• Теги
    • избранные теги
    • Компании1465
      • Показать ещё
      Международные организации41
      • Показать ещё
      Страны / Регионы525
      • Показать ещё
      Разное628
      • Показать ещё
      Формат36
      Люди207
      • Показать ещё
      Издания75
      • Показать ещё
      Показатели27
      • Показать ещё
Выбор редакции
19 февраля, 00:01

Новая статья: Главные события прошедшей недели, 13–19 февраля 2017 года

В этом выпуске: в Барселоне представят современный вариант легендарной Nokia 3310; Canon представила зеркалки EOS 800D и EOS 77D; Nikon перестанет производить премиум-фотокамеры серии DL; Meizu M5s получил металлический корпус; «беззеркалка» Canon EOS M6 оснащена 24-Мп сенсором; HTC покинет рынок смартфонов начального уровня

Выбор редакции
15 февраля, 14:54

Canon представила Bluetooth-пульт ДУ и объектив EF-S 18-55mm F4-5.6 IS STM

Компания Canon, помимо новых зеркальных фотоаппаратов EOS 800D и EOS 77D, анонсировала ещё две новинки — пульт Wireless Remote Control BR-E1 и объектив EF-S 18-55mm F4-5.6 IS STM. Аксессуар Wireless Remote Control BR-E1 предназначен для дистанционного управления названными камерами. Пульт использует беспроводную связь Bluetooth, радиус действия составляет около пяти метров.

Выбор редакции
15 февраля, 11:04

Canon EOS M6: беззеркальная фотокамера с 24-Мп сенсором APS-C

Компания Canon официально представила флагманский беззеркальный фотоаппарат EOS M6 со сменной оптикой, продажи которого начнутся в апреле. В новинке задействованы КМОП-сенсор APS-C (22,3 × 14,9 мм) с 24,2 млн пикселей и процессор DIGIC 7, обеспечивающий высокую скорость обработки изображений. Возможна последовательная фотосъёмка со частотой до 9 кадров в секунду и запись видеороликов в формате Full HD (1920 × 1080 пикселей) со скоростью 60 кадров в секунду.

14 февраля, 14:10

Глава Toshiba уходит в отставку из-за убытков

Японская корпорация Toshiba намерена списать убытки американского подразделения Westinghouse Electric на $6,26 млрд. Председатель совета директоров уходит в отставку. Ранее сегодня котировки акций Toshiba упали на 9,5% из-за задержки публикации финотчета

14 февраля, 14:10

Глава Toshiba уходит в отставку из-за убытков

Японская корпорация Toshiba намерена списать убытки американского подразделения Westinghouse Electric на $6,26 млрд. Председатель совета директоров уходит в отставку. Ранее сегодня котировки акций Toshiba упали на 9,5% из-за задержки публикации финотчета

Выбор редакции
14 февраля, 09:22

Canon EOS M6: характеристики новой японской «беззеркалки»

Компания Canon готовится анонсировать свой новый беззеркальный фотоаппарат EOS M6, но официальная дата его анонса неизвестна. Не обнародовал производитель пока и характеристики новинки, что, однако, не мешает ознакомиться с ними, обратившись к неофициальным источникам. Накануне японский сайт nokishita-camera.com опубликовал следующие спецификации Canon EOS M6:

13 февраля, 18:39

How Today's Heartland Fiction Can Break Us Out Of Our Bubbles

As the results of the 2016 presidential election trickled in on Nov. 8, 2016, all eyes were suddenly glued to the center of the electoral map: Ohio, Michigan, Iowa, Wisconsin ― Midwestern states that had previously swung Democratic ― were looking likely to go for Republican candidate Donald Trump. And they did (Michigan and Wisconsin by impossibly slim margins), allowing Trump to eke out a surprise victory.  Though the Midwestern states typically enjoy attention during presidential elections, this unexpected outcome has sparked a lasting fascination among liberals and pundits who can’t understand how they got it so wrong. What’s really going on in the middle of the country? To writer and critic Mark Athitakis, it’s not so difficult to understand ― at least if you’ve been paying attention. His slim new book, The New Midwest: A Guide to Contemporary Fiction of the Great Lakes, Great Plains, and Rust Belt, dives deep into Midwestern literature, unpacking the mythology of the region and how today’s writers are complicating our simple idea of the Heartland. “There are some things that make [the Midwest] specific and some things that make it unique,” he told The Huffington Post in a phone interview, “but I think it would be helpful if we got past this conversation ... that everybody in the Midwest is all this one way.” For those who have been reading the great Midwestern fiction of recent years ― Marilynne Robinson’s Iowa novels, Jonathan Franzen’s The Corrections, Angela Flournoy’s The Turner House, Celeste Ng’s Everything I Never Told You, and even out-of-print works like Divine Days by Leon Forrest and On Wings of Song by Thomas M. Disch ― it’s clear that the region is more than a cesspool of white resentment, but also more than a simple place full of homespun virtue and redemptive hard work. Athitakis parses how the best Midwestern fiction punctures the region’s superficially comforting image and re-examines its past to uncover a less idyllic, more troubled history.  HuffPost spoke to Athitakis about The New Midwest, what we can learn about the Midwest from its great fictional chroniclers, and why it matters: You write that you don’t really find it helpful to talk about the fiction of the Midwest as a piece, all together, and you break it out into different themes. Which to me raises the question: What even inspired you to write a book about Midwestern fiction if you don’t see it as a cohesive whole? I think I wanted to unsettle the canon of Midwestern literature as we understood it. Even today, people will say, “Oh, Midwestern literature, of course that’s Ernest Hemingway, Willa Cather, Saul Bellow, Nelson Algren.” I felt that’s one, two, maybe three generations past. What I was hoping to do here is raise some of these complications. You’re absolutely right that there’s not a monolithic Midwest. There’s an urban Midwest, there’s a white Midwest, there’s a black Midwest, there’s a Hispanic Midwest. There’s various class strata in the Midwest. What I wanted to do was [...] take a look at some of these themes that seem to kind of adhere to the Midwest ― that it’s the region of hardworking immigrants, that it’s the region of sturdy families, it’s a region of farmlands, or even just in terms of the novel, that it is a place of the very four-square, conventional novel. And I thought that was a good framing device. Let’s take a look at the books that challenge those ideas of what the Midwestern novel is. So for instance, when I was thinking about religion, obviously Marilynne Robinson is an important writer on that front. One thing that gets short shrift, I think, when a lot of critics write about Marilynne Robinson ― there is this reflex to say, “Oh, it’s about Iowa and it’s about religion,” and that there’s something sort of comforting about the way that she writes about faith. But these are kind of difficult books that deal with institutional racism and fractures within these Iowa communities.  I don’t write much about Garrison Keillor, I think I only mention him in passing. But he’s maybe the most obvious example of “here’s what the sturdy, folksy Midwestern culture is.” And I don’t have a lot of abiding anger toward Garrison Keillor. I think in some ways he’s a good writer and an interesting entertainer. But that’s not the kind of Midwest that is interesting to me. You also note that much of today’s Midwestern fiction that you’re interested in is set in the past rather than contemporary. Why do you think that is? Do you think that has something to do with the idea of unsettling the mythology of the Midwest? It’s hard to say without interviewing every single individual author, but I think there’s plainly an urge to try to look at this and recapture it and maybe try to salvage it from the folklore that has attached to it. I would say that’s pretty plain if you read the “Last Hundred Years” trilogy that Jane Smiley has published over the last three years. These three big, sweeping novels, which start out as seeming like it’s just going to be a fairly polite tale about an Iowa farm family, but I think maybe the more ... maybe sinister is the wrong word, but the more complicated argument that Jane Smiley is making is that what happens in this small Iowa farm town is something that radiates to encompass a lot of things that have happened in American culture in the past 100 years. I think maybe that there is this feeling among a lot of writers that the Midwest as it’s been presented doesn’t really adhere to what a lot of the reality is. To the extent that these novels recently are really grappling with social justice issues like race, gender, gender identity, etc., do you think there’s a particular concern with how these social justice issues manifest in the region, or is it of a piece with a national trend to write about these topics? I think there’s a few ways to answer that question. I think certainly you can’t talk about the Great Migration without talking about the Midwest. I think that’s plain. I close the book with a longer essay about a novel called Divine Days by Leon Forrest, who is an African-American novelist. He had started his career writing experimental fiction about the South. Toni Morrison was his editor. His final big book was this 1200-page epic that encompasses a black family that had migrated up to Chicago from New Orleans, deals with the legacy of slavery, deals with the relationships between black and white. It is, in many ways, a celebration of Chicago’s South Side culture even while it criticizes some of the cultural elements of it, especially when it comes to religion. I would say that is something that is a uniquely Chicago story, and a uniquely Midwestern story. I think also a book like Angela Flournoy’s The Turner House deals very explicitly with the relationship of the African-American community to Detroit, and what kind of responsibility does a city like Detroit have toward its citizens, especially once the community starts collapsing. She does an interesting job of paralleling the larger civic collapse that happens in Detroit with what’s crippling that family that she writes about, who are forced to take on different paths because they have the support system of a family, but they don’t have that larger superstructure looking out for them. Another one: Celeste Ng’s Everything I Never Told You is an interesting look at what happens to an Asian-American family in Ohio in the 1970s, where they are treated as a foreign ... more of a curiosity, where I don’t think that would necessarily happen in a more pluralistic culture, say on the East Coast or the West Coast. So I think there are some unique aspects to the Midwest when it comes to that. One book that I think didn’t get a lot of attention when it came out, and I think it’s an interesting example: Rachel Louise Snyder’s novel What We’ve Lost Is Nothing, which is set in Oak Park, Illinois, a Chicago suburb. Oak Park has become this long-running experiment in how you integrate a community. They have laws on the books that try to ensure black and white families live close to each other, because there are enough studies that show that integrated communities can be more successful, lower crime rates and that sort of thing. And she spotlights the sort of reflexive racism that still kicks in when events happen in this neighborhood. It speaks to this perhaps stereotypically Midwestern spirit to try to enforce ways for different types and groups of people to get along, but also reveal some of the challenges connected to that. I wanted to talk a little bit about the political aspect. I don’t know if you could have known, when you began writing this, how much the Midwest would have become the focus of political attention by now. What do you make of the conversations that have been had in the media and political circles about Midwestern voters recently and what needs to be done to speak to them? I wrote the book pretty much in the first half of 2016, where Donald Trump was obviously a presence, but I think there was still a lot of wishful thinking going on that there really wasn’t going to be a lot of people voting en masse to make him the Republican nominee and the president. In some ways, I was as shocked as anybody, but once you saw how things broke down ... I’m not entirely shocked that this had happened, once I’d had a moment to think about it. I did write a piece, “11 Works of Midwestern Fiction for the Trump Era.” Even though we’ve had eight years of Obama, we’ve had a long period, starting from the Rust Belt era in the ‘70s, where a lot of people who’ve been raised in manufacturing areas have been left behind and not a whole lot has been presented to them as opportunities to improve their status. I don’t buy into the argument the Midwest is uniformly anything, but certainly not uniformly this hotbed of angry white racist resentment. I think there’s a pocket of that. If you even go back to read Joyce Carole Oates’s 1970 novel, Them, which is covering a lower-middle-class white family in Detroit, which does feel that sort of resentment about what’s going on in racial politics and feels very disassociated from it. So it certainly exists. I think there isn’t one reason that made the region go toward Trump, but I think there’s a variety of economic and cultural forces and long-standing frustrations that, perhaps if you read a little of the fiction of the region, wouldn’t come as so much of a surprise. I don’t know if you saw, but President Obama gave an interview to The New York Times, and he talked about how much reading fiction helped him during his presidency, as a way to remind himself about broader truths. Do you think reading fiction about the Midwest is a really important way for politicians and citizens to connect with what’s going on in the country? I think it certainly couldn’t hurt. I see these stories that come up every few months that say fiction helps improve our capacity for empathy, and part of me wants to say, even though I’m a book critic ― well, talking to people will do that as well! I think what we’re seeing here is we’re in an environment now where all of us need to develop our reflex for trying to understand where other people come from, or people who are different from our experiences, our economic backgrounds, our geographical backgrounds, our understanding of what politics means, our idea of what place means.  I think there’s a little more urgency to remove ourselves from our bubbles. Maybe one way to start the conversation is to say that the Midwest is not a monolithic place. There are some things that make it specific and some things that make it unique, but I think it would be helpful if we got past this conversation to say that everybody in the Midwest is all this one way. Perhaps the book can do a little bit to spotlight some of the diversity of the region.  Obama talked about the importance of stepping into somebody else’s shoes for a while, and I think that’s probably a very valuable thing to do these days.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

13 февраля, 17:15

Circumventing the Zero Lower Bound with Monetary Policy Rules Based on Money -- by Michael T. Belongia, Peter N. Ireland

Discussions of monetary policy rules after the 2007-2009 recession highlight the potential ineffectiveness of a central bank's actions when the short-term interest rate under its control is limited by the zero lower bound. This perspective assumes, in a manner consistent with the canonical New Keynesian model, that the quantity of money has no role to play in transmitting a central bank's actions to economic activity. This paper examines the validity of this claim and investigates the properties of alternative monetary policy rules based on control of the monetary base or a monetary aggregate in lieu of the capacity to manipulate a short-term interest rate. The results indicate that rules of this type have the potential to guide monetary policy decisions toward the achievement of a long-run nominal goal without being constrained by the zero lower bound on a nominal interest rate. They suggest, in particular, that by exerting its influence over the monetary base or a broader aggregate, the Federal Reserve could more effectively stabilize nominal income around a long-run target path, even in a low or zero interest-rate environment.

13 февраля, 13:40

СМИ: Toshiba получит убыток в $3,5 млрд

Японская корпорация Toshiba завтра должна опубликовать финотчет, где будет сообщено об убытках из-за перерасхода средств в ядерном бизнесе. Накануне японские СМИ сообщают, что за отчетный период потери составят порядка $3,5 млрд.

13 февраля, 13:40

СМИ: Toshiba получит убыток в $3,5 млрд

Японская корпорация Toshiba завтра должна опубликовать финотчет, где будет сообщено об убытках из-за перерасхода средств в ядерном бизнесе. Накануне японские СМИ сообщают, что за отчетный период потери составят порядка $3,5 млрд.

13 февраля, 08:45

The 100 best nonfiction books: No 54 – Brief Lives by John Aubrey (edited by Andrew Clark, 1898)

Truly ahead of his time, the 17th-century historian and gossip John Aubrey is rightly credited as the man who invented biographyPosterity in books is fickle. For the odd and unpredictable afterlives of some English classics, consider the case of John Aubrey. This gossipy gentleman-scholar, antiquarian and pioneer biographer died in 1697, after a life brushed by the wings of history. At the time of his death, his chances of being remembered must have seemed vanishingly slim. The only title published in his lifetime Miscellanies: A Collection of Hermetick Philosophy (1696) was deemed “mad”. Slowly, however, his numerous manuscripts were rediscovered, although a really substantial portion of Brief Lives did not appear in print until 1813. Finally, two centuries after Aubrey’s death, in 1898, a Church of England rector and scholar, the Rev Andrew Clark, edited a transcript of Brief Lives in a bowdlerised edition that finally established Aubrey’s name in the English canon.Thereafter, in the 20th century, his reputation took off. Anthony Powell published John Aubrey and His Friends in 1948. A year later, Oliver Lawson Dick published the first complete scholarly edition, which alphabetised the Lives and modernised the text. Paradoxically, this updating helped revive Aubrey’s reputation once and for all, and eventually inspired Patrick Garland’s one-man play, eventually performed by Roy Dotrice, a show that ran for 40 years on both sides of the Atlantic. In 2015, Kate Bennett published a new and complete scholarly edition (Brief Lives With an Apparatus for the Lives of Our English Mathematical Writers) with OUP; in the same year, Ruth Scurr’s brilliantly imaginative John Aubrey, My Own Life came out in celebration of a national treasure – an ingenious literary man, and a writer of originality, wit and wisdom who had constructed “a paper museum” of timeless fascination. Continue reading...

Выбор редакции
11 февраля, 16:50

Преимущество специализированных магазинов материалов для печати

В настоящий момент все крупные сети продают расходные материалы для печати. Продают их и в торговых точках по городам. Продают их все кому не лень, даже те, кто о печати не имеет в общем никаких […]

10 февраля, 14:58

Research Review | 10 February 2017 | Portfolio Strategy

Liquid Alternative Mutual Funds versus Hedge Funds Jonathan S. Hartley (University of Pennsylvania) February 1, 2017 Despite the rapid rise of the number of liquid alternative mutual funds (LAMFs) available to retail investors in recent years, few studies have compared how their return and risk characteristics differ from their hedge fund counterparts across their entire […]

Выбор редакции
10 февраля, 13:52

Is it wrong to laugh at Donald Trump? | Steven Johnson

Make no mistake, these are dark times. But it makes sense that we should find ourselves reaching for punchlines when we want to throw punchesWhatever else you might want to say about the first weeks of the Trump era, one fact is undeniable: we are living in the golden age of hand-lettered signs. History will judge how effective the Women’s March and the airport protests of last week turn out to be, but as protest movements go, I suspect they were unrivalled in terms of genuinely clever one-liners. The signs were everywhere – on Instagram and Twitter and email – cardboard memes designed both for the crowd they were immersed in, and the great teeming after-party of social media. Some were gleefully profane: “This pussy grabs back!”; “now you’ve pissed off grandma”. Some were meta, like the many variations of the “Not normally a sign guy, but geez” placard that first appeared in the weeks after the election. Some found comedic defiance in rewriting the canon of resistance, like the sign that appeared at JFK the night after Trump signed the immigration executive order: “First they came for the Muslims, and I said NOT THIS TIME FASCISTS!” Continue reading...

09 февраля, 20:51

Roots of the problem: the controversial history of Alex Haley's book

Haley’s influential family saga about 18th century slavery is back on TV, but its literary reputation is still tarnished by questions of authenticity This week saw both the debut on BBC4 of a star-studded mini-series based on Alex Haley’s Roots, and the 25th anniversary of Haley’s death on 10 February 1992. That the latter was not accompanied by a clutch of major reassessments testifies to his fascinatingly ambiguous status: he is the most-read African American author ever – The Autobiography of Malcolm X (which he co-authored with the black nationalist leader) sold 6m copies in its first decade, Roots sold the same number in its first year alone – yet is forever tainted by controversy and kept out of the canon.What’s strange about the sniffiness towards Haley is that his impact was felt in literary fiction, as well as by the 130 million Americans who viewed the (much less classy) original adaptation of Roots in 1977. Published the previous year, the saga charts the lives of six generations of Haley’s family, starting with a putative 18th-century ancestor in the Gambia, Kunta Kinte, who is enslaved and transported to America, and put slavery and Africa back on the agenda. Before Roots, leading black novelists – Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin – had largely stuck to contemporary or recent-past American subject matter. But after it, Octavia Butler used time travel to explore slavery in Kindred (1979), Alice Walker deployed an African subplot in The Color Purple (1982) and Toni Morrison made a fugitive slave her protagonist in Beloved (1987). Continue reading...

Выбор редакции
09 февраля, 19:36

The church’s strategy on protecting the child is designed to protect itself | Giles Fraser: Loose canon

The bishops are in denial that there is a connection between the caning of young men and a theology of the atonementIt was towards the end of the bishop of Guildford’s statement that the main purpose of his press conference appeared to become clear. Rt Rev Andrew Watson said he had been “drawn into the Smyth circle” on elite Christian holiday camps, and beaten by him once. It was “violent, excruciating and shocking”. But – and here comes the key bit – “absolutely nothing that happened in the Smyth shed was the natural fruit of any Christian theology that I have come across”. That, of course, is what the evangelicals are most afraid of: people making a connection between their theology and John Smyth’s beating of the children in his care. Yet the connection is obvious – and at the very core of the evangelical story: that God the father violently punishes his son for the salvation of the human race. To reference Isaiah: “He was whipped so we could be healed.” Related: C of E bishop: I was given 'excruciating' beating by John Smyth Continue reading...

Выбор редакции
08 февраля, 21:34

A Conservative Case for Climate Action

Feldstein, Halstead, and Mankiw : A Conservative Case for Climate Action: Crazy as it may sound, this is the perfect time to enact a sensible policy to address the dangerous threat of climate change. Before you call us nuts, hear...

08 февраля, 14:00

Simon and Garfunkel – 10 of the best

Their friendship hit troubled waters at the height of their fame, but from The Sound of Silence to Mrs Robinson they created some of the most memorable music in the pop canonGiven that they had one of the most fractious relationships in music, it should come as no surprise to learn that Simon and Garfunkel almost didn’t make it beyond their time as a rock’n’roll duo named Tom and Jerry. They had one moderately successful single during high school, and three subsequent ones that sank without a trace, but Tom and Jerry fizzled out when the pair went off to college. Their death knell came when Paul Simon released a solo single, True Or False, the perceived betrayal of which Art Garfunkel carried with him for decades. “That solo record I made at the age of 15,” Simon told Playboy in 1984, “permanently coloured our relationship.” Still, they reconciled several years later in 1963, this time using their real names, and in the space of three recording sessions had produced an album – Wednesday Morning, 3am. To promote it, they performed a handful of terribly received shows. The Sound of Silence in particular was treated with derision. “[The song] actually became a running joke,” said folk singer Dave Van Ronk, who was at the shows. “It was only necessary to start singing ‘Hello darkness, my old friend …’ and everybody would crack up.” Discouraged and dispirited, and selling just 3,000 copies of their album, the pair split up once again, and Simon moved to London. That might easily have been the end of the duo, if it weren’t for the album’s producer, Tom Wilson, overdubbing electric guitars and a drumbeat to the melancholic, acoustic ballad and rereleasing it without their consent. That version reached No1 in the US Billboard Hot 100, and catapulted the pair to fame, though the haunting original has also come to be revered. Continue reading...

08 февраля, 11:39

Marvel’s ‘Iron Fist’: 11 New Spoilers From the Latest Trailer

The second trailer for 'Iron Fist' has arrived, and it comes packed with exciting new details on what we can expect from Marvel's next Netflix series.

07 февраля, 09:46

Paying for the Wall/Fence: Tariff Edition

Tax reform (DBCFT) will not pay for the wall. A remittances tax will not yield sufficient revenues, except perhaps over many years. What about a tariff? That’ll do the trick (back-of-the-envelope calculations!). But it won’t necessarily be the Mexicans paying… First consider the canonical analysis, where the US is considered a small country (in the […]