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Выбор редакции
22 февраля, 17:48

Top Ranked Momentum Stocks to Buy for February 22nd

Top Ranked Momentum Stocks to Buy for February 22nd

22 февраля, 17:30

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Cymabay Therapeutics, Attunity, Lumentum Holdings, Datawatch and Arconic

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Cymabay Therapeutics, Attunity, Lumentum Holdings, Datawatch and Arconic

22 февраля, 17:30

Zacks.com featured highlights: Pool, Apollo Global Management and Alcoa

Zacks.com featured highlights: Pool, Apollo Global Management and Alcoa

22 февраля, 01:34

5 Top Performers of Trump's First 30 Days in Office

Trump indicated these gains were largely attributable to the positive sentiment generated by his victory.

22 февраля, 01:07

Explosive Returns with the Filtered Zacks Rank 5 Strategy

Explosive Returns with the Filtered Zacks Rank 5 Strategy

13 февраля, 15:32

Off-Shorers Should Shut Up

Whirlpool, the big appliance manufacturer, stressed in recent years its preference to make it in America. In 2013, it actually moved dishwasher manufacturing jobs back to the United States from Mexico. The next year, it announced a $40 million investment in its Greenville, Ohio KitchenAid plant, adding 400 jobs. Last year, Whirlpool CEO Jeff Fettig said the company would spend another $40 million to expand its Findlay, Ohio dishwasher plant, adding 50 jobs and raising to $1 billion its investment in U.S. manufacturing since 2010. Last week, Intel announced it would spend $7 billion to upgrade an Arizona facility and employ 3,000 people to fabricate advanced computer wafers – meaning its CEO Brian Krzanich chose the United States over Ireland, Israel and China where Intel already produces silicon wafers. So it makes sense that Fettig and Krzanich serve on President Donald Trump’s new Manufacturing Jobs Initiative. The initiative is supposed to help the president promote U.S. job and manufacturing growth. Curiously, though, named to that same 28-member committee are at least seven CEOs who have recently – and sometimes infamously – offshored manufacturing and jobs. They include Greg Hayes, CEO of United Technologies, the corporation that is shipping Indiana jobs from its Carrier subsidiary to Mexico. The performance of the manufacturing council is crucial to large swaths of workers who voted for President Trump based on his promises to stop unfair trade and resurrect American manufacturing. In his inauguration speech, the president told those voters that he would enact “America first” policies. It is no “America first” policy to send jobs from two profitable Carrier plants in Indiana to Mexico for the sole purpose of making extra bucks. That kind of offshoring exhibits a greed first mindset. The CEOs who have pursued that philosophy should shut up and take advice from the committee’s American job creators. The U.S. job generators on the committee include the likes of Elon Musk, CEO of Tesla. His cars were rated the most American-made electrics for content and assembly for the second year in a row in 2016. The council also includes Mario Longhi, the CEO of U.S. Steel, and Klaus Kleinfeld, who last fall became CEO of Arconic, but who for eight years before that was CEO of Alcoa, the corporation that split to create Alcoa and Arconic. U.S. Steel and Alcoa have suffered from unfair trade, so Longhi and Kleinfeld have a strong interest in policies that support American manufacturing. But, oddly, placed on the committee was recently retired Caterpillar CEO Doug Oberhelman, who announced two years ago that the corporation would move 230 jobs making gear and engine oil pumps and valves from its plant in Joliet, Ill., to a factory in Monterrey, Mexico. Another advisor is Nucor CEO John Ferriola, who is building a new mill in Mexico instead of the United States. The joint venture with a Japanese company will make steel for the auto industry. Dana CEO Jim Kamsickas is on the committee too. This month, Dana is closing a truck parts manufacturing plant in Kentucky, shifting the work out of the country and killing 180 good, family-supporting American jobs. In 2007, it closed plants in Syracuse, Ind., and Cape Girardeau, Mo., and shipped the auto parts manufacturing work to Mexico. More than 250 American workers lost their jobs. This is what happens when so many corporations transport factories to Mexico. Then the supply chain – the manufacturing of components like engines and auto parts and steel – moves to Mexico too. For example, while Ford announced in January that it would invest $700 million and create 700 new jobs in Michigan, the auto company still intends to transfer production of its small car, the Focus, from the United States to Mexico. And yet, Ford CEO Mark Fields was chosen for the American manufacturing initiative. The United States lost 5 million manufacturing jobs since the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) took effect. Robots didn’t do it. Trade deficits did. Corporations like Carrier and Rexnord that offshore American factories then ship the manufactured products back to the United States kill good American jobs while ballooning the trade deficit. Those are the problems that workers who voted for Donald Trump wanted him to solve. They want those factories and those jobs back. That, however, is the opposite of the longstanding philosophy of General Electric. Its former CEO Jack Welch famously said, “Ideally, you’d have every plant you own on a barge to move with currencies and changes in the economy.” In other words, when a country like China manipulates the value of its currency and suppresses its workers’ wages, GE would uproot production from Peoria and float it to Beijing – allegiance to the United States be damned. That’s exactly what General Electric does under its current CEO Jeff Immelt. The show 60 Minutes described GE this way in 2009: “No company has gone global more aggressively than General Electric, the conglomerate that makes everything from refrigerators to MRI machines to jet engines.” Between 2004 and 2014, the number of GE employees in the United States declined by nearly 18 percent, from 165,000 to 136,000, while the number abroad rose 19 percent, from 142,000 to 169,000. Immelt was GE chairman that entire time. So it’s confounding that he is a member of an initiative that’s supposed to prioritize American jobs. Under Immelt’s leadership, not only does GE move factories, it uses offshoring as a threat when lawmakers don’t cave to its demands. In September of 2015, two months after Congress declined to reauthorize the Export-Import Bank, Immelt announced that GE, which had been among the largest benefactors of the bank, would move 500 U.S. jobs overseas. It was Republicans in Congress who had called the bank corporate welfare and refused to renew its charter. The bank provides financing for transactions that commercial lenders decline as too risky. But within six weeks of GE’s threats, Congress restored the bank, with a majority of Republicans suddenly on board. Frankly, it’s unpatriotic CEOs like Immelt and Hayes who should be stuck on a barge and shipped offshore. An American Manufacturing Jobs Initiative needs more CEOs who actually focus on making it in America. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

13 февраля, 15:32

Off-Shorers Should Shut Up

Whirlpool, the big appliance manufacturer, stressed in recent years its preference to make it in America. In 2013, it actually moved dishwasher manufacturing jobs back to the United States from Mexico. The next year, it announced a $40 million investment in its Greenville, Ohio KitchenAid plant, adding 400 jobs. Last year, Whirlpool CEO Jeff Fettig said the company would spend another $40 million to expand its Findlay, Ohio dishwasher plant, adding 50 jobs and raising to $1 billion its investment in U.S. manufacturing since 2010. Last week, Intel announced it would spend $7 billion to upgrade an Arizona facility and employ 3,000 people to fabricate advanced computer wafers – meaning its CEO Brian Krzanich chose the United States over Ireland, Israel and China where Intel already produces silicon wafers. So it makes sense that Fettig and Krzanich serve on President Donald Trump’s new Manufacturing Jobs Initiative. The initiative is supposed to help the president promote U.S. job and manufacturing growth. Curiously, though, named to that same 28-member committee are at least seven CEOs who have recently – and sometimes infamously – offshored manufacturing and jobs. They include Greg Hayes, CEO of United Technologies, the corporation that is shipping Indiana jobs from its Carrier subsidiary to Mexico. The performance of the manufacturing council is crucial to large swaths of workers who voted for President Trump based on his promises to stop unfair trade and resurrect American manufacturing. In his inauguration speech, the president told those voters that he would enact “America first” policies. It is no “America first” policy to send jobs from two profitable Carrier plants in Indiana to Mexico for the sole purpose of making extra bucks. That kind of offshoring exhibits a greed first mindset. The CEOs who have pursued that philosophy should shut up and take advice from the committee’s American job creators. The U.S. job generators on the committee include the likes of Elon Musk, CEO of Tesla. His cars were rated the most American-made electrics for content and assembly for the second year in a row in 2016. The council also includes Mario Longhi, the CEO of U.S. Steel, and Klaus Kleinfeld, who last fall became CEO of Arconic, but who for eight years before that was CEO of Alcoa, the corporation that split to create Alcoa and Arconic. U.S. Steel and Alcoa have suffered from unfair trade, so Longhi and Kleinfeld have a strong interest in policies that support American manufacturing. But, oddly, placed on the committee was recently retired Caterpillar CEO Doug Oberhelman, who announced two years ago that the corporation would move 230 jobs making gear and engine oil pumps and valves from its plant in Joliet, Ill., to a factory in Monterrey, Mexico. Another advisor is Nucor CEO John Ferriola, who is building a new mill in Mexico instead of the United States. The joint venture with a Japanese company will make steel for the auto industry. Dana CEO Jim Kamsickas is on the committee too. This month, Dana is closing a truck parts manufacturing plant in Kentucky, shifting the work out of the country and killing 180 good, family-supporting American jobs. In 2007, it closed plants in Syracuse, Ind., and Cape Girardeau, Mo., and shipped the auto parts manufacturing work to Mexico. More than 250 American workers lost their jobs. This is what happens when so many corporations transport factories to Mexico. Then the supply chain – the manufacturing of components like engines and auto parts and steel – moves to Mexico too. For example, while Ford announced in January that it would invest $700 million and create 700 new jobs in Michigan, the auto company still intends to transfer production of its small car, the Focus, from the United States to Mexico. And yet, Ford CEO Mark Fields was chosen for the American manufacturing initiative. The United States lost 5 million manufacturing jobs since the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) took effect. Robots didn’t do it. Trade deficits did. Corporations like Carrier and Rexnord that offshore American factories then ship the manufactured products back to the United States kill good American jobs while ballooning the trade deficit. Those are the problems that workers who voted for Donald Trump wanted him to solve. They want those factories and those jobs back. That, however, is the opposite of the longstanding philosophy of General Electric. Its former CEO Jack Welch famously said, “Ideally, you’d have every plant you own on a barge to move with currencies and changes in the economy.” In other words, when a country like China manipulates the value of its currency and suppresses its workers’ wages, GE would uproot production from Peoria and float it to Beijing – allegiance to the United States be damned. That’s exactly what General Electric does under its current CEO Jeff Immelt. The show 60 Minutes described GE this way in 2009: “No company has gone global more aggressively than General Electric, the conglomerate that makes everything from refrigerators to MRI machines to jet engines.” Between 2004 and 2014, the number of GE employees in the United States declined by nearly 18 percent, from 165,000 to 136,000, while the number abroad rose 19 percent, from 142,000 to 169,000. Immelt was GE chairman that entire time. So it’s confounding that he is a member of an initiative that’s supposed to prioritize American jobs. Under Immelt’s leadership, not only does GE move factories, it uses offshoring as a threat when lawmakers don’t cave to its demands. In September of 2015, two months after Congress declined to reauthorize the Export-Import Bank, Immelt announced that GE, which had been among the largest benefactors of the bank, would move 500 U.S. jobs overseas. It was Republicans in Congress who had called the bank corporate welfare and refused to renew its charter. The bank provides financing for transactions that commercial lenders decline as too risky. But within six weeks of GE’s threats, Congress restored the bank, with a majority of Republicans suddenly on board. Frankly, it’s unpatriotic CEOs like Immelt and Hayes who should be stuck on a barge and shipped offshore. An American Manufacturing Jobs Initiative needs more CEOs who actually focus on making it in America. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

13 февраля, 06:26

Легкие и высокотехнологичные защитные материалы. Часть 2

Вот уже почти сто лет компания Alcoa Defense держит руку на пульсе инновационных технологий, являясь надежным партерном и поставщиком военных структур, ее продукция позволяет поддерживать защиту наземных, воздушных и морских платформ вооружения на самом высоком уровне.

Выбор редакции
08 февраля, 18:26

Top Ranked Growth Stocks to Buy for February 8th

Top Ranked Growth Stocks to Buy for February 8th

06 февраля, 05:52

Легкие и высокотехнологичные защитные материалы. Часть 1

Сфера защитных материалов необъятна и бурно развивается. Новые материалы расширяют технологическую основу для систем защиты личного состава и платформ вооружения. В тоже время меняются формы ведения бизнеса, который уходит от эксклюзивных поставщиков и других традиционных схем, общих для таких отраслей промышленности, как оборонная и обеспечения безопасности.

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Выбор редакции
02 февраля, 21:28

Here's How Arconic Performed After Its First Ever Earnings Report

Shares of Arconic Inc. (ARNC) were up by 11% at its highest on Wednesday following the release of their fourth quarter earnings result on Tuesday, despite reporting a net loss. This is its first earnings report after the split from Alcoa Inc.

02 февраля, 16:49

До начала регулярной сессии поступили сообщения о рейтингах акций следующих компаний

Повышение рейтингов: Аналитики BGC повысили рейтинг акций Apple (AAPL) до уровня Hold с Sell Аналитики JP Morgan повысили рейтинг акций Alcoa (AA) до уровня Overweight с Neutral Снижение рейтингов: Аналитики Pivotal Research Group снизили рейтинг акций Facebook (FB) до уровня Hold; целевая стоимость снижена до $135 Прочее: Аналитики Mizuho повысили целевую стоимость акций Facebook (FB) до $148 с $146Источник: FxTeam

Выбор редакции
02 февраля, 15:29

Alcoa upgraded to overweight from neutral at J.P. Morgan

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news.

01 февраля, 17:30

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Apple, Electronic Arts, Arconic and Alcoa

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Apple, Electronic Arts, Arconic and Alcoa

01 февраля, 14:32

Arconic's (ARNC) Q4 Earnings & Revenues Beat Estimates

Arconic's (ARNC) fourth-quarter adjusted earnings and sales beat the respective Zacks Consensus Estimate.

Выбор редакции
01 февраля, 08:29

Выделившаяся из Alcoa Arconic сообщила о годовом убытке

Arconic Inc., выделенная из металлургической компании Alcoa в ноябре прошлого года, сообщила о годовом убытке в $0,9 млрд, или $2,28 на акцию, против убытка в 2015 г. на уровне $0,3 млрд. В IV квартале убыток компании составил $1,2 млрд, или $2,88 на акцию, против чистого убытка годом ранее. Компания объяснила убытки результатом разделения материнской компании и сообщила, что с учетом всех затрат на эту реструктуризацию в IV квартале компания бы получила прибыль на уровне $0,12 на акцию.

01 февраля, 01:45

Apple Reports Big Earnings Beat, Plus EA and Arconic

Apple Inc. (AAPL) put an old-school beat-down on Q1 2017 estimates from the Zacks consensus: $3.36 per share on sales of $78.4 billion.

Выбор редакции
31 января, 23:16

Инвесторы требуют отставки гендиректора Arconic Клауса Кляйнфельда

В ноябре прошлого года Клаус Кляйнфельд, тогда возглавлявший крупнейшую металлургическую компанию США Alcoa, принимал поздравления с успешным разделением ее на две части. Но с тех пор акции Arconic, в которую вошли, как считалось, наиболее привлекательные подразделения по производству деталей для аэрокосмической и автомобильной отраслей, выросли всего на 1,7%. А акции новой Alcoa, куда были выделены менее стабильные горнодобывающий бизнес и производство алюминия, подорожали на 66%. Теперь, по словам людей, знакомых с ситуацией, ряд крупнейших акционеров Arconic настаивают на отставке возглавившего ее Кляйнфельда.

30 января, 18:18

Top Ranked Growth Stocks to Buy for January 30th

Top Ranked Growth Stocks to Buy for January 30th

19 мая 2015, 23:59

США обвинили граждан КНР в краже секретов и шпионаже

Американские власти предъявили обвинения группе граждан Китая в экономическом шпионаже и краже секретов, представляющих коммерческую тайну.

Выбор редакции
10 октября 2012, 02:46

Отчет Alcoa за Q3 2012

Результаты на редкость мерзкие. Минус 142 млн за квартал. Это первый квартальный убыток за всю современную историю существования компании, если считать период с июля по сентябрь. Даже в 2008-2009 годах в Q3 была прибыль. Они говорят, что убыток из-за каких то там судебных издержек и при урегулировании экологических проблем в реке Грасс. Но мы то знаем, что все значительно хуже, чем они пытаются изобразить? ))Какие то 100-120 млн дополнительных издержек ничего не меняют в общей картине, которая наиболее удручающая. В лучшие времена компания имела до 2.5 млрд чистой прибыли в год, сейчас же убытки на 242 млн за последние 12 месяцев.Доходы упали на 9.5% к прошлому году.Сейчас на уровнях 10 летней давности. Они нам говорят, что это из-за падения цен на металл на 17%? Ну да, конечно )) Производство алюминия упало на 2% к прошлому году, хотя раньше в докризисный период давали темпы прироста в 20-25% годовых.Активы перестали расти, собственный капитал сокращается, инвестиции практически не производят. Раньше капитальные инвестиции составляли по 3.6 млрд долл в год, а сейчас немногим больше 1 млрд. В 3 раза упали.  Если дальше отчеты пойдут в стиле Alcoa, то мне станет страшно за американскую и мировую экономику ))alcoa Что ж, сезон отчетностей пока начали с фальстарта. Посмотрим, что будет дальше. Я практически уверен, что ничего хорошего. Прибыль и выручка должны быть ниже уровней сентября 2011. Таким образом, мы входим в рецессию.