobs will increase by 6% by 2018, according to some estimates, but not everyone agrees that the rise in temp work is good for employees.

15 июня 2016, 17:01

Jacobs' Growth Momentum Intact: Wins Contracts Back to Back

Jacobs Engineering Group Inc.'s (JEC) boosted its growth prospects with two new contract wins.

23 мая 2016, 15:31

Is Adecco Group (AHEXY) Stock A Great Combo of Value and Growth?

Adecco Group may be a strong candidate for value investing, since it has a low PE, solid outlook and a decent dividend.

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10 мая 2016, 18:47

Чистая прибыль Adecco снизилась в первом квартале на 10% г/г

Крупнейшая в мире рекрутинговая компания Adecco зафиксировала 10%-ное снижение чистой прибыли в первом квартале, которая составила 144 млн евро. Продажи, тем временем, возросли на 5% г/г до 5,3 млрд евро ($6,06 млрд), что совпало со средними ожиданиями аналитиков. Заметим, что прибыль до уплаты процентов, налогов и амортизации понизилась на 4% г/г до 228 млн евро, а выручка во Франции возросла на 7% г/г до 1,1 млрд евро.

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10 мая 2016, 15:49

Чистая прибыль Adecco снизилась в первом квартале на 10% г/г

Крупнейшая в мире рекрутинговая компания Adecco зафиксировала 10%-ное снижение чистой прибыли в первом квартале, которая составила 144 млн евро. Продажи, тем временем, возросли на 5% г/г до 5,3 млрд евро ($6,06 млрд), что совпало со средними ожиданиями аналитиков. Заметим, что прибыль до уплаты процентов, налогов и амортизации понизилась на 4% г/г до 228 млн евро, а выручка во Франции возросла на 7% г/г до 1,1 млрд евро.

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09 марта 2016, 19:21

Adecco chief calls on ECB to do more

Staffing group reports surge in French revenues

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09 марта 2016, 19:21

Adecco chief calls on ECB to do more

Staffing group reports surge in French revenues

01 марта 2016, 18:00

Making Matrix Organizations Actually Work

Most discussions about matrix organizations usually quickly devolve into a debate between two sides: those who love to hate the matrix, and those who hate to love the matrix. The former claim that a matrix structure slows decision making and obfuscates accountability. The latter retort that a matrix structure is an inescapable prerequisite for lateral coordination in large complex businesses. From our two decades of experience with organization design, we tend to side with the latter. In fact, we may even belong to a third camp, those who love to love the matrix. But our love is conditional upon its sparing and wise use. Let’s get back to first principles first. Just in case you’ve forgotten, a manager in a matrix organization has two or more upward reporting lines to bosses who each represent a different business dimension, such as product, region, customer, capability, or function. It’s often a response to, or a prophylactic against, corporate silos. Silos can form in any company, regardless of how it’s organized, whether that’s around different products, different regions, or different types of customers. When a company reorganizes, it’s often because the strategy has also changed. For example, the French global energy player ENGIE recently tilted its primary dimension from product (such as power, services, and infrastructure) toward region in order to better serve its clients in the territories in which it operates. Likewise, the British communications services company BT Group recently tilted from product toward customer (such as consumer, business, and public sector). But such reorgs don’t make silos go away — they just create new ones. So it remains crucial to ensure lateral coordination between the various units. Lateral coordination is accomplished rather easily at the top of a company. The executives in charge of the various groups sit together naturally in the top management team. Often, they are also incentivized for the company’s well-being as a whole. But obviously the top management team cannot afford to let all day-to-day operational coordination issues escalate upward. Its real challenge is to achieve lateral coordination also at the levels below. This can be achieved through hard-wiring or soft-wiring. A matrix structure is an example of hard-wiring, because the two bosses of a manager in a matrixed position have the joint responsibility to set his objectives, supervise his work, do his appraisal, and ensure his development. For example, the procurement manager of a business unit would report both to the business unit head and to the corporate procurement officer. Soft-wiring relies on more informal, organic, voluntary, temporary, or one-off instruments, such as an ad-hoc multi-dimensional task force, an annual corporate planning cycle, an advisory council, a central coordination function, or a company-wide knowledge management system. For example, the U.S. oilfield services company Schlumberger builds on its knowledge management system to share technical expertise across regions and products. Executives who are fundamentally opposed to a matrix do not argue that there’s no need for lateral coordination. They simply consider that soft-wiring can do the job all by itself. Whenever there is a real need in the field for coordination across organizational silos, the managers concerned will find each other. A matrix, they argue, needlessly complicates things. Patrick De Maeseneire, the former CEO of the Swiss HR solutions provider Adecco, formulates it as follows: “No complicated matrix structures. One man or woman. One number. In matrix structures, everybody claims a success as his and points to everybody else when things go wrong.” We would argue that it is not an either/or issue. Provided that the hard-wired matrix is deployed sparingly and wisely, it has its place in the arsenal of management tools along with soft-wired ones. Here are five practical guidelines. 1. Adopt when purposeful. The matrix should not be the default design option. It should be used only when two conditions are met. First, when there is a major need for middle managers of different units or teams to coordinate on important business matters on a daily basis. For example, when the finance manager of a region has to coordinate intensely with the heads of the country subsidiaries in that region, it may make sense to put the business controller of each subsidiary in a matrixed position, that is, to have each of these report not only to their respective subsidiary head but also the region finance manager. The second condition for a matrix is that the required coordination cannot be achieved adequately through soft-wiring only. For example, if you are in a fairly steady business with fairly autonomous country subsidiaries selling either standard or strictly local products, something like a quarterly “country coordination council” may be sufficient. 2. Keep intrinsic conflict out. Research by Joachim Wolf and William G. Egelhoff shows that the likelihood of intra-organizational conflict in a matrix structure depends on the groups involved. For example, a matrix with region and function as organizing principles tends to have lower levels of conflict than a matrix with region and product as organizing principles. The reason is easily understood: region and function have more complementary roles and objectives than region and product have. If both region and product have P&L responsibility and are expected to manage the same factors (human resources, customer relationships, price levels, etc.) to optimize their performance, conflict is baked into the matrix. Therefore, when defining the roles and accountabilities of the two matrix dimensions, make sure there are intrinsic reasons for them to collaborate rather than to compete. 3. Limit breadth and depth. A matrix may contain more than two organizing principles (e.g., product + region + function). But since a matrix with two such principles is difficult enough to manage, stick to two unless there is an overwhelming argument to broaden beyond two, such as in a particularly complex part of the business. A trickier issue is how deep down the hierarchy to replicate the matrix. We would advocate avoiding nested matrices. Continuing the aforementioned example of the subsidiary controller, “nested” means that the risk manager reporting to the matrixed subsidiary controller would also report to the regional risk manager who in turn reports to the regional finance manager. If grasping the preceding sentence is already quite challenging, imagine how difficult it would be to make the concept work in practice. 4. Don’t pretend. The previous three guidelines are a call for the spare use of a matrix. But once you have opted for one, go all the way. Ban the oft-used distinction between a dotted and full reporting line, implying that the former carries less weight. Position the two reporting lines of a matrixed manager as fully balanced — that is, 50-50, not 70-30 or some other unequal ratio. (Don’t even use a dotted line to distinguish between different reporting lines on the org chart. Use full lines in different colors.) Likewise, don’t degrade the joint objective setting and performance appraisal of a matrixed manager into an almost perfunctory ritual whereby one of the two bosses actually takes care of it, merely soliciting some final secondary comments from the other boss. Messages or practices that appear to detract from the fundamental philosophy of the matrix are lethal because the effectiveness of a matrix depends on its credibility. 5. Escalate by exception only. A common complaint about a matrix structure is that it increases upward reporting and slows decision making. The opposite should be true in a well-functioning matrix because it pushes operational decision making down in a controlled way. Suppose product and region are the two organizing principles. When a decision is to be made about some minor regional product adaptation, the regional product manager should be able to make that judgment without escalating the issue to a global product manager and the regional business unit head, let alone to even more senior executives. It is up to the higher levels to refuse unwarranted upward escalation of trade-offs and conflicts. Nothing in business is perfect, and all organizational structures involve trade-offs. If you’re implementing a matrix at your company, start small, learn, and fine-tune as you progress. There is not a one-size-fits-all solution. How far you implement a matrix depends on the maturity of your organization, i.e., its ability to understand that a seemingly complex and ambiguous setup can in fact improve the quality and speed of decision making. Clear communication and consistent behavior are required to dispel the matrixed manager’s anxiety about roles conflict and the boss’s fear of losing power. Ultimately, your organization will gain enough trust in the matrix to let it do its work, evolving from reluctant acceptance to full-hearted embrace, sensing the matrix is there without noticing it.

24 января 2016, 09:29

Какую работу находят русские на юге Испании?

Порядка 1,2 млн. жителей южной испанской провинции Андалусия являются безработными, что напоминает нам о непростых экономических временах, которые переживает эта солнечная страна. Но европейский блогер «БИЗНЕС Online» Наталия Николаевская, живущая в столице Андалусии Севилье, утверждает, что и в этих условиях ее русскоязычные друзья находят работу, было бы желание. И хороший испанский язык.

22 января 2016, 19:26

Davos 2016 - Is the Swiss Model under Threat

http://www.weforum.org/ Switzerland’s economic and governance models have produced one of the world’s richest and most competitive countries. Can the Swiss model of economic liberalism and direct democracy survive? - How will the implementation of the 2014 referendum on migration restrictions harm industry and EU relations? - How can the education system meet the needs of knowledge-intensive industries? - What is the effect of years of a strong franc and unconventional monetary policy? - How will these challenges affect Switzerland’s position as an international financial centre? Speakers: · Rolf Dörig, Chairman, Adecco Group, Switzerland. · Sergio P. Ermotti, Group Chief Executive Officer, UBS Group, Switzerland. · Lino Guzzella, President and Professor, ETH Zurich, Switzerland. · Johann N. Schneider-Ammann, President of the Swiss Confederation and Federal Councillor of Economic Affairs, Education and Research of Switzerland. · Ulrich Spiesshofer, President and Chief Executive Officer, ABB, Switzerland. Moderated by Christa Markwalder, President of the National Council of Switzerland.

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21 января 2016, 09:12

Adecco says completes 250 million euro share buyback programme

ZURICH, Jan 21 (Reuters) - Adecco, the world's largest staffing group, completed a 250 million euro ($272.33 million) share buyback programme launched in November 2014, it said on Thursday.

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20 января 2016, 20:04

VIDEO: Where should you work?

Which countries should young people look to work in, both now and in the future? We asked Alain Dehaze, the CEO of Adecco Group.

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19 января 2016, 21:25

Hays climbs on bid talk

Recruitment agency may be a target of Adecco or Randstad