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Выбор редакции
28 марта, 15:54

Is Alcoa (AA) Stock a Solid Choice Right Now?

Alcoa's (AA) industry is currently in the top third, and it is seeing solid estimate revisions as of late, suggesting it could be a very interesting choice for investors seeking a name in this great industry segment.

21 марта, 16:31

New Strong Buy Stocks for March 21st

New Strong Buy Stocks for March 21st

17 марта, 15:50

Top Ranked Value Stocks to Buy for March 17th

Top Ranked Value Stocks to Buy for March 17th

Выбор редакции
14 марта, 14:47

Alcoa stock price target raised to $43 from $40 at Morgan Stanley

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news.

Выбор редакции
06 марта, 15:47

Trumping The WTO

This month is the one-year anniversary of Alcoa closing the largest aluminum smelter in the United States – the Warrick in Indiana. More than 325 workers lost their family-supporting jobs, including Brandon Marshall, who, like most aluminum workers, was a member of my union, the United Steelworkers (USW). Brandon told the New York Times last week that he found another job, but it pays only about half what he earned before, so his wife had to go back to work. Alcoa also shut down its Wenatchee smelter last year, laying off 420 workers in Washington State, including Josh Busjahn, who told a reporter from public radio’s Marketplace that he had to cut his family’s budget in half. In 1970, there were 24,000 aluminum smelter workers nationwide. Now, there are 2,200. Just 17 years ago, the United States had 23 smelters. Now, there are five. And only one is operating at full capacity. A major cause of this suffering and job loss is China’s violation of trade rules. Beijing overbuilt its aluminum capacity to keep its citizens employed, then dumped the subsidized excess on the world market, artificially suppressing prices. In January, the Obama administration filed a complaint against China with the World Trade Organization (WTO) in an attempt to stop Beijing’s destruction of the American industry, one that is crucial to national defense. But the outlook for this case isn’t great. The WTO has repeatedly stiffed the United States. It’s supposed to adjudicate trade disputes, but a new report, commissioned by the Alliance for American Manufacturing (AAM) and titled, “How the WTO Undermines U.S. Trade Remedy Enforcement,” shows that the WTO treats the United States like a punching bag that must suffer the economic blows of trade cheating by nations worldwide. For a quarter century, since the dawn of NAFTA, the USW has called for fair trade and protection for American manufacturers like Alcoa and workers like Brandon and Josh against abuses such as currency manipulation, government subsidization and dumping. Finally, last week, President Donald Trump announced the United States would not be bound by WTO decisions. That sounded great to laid-off manufacturing workers nationwide. The president’s action is supported by findings in the Alliance for American Manufacturing report written by trade law experts Terence P. Stewart and Elizabeth J. Drake. The report shows that the WTO has taken a hugely disproportionate number of cases against the United States. And in those cases, the WTO ruled against the United States a shocking 90 percent of the time, a rate that seriously erodes America’s ability to enforce its own trade laws. Stewart and Drake wrote, “The world trading system depends on countries’ ability to take rapid, effective, and meaningful action against unfair dumping and subsidization that is harming their manufacturers, farmers, ranchers, and workers. That ability is currently being undermined by the WTO dispute settlement system, contrary to the system’s original design.” Since 1995 when the WTO was established, it heard 42 trade remedy cases involving the United States and issued 38 decisions against the United States. That means that in 38 instances when the U.S. imposed sanctions against foreign companies for violating U.S. trade laws, the WTO ordered reversal of those rulings. It’s nearly five times the number for any of the other 163 member countries. In addition, the report points out that the WTO’s focus on trade sanctions is out of line. Forty-five percent of WTO final or interim decisions have challenged trade remedies, even though these measures, such as tariffs, affect a minuscule portion of world trade. Stewart and Drake note that WTO decisions have “prompted legal scholars to criticize dispute panels, and especially the Appellate Body, for going beyond their mandate and creating new rights and obligations beyond those contained in the WTO agreements.” They also point out that the U.S. Trade Representative and other WTO members have repeatedly expressed concern about WTO over-reaching. “For years, Congress has identified reining in the WTO dispute settlement system and preserving the ability of the United States to rigorously enforce its trade remedy laws as key trade negotiating objectives,” the report states. That is what the Trump administration told Congress last week it intends to do. America will defend its “national sovereignty over trade policy,” the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative said in its annual report to Congress. Under the terms of its entry into the WTO, the U.S. didn’t abandon its own trade rights, the annual report says. Free traders responded immediately with complaints. For example, Eswar Prasad, a senior professor of trade policy at Cornell University, told the Washington Post: “If the Trump administration follows through on the proposals in this document, it would be a body blow to the multinational trade system that the U.S. has helped to build up. . .The WTO will lose effectiveness and credibility in trade resolutions if the U.S. decides to walk away.” The United States helped build up a multinational trade system that is tearing down American manufacturing. That system already has lost credibility by focusing the vast majority of its enforcement on the United States, which from 1995 to 2015 accounted for only 14.17 percent of global imports and imposed only 12.73 percent of trade sanctions among the WTO nations. The current system, as last week’s Alliance for American Manufacturing report points out, is deeply flawed. It’s not free trade. It’s faulty trade. Companies like Alcoa and U.S. Steel, workers like Brandon and Josh, communities like Wenatchee and Warrick are all suffering as a result. The president is right to move the country toward fair trade by trumping the WTO. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

06 марта, 15:47

Trumping The WTO

This month is the one-year anniversary of Alcoa closing the largest aluminum smelter in the United States – the Warrick in Indiana. More than 325 workers lost their family-supporting jobs, including Brandon Marshall, who, like most aluminum workers, was a member of my union, the United Steelworkers (USW). Brandon told the New York Times last week that he found another job, but it pays only about half what he earned before, so his wife had to go back to work. Alcoa also shut down its Wenatchee smelter last year, laying off 420 workers in Washington State, including Josh Busjahn, who told a reporter from public radio’s Marketplace that he had to cut his family’s budget in half. In 1970, there were 24,000 aluminum smelter workers nationwide. Now, there are 2,200. Just 17 years ago, the United States had 23 smelters. Now, there are five. And only one is operating at full capacity. A major cause of this suffering and job loss is China’s violation of trade rules. Beijing overbuilt its aluminum capacity to keep its citizens employed, then dumped the subsidized excess on the world market, artificially suppressing prices. In January, the Obama administration filed a complaint against China with the World Trade Organization (WTO) in an attempt to stop Beijing’s destruction of the American industry, one that is crucial to national defense. But the outlook for this case isn’t great. The WTO has repeatedly stiffed the United States. It’s supposed to adjudicate trade disputes, but a new report, commissioned by the Alliance for American Manufacturing (AAM) and titled, “How the WTO Undermines U.S. Trade Remedy Enforcement,” shows that the WTO treats the United States like a punching bag that must suffer the economic blows of trade cheating by nations worldwide. For a quarter century, since the dawn of NAFTA, the USW has called for fair trade and protection for American manufacturers like Alcoa and workers like Brandon and Josh against abuses such as currency manipulation, government subsidization and dumping. Finally, last week, President Donald Trump announced the United States would not be bound by WTO decisions. That sounded great to laid-off manufacturing workers nationwide. The president’s action is supported by findings in the Alliance for American Manufacturing report written by trade law experts Terence P. Stewart and Elizabeth J. Drake. The report shows that the WTO has taken a hugely disproportionate number of cases against the United States. And in those cases, the WTO ruled against the United States a shocking 90 percent of the time, a rate that seriously erodes America’s ability to enforce its own trade laws. Stewart and Drake wrote, “The world trading system depends on countries’ ability to take rapid, effective, and meaningful action against unfair dumping and subsidization that is harming their manufacturers, farmers, ranchers, and workers. That ability is currently being undermined by the WTO dispute settlement system, contrary to the system’s original design.” Since 1995 when the WTO was established, it heard 42 trade remedy cases involving the United States and issued 38 decisions against the United States. That means that in 38 instances when the U.S. imposed sanctions against foreign companies for violating U.S. trade laws, the WTO ordered reversal of those rulings. It’s nearly five times the number for any of the other 163 member countries. In addition, the report points out that the WTO’s focus on trade sanctions is out of line. Forty-five percent of WTO final or interim decisions have challenged trade remedies, even though these measures, such as tariffs, affect a minuscule portion of world trade. Stewart and Drake note that WTO decisions have “prompted legal scholars to criticize dispute panels, and especially the Appellate Body, for going beyond their mandate and creating new rights and obligations beyond those contained in the WTO agreements.” They also point out that the U.S. Trade Representative and other WTO members have repeatedly expressed concern about WTO over-reaching. “For years, Congress has identified reining in the WTO dispute settlement system and preserving the ability of the United States to rigorously enforce its trade remedy laws as key trade negotiating objectives,” the report states. That is what the Trump administration told Congress last week it intends to do. America will defend its “national sovereignty over trade policy,” the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative said in its annual report to Congress. Under the terms of its entry into the WTO, the U.S. didn’t abandon its own trade rights, the annual report says. Free traders responded immediately with complaints. For example, Eswar Prasad, a senior professor of trade policy at Cornell University, told the Washington Post: “If the Trump administration follows through on the proposals in this document, it would be a body blow to the multinational trade system that the U.S. has helped to build up. . .The WTO will lose effectiveness and credibility in trade resolutions if the U.S. decides to walk away.” The United States helped build up a multinational trade system that is tearing down American manufacturing. That system already has lost credibility by focusing the vast majority of its enforcement on the United States, which from 1995 to 2015 accounted for only 14.17 percent of global imports and imposed only 12.73 percent of trade sanctions among the WTO nations. The current system, as last week’s Alliance for American Manufacturing report points out, is deeply flawed. It’s not free trade. It’s faulty trade. Companies like Alcoa and U.S. Steel, workers like Brandon and Josh, communities like Wenatchee and Warrick are all suffering as a result. The president is right to move the country toward fair trade by trumping the WTO. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

06 марта, 15:21

Alcoa (AA) Combines Business Units, Appoints New Unit Head

Alcoa (AA) is merging its business units to increase operational agility, cut costs and improve internal coordination.

03 марта, 11:24

Arconic (ARNC) Up 16.9% Since Earnings Report: Can It Continue?

Arconic (ARNC) reported earnings 30 days ago. What's next for the stock? We take a look at earnings estimates for some clues.

02 марта, 17:30

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Alcoa, AK Steel, U.S. Concrete, JPMorgan and Exxon Mobil

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Alcoa, AK Steel, U.S. Concrete, JPMorgan and Exxon Mobil

Выбор редакции
02 марта, 17:06

Alcoa to combine a number of business units to simplify structure

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news.

02 марта, 16:49

Why Alcoa (AA) Could Be a Potential Winner

One such company that looks well positioned for a solid gain, but has been overlooked by investors lately, is Alcoa Corporation (AA).

02 марта, 13:51

Американский премаркет: переход в истерическую фазу роста

Затишье на рынке, наблюдаемое в конце прошлой и начале этой недели, было явно временным. Рынок готовился к прыжку и оставался только открытым вопрос - куда? Вверх или вниз?

Выбор редакции
01 марта, 21:19

Alcoa (АА) может пострадать в случае увеличения китайского экспорта алюминия

Одной из главных проблем для мировой алюминиевой промышленности стал рост китайского экспорта алюминия. Именно в этом видят причину всех своих бед производители алюминия, такие как Alcoa (AA) и Century Aluminum (CENX). В 2015 году экспорт алюминия Китая вырос на 10% по сравнению с аналогичным периодом прошлого года. Столкнувшись с критикой большинства своих торговых партнеров, Китай объявил о сокращении избытка экспорта своего алюминия в конце 2015 года. После этого рынок увидел небольшое замедление китайского экспорта алюминия в 2016 году, с падением на 3,6% в годовом сопоставлении. Тем не менее, экономические причины повлияли на снижение экспорта больше, чем шаги, предпринятые китайским правительством. В прошлом году спрос на алюминий в Поднебесной показывал признаки восстановления на фоне более высокого спроса на автомобили и благодаря стимулам, предоставленным китайским правительством. Несмотря на это, в первой половине 2016 года китайские мощности по выплавке алюминия стояли на холостом ходу, преимущественно на фоне снижения цен на металл. Тем не менее, в 2017 году наблюдается другая ситуация. Китайский экспорт алюминия вырос на 2,6% до 390 тыс. метрических тонн, а производство этого металла в Китае выросло почти на 19% в прошлом месяце по сравнению с аналогичным периодом прошлого года. На Лондонской бирже металлов цены на алюминий перешли на более высокие уровни, некоторые из сокращенных мощностей в Китае могут вновь заработать. Недавний всплеск китайского производства алюминия также обосновывает эту точку зрения. Стоит отметить, что китайский экспорт алюминия не увеличился соразмерно со всплеском производства в январе. На текущий момент акции Alcoa (АА) котируются по $37,94 (+9,68%) Информационно-аналитический отдел TeleTradeИсточник: FxTeam

Выбор редакции
22 февраля, 17:48

Top Ranked Momentum Stocks to Buy for February 22nd

Top Ranked Momentum Stocks to Buy for February 22nd

22 февраля, 17:30

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Cymabay Therapeutics, Attunity, Lumentum Holdings, Datawatch and Arconic

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Cymabay Therapeutics, Attunity, Lumentum Holdings, Datawatch and Arconic

22 февраля, 17:30

Zacks.com featured highlights: Pool, Apollo Global Management and Alcoa

Zacks.com featured highlights: Pool, Apollo Global Management and Alcoa

22 февраля, 01:34

5 Top Performers of Trump's First 30 Days in Office

Trump indicated these gains were largely attributable to the positive sentiment generated by his victory.

22 февраля, 01:07

Explosive Returns with the Filtered Zacks Rank 5 Strategy

Explosive Returns with the Filtered Zacks Rank 5 Strategy

13 февраля, 15:32

Off-Shorers Should Shut Up

Whirlpool, the big appliance manufacturer, stressed in recent years its preference to make it in America. In 2013, it actually moved dishwasher manufacturing jobs back to the United States from Mexico. The next year, it announced a $40 million investment in its Greenville, Ohio KitchenAid plant, adding 400 jobs. Last year, Whirlpool CEO Jeff Fettig said the company would spend another $40 million to expand its Findlay, Ohio dishwasher plant, adding 50 jobs and raising to $1 billion its investment in U.S. manufacturing since 2010. Last week, Intel announced it would spend $7 billion to upgrade an Arizona facility and employ 3,000 people to fabricate advanced computer wafers – meaning its CEO Brian Krzanich chose the United States over Ireland, Israel and China where Intel already produces silicon wafers. So it makes sense that Fettig and Krzanich serve on President Donald Trump’s new Manufacturing Jobs Initiative. The initiative is supposed to help the president promote U.S. job and manufacturing growth. Curiously, though, named to that same 28-member committee are at least seven CEOs who have recently – and sometimes infamously – offshored manufacturing and jobs. They include Greg Hayes, CEO of United Technologies, the corporation that is shipping Indiana jobs from its Carrier subsidiary to Mexico. The performance of the manufacturing council is crucial to large swaths of workers who voted for President Trump based on his promises to stop unfair trade and resurrect American manufacturing. In his inauguration speech, the president told those voters that he would enact “America first” policies. It is no “America first” policy to send jobs from two profitable Carrier plants in Indiana to Mexico for the sole purpose of making extra bucks. That kind of offshoring exhibits a greed first mindset. The CEOs who have pursued that philosophy should shut up and take advice from the committee’s American job creators. The U.S. job generators on the committee include the likes of Elon Musk, CEO of Tesla. His cars were rated the most American-made electrics for content and assembly for the second year in a row in 2016. The council also includes Mario Longhi, the CEO of U.S. Steel, and Klaus Kleinfeld, who last fall became CEO of Arconic, but who for eight years before that was CEO of Alcoa, the corporation that split to create Alcoa and Arconic. U.S. Steel and Alcoa have suffered from unfair trade, so Longhi and Kleinfeld have a strong interest in policies that support American manufacturing. But, oddly, placed on the committee was recently retired Caterpillar CEO Doug Oberhelman, who announced two years ago that the corporation would move 230 jobs making gear and engine oil pumps and valves from its plant in Joliet, Ill., to a factory in Monterrey, Mexico. Another advisor is Nucor CEO John Ferriola, who is building a new mill in Mexico instead of the United States. The joint venture with a Japanese company will make steel for the auto industry. Dana CEO Jim Kamsickas is on the committee too. This month, Dana is closing a truck parts manufacturing plant in Kentucky, shifting the work out of the country and killing 180 good, family-supporting American jobs. In 2007, it closed plants in Syracuse, Ind., and Cape Girardeau, Mo., and shipped the auto parts manufacturing work to Mexico. More than 250 American workers lost their jobs. This is what happens when so many corporations transport factories to Mexico. Then the supply chain – the manufacturing of components like engines and auto parts and steel – moves to Mexico too. For example, while Ford announced in January that it would invest $700 million and create 700 new jobs in Michigan, the auto company still intends to transfer production of its small car, the Focus, from the United States to Mexico. And yet, Ford CEO Mark Fields was chosen for the American manufacturing initiative. The United States lost 5 million manufacturing jobs since the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) took effect. Robots didn’t do it. Trade deficits did. Corporations like Carrier and Rexnord that offshore American factories then ship the manufactured products back to the United States kill good American jobs while ballooning the trade deficit. Those are the problems that workers who voted for Donald Trump wanted him to solve. They want those factories and those jobs back. That, however, is the opposite of the longstanding philosophy of General Electric. Its former CEO Jack Welch famously said, “Ideally, you’d have every plant you own on a barge to move with currencies and changes in the economy.” In other words, when a country like China manipulates the value of its currency and suppresses its workers’ wages, GE would uproot production from Peoria and float it to Beijing – allegiance to the United States be damned. That’s exactly what General Electric does under its current CEO Jeff Immelt. The show 60 Minutes described GE this way in 2009: “No company has gone global more aggressively than General Electric, the conglomerate that makes everything from refrigerators to MRI machines to jet engines.” Between 2004 and 2014, the number of GE employees in the United States declined by nearly 18 percent, from 165,000 to 136,000, while the number abroad rose 19 percent, from 142,000 to 169,000. Immelt was GE chairman that entire time. So it’s confounding that he is a member of an initiative that’s supposed to prioritize American jobs. Under Immelt’s leadership, not only does GE move factories, it uses offshoring as a threat when lawmakers don’t cave to its demands. In September of 2015, two months after Congress declined to reauthorize the Export-Import Bank, Immelt announced that GE, which had been among the largest benefactors of the bank, would move 500 U.S. jobs overseas. It was Republicans in Congress who had called the bank corporate welfare and refused to renew its charter. The bank provides financing for transactions that commercial lenders decline as too risky. But within six weeks of GE’s threats, Congress restored the bank, with a majority of Republicans suddenly on board. Frankly, it’s unpatriotic CEOs like Immelt and Hayes who should be stuck on a barge and shipped offshore. An American Manufacturing Jobs Initiative needs more CEOs who actually focus on making it in America. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

19 мая 2015, 23:59

США обвинили граждан КНР в краже секретов и шпионаже

Американские власти предъявили обвинения группе граждан Китая в экономическом шпионаже и краже секретов, представляющих коммерческую тайну.

Выбор редакции
10 октября 2012, 02:46

Отчет Alcoa за Q3 2012

Результаты на редкость мерзкие. Минус 142 млн за квартал. Это первый квартальный убыток за всю современную историю существования компании, если считать период с июля по сентябрь. Даже в 2008-2009 годах в Q3 была прибыль. Они говорят, что убыток из-за каких то там судебных издержек и при урегулировании экологических проблем в реке Грасс. Но мы то знаем, что все значительно хуже, чем они пытаются изобразить? ))Какие то 100-120 млн дополнительных издержек ничего не меняют в общей картине, которая наиболее удручающая. В лучшие времена компания имела до 2.5 млрд чистой прибыли в год, сейчас же убытки на 242 млн за последние 12 месяцев.Доходы упали на 9.5% к прошлому году.Сейчас на уровнях 10 летней давности. Они нам говорят, что это из-за падения цен на металл на 17%? Ну да, конечно )) Производство алюминия упало на 2% к прошлому году, хотя раньше в докризисный период давали темпы прироста в 20-25% годовых.Активы перестали расти, собственный капитал сокращается, инвестиции практически не производят. Раньше капитальные инвестиции составляли по 3.6 млрд долл в год, а сейчас немногим больше 1 млрд. В 3 раза упали.  Если дальше отчеты пойдут в стиле Alcoa, то мне станет страшно за американскую и мировую экономику ))alcoa Что ж, сезон отчетностей пока начали с фальстарта. Посмотрим, что будет дальше. Я практически уверен, что ничего хорошего. Прибыль и выручка должны быть ниже уровней сентября 2011. Таким образом, мы входим в рецессию.