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24 мая, 16:06

SAPVoice: Big Data Is Life Of The Party: This Is What Data-Driven Tastes Like

Guests at the swanky, big data-powered SAP Leonardo & Analytics Smart-Bar reception last week enjoyed deftly crafted drinks with names like Mojito of Things, BI Bourbon, Analytics Ale, Cloud Chardonnay and AI Sauvignon. This is what the innovation buzz is all about.

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20 мая, 17:25

15 of the Healthiest Meals You Can Order at Applebee’s

Heading to Applebee's for dinner tonight? These are the healthiest meals you'll find on the menu, based on calories, fat, and sodium.

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18 мая, 17:45

Drink Whisky All Day. Stay Healthy. Here's How.

How do professionals in the beverage industry stay healthy, when it's their job to drink alcohol pretty much all day? It's a tricky question. Today, Maker’s Mark Bourbon's VP of Operations offers her perspective on some answers to that question.

13 мая, 14:28

How William F. Buckley, Jr., Changed His Mind on Civil Rights

The man who boasted he purged the conservative movement of ‘kooks’ and bigots was once a strong defender of racial discrimination—even violence. What changed?

09 мая, 18:18

17 Must-See Factory Tours in the United States

Learn all about the American manufacturing process and score some amazing free samples by embarking on some of these factory tours.

06 мая, 20:23

America’s Bourbon Boom

American whiskey is experiencing an impressive resurgence, but the road to the current bourbon boom hasn’t always been smooth. The post America’s Bourbon Boom appeared first on Visual Capitalist.

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05 мая, 21:47

A Bourbon-Drinker's Guide To Cinco De Mayo

Añejo tequila is aged in a barrel, providing the bridge for bourbon drinkers to cross over while enjoying the unique flavor of tequila.

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04 мая, 02:00

The 15 Worst States to Retire In

Which states will do the most harm to your retirement savings and laid-back lifestyle? If you're in one of these 15, you might want to move.

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02 мая, 15:05

Coming To Next Year's Kentucky Derby: A Top-Shelf Partnership Between Bar And Bourbon-Maker

Next year at this time, a massive craft distillery in Louisville will boast a bar run by the team behind some of the world’s best cocktail programs.

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01 мая, 18:41

'Kingsman: The Golden Circle' Partners With Old Forester For Truly Unique Movie Marketing

20th Century Fox wanted to have marketing for 'Kingsman: The Golden Circle' that was as unique as the movie itself. It partnered with Brown-Forester, legendary makers of Old Forester, to create a bourbon that jumped off the screen and into audience's hands.

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25 апреля, 15:43

'I Dream OF Jeannie' Home, A Jim Beam Whiskey Bourbon Bottle, Expected to Fetch $100,000 At Auction

The Jim Beam whiskey bourbon decanter bottle that was the original prop in the NBC TV series, "I Dream of Jeannie" starring Barbara Eden and Larry Hagman, goes up for auction this week by Juliens.

25 апреля, 13:00

Why You Should Have (at Least) Two Careers

It’s not uncommon to meet a lawyer who’d like to work in renewable energy, or an app developer who’d like to write a novel, or an editor who fantasizes about becoming a landscape designer. Maybe you also dream about switching to a career that’s drastically different from your current job. But in my experience, it’s rare for such people to actually make the leap. The costs of switching seem too high, and the possibility of success seems too remote. But the answer isn’t to plug away in your current job, unfulfilled and slowly burning out. I think the answer is to do both. Two careers are better than one. And by committing to two careers, you will produce benefits for both. In my case, I have four vocations: I’m a corporate strategist at a Fortune 500 company, US Navy Reserve officer, author of several books, and record producer. The two questions that people ask me most frequently are “How much do you sleep?” and “How do you find time to do it all?” (my answers: “plenty” and “I make the time”). Yet these “process” questions don’t get to the heart of my reasons and motivations. Instead, a more revealing query would be, “Why do you have multiple careers?” Quite simply, working many jobs makes me happier and leaves me more fulfilled. It also helps me perform better at each job. Here’s how. Subsidize Your Skill Development My corporate job paycheck subsidizes my record producing career. With no track record as a producer, nobody was going to pay me to produce his or her music, and it wasn’t money that motivated me to become a producer in the first place — it was my passion for jazz and classical music. Therefore, I volunteered so that I could gain experience in this new industry. My day job not only afforded me the capital to make albums, but it taught me the skills to succeed as a producer. A good producer should be someone who knows how to create a vision, recruit personnel, establish a timeline, raise money, and deliver products. After producing over a dozen albums and winning a few Grammys, record labels and musicians have started to reach out to see if they can hire me as a producer. I still refuse payment because making music, something that is everlasting, is reward enough for me. At the same time, I typically invite my corporate clients to recording sessions. For someone who works at an office all day, it’s exciting to go “behind-the-scenes” and interact with singers, musicians, and other creative professionals. While I was in Cuba making an album, one of my clients observed about the dancing musicians, “I’ve never been around people who have so much fun at work.” That my clients have a phenomenal experience only helps me drive revenue at work, so my corporate and recording careers are mutually beneficial. You and Your Team Series Career Transitions Free Yourself from What You “Should” Be Doing Andy Molinsky How to Use Your LinkedIn Profile to Power a Career Transition Jane Heifetz Change Your Career Without Having to Start All Over Again Dorie Clark Make Friends in Different Circles When I worked on Wall Street, my professional circle was initially limited to other folks in the financial services sector: bankers, traders, analysts, economists. Taken together, all of us establish a “consensus” view on the markets. And most of my asset manager clients were looking for something different: “Give me a contrarian perspective.” In other words, they didn’t want to hear the groupthink. I took this as marching orders to tap my rolodex for people who could provide my clients a differentiated perspective. For example, one of my clients wanted to understand what Chinese citizens were saying to each other. Because I am an author, I have gotten to know other writers, so I reached out to my friend who was a journalist at a periodical that monitors chatter in China. Not restricted by the compliance department of a bank, he was able to give an unbridled perspective to my client, who was most appreciative. My client got a new idea. I got a trade. My friend got a new subscriber. By being in different circles, you can selectively introduce people who would typically never meet and unlock value for everyone. Discover Real Innovations When you work different jobs, you can identify where ideas interact — and more significantly, where they should interact. “It’s technology married with liberal arts, married with the humanities, that yields us the result that makes our heart sing,” said Steve Jobs, who was the embodiment of interdisciplinary thinking. Because of Hurricane Katrina, many musicians left New Orleans. In order to generate funds to help musicians in the city, I could have created a typical nonprofit organization that solicits people for money. Instead, I helped create a more sustainable solution: a brokerage for musicians that I described as Wall Street meets Bourbon Street. People wanting to book a musician for a party in New York could find a band on my organization’s website, which would then ask the booker to add a “tip” which would be allocated to a New Orleans-based charity. The booker (who in some cases were my corporate clients) easily found a band for the party, the New York City-based musician got a gig, and the charity in New Orleans got a small donation. Because of my time working at a bank, I was able to create a different type of organization, one which has since merged with an even larger charitable organization. When you follow your curiosities, you will bring passion to your new careers, which will leave you more fulfilled. And by doing more than one job, you may end up doing all of them better.

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17 апреля, 21:05

11 Best Bourbons (Plus 5 Awesome Ryes) For Kentucky Derby Season 2017

There’s no better way to enjoy the Kentucky Derby than with a bourbon or mint julep in hand. (And if you’re so inclined, a rye.) Here are 16 solid bottle options to choose from—as curated by Julianna Arquilla from Chicago’s The Betty.

14 апреля, 04:19

7 Easy Dishes to Bring to Easter Dinner

Impress everyone at the Easter celebration with one of these 7 easy recipes.

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11 апреля, 05:46

The 16 Worst Frozen Meals You Should Never Eat

Some brands have a reputation for creating healthy meals for busy eaters. Some, however offer the worst frozen meals you can buy.

05 апреля, 03:18

Meet The New Class Of Wall Street Democrats

WASHINGTON ― When the 2008 financial crisis hit, the Democratic Party was forced to reckon with a dormant struggle between two internal factions that had ― until recently ― been feuding for centuries. One tradition, beginning with Thomas Jefferson and running through Franklin Delano Roosevelt, presented Democrats as defenders of the common man against the predations of elite financiers. Another, epitomized by 19th century Bourbon Democrat Grover Cleveland and his 20th century disciple Bill Clinton, viewed big business as an engine of progress and prosperity. There are other traditions in the party’s history, some shameful (see: segregation) and others obsolete (Prohibition). But the Democratic Party has spent most of its earthly tenure defining itself through its economic agenda.  By the time of the George W. Bush presidency, Democrats had evolved into the party of Economic Whatevz. If an economic program worked ― cool. If it didn’t ― well, that could be worked out. Voting rights, abortion rights, the Iraq War ― these were the pressing matters of principle. Economics, that was just a slate of numbers that needed to add up. The banking crash should have discredited this financial complacency. “We’re going to need an assload of food stamps if Wall Street blows up the economy again,” a House Democratic aide once griped to The Huffington Post, a comment that didn’t make the cut for a 2014 story on a new crop of (you guessed it) Wall Street Democrats. That staffer was voicing frustration with a party leadership that had essentially punted on the economic meltdown. A Democratic president had pursued Wall Street regulatory reforms while shrugging off the pursuit of criminal prosecutions for blatant fraud and agreeing to civil settlements that one of his top economic advisers now decries as a con job on the public. This toxic two-step played out in the 2016 Democratic Party presidential primary, with Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) excoriating big banks as former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton defended her paid speeches to Goldman Sachs. What was a Good Democrat ― or the general public ― to think?  It appears that not even Donald Trump can keep the modern Bourbon Democrats from the object of their hearts’ desire. On Tuesday, Sens. Mark Warner (D-Va.), Heidi Heitkamp (D-N.D.) and Jon Tester (D-Mont.) voted to advance the nomination of Jay Clayton, a man who worked as the bailout attorney for Goldman Sachs, to be the next chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, a regulator tasked with overseeing, among other big banks, Goldman Sachs. Clayton spent much of his confirmation hearing decrying cruel, counterproductive government regulations on “capital formation” while insisting he had no opinion about a rule that would require CEOs to disclose the ratio of their own pay to that of a typical company worker. “How exactly will Tester, Warner and Heitkamp explain to their constituents that they voted for a man to be Wall Street’s top cop whose only professional experience has been fighting to protect the interests of Wall Street’s most powerful institutions?” asks Karl Frisch, executive director of Allied Progress, a liberal group that advocates for tougher rules on banks and payday lenders. “They can spin and offer hollow rhetoric to excuse their actions, or they can simply point to their bulging campaign bank accounts.” They can spin and offer hollow rhetoric to excuse their actions, or they can simply point to their bulging campaign bank accounts. Karl Frisch of Allied Progress Most Democrats on the Senate Banking Committee opposed Clayton’s nomination. Sens. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) and Robert Menendez (D-N.J.) excoriated him during the confirmation hearing and voted against him in committee. And not every Red State Democrat on the committee decided that a vote for a Wall Street elite was the way to win over constituents. Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) voted against Clayton, and others may join him when Clayton is up for a vote on the Senate floor. But the Warner-Heitkamp-Tester axis will be an important coalition for Democrats in the Trump era, as on-again, off-again Democratic donors like JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon pursue bank deregulation under President Trump. Deregulating banks isn’t just about making it easier for bankers to pay themselves bigger salaries. It’s also about making it easier for banks to careen into crises that undermine ostensible Democratic priorities like preserving abortion rights, dealing with the racial wealth gap and not bombing the hell out of civilians. “It’s disappointing and unnecessary to see three Democratic senators line up with Trump’s agenda of enriching powerful corporations at the public’s expense,” notes Kurt Walters, campaign director for the liberal advocacy group Demand Progress. “Few states are filled with voters clamoring for a full-scale takeover of government positions by the most powerful corporate special interests in the country.” Warner, Heitkamp and Tester are often described as moderates ― politicians who don’t toe the party line. But they are better understood as Wall Street Democrats. Their collective willingness to support Trump’s SEC nominee, after all, demonstrates that there is no real party line against Wall Street ― Democratic leaders aren’t putting any feet down on the bailout attorney for Goldman Sachs and demanding that senators oppose his nomination. One cannot moderate partisanship by deviating from a party standard that does not exist. It’s a matter of simply swearing fealty to a different leader. Warner, Heitkamp and Tester declined to comment for this article. Clayton’s nomination will now be considered on the Senate floor. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

05 апреля, 03:18

Meet The New Class Of Wall Street Democrats

WASHINGTON ― When the 2008 financial crisis hit, the Democratic Party was forced to reckon with a dormant struggle between two internal factions that had ― until recently ― been feuding for centuries. One tradition, beginning with Thomas Jefferson and running through Franklin Delano Roosevelt, presented Democrats as defenders of the common man against the predations of elite financiers. Another, epitomized by 19th century Bourbon Democrat Grover Cleveland and his 20th century disciple Bill Clinton, viewed big business as an engine of progress and prosperity. There are other traditions in the party’s history, some shameful (see: segregation) and others obsolete (Prohibition). But the Democratic Party has spent most of its earthly tenure defining itself through its economic agenda.  By the time of the George W. Bush presidency, Democrats had evolved into the party of Economic Whatevz. If an economic program worked ― cool. If it didn’t ― well, that could be worked out. Voting rights, abortion rights, the Iraq War ― these were the pressing matters of principle. Economics, that was just a slate of numbers that needed to add up. The banking crash should have discredited this financial complacency. “We’re going to need an assload of food stamps if Wall Street blows up the economy again,” a House Democratic aide once griped to The Huffington Post, a comment that didn’t make the cut for a 2014 story on a new crop of (you guessed it) Wall Street Democrats. That staffer was voicing frustration with a party leadership that had essentially punted on the economic meltdown. A Democratic president had pursued Wall Street regulatory reforms while shrugging off the pursuit of criminal prosecutions for blatant fraud and agreeing to civil settlements that one of his top economic advisers now decries as a con job on the public. This toxic two-step played out in the 2016 Democratic Party presidential primary, with Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) excoriating big banks as former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton defended her paid speeches to Goldman Sachs. What was a Good Democrat ― or the general public ― to think?  It appears that not even Donald Trump can keep the modern Bourbon Democrats from the object of their hearts’ desire. On Tuesday, Sens. Mark Warner (D-Va.), Heidi Heitkamp (D-N.D.) and Jon Tester (D-Mont.) voted to advance the nomination of Jay Clayton, a man who worked as the bailout attorney for Goldman Sachs, to be the next chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, a regulator tasked with overseeing, among other big banks, Goldman Sachs. Clayton spent much of his confirmation hearing decrying cruel, counterproductive government regulations on “capital formation” while insisting he had no opinion about a rule that would require CEOs to disclose the ratio of their own pay to that of a typical company worker. “How exactly will Tester, Warner and Heitkamp explain to their constituents that they voted for a man to be Wall Street’s top cop whose only professional experience has been fighting to protect the interests of Wall Street’s most powerful institutions?” asks Karl Frisch, executive director of Allied Progress, a liberal group that advocates for tougher rules on banks and payday lenders. “They can spin and offer hollow rhetoric to excuse their actions, or they can simply point to their bulging campaign bank accounts.” They can spin and offer hollow rhetoric to excuse their actions, or they can simply point to their bulging campaign bank accounts. Karl Frisch of Allied Progress Most Democrats on the Senate Banking Committee opposed Clayton’s nomination. Sens. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) and Robert Menendez (D-N.J.) excoriated him during the confirmation hearing and voted against him in committee. And not every Red State Democrat on the committee decided that a vote for a Wall Street elite was the way to win over constituents. Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) voted against Clayton, and others may join him when Clayton is up for a vote on the Senate floor. But the Warner-Heitkamp-Tester axis will be an important coalition for Democrats in the Trump era, as on-again, off-again Democratic donors like JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon pursue bank deregulation under President Trump. Deregulating banks isn’t just about making it easier for bankers to pay themselves bigger salaries. It’s also about making it easier for banks to careen into crises that undermine ostensible Democratic priorities like preserving abortion rights, dealing with the racial wealth gap and not bombing the hell out of civilians. “It’s disappointing and unnecessary to see three Democratic senators line up with Trump’s agenda of enriching powerful corporations at the public’s expense,” notes Kurt Walters, campaign director for the liberal advocacy group Demand Progress. “Few states are filled with voters clamoring for a full-scale takeover of government positions by the most powerful corporate special interests in the country.” Warner, Heitkamp and Tester are often described as moderates ― politicians who don’t toe the party line. But they are better understood as Wall Street Democrats. Their collective willingness to support Trump’s SEC nominee, after all, demonstrates that there is no real party line against Wall Street ― Democratic leaders aren’t putting any feet down on the bailout attorney for Goldman Sachs and demanding that senators oppose his nomination. One cannot moderate partisanship by deviating from a party standard that does not exist. It’s a matter of simply swearing fealty to a different leader. Warner, Heitkamp and Tester declined to comment for this article. Clayton’s nomination will now be considered on the Senate floor. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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04 апреля, 22:02

How To Buy A Barrel Of Bourbon

Anytime my bourbon obsessed buddy, David Moritz, comes calling, it usually involves whiskey. On one particularly dreary day last year, he called about a lot of whiskey. “I’d like to buy a barrel of bourbon,” he announced. “And I need your help.” An adventure was born.

01 апреля, 11:00

Europe’s Illiberal Establishment

The European Union's supposedly liberal elites – in London and around the continent – are aghast at how populism is tearing Europe apart. Like the Bourbons, they have learned nothing and forgotten nothing.