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06 декабря, 13:22

Deforestation and the Trillion-Dollar Time Bomb

You probably recognize many of the companies on the first of the two lists we'll be examining today - like Colgate Palmolive, L'Oréal, and McDonald's, which are household names. You might not know the others - like Marfrig Global Foods and Bunge - but they're equally massive, and they depend on sustainable supplies of palm, soy, cattle, and timber & pulp - the "big four" forest risk commodities responsible most of the world's deforestation. These four commodities account for 24% of the cumulative income of 187 companies surveyed for a new report called "Revenue at risk: Why addressing deforestation is critical to business success", and their supplies could be disrupted if deforestation continues. Produced by CDP (formerly the Carbon Disclosure Project) at the behest of 365 institutional investors, the report concludes that disruptions in supplies of forest risk commodities could cost $906 billion per year. There's another list, too: the Forest 500, which names and shames the 500 entities that can end deforestation. Half those entities are companies, and many of them have pledged to end practices that kill forests. The list is compiled by the Global Canopy Programme (GCP), which ranks those pledges and gives credit for good ones. GCP also published a report today, and it's called "Sleeping giants of deforestation". It shows that 57% of the companies on the Forest 500 either have no policies to end deforestation or none that the organization deems credible, while the CDP report shows that just 42% of the companies on the risk side have even bothered to investigate the ways that supply disruptions could impact their business. On top of that, the Forest Trends Supply Change project tracks the progress that companies are reporting on their deforestation pledges and shows less than half of them are even reporting progress. Add the findings up, and you find a global agriculture sector facing an existential threat and partially acting on it, but mostly hobbled by poor traceability and weak governance or blinded by apathy and overconfidence and frustrated by shortages of certified raw materials. The GCP report looked at countries, too, and found many of those on the supply side - the rainforest countries that export forest risk commodities - were beginning to take action, while those on the demand side - the developed countries that import them - aren't. Paradoxically, while developed countries often funded sustainability efforts in tropical countries, only two of the importing countries on the Forest 500 - Germany and the Netherlands - formally support national sustainability efforts among consumers. The Bright(ish) Side It's not all doom and gloom. Supply Change also found that those pledges with publicly-available disclosure were, on average, more than 70% of the way towards completion; and while many companies are certainly avoiding disclosure to hide bad performance, others have taken productive actions that are just difficult to quantify. Danone, for example, is helping small farmers around the world shift to sustainable farming, and progress on that front won't show up incrementally the way shifting to certified commodities does. Likewise, Norwegian consumer goods group Orkla implemented a three-pronged sustainable palm oil policy in 2014 and recently saw their Forest 500 rating jump from three stars to five, as did two other companies: Colgate Palmolive and Marks & Spencer. Orkla has been working for years to replace palm oil with options that are healthier and not associated with deforestation, and they launched their sustainable palm oil policy in 2014. That involved renegotiating their contracts with key suppliers and becoming a member of the RSPO at Group level. "We have a regular dialogue with suppliers about the progress of the work," says Ellen Behrens, the company's Vice President for Corporate Responsibility. "We only work with suppliers who have good plans for sustainable improvement. Examples of supplier activities include the use of satellite-based risk assessments, fire alert systems and various types of training programs." Like Danone, they're also looking to drive complex changes on the ground. "We look for suppliers who engage in training of mill management and of farmers, and who engage in awareness-building in local communities," she says. The final component, she says, is certification, which among others is important to monitor compliance with important aspects such as working conditions and the use of pesticides. Their most recent disclosure document shows that 40% of the palm oil, blends, and derivatives they purchase are either certified as sustainable by the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) or have their impacts offset by Green Palm certificates. "Certification is the easiest activity to communicate in a quantified way," says Behrens. "We're currently looking into how to verify other activities." That's something to keep in mind as you explore the group's Supply Change profile: companies whose only pledge involves certification will show more "quantitative progress" than those undertaking more complex strategies, so it pays to heed the milestones embedded in the profiles as well. Radical Transparency The reports come in as a flurry of new transparency tools are also coming on line, as we covered in a recent edition of the Bionic Planet podcast, which is available on iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, and here: Perils and Possibility The CDP report uncovered a disturbing sense of confidence among companies with high exposure to the big four commodities, with 72% of them expressing confidence in their ability to source them in the future - even as 81% of companies in the Agricultural Production sector reported impacts related to forest-risk commodities in the past five years. On the other hand, many also seemed unaware of the potential for growth that a shift to sustainable sourcing could offer. "Investors are poised to capitalize on the opportunities that await," wrote CDP CEO Paul Simpson in the foreword. "Some of the biggest index providers in the world, including S&P and STOXX, have created low-carbon indices to help investors direct their money towards the sustainable companies of the future. Investors see opportunities in sustainably managed timberland, and are beginning to direct funding to innovative approaches to protect forests, such as REDD+ credits." This story is cross-posted on Ecosystem Marketplace. Read the original. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

03 декабря, 08:52

Can Radical Transparency Change Agriculture And Slow Climate Change?

This story is cross-posted on Ecosystem Marketplace. Kevin Rabinovitch stands straight and speaks in clear, clipped tones - more like a naval officer than a corporate quant - as, on the screen behind him, a daunting mass of threads and whorls illustrates the global flows of Brazilian soybeans from thousands of individual municipalities across Brazil, through specific exporters and importers, to countries around the world. "We buy a lot of soy from Brazil," he says. "But we also buy things that eat soy in Brazil before we buy them," he continues, referring to the chickens and cows that end up in pet food manufactured by food giant Mars Inc, where he's Global Director of Sustainability. Known for its ubiquitous Mars and Milky Way candy bars, privately-held Mars, Inc also makes Whiskas cat food, Wrigley's chewing gum, and dozens of other products that require tens of thousands of tons of cattle, soy, and palm oil - all of which are packaged in products derived from pulp & paper. These are the "big four" commodities responsible for most of the world's deforestation, and they achieved that status because thousands of companies buy them from hundreds of thousands of farmers around the world, and many of those farmers chop forests to make way for plantations. But a relative handful of companies have been acting more like environmental groups than for-profit entities, largely because unsustainable agriculture means unsustainable business. Mars, for example, recently teamed up with Danone to launch the Livelihoods Funds, which invest in sustainable small-scale farms around the world, and it's one of 56  companies to endorse the New York Declaration on Forests (NYDF), which aims, among other things, to purge deforestation "from the production of agricultural commodities such as palm oil, soy, paper, and beef products by no later than 2020." Even before endorsing the NYDF, Mars had established concrete goals for improving the way it gathers raw materials, and it set tight deadlines for achieving them. Now it's reporting solid progress on two of them: the Forest Trends Supply Change project shows Mars reporting it is 91% of the way towards achieving its palm oil goal and 89% of the way towards achieving its packaging goal. But the company hasn't yet publicly reported progress on its soy or cattle pledges, both of which have 2017 due dates, and Rabinovitch says the task is proving more difficult than he and most corporate sustainability directors imagined. "Privately amongst ourselves - and even publicly in forums - there's a lot of head-scratching that goes on," he says. "We know we want to end deforestation, but it's not obvious how we're going to do it, and it's critically important to have the data community step up and say, 'Here are tools that can help you.'" That massive blob on the wall behind him could be one of those tools (see "How it Works", below). Further Coverage on Bionic Planet Scroll down to continue reading, or hear more on the latest episode of of Bionic Planet, which is available on iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, and elsewhere. The latest episode features extended interviews with the team that developed Trase, as well as a walk-through of the platform. Trasing the Globe It's called "Trase", which stands for "TRAnsparence for Sustainable Economies", and was developed jointly over the past two years by the Global Canopy Programme (GCP), the Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI), and the European Forest Institute (EFI). It's designed to help companies and watchdogs track the impact that the purchases in one part of the world are having on the ground in other parts, and it works by tracking soybeans from every Brazilian municipality that produces them - more than 2,000 in total - through brokers, exporters, and importers, and then providing an overlay to compare the supply chain with environmental conditions in the municipality of origin. "Traders tell us that they need to be able to filter the threats and opportunities quickly to be able to prioritize those places - and the other actors associated with those places - where they need to be acting first, and with the highest priority," says Toby Gardner, an SEI Research Fellow who demonstrated the portal at year-end climate talks in Marrakesh, Morocco. The demonstration came just days before Climate Focus presented an assessment report consolidating data from 12 transparency initiatives, including Supply Change and GCP's Forest 500, as well as interviews with corporate sustainability officers, finding a disturbing lack of transparency around progress among NYDF companies. Tedious Research; Simple Interface Trase lets users view both a supply-chain map and a geographical map, and the data driving it was cobbled together over two years using bills of lading, customs declarations, and other documents generated in the harvesting and transport of soybeans. Many were purchased from trade intelligence companies. "Tellingly, this is data that already existed, but it was not tapped by the sustainability community," says Gardner. "We were looked upon with bemused astonishment when we approached trade intelligence companies to use these, and I wonder how many other useful sources are out there just waiting to be tapped." They plan to expand the portal to include other Latin American countries, then to facilities that crush soybeans into meal and oil, as well to feedlots that turn soybeans into chickens and beef, and finally to the other big four commodities. Internally, they assign confidence ratings to many of the "threads" in the supply-chain map, which is constantly being improved through site-specific research. "If a company declares that they have a production farm in a given municipality, that's something we can take into account," says Clément Suavet, who lead development of the platform. "As we gain more information, we can add certainty incrementally, and we would like to make this available on the site as well." Yin and Yang The platform is designed to blend with others that show different parts of the supply-chain puzzle. Trase, for example, ends at the port of import, which means it doesn't yet show end retailers and manufacturers. Supply Change, on the other hand, begins with end retailers and manufacturers, as well as brokers. "Each of our platforms are tackling different parts of the puzzle, and there are many others coming at it from other angles as well - from supply chains transparency and data collection tools such as CDP Forests Program to the sustainable commodity certification agencies such as RTRS and RSPO," says Stephen Donofrio, Supply Change's Senior Advisor. "As Supply Change relies solely on self-reported commitment declarations and progress updates, then in a sense, Trase compliments this in that it could provide a ground-truthing, or spot check, against what companies are saying in their own documentation." Rabinovitch says that, as more entities shine more transparency on supply chains, good companies will be more willing to show their cards, leading to virtuous cycle of more and more disclosure. "The default mindset of corporate entities is, 'If I share data, something bad cold happen; someone could figure out something about my business,'" he says. "But as soon as a number is out there, a customer or supplier says, 'I'm assuming that number applies to you, because Trase says it's the deforestation number of companies in your country,' so good actors now have a motivation to say, 'Whoa, hang on. Disaggregate us from that lot. These are our numbers,'" Thomas Sembres works with the UN REDD Facility and EFI. He contributed to the platform's development and sees such tools providing support to cash-strapped regulators, and cites the European Union's long development of the Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade (FLEGT) initiative, which is designed to identify sustainable sources of timber coming into the EU. "If this type of platform had existed when we were negotiating FLEGT, we would have been able to identify much more sharply the key actors from the private sector, as well as the key jurisdictions that have a stake in the trade between countries, and incentivize progress along the way," he says, adding that good actors are already becoming dramatically more transparent. "We're seeing transparency becoming a competitive advantage," he says. "We've struggled for so many years to try to convince the private sector to release more data on supply chains, but we've never had a complete picture." And that complete picture is critical, because transparency can be a double-edged sword, according to Rosa Maria Vidal, Executive Director of the Governors' Climate and Forests Fund. Use and Abuse: To Flee or to Fix? Vidal says she's a big believer in transparency, but she cautions that it can backfire if disclosure scares companies away from problematic municipalities instead of encouraging them to engage productively. "We're working to build new partnerships across 35 subnational jurisdictions responsible for 30% of the world's deforestation," she says. "These are jurisdictions that have promised to reduce deforestation 80% by 2020 by bringing benefits to communities, but they haven't seen any finance yet." If the emerging transparency efforts shine a light on companies that are sourcing material from high-deforestation areas, she says, they should encourage those companies to actively improve conditions rather than pull up and move elsewhere. "If we don't facilitate this dialogue - if we just say, 'It's a risky jurisdiction' - it will mean more deforestation because of fewer jobs and opportunity," she says - and Gardner agrees. "It's unrealistic for all companies to just pick up and move to where there are no problems, and if they tried, no one would ever meet their commitments," he says. "But companies often don't even know their impacts, and this makes it possible for them to know where they need to invest." How it Works The address is www.trase.earth, and the portal offers introductory tutorials at the bottom of the page.  Or you can click on "explore the tool" and see where your mouse takes you: The first layer shows all known soybean flows from Brazilian municipalities, through trading companies and exporters in Brazil to importers working in other countries. You can color code to highlight supply chains by various criteria - in this case, the type of biome from which the soybeans come: The Amazon may be Brazil's most famous biome, but the country has six of them, and some are more fragile than the forest. Or you can filter it to one or several countries - in this case, China: China is the leading importer of soybeans. Filter to one trader - Bunge - and you get this: Bunge is the largest soybean trader operating in Brazil. You can then reduce it to one importer - Guangxi - and you get this: Now you can trace all the flows through Bunge and Guangxi into China. Finally, you can expand the municipality bar to see where Bunge gets the beans that it sells to Guangxi. In this case, hundreds of strings appeared, but we highlighted just four. The municipalities you select will show up on the map, and you can begin layering in factors like deforestation rates, reported rates of forced labor, and water scarcity. Bunge buys from hundreds of municipalities in Brazil, but here we have highlighted four of them. Note their appearance on the map. You can also layer in various risk factors, such as rate of deforestation or reported cases of slave labor. For now, TRACE includes 320,000 unique pathways, and that will increase exponentially as the portal grows to include other countries and commodities. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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24 ноября, 15:49

Ghosts review – Niamh Cusack is outstanding in intense Ibsen

Home, ManchesterSeemingly located in the only fjord in range of Weatherfield, Polly Findlay’s powerful revival features some fine performancesWhen Ibsen’s Ghosts was first produced in London in 1891, it was dismissed by one critic as “an open drain, a loathsome sore unbandaged, a dirty act done publicly”. The festering atmosphere of Polly Findlay’s revival, using an updated version by David Watson, suggests the early reviewer got it just about right; though now we might use the same terms in glowing approbation.You wonder, for instance, what could be a more insidious example of a dirty deed done in public than Mrs Alving’s plan to expunge the sins of her dissolute husband by funding an orphanage. More than once you’re forced to consider what kind of children’s home could possibly be established in the late Captain Alving’s honour. The foul-mouthed carpenter Engstand threatens his daughter Regine with the prospect of: “That kiddies’ home … She’ll [Mrs Alving] bung you in there with those pikey little … before you can say bon-fucking-jour.” Continue reading...

20 ноября, 11:31

Победителей не садят, или Рейдерство как часть украинской бизнес-культуры

Специфика украинской бизнес-культуры способна извратить любые реформаторские намерения. Особенно если реформаторы эту специфику не учитывают, ярким доказательством чему стал новый ренессанс рейдерства в Украине.

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04 ноября, 16:18

Bunge (BG) is in Overbought Territory: What's Next?

Bunge Limited (BG) has moved higher as of late, but there could definitely be trouble on the horizon for this company

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01 ноября, 15:32

Agriculture Stocks' Q3 Earnings Slated on Nov 2: CF, IPI, BG

We take a look at three agriculture companies that are slated to report their third-quarter numbers on Nov 2.

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25 октября, 18:19

В начале 2017 года дефицит на рынке сахара может усугубиться

В период с 19 сентября по 21 октября 2016 г. цены на сахар-сырец продолжали расти, достигнув максимума на уровне 24,10 цента за фунт под влиянием активных покупок со стороны фондов, после чего снизились к уровню 22-23 цента за фунт. При экспирации октябрьского контракта на сахар-сырец №11 поставка составила 777,5 тыс. тонн сахара-сырца, из которых почти весь объем забрала компания Bunge Ltd. Долгосрочный растущий тренд на мировом рынке сахара продолжается, однако в настоящее время количество открытых длинных позиций крайне велико, что чревато резкими коррекциями цен вниз. По некоторым оценкам, рост волатильности может вызвать снижение цен на уровни 17-18 центов за фунт. Кроме того, большинство бразильских производителей уже захеджировали продажи произведенных объемов, а, по оценке компании Sucden, избыток сахара-сырца на мировом рынке в конце 4 кв. 2016 г. может достичь 860 тыс.

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25 октября, 12:46

В начале 2017 года дефицит на рынке сахара может усугубиться

В период с 19 сентября по 21 октября 2016 г. цены на сахар-сырец продолжали расти, достигнув максимума на уровне 24,10 цента за фунт под влиянием активных покупок со стороны фондов, после чего снизились к уровню 22-23 цента за фунт. При экспирации октябрьского контракта на сахар-сырец №11 поставка составила 777,5 тыс. тонн сахара-сырца, из которых почти весь объем забрала компания Bunge Ltd. Долгосрочный растущий тренд на мировом рынке сахара продолжается, однако в настоящее время количество открытых длинных позиций крайне велико, что чревато резкими коррекциями цен вниз. По некоторым оценкам, рост волатильности может вызвать снижение цен на уровни 17-18 центов за фунт. Кроме того, большинство бразильских производителей уже захеджировали продажи произведенных объемов, а, по оценке компании Sucden, избыток сахара-сырца на мировом рынке в конце 4 кв. 2016 г. может достичь 860 тыс.

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25 октября, 11:12

Открытие Брокер: В начале 2017 года дефицит на рынке сахара может усугубиться

В период с 19 сентября по 21 октября 2016 г. цены на сахар-сырец продолжали расти, достигнув максимума на уровне 24,10 цента за фунт под влиянием активных покупок со стороны фондов, после чего снизились к уровню 22-23 цента за фунт. При экспирации октябрьского контракта на сахар-сырец №11 поставка составила 777,5 тыс. тонн сахара-сырца, из которых почти весь объем забрала компания Bunge

21 октября, 14:00

The Comprehensive Business Case for Sustainability

Today’s executives are dealing with a complex and unprecedented brew of social, environmental, market, and technological trends. These require sophisticated, sustainability-based management. Yet executives are often reluctant to place sustainability core to their company’s business strategy in the mistaken belief that the costs outweigh the benefits. On the contrary, academic research and business experience point to quite the opposite. Embedded sustainability efforts clearly result in a positive impact on business performance.  Drawing from our own research and our colleagues’ research in this area, we have created a sustainability business case for the 21st century corporate executive. Hoping to alleviate their concerns, this article also provides concrete examples of how sustainability benefits the bottom line. For the purpose of this article, we define sustainable practices as those that: 1) at minimum do not harm people or the planet and at best create value for stakeholders and 2) focus on improving environmental, social, and governance (ESG) performance in the areas in which the company or brand has a material environmental or social impact (such as in their operations, value chain, or customers). We exclude companies with a traditional CSR program that supports employee volunteering in the community – this does not by itself qualify as sustainability. Driving competitive advantage through stakeholder engagement Traditional business models aim to create value for shareholders, often at the expense of other stakeholders. Sustainable businesses are redefining the corporate ecosystem by designing models that create value for all stakeholders, including employees, shareholders, supply chains, civil society, and the planet. Michel Porter and Mark Kramer pioneered the idea of “creating shared value,” arguing that businesses can generate economic value by identifying and addressing social problems that intersect with their business. Much of the strategic value of sustainability comes from the need to continually talk with and learn from key stakeholders. Through regular dialogue with stakeholders and continual iteration, a company with a sustainability agenda is better positioned to anticipate and react to economic, social, environmental, and regulatory changes as they arise. When firms fail to establish good relationships with their stakeholders, it can lead to increased conflict and reduced stakeholder cooperation. This can disrupt a firm’s ability to operate on schedule and budget.  A study of the gold mining industry, for example, found that stakeholder relations can heavily influence land permitting, taxation, and the regulatory environment, thus playing a substantial role in determining whether a firm has the right to transform gold into shareholder capital – therefore, as the study authors wrote, stakeholder engagement “is not just corporate social responsibility but enlightened self-interest.” Improving risk management Supply chains today extend around the world, and are vulnerable to natural disasters and civil conflict. Climate change, water scarcity, and poor labor conditions in much of the world increase the risk. McKinsey reports that the value at stake from sustainability concerns can be as a high as 70% of earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization. In the largest study on climate change data and corporations, 8,000 supplier companies (that sell to 75 multinationals) reported on their level of climate risk. Of the respondents, 72% said that climate change presents risks that could significantly impact their operations, revenue, or expenditures. Unlike traditional forms of business risk, social and environmental risks manifest themselves over a longer term, often affect the business on many dimensions, and are largely outside the organization’s control. Managing risks therefore requires making investment decisions today for longer-term capacity building and developing adaptive strategies. In the agriculture, food, and beverage sector, the impacts of climate change have the potential to alter growing conditions and seasons, increase pests and disease, and decrease crop yields. Disruptions in the supply chain may affect production processes that depend on unpriced natural capital assets such as biodiversity, groundwater, clean air, and climate. These unpriced natural capital costs are generally internalized until events like floods or droughts cause disruption to production processes or commodity price fluctuation. For example, Bunge, an agribusiness firm, reported a $56 million quarterly loss in its sugar and bioenergy segments due to drought in 2010. Flooding in 2011 in Thailand, harmed 160 companies in the textile industry and halted nearly a quarter of the country’s garment production, increasing global prices by 28%. To address these threats along their supply chain, companies like Mars, Unilever, and Nespresso have invested in Rainforest Alliance certification to help farmers deal with climate volatility, reduce land degradation, and increase resilience to drought and humidity—all of which ensure the long-term supply of their agricultural products. Certification also improves productivity and net income:   According to an independent study by COSA, Rainforest Alliance reported that certified cocoa farmers in Cote d’Ivoire, for example, produced 1,270 pounds of cocoa per hectare, compared with 736 pounds per hectare on non-certified farms. Net income was also significantly higher on certified cocoa farms than noncertified: $403 versus $113 USD per hectare. Companies are also experiencing risks in their manufacturing due to resource depletion – particularly water. Water has largely been considered a free raw material and therefore used inefficiently, but many companies are now experiencing the higher costs of using the resource. Coca-Cola, for example, faced a water shortage in India that forced it to shut down one of its plants in 2004. As the 24th biggest industrial consumer of water, Coca Cola has now invested $2 billion to reduce water use and improve water quality in the communities in which it operates. SabMiller has also invested heavily in water conservation, including $6 million to improve equipment at a facility in Tanzania affected by deteriorating water quality. Water-related risks threaten to strand billions of dollars for mining, oil, and gas companies. “Stranded assets” are investments that become obsolete due to regulatory, environmental, or market constraints. For example, social conflict related to disruptions to water supplies in Peru has resulted in the indefinite suspension of $21.5 billion in mining projects since 2010. Fostering innovation Investing in sustainability is not only a risk management tool; it can also drive innovation.  Redesigning products to meet environmental standards or social needs offers new business opportunities. 3M, for example, integrates sustainability into its innovation pipeline through its “Pollution Prevention Pays” program, which aims to proactively minimize waste and avoid pollution through product reformulation, equipment redesign, process modification, and waste recycling. 3M’s Novec fire suppression fluids are the first viable, sustainable alternative to hydrofluorocarbons. Nike embedded sustainability into its innovation process and created the $1 billion-plus Flyknit line, which uses a specialized yarn system, requiring minimal labor and generating large profit margins. Flyknit reduces waste by 80% compared with regular cut and sew footwear.   Since its launch in 2012, Flyknit has reduced 3.5 million pounds of waste and fully transitioned from yarn to recycled polyester, diverting 182 million bottles from landfills. Recognizing the growing consumer interest in sustainable products and looking to solve consumer challenges such as high energy costs, CPG companies have developed new products to gain access to this market. Proctor & Gamble, for example, conducted a life cycle assessment of its products and found that U.S. households spend 3% of annual electricity budgets on heating water to wash clothes. In 2005, they launched a U.S. and European line of cold-water detergents that require 50% less energy than warm water washing. Facing strict regulation on chemical release and competition from flowers from Africa, the Dutch flower industry developed a closed-loop system that grows flowers hydroponically in greenhouses, lowering risk of infestation and reducing the use of fertilizers and pesticides. The system also improves product quality by creating regulated growing conditions. Their innovative system has increased productivity and quality, reduced environmental impact and costs, and increased global competitiveness. Improving Financial Performance Many business leaders have the erroneous perception that one can have profits or sustainability, but not both.  This probably has its roots in Milton Friedman’s 50-year old, but still influential, thesis that the only business of a business is profit as well as a hangover from the 1970s and 80s, when low quality, high priced environmental products failed in the market and early socially responsible investing delivered low returns. That conventional wisdom has now reversed. In addition to the financial benefits that accrue from increased competitive advantage and innovation as discussed earlier, companies are realizing significant cost savings through environmental sustainability-related operational efficiencies. Moreover, investors are now able to track the high performers on ESG (environmental, social and governance factors) and are correlating better financial performance with better ESG performance. Significant cost reductions can result from improving operational efficiency through better management of natural resources like water and energy, as well as minimizing waste. One study estimated that companies experience an average internal rate of return of 27% to 80% on their low carbon investments. Since 1994, Dow has invested nearly $2 billion in improving resource efficiency and has saved $9.8 billion from reduced energy and wastewater consumption in manufacturing.  In 2013, GE had reduced greenhouse gas emissions by 32% and water use by 45% compared to 2004 and 2006 baselines, respectively, resulting in $300 million in savings. A focus on sustainability can also unlock opportunities for process and logistics savings. Wal-Mart, for example, aimed to double fleet efficiency between 2005 and 2015 through better routing, truck loading, driver training, and advanced technologies. By the end of 2014, they had improved fuel efficiency approximately 87% compared to the 2005 baseline. In that year, these improvements resulted in 15,000 metric tons of CO2 emissions avoided and savings of nearly $11 million. Mounting evidence shows that sustainable companies deliver significant positive financial performance, and investors are beginning to value them more highly. Arabesque and University of Oxford reviewed the academic literature on sustainability and corporate performance and found that 90% of 200 studies analyzed conclude that good ESG standards lower the cost of capital; 88% show that good ESG practices result in better operational performance; and 80% show that stock price performance is positively correlated with good sustainability practices. Here are some other datapoints to consider: Between 2006 and 2010, the top 100 sustainable global companies experienced significantly higher mean sales growth, return on assets, profit before taxation, and cash flows from operations in some sectors compared to control companies. During the 2008 recession, companies committed to sustainability practices achieved “above average” performance in the financial markets during the 2008 recession, translating into an average of $650 million in incremental market capitalization per company. Additionally, companies with superior environmental performance experienced lower cost of debt by 40-45 basis points. Studies also suggest that companies with strong corporate responsibility reputations “experience no meaningful declines in share price compared to their industry peers during crises” versus firms with poor CSR reputations whose reputations declined by “2.4-3%; a market capitalization loss of $378M per firm.” Investors are paying attention. According to the 2015 EY Global Institutional Investor Survey, investors are increasingly using companies’ nonfinancial disclosures to inform their investment decisions. In its survey of over 200 institutional investors, 59.1% of respondents view nonfinancial disclosures as “essential” or “important” to investment decisions, up from 34.8% in 2014. Some 62.4% of investors are concerned about the risk of stranded assets (i.e. assets that lose value prematurely due to environmental, social, or other external factors) and over one-third of respondents reported cutting their holdings of a company in the past year because of this risk. Building Customer Loyalty Companies are skeptical about consumer interest in sustainable products – especially where willingness-to-pay is concerned.  Some of that is self-inflicted, as early on companies tended to increase “sustainable” product prices substantially and in some cases sold inferior products (e.g. pricy natural cleaning products that did not work). However, a shift is occurring in the minds of consumers. Today’s consumers expect more transparency, honesty, and tangible global impact from companies and can choose from a raft of sustainable, competitively priced, high quality products.  In fact, one study found that among numerous factors surveyed, the news coverage regarding environmental and social responsibility was the only significant factor that affected respondents’ evaluation of a firm and intent to buy. Nearly two-thirds of consumers across six international markets believe they “have a responsibility to purchase products that are good for the environment and society” — 82% in emerging markets and 42% in developed markets. In the food and beverage industry, a growing number of consumers are considering values beyond price and taste in their purchasing decisions, such as safety, social impact, and transparency. Far from feeling skittish about buying sustainable products, today’s consumers perceive a higher level of product performance in products from sustainable companies and sustainability information has a significantly positive impact on consumers’ evaluation of a company, which translates into purchase intent. The results of these studies support that consumers in a post-Recession era are shifting purchasing decisions to brands with integrity, social responsibility, and sustainability at their core. In fact, Unilever claims its “brands with purpose” are growing at twice the rate as others in their portfolio. Companies can also charge higher price premiums based on positive corporate responsibility performance. These premiums can reach 20% according to some estimates. Moreover, some studies show that overall sales revenue can increase up to 20% due to corporate responsibility practices. Another study found that revenues from sustainable products and services grew at six times the rate of overall company revenues between 2010 and 2013, among the 12 members of the S&P Global 100 sampled (Singer, 2015). GE’s Ecomagination division, for example, has generated $200 billion in sales since 2005. IKEA’s line of sustainable products like LED bulbs and solar panels from its Products for a More Sustainable Life at Home now generate a billion dollars. Attracting and Engaging Employees Corporate sustainability initiatives aimed at improving ESG performance and proving value to society can increase employee loyalty, efficiency, and productivity and improve HR statistics related to recruitment, retention, and morale. Research is finding that 21st century employees are focusing more on mission, purpose, and work-life balance. Companies that invest in sustainability initiatives tend to create sought-after culture and engagement due to company strategy focusing more on purpose and providing value to society.  In addition, companies who embed sustainability in their core business strategy treat employees as critical stakeholders, just as important as shareholders. Employees are proud to work there and feel part of a broader effort. One study found that morale was 55% better in companies with strong sustainability programs, compared to those with poor ones, and employee loyalty was 38% better. Better morale and motivation translate into reduced absenteeism and improved productivity. Firms that adopted environmental standards have seen a 16% increase in productivity over firms that did not adopt sustainability practices. Corporate responsibility performance also positively impacts turnover and recruitment. Studies show that firms with greater corporate responsibility performance can reduce average turnover over time by 25-50%. It can also reduce annual quit rates by 3-3.5%, saving replacement costs up to 90%-200% of an employee’s annual salary for each retained position. *** The preponderance of evidence shows that sustainability is going mainstream.  Executives can no longer afford to approach sustainability as a “nice to have” or as solid function separated from the “real” business.  Those companies that proactively make sustainability core to business strategy will drive innovation and engender enthusiasm and loyalty from employees, customers, suppliers, communities and investors.

12 октября, 09:33

The Economist explains: Why is world trade growth slowing?

Main image:  GLOBAL trade is in a grim state. Between 1985 and 2007 trade volumes shot up at around twice the rate of global GDP; since 2012 the rate of growth has barely kept pace. Things appear to be getting worse. On September 27th the World Trade Organisation slashed its forecast for growth in trade of goods from 2.8% in 2016 to just 1.7%, implicitly predicting that for the first time in 15 years, trade would grow more slowly than GDP. Trade lets countries specialise, it allows ideas to spread and it promotes healthy competition. Policymakers interested in economic growth should be asking why it is so weak. Trade depends on a mix of demand and supply in different countries. It can be bunged up by protectionism, and deflated by depressed economies (exports and imports depend on demand). It also depends on more benign factors; the rapid growth of the 1990s and early 2000s was itself unnaturally high. Two forces added momentum to trade over that period: the falling costs of doing business across borders and China’s entry into the global economy. Lower costs encouraged a web of supply chains to form, so that parts that were previously manufactured domestically could be shipped and assembled in foreign countries. Now that costs are not falling as quickly, the process may have run ...

12 октября, 09:33

The Economist explains: Why is world trade growth slowing?

Main image:  GLOBAL trade is in a grim state. Between 1985 and 2007 trade volumes shot up at around twice the rate of global GDP; since 2012 the rate of growth has barely kept pace. Things appear to be getting worse. On September 27th the World Trade Organisation slashed its forecast for growth in trade of goods from 2.8% in 2016 to just 1.7%, implicitly predicting that for the first time in 15 years, trade would grow more slowly than GDP. Trade lets countries specialise, it allows ideas to spread and it promotes healthy competition. Policymakers interested in economic growth should be asking why it is so weak. Trade depends on a mix of demand and supply in different countries. It can be bunged up by protectionism, and deflated by depressed economies (exports and imports depend on demand). It also depends on more benign factors; the rapid growth of the 1990s and early 2000s was itself unnaturally high. Two forces added momentum to trade over that period: the falling costs of doing business across borders and China’s entry into the global economy. Lower costs encouraged a web of supply chains to form, so that parts that were previously manufactured domestically could be shipped and assembled in foreign countries. Now that costs are not falling as quickly, the process may have run ...

11 октября, 16:53

Ключевой вопрос инвестиций в портовую отрасль лежит в законодательной плоскости

Главная проблема инвестирования в морехозяйственный комплекс Украины лежит в законодательной плоскости и в вопросах изменения этого законодательства, считает генеральный директор группы терминалов "ТИС" (Одесская обл.) Андрей Ставницер.

Выбор редакции
07 октября, 15:46

На серых схемах в Николаевском порту зарабатывают до $20 млн в год

Схемы, которые внедрили руководители крупных компаний-зернотрейдеров и руководство Николаевского порта, приносят их создателям до 20 миллионов долларов ежегодно.

03 октября, 15:08

Solidarity Against Trump

Donald Trump likes to say he has a very, very good relationship with unions.  “I have great relationships with unions,” he told Newsweek last year. And the press is in love with saying blue-collar workers are in love with Trump. Real reporters and even fake news shows like Full Frontal with Samantha Bee have crisscrossed the rust belt interviewing blue-collar workers seeking the reason for Trump’s supposed allure. The AFL-CIO has found, however, that only a small faction, fewer than a third, of its members are Trump supporters. That’s true in my union, the United Steelworkers (USW), as well. And the numbers are declining daily as members find out the truth about The Donald, including how he managed to lose a whopping $916 million in one year and his failure to pay federal income taxes. Particularly important to my members is the issue of trade because we are a manufacturing union, with members making not just steel, but tires, glass, paper, cardboard, aluminum, auto parts and many other products. When Trump promises to arbitrarily slap 25 percent and 35 percent tariffs on unfairly traded commodities from China and Mexico, that sounds great. That is, until the voter discovers a U.S. president can’t unilaterally impose tariffs. Also, until the voter discovers Trump manufactures virtually all his signature products, from suits to shirts, sweaters, belts, ties, tie pins, tie clips, and dozens of others, overseas. Not by American workers in America. Trump could have created American jobs. But he chose not to. Here is what some members of my union had to say about the difference between The Don and Hillary Clinton: Michael D. Snyder, 58 of Decatur, Ind., works for Bunge, which makes food oils. A union man for 39 years, he’s been president of USW Local 15173 for 21 years. “You need to look at the whole package and history of a candidate for president. Look at the whole package of Trump. I see someone who has done nothing but take from people in this country. There is a huge list of people who are suing him for taking from them, and that is disrespecting the American people.  “It is a power game. He has got all the money. He knows he can do all these terrible things. He knows he may have to pay, but not until he is forced to by court. And people have to wait years to get some portion of the money owed. That is just terrible and disrespecting every American. That kind of person should not be president. It is inconceivable to put that person in charge of this country. “In our churches, we would pray for this person because they are totally lost. It is hard to understand how a Christian would say OK to this kind of behavior.” Marlon S. Williamson, 45, of Warren, Ohio, works at ATEP Alcoa. He has been a Steelworker for 20 years. I got a job at what was once Republic Steel in Warren, Ohio, when I was 23 years old. It was a great union job. But, beginning in 2008, I was laid off for 17 months because of dumped [foreign] steel. Those were hard times. I returned to work, but then, just a few years later, in 2012, management informed us the mill would be scrapped. I was stunned. I was shocked. It was because of a mix of bad management and dumped steel. “I can’t even drive down that street now. I had worked there 17 years. At the time you are searching for answers. Imports contributed to that, with all that illegal dumping of steel. “A lot of prayers got me the job at the titanium plant. I was very fortunate. I was off for four months. Some of the guys I used to work with are still out of work. It is devastating. “I support Hillary Clinton because she supports the working man and woman. She says exactly how she is going to do that. If we get her in office, maybe someone will pass that Bring Jobs Home Act, that denies tax credits for sending jobs overseas and gives credits for bringing jobs back here. “Also, I have a daughter. My youngest child is a daughter. I do not want her to see Donald Trump as our country’s leadership. He mocks a guy with a handicap. He degrades women. He picks on immigrants. That is totally the opposite of what her mother and I have taught her.” Kristia O’Brien, 45, is a veteran who lives in Gadsden, Ala. She has been a member of USW Local 12 for 22 years. She is a tire builder at Goodyear in Gadsden. My mother lost her garment factory job that she had for 20 years as a result of NAFTA, and I almost lost my job because of trade. So Hillary Clinton’s opposition to the Trans-Pacific Partnership, and her statement that she would not support any more free trade deals that don’t work for working people is really important to me. “My mom worked for H.D. Lee, the jeans company, in Guntersville, Ala. She sewed the inseams. She has rheumatoid arthritis now, but she made a good living because it was a union job. But she lost that job when the plant went to Mexico. And another garment factory about 15 miles away went to Mexico too a few years after NAFTA was passed. “Later, my plant was threatened by a flood of imported Chinese tires. President Obama imposed three years of tariffs on those unfairly traded tries to prevent American factories from closing and American jobs from being lost. I have a job today because of that. I do trust Hillary to do the same kind of thing. She has stood for working families and unions her entire life. Her father came out of manufacturing and she understands the importance of manufacturing in America.” James Morgan, 30, of Belleville, Mich., works for Chemetall Group. He has been a member of USW Local 2659 for five years. I am working to elect Hillary Clinton for my unborn child, to make sure when he or she comes into the world, it is a better place, not a Donald Trump place. I want this to be a country that is accepting, a country that provides plenty of opportunity. Hopefully when he or she comes into this world, we have free college tuition and things like that.  “I want this to be the land of the free where we accept everyone whether you are black, Asian, Mexican or Muslim. We have all contributed. And that is what made America what it is.  We can’t shun people.  It is not just an American value. Acceptance absolutely is a union value. If you have been to a union event, you see people from all walks of life, and they are people who accept people from all walks of life. Heidi Puhl, 44, of South Range Wis., a member of USW Local 9460 for 10 years, works at Ecumen-Lakeshore, a short term rehab facility in Duluth, Minn. My father and grandfather worked on a railroad, the Duluth, Mesabi & Iron Range line. It hauled taconite pellets from the Mesabi Range to Lake Superior where they were shipped to steel mills. There was a railroad roundhouse in my hometown of Proctor, and in the harbor in the winter, typically dozen ships would arrive in winter to be overhauled. “It’s all gone now. The railroad is shut down. Half the ships arrive to be overhauled these days. The town’s grocery store, pizza shop and ice cream parlor are all closed. And it’s because illegally traded steel flooded the U.S. market, shuttering American mills. And that eliminated the demand for taconite. “Bad trade deals created pockets of nothing in our small towns. Hillary Clinton says she will put a stop to that. I believe she can. Donald Trump is all talk and no experience. I don’t believe he can do anything. “I know people who support Trump. But is that how you want your daughter to be talked to? Is that how you want your son raised? Is that how you want your mother treated, your grandmother or grandfather treated? That is not our personal values. That is not the values of anybody in America. I do not think Trump has the right temperament or the right morals to be president.  “I am working to elect Hillary Clinton because I do not want my kids to be raised in a place where it is okay to make fun of someone because of their disability or the color of their skin or their religion.  “I like that Hillary worked for the Children’s Defense Fund. I like that she took a job that did not pay well to do public service. I think that says a lot about a person. I know someone who graduated with Hillary, and she says Hillary is the nicest and most sincere person. Hillary still goes to college reunions with her. That says a lot about her.” Jerry August, 30, of San Bernardino, Calif., has been a member of USW Local 5632 for three years at GATX, where he rebuilds railcar valves to ensure they don’t leak and cause an explosion. My family is Hispanic. My grandparents came from Mexico. The way Donald Trump talks about undocumented immigrants is morally incorrect. It is not right. People should be given a chance to do what they can for themselves, to do better for themselves and their children and their future. “To throw 11 million undocumented immigrants out of this country – why throw them out?  Why not get them documented and let them work? It is not morally right. They are not taking jobs. They are doing jobs no one else wants to do. The majority of people will not do the jobs they are doing. The jobs are there for everybody. These are hard labor jobs for pennies an hour. “Trump harassed a judge of Mexican heritage whose father was a Steelworker. It is just ignorance. It is insulting. Ignorant people are just going to do ignorant things.” “Coming from a Hispanic family, I still have family members who do not speak good English and who struggle to make good money, and I know Hillary Clinton will try to help us get to an even playing field. I feel that it is admirable that she has always tried to help the less fortunate.” Terra Samuel, 43, of East Chicago, Ind., a member of USW Local 1010 for two years, works for ArcelorMittal.  I don’t see a future if Trump is elected. With Hillary, there is a track record. We know she can produce. “The change would be devastating if Trump were to win. He is so angry and his followers are so angry. He would turn back the hands of time. I am not sure the country is ready for that.” “I have two children. My 10-year-old daughter asked me, ‘If Trump is going to send Mexican people back to Mexico, where is he going to send black people?’ Donald Trump is scaring children! “Hillary has credibility for working with labor unions and looking out for young people. I love her ideas for investing in infrastructure. Because she will require American-made products, that will support American manufacturing and create American jobs. That shows she is looking out for the future.” Sam D’Orazio, 46, of Bentleyville, Pa., has been a member of USW Local 3403, Unit 25, for a decade. He works for All-Clad, a cookware manufacturer. Donald Trump says people earn too much. Does he include himself in that or just me? “Donald Trump does not speak for me. He does not treat people fairly and equitably. I accept diversity and Trump rejects that. “Donald Trump’s promises are false and not fulfillable.  He is an illusionist. “Hillary Clinton will make sure people have a decent chance to get ahead. She opposes right to work and has a loyalty to labor. She doesn’t turn her back on people.” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

03 октября, 15:08

Solidarity Against Trump

Donald Trump likes to say he has a very, very good relationship with unions.  “I have great relationships with unions,” he told Newsweek last year. And the press is in love with saying blue-collar workers are in love with Trump. Real reporters and even fake news shows like Full Frontal with Samantha Bee have crisscrossed the rust belt interviewing blue-collar workers seeking the reason for Trump’s supposed allure. The AFL-CIO has found, however, that only a small faction, fewer than a third, of its members are Trump supporters. That’s true in my union, the United Steelworkers (USW), as well. And the numbers are declining daily as members find out the truth about The Donald, including how he managed to lose a whopping $916 million in one year and his failure to pay federal income taxes. Particularly important to my members is the issue of trade because we are a manufacturing union, with members making not just steel, but tires, glass, paper, cardboard, aluminum, auto parts and many other products. When Trump promises to arbitrarily slap 25 percent and 35 percent tariffs on unfairly traded commodities from China and Mexico, that sounds great. That is, until the voter discovers a U.S. president can’t unilaterally impose tariffs. Also, until the voter discovers Trump manufactures virtually all his signature products, from suits to shirts, sweaters, belts, ties, tie pins, tie clips, and dozens of others, overseas. Not by American workers in America. Trump could have created American jobs. But he chose not to. Here is what some members of my union had to say about the difference between The Don and Hillary Clinton: Michael D. Snyder, 58 of Decatur, Ind., works for Bunge, which makes food oils. A union man for 39 years, he’s been president of USW Local 15173 for 21 years. “You need to look at the whole package and history of a candidate for president. Look at the whole package of Trump. I see someone who has done nothing but take from people in this country. There is a huge list of people who are suing him for taking from them, and that is disrespecting the American people.  “It is a power game. He has got all the money. He knows he can do all these terrible things. He knows he may have to pay, but not until he is forced to by court. And people have to wait years to get some portion of the money owed. That is just terrible and disrespecting every American. That kind of person should not be president. It is inconceivable to put that person in charge of this country. “In our churches, we would pray for this person because they are totally lost. It is hard to understand how a Christian would say OK to this kind of behavior.” Marlon S. Williamson, 45, of Warren, Ohio, works at ATEP Alcoa. He has been a Steelworker for 20 years. I got a job at what was once Republic Steel in Warren, Ohio, when I was 23 years old. It was a great union job. But, beginning in 2008, I was laid off for 17 months because of dumped [foreign] steel. Those were hard times. I returned to work, but then, just a few years later, in 2012, management informed us the mill would be scrapped. I was stunned. I was shocked. It was because of a mix of bad management and dumped steel. “I can’t even drive down that street now. I had worked there 17 years. At the time you are searching for answers. Imports contributed to that, with all that illegal dumping of steel. “A lot of prayers got me the job at the titanium plant. I was very fortunate. I was off for four months. Some of the guys I used to work with are still out of work. It is devastating. “I support Hillary Clinton because she supports the working man and woman. She says exactly how she is going to do that. If we get her in office, maybe someone will pass that Bring Jobs Home Act, that denies tax credits for sending jobs overseas and gives credits for bringing jobs back here. “Also, I have a daughter. My youngest child is a daughter. I do not want her to see Donald Trump as our country’s leadership. He mocks a guy with a handicap. He degrades women. He picks on immigrants. That is totally the opposite of what her mother and I have taught her.” Kristia O’Brien, 45, is a veteran who lives in Gadsden, Ala. She has been a member of USW Local 12 for 22 years. She is a tire builder at Goodyear in Gadsden. My mother lost her garment factory job that she had for 20 years as a result of NAFTA, and I almost lost my job because of trade. So Hillary Clinton’s opposition to the Trans-Pacific Partnership, and her statement that she would not support any more free trade deals that don’t work for working people is really important to me. “My mom worked for H.D. Lee, the jeans company, in Guntersville, Ala. She sewed the inseams. She has rheumatoid arthritis now, but she made a good living because it was a union job. But she lost that job when the plant went to Mexico. And another garment factory about 15 miles away went to Mexico too a few years after NAFTA was passed. “Later, my plant was threatened by a flood of imported Chinese tires. President Obama imposed three years of tariffs on those unfairly traded tries to prevent American factories from closing and American jobs from being lost. I have a job today because of that. I do trust Hillary to do the same kind of thing. She has stood for working families and unions her entire life. Her father came out of manufacturing and she understands the importance of manufacturing in America.” James Morgan, 30, of Belleville, Mich., works for Chemetall Group. He has been a member of USW Local 2659 for five years. I am working to elect Hillary Clinton for my unborn child, to make sure when he or she comes into the world, it is a better place, not a Donald Trump place. I want this to be a country that is accepting, a country that provides plenty of opportunity. Hopefully when he or she comes into this world, we have free college tuition and things like that.  “I want this to be the land of the free where we accept everyone whether you are black, Asian, Mexican or Muslim. We have all contributed. And that is what made America what it is.  We can’t shun people.  It is not just an American value. Acceptance absolutely is a union value. If you have been to a union event, you see people from all walks of life, and they are people who accept people from all walks of life. Heidi Puhl, 44, of South Range Wis., a member of USW Local 9460 for 10 years, works at Ecumen-Lakeshore, a short term rehab facility in Duluth, Minn. My father and grandfather worked on a railroad, the Duluth, Mesabi & Iron Range line. It hauled taconite pellets from the Mesabi Range to Lake Superior where they were shipped to steel mills. There was a railroad roundhouse in my hometown of Proctor, and in the harbor in the winter, typically dozen ships would arrive in winter to be overhauled. “It’s all gone now. The railroad is shut down. Half the ships arrive to be overhauled these days. The town’s grocery store, pizza shop and ice cream parlor are all closed. And it’s because illegally traded steel flooded the U.S. market, shuttering American mills. And that eliminated the demand for taconite. “Bad trade deals created pockets of nothing in our small towns. Hillary Clinton says she will put a stop to that. I believe she can. Donald Trump is all talk and no experience. I don’t believe he can do anything. “I know people who support Trump. But is that how you want your daughter to be talked to? Is that how you want your son raised? Is that how you want your mother treated, your grandmother or grandfather treated? That is not our personal values. That is not the values of anybody in America. I do not think Trump has the right temperament or the right morals to be president.  “I am working to elect Hillary Clinton because I do not want my kids to be raised in a place where it is okay to make fun of someone because of their disability or the color of their skin or their religion.  “I like that Hillary worked for the Children’s Defense Fund. I like that she took a job that did not pay well to do public service. I think that says a lot about a person. I know someone who graduated with Hillary, and she says Hillary is the nicest and most sincere person. Hillary still goes to college reunions with her. That says a lot about her.” Jerry August, 30, of San Bernardino, Calif., has been a member of USW Local 5632 for three years at GATX, where he rebuilds railcar valves to ensure they don’t leak and cause an explosion. My family is Hispanic. My grandparents came from Mexico. The way Donald Trump talks about undocumented immigrants is morally incorrect. It is not right. People should be given a chance to do what they can for themselves, to do better for themselves and their children and their future. “To throw 11 million undocumented immigrants out of this country – why throw them out?  Why not get them documented and let them work? It is not morally right. They are not taking jobs. They are doing jobs no one else wants to do. The majority of people will not do the jobs they are doing. The jobs are there for everybody. These are hard labor jobs for pennies an hour. “Trump harassed a judge of Mexican heritage whose father was a Steelworker. It is just ignorance. It is insulting. Ignorant people are just going to do ignorant things.” “Coming from a Hispanic family, I still have family members who do not speak good English and who struggle to make good money, and I know Hillary Clinton will try to help us get to an even playing field. I feel that it is admirable that she has always tried to help the less fortunate.” Terra Samuel, 43, of East Chicago, Ind., a member of USW Local 1010 for two years, works for ArcelorMittal.  I don’t see a future if Trump is elected. With Hillary, there is a track record. We know she can produce. “The change would be devastating if Trump were to win. He is so angry and his followers are so angry. He would turn back the hands of time. I am not sure the country is ready for that.” “I have two children. My 10-year-old daughter asked me, ‘If Trump is going to send Mexican people back to Mexico, where is he going to send black people?’ Donald Trump is scaring children! “Hillary has credibility for working with labor unions and looking out for young people. I love her ideas for investing in infrastructure. Because she will require American-made products, that will support American manufacturing and create American jobs. That shows she is looking out for the future.” Sam D’Orazio, 46, of Bentleyville, Pa., has been a member of USW Local 3403, Unit 25, for a decade. He works for All-Clad, a cookware manufacturer. Donald Trump says people earn too much. Does he include himself in that or just me? “Donald Trump does not speak for me. He does not treat people fairly and equitably. I accept diversity and Trump rejects that. “Donald Trump’s promises are false and not fulfillable.  He is an illusionist. “Hillary Clinton will make sure people have a decent chance to get ahead. She opposes right to work and has a loyalty to labor. She doesn’t turn her back on people.” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

26 сентября, 16:30

Zacks.com featured highlights: Barnes & Noble, General Motors, Bunge Limited, Big Lots, Best Buy and Builders FirstSource

Zacks.com featured highlights: Barnes & Noble, General Motors, Bunge Limited, Big Lots, Best Buy and Builders FirstSource

01 сентября, 09:25

Zerohedge.com: Deutsche Bank отказывается отдавать золото, подлежащее поставке по требованию

В то время, как трейдеры фокусируют свое внимание на последних новостях о том, что Deutsche Bank, вызывающий беспокойство инвесторов, рассматривает вопрос о слиянии с Commerzbank, как часть стратегии перестройки своего бизнеса, на немецком сайте, посвященному анализу золота, появилась тревожная публикация,… читать далее → Запись Zerohedge.com: Deutsche Bank отказывается отдавать золото, подлежащее поставке по требованию впервые появилась .