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15 сентября, 17:53

4 HMO Stocks Standing Out in a Top-Ranked Industry

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HMO stocks looks poised for strong growth given their favorable fundamentals in a top-ranked industry.

14 сентября, 15:35

Centene Corporation (CNC) Catches Eye: Stock Jumps 8%

Centene Corporation (CNC) saw its shares rise over 8% on the day after the company signed an agreement to buy all the assets of Fidelis Care for $3.75 billion in order to expand operation in New York.

14 сентября, 15:33

Why the Earnings Streak Will Continue for Aetna Inc. (AET)

Aetna Inc. (AET) can be a harbinger of out performance and a signal for a strong earnings profile on the back of its favorable Zacks rank and earnings ESP in the positive territory.

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13 сентября, 15:38

Centene's Fidelis Care Buyout to Expand Presence in New York

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Centene's (CNC) acquisition of Fidelis Care for $3.75 billion for expanding in New York, is expected to impact Centene's top line and bottom line positively.

12 сентября, 23:07

3 Value Stocks in Health Insurance to Bet On

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The Health Insurance industry gains from growing government business, benefits of ACA, business diversification and profit-boosting medical plans despite regulatory hurdles

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11 сентября, 17:06

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Home Depot, Aetna, Dickinson, Kellogg and FirstEnergy

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Home Depot, Aetna, Dickinson, Kellogg and FirstEnergy

11 сентября, 17:06

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Home Depot, Aetna, Dickinson, Kellogg and FirstEnergy

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Home Depot, Aetna, Dickinson, Kellogg and FirstEnergy

11 сентября, 16:26

Cigna Shares (CI) Up 38% This Year: Is Further Upside Left?

A mix of factors, ranging from industry to company-specific, are favoring the stock of Cigna (CI), driving solid returns.

11 сентября, 16:15

Universal Health (UHS) Grows on Buyouts, Expenses a Drag

Despite solid revenue growth backed by inorganic strategies, Universal Health's (UHS) rising level of debt and expenses continue to weigh on margins.

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30 июня, 00:45

It's Not Just Illinois: Connecticut Faces Friday Day Of Reckoning

With Illinois facing a Friday night deadline by which it has to come up with its first fiscal budget in three years or face a downgrade to junk resulting in what a policymaker called a "death spiral", another mini drama is taking place in Connecticut, which is also facing big budget problems as wealthy residents, hedge funds and major corporations flee the state's high taxes and its fiscal future gets murkier by the day. Just today, we reported that Aetna, the insurance giant founded in Hartford where it has been for the past 164 years, announced it would move its headquarters to New York City despite intensive lobbying efforts by Connecticut officials. The move, which followed a departure by GE of its Fairfield HQ of 40 years, is a blow to the company’s hometown, which is facing severe financial problems. Hartford's problems are a representation of the troubles facing the entire state: while Illinois' story is familiar, Connecticut has the distinction of the third-worst ratings in the country, only behind Illinois and New Jersey after S&P, Moody's and Fitch all downgraded the state last month in what officials described as a "call to action" for state leaders. “We’ve been downgraded by everybody in the last six months, and in the last year two or three times,” Senate Republican President Len Fasano said cited by Fox news. “If we don’t pass a budget, I think we will see a further downward spiral.” And, just like Illinois (and 14 other states), Connecticut faces a Friday day of reckoning: the state has yet to pass a fiscal 2018 budget by the June 30 deadline. “We must immediately take the necessary steps to mitigate the current year deficit and then balance the ... budget with recurring measures to reduce spending and structural solutions to our long-term problems,” a spokesperson for the Connecticut Office of Policy and Management said in response to Moody’s downgrade. It's not just the rating, however. Connecticut’s deficit has reached $5 billion, and according to an analysis by Pew, the state only has $240 million in its 'rainy day fund'; just five states have a smaller cushion. Much of the financial troubles are tied to the state’s pension system, which two-term Democratic Gov. Daniel Malloy’s office is seeking to address with a new plan to save the state $24 billion in “coming years.” One solution offered by Malloy is to require new state employees to be covered under a new hybrid pension system. The agreement, which Malloy’s office made with the state union, is tentative and awaiting legislative approval. “Connecticut can and will adopt a responsible, balanced budget for the coming biennium—the question is how best to handle our finances until that happens,” Malloy said. He offered a short-term “mini-budget” to allow “more time to negotiate a full budget, without making our current problems any worse and without further jeopardizing the state’s bond rating.” But, like in Illinois, Republican Fasano told Fox News the governor’s budget is not seeing support on “either side of the aisle.” “His proposal decimates municipalities, social services and has no support, so we did our own budget,” Fasano said. “He has really shown the propensity of turning this state in a very negative direction.” What makes things even more complicated is the even split in the State Senate: Fasano serves as the State Senate’s Republican president in conjunction with the Democratic president. This is a special situation, as for the first time in decades, the State Senate is split evenly in the historically blue state.   “We are tied, 18-18, and that’s making it more difficult because the Democrats can no longer plow across the finish line a progressive agenda, fiscally speaking—so they can’t figure out what to do,” Fasano said. “Senate Republicans are the only ones with a line-by-line, detailed and balanced budget.” Fasano claimed the budget put forth by Senate Republicans changes taxes and includes structural provisions that would help keep businesses in the state, although if Aetna is any indication, it's not nearly enough. “We are doing things to try to attract people to stay here as best we can, given the fact that we have a $5 billion deficit,” Fasano said. “If we do not pass a budget by June 30, we have sent a message, I think to everyone, that we have no idea what we’re doing, and that is not going to give [comfort] to people to buy or stay here.” Those who have already left the state, mostly affluent hedge fund managers who have migrated to Florida, already got the message. And while Aetna's depature was a hit to the state, the state capital Hartford has been struggling with a financial quagmire of its own, even as we reported in early May, meeting last month to discuss the option of filing bankruptcy. “We know that now more than ever, we are in competition across all industries –not just with Massachusetts or New York state, but more specifically with Boston and New York City,” Malloy said last month. Another problem is the fundamental deterioration in the state's economy. Connecticut’s unemployment rate rose to 4.9 percent in April, up from 4.5 percent in January. “Keeping those employees in Connecticut is far more important than where Aetna plants its corporate flag,” Malloy said. Malloy is looking to boost jobs with the approval this week to begin construction on the state’s third casino. The Democratic governor remains optimistic, however, and his office told Fox News that companies like Xerox, Sikorsky, and Vineyard Vines, among others, have committed to the state over the last two years. But Fasano said he spoke with GE executives before they left and they cited state financial issues. “They said Connecticut continues to tax at rates that make it unaffordable for businesses, people to stay here and didn’t see what Connecticut looked like seven or eight years from now,” he said. “... That’s the same analysis I’ve heard from a number of businesses as to why they’re leaving. The progressive agenda this governor put forth is now coming home to roost.” * * * So will CT pass a state budget? There was some 11th hour hope on Thursday, when AP reported that Connecticut House Democrats said they've come up with a two-year budget proposal that could be ready for a vote on July 18. The last minute $40 billion two-year plan would increase the state's 6.35% sales tax to 6.99% to help maintain funding to cities and towns. It would also provide municipalities with additional ways to generate local revenue and restore the local property tax credit against the personal income tax. The proposal was being offered up Thursday as lawmakers grappled over whether to pass Democratic Gov. Dannel P. Malloy's three-month, stop-gap budget before the fiscal year ends on Friday. Malloy says it will be less draconian than having him run state government using his limited executive authority. And, of course, there's disagreement, about whether to vote on the mini budget. If the disagreement is not overcome by Friday, Connecticut could soon be in the same financial straits as Illinois. Incidentally, the muni bond market - with its usual glacial delay - finally noticed that not all is well, and today yields on AAA-rated 10-year muni bonds rose 7 basis points to close at 1.95% , the biggest one day absolute increase since Dec. 15. There was a similar move for 5-year muni bonds which rose 5bps on the day to end at 1.34% now up 10 bps week-to-date, also the largest day-over-day move since December 15.

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29 июня, 17:53

After 164 Years, Aetna Is Leaving Connecticut For New York

While the public's attention is keenly focused on whether Illinois will reach a budget deal in the next 2 days ahead of the next fiscal year which begins on July 1, avoiding the first ever downgrade to junk for a US state as the state piles up some $15 billion in unpaid bills and now oews more than $800 million in interest on the unpaid balances alone, the financial peril facing Connecticut is just as dire. We laid out the big picture one month ago in "Connecticut State Capital Prepares For Bankruptcy Amid Collapse In Hedge Fund Revenue." And now, as the state rushes to iron out its own budget deal ahead of the June 30 deadline, another major hit for the fiscally challenged state has emerged because one of the state's most reliable sources of corporate tax revenue, Aetna, is leaving Hartford and moving to New York. According to the NYT, Aetna, the insurance giant founded in Hartford, where it has been for the past 164 years, announced Thursday that it would move its headquarters to New York City despite intensive lobbying efforts by Connecticut officials. The move is a blow to the company’s hometown, which is facing severe financial problems, and a potential boon for Aetna, which stands to receive $24 million in tax breaks over the next decade, among other benefits, for its new headquarters in the Chelsea neighborhood of Manhattan. The relocation, which involves 250 current and new executive and digital jobs, bolsters New York City’s vision of itself as an emerging digital powerhouse, but also continues the erosion in Connecticut of an industry that has long been an economic engine there. The number of workers employed in the insurance industry in Hartford and the surrounding area has plunged to 37,000 this year from over 60,000 in 1990, according to federal statistics. According to Empire State Development, New York State’s economic development agency, Aetna will invest $89 million to transform 145,000 square feet in a building on Ninth Avenue into its new home. The decision to move from CT was likely not easy, although in the end NY provided enough incentives to management to make the switch: efforts to lure the company were highly competitive — Aetna considered numerous cities for its new home, but in the end New York offered one of the most attractive deals. Besides the state tax credits, which are based on the number of new jobs Aetna creates, the New York City Economic Development Corporation will provide nearly $10 million worth of incentives through a combination of property and sales tax credits, among other benefits. The move is a coup for Mayor Bill de Blasio who said that “New York City is where talent and technology come together" adding that "we’ve never been stronger.’’ The decision comes as a double blow to Hartford, which had agreed to match the package after news broke this year about Aetna’s plan to move, according to the administration of Connecticut’s governor, Dannel P. Malloy. But it was not meant to be: "the company places greater emphasis on creating digital tools for people to manage their health care, being in New York City, with its large reservoir of talent, seemed vital to the company’s future" said Mark T. Bertolini, Aetna’s chairman and CEO. New York provides “the ecosystem of having people in the knowledge economy, working in a town they want to be living in, and we want to attract those folks, and we want to have them on our team,” Mr. Bertolini said in an interview. “It’s very hard to recruit people like that to Hartford.”   "It is a difficult decision,” Mr. Bertolini added. “We have continued to work with the governor and mayor of Hartford to try and improve the quality of life in the Hartford area, but that is too slow in coming.” While Aetna is moving its headquarters out of the state, about 5,000 employees will remain in Connecticut, although it is unlikely they will remain in their seats for long. Meanwhile, realizing just how precarious the situation is for the troubled state, a spokeswoman for Gov. Malloy quickly came to Hartford’s defense. “While Hartford may not be New York City, we are proud of the city’s revitalization,’’ the spokeswoman, Meg Green, said. “Hartford provides a strong foundation for any company in the insurance sector, large or small. From a very deep bench of top insurance talent, to incredible school systems and a high quality of life for employees, Connecticut remains the insurance capital of the world for good reason.” For Hartford, losing Aetna, a company with a history closely linked to the city (a son of the founder served as the city’s mayor), is not just a crushing blow in terms of revenue, but leaves it with just one major insurance company. That company, the Hartford Financial Services Group, which has been in Hartford for more than 200 years, isn’t going anywhere, according to its chairman and chief executive, Christopher J. Swift, unless of course some Chinese conglomerate comes in and swoops it up once the moratorium on outbound M&A ends. The good news, at least for now, is that Hartford remains "bullish on the city", where recent real estate developments could help reverse its economic slide. “We are encouraged by the early signs of revitalization in the city and the more honest assessment and discussion of priorities in light of fiscal realities at the city and state level.” Mr. Swift said. “We are committed to the city, and the state of Connecticut.” He may change his mind soon, especially if - as some have speculated - a bankruptcy for Connecticut is imminent.

29 июня, 17:43

Medtronic (MDT) Partners with Aetna for Type 1 & 2 Diabetes (Revised)

Medtronic plc (MDT) inked a new outcomes-based collaboration with Aetna (AET) for type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients who are on doses of multiple daily insulin injections.

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29 июня, 17:22

Aetna to move headquarters to New York in late 2018

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news.

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29 июня, 17:22

Aetna becomes latest Connecticut employer to relocate

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news.

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27 июня, 17:31

Medtronic (MDT) Partners with Aetna for Type 1 & 2 Diabetes

Medtronic plc (MDT) recently inked a new 'outcomes-based' collaboration with Aetna (AET) for type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients who are on doses of multiple daily insulin injections.

26 июня, 16:01

Aetna Inks New Deal to Improve Healthcare in North Carolina

Aetna, Inc. (AET) recently inked a deal with Community Care Physician Network, LLC

23 июня, 16:14

Senate Releases AHCA Draft Bill, Healthcare Stocks Surge

The Senate recently released the draft version of the healthcare bill that would repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

22 июня, 16:26

Anthem Quits 2 More Exchanges Amid Regulatory Uncertainty

Anthem Inc. (ANTM) is quitting public exchange markets in the states of Wisconsin and Indiana for 2018.

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21 июня, 11:37

Senate cannot repeal Obamacare, only fix it: Aetna CEO

Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini speaks about how U.S. President Donald Trump's proposed health care reform will play out.