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27 марта, 06:46

Mexicans Who Help Build Donald Trump's Wall Are 'Traitors,' Top Archdiocese Says

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Mexicans who help build President Donald Trump’s planned border wall would be acting immorally and should be deemed traitors, the Catholic Archdiocese of Mexico said on Sunday, turning up the heat on a simmering dispute over the project. In a provocative editorial, the country’s biggest Archdiocese sought to increase pressure on the government to take a tougher line on companies aiming to profit from the wall, which has strained relations between Trump and the Mexican government. “Any company intending to invest in the wall of the fanatic Trump would be immoral, but above all, its shareholders and owners should be considered traitors to the homeland,” said the editorial in Desde la fe, the Archdiocese’s weekly publication. On Tuesday, Economy Minister Ildefonso Guajardo warned firms it would not be in their “interests” to participate in the wall. But the editorial accused the government of responding “tepidly” to those eyeing the project for business. A spokesman for the Archdiocese, which centers on Mexico City and is presided over by the country’s foremost Roman Catholic cleric, Cardinal Norberto Rivera, said the editorial represented the views of the diocese. Trump says he wants to build the wall to stop illegal immigrants from crossing the U.S. southern border. He has pledged Mexico will pay for the wall, which the Mexican government adamantly says it will not do. The Desde la fe editorial, which was published online, said the barrier would only feed prejudice and discrimination. “In practice, signing up for a project that is a serious affront to dignity is shooting yourself in the foot,” it wrote. Mexican cement maker Cemex has said it is open to providing quotes to supply raw materials for the wall but will not take part in the bidding process to build it. Grupo Cementos de Chihuahua, another company specializing in construction materials, has also signaled readiness to work on the project. function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_2'),onPlayerReadyVidible); -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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23 марта, 18:44

The battle to build Donald Trump’s wall

FEW slogans were chanted with as much passion by Donald Trump’s supporters in the presidential campaign as “Build that wall!”. The construction industry is almost as enthusiastic. Last week America’s Customs and Border Protection agency (CBP) issued two invitations for companies to bid to build the wall on the border with Mexico, which is expected to cost anywhere between $12bn and $25bn. The deadline for designs falls on March 29th. One request is for a solid concrete border wall, and the other for a wall using “alternatives” to reinforced solid concrete, suggesting the government has yet to decide what the barrier should be made of. More than 700 companies, from big general contractors to firms selling materials to niche providers of lighting and surveillance systems, have registered to try to become suppliers. To the surprise of some, about one in ten of the firms bidding are local ones with Hispanic owners, drawn by the scale of the earnings on offer. Cemex, a Mexican cement giant that has plants on both sides of the border, said it would not sell cement for the project, though it had earlier expressed interest in joining the bidding. Another, tiny, Mexican firm has...

17 марта, 17:59

Крупнейший в Америке производитель цемента отказал Трампу

Компания Cemex не станет участвовать в строительстве разграничительной стены между США и Мексикой

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10 марта, 16:30

How to Cut Costs More Strategically

We’ve all been through it — the looming cost project. And for many of us, it’s not a fond memory. How many cost-cutting initiatives have our companies gone through in the last dozen years? More important, do we look back on those initiatives as transformative in helping us build success and leading us to growth? For executives at most large organizations, the answer to the first question is probably “too many,” and the answer to the second is “no.” Call it cost management fatigue. When doing research for our book, we found that the main reasons most companies suffer from this syndrome are that they make across-the-board cuts that are unconnected to their strategy, and fail to make the cuts sustainable. Most organizations wait to act until they have a problem, at which point they don’t have the time to make the right trade-offs for the long term. The best-run companies, in contrast, think of cost management as a way to support their strategy, and of cost as precious investment that will fuel their growth. They put their money where their strategy is and continually cut bad costs and redirect resources toward good costs. After all, if we aren’t directing spending to the right places, what chance do we have to grow? Management teams at such companies spend a lot of effort separating out the costs that truly fuel their distinct advantage from the ones that don’t. They base their decisions about where to cut and where to invest on the need to support their greatest strengths: the capabilities that enable them to create unique value for customers. This important distinction is a way of life at leading companies we have studied, like Amazon, CEMEX, Frito-Lay, Ikea, Lego, and Starbucks. They cut costs to grow stronger. You can see this different approach to cost allocation at work in the way winning companies behave in times of adversity. When Roger Enrico took the helm as CEO of Frito-Lay, in 1991, the company was developing an innovative and distinctive approach to direct-store delivery that would allow it to consistently deliver the right products to the right stores at the right time. At the same time, Eagle Snacks was gaining market share with innovative new products and its own distribution system. Enrico realized that Frito-Lay had to make a major investment in product quality to meet the competitive threat. He resolved to start by cutting $100 million — 40% — in general and administrative costs. This was painful, including laying off 1,800 managerial and professional people in a single day. But the action removed layers of management and many unnecessary practices, leading to a much higher level of responsiveness and effectiveness, and freed up money to invest in Frito-Lay’s distinctive capabilities — including not only the direct-store delivery capability, but also product and manufacturing innovation, and consumer marketing. Today, Frito-Lay “owns the streets” in its markets, as well as several $1 billion brands. Five big mindset shifts can help you and your organization manage costs in the right way. First, connect costs and strategy. Look at every opportunity to cut costs as an opportunity to channel investments toward strengthening your value proposition. Connect your budget directly to your strategic priorities; if your budget doesn’t reflect your priorities, you have very little chance of executing your vision. This entails viewing costs not merely as an in-year expense but also as a multiyear investment in differentiating capabilities designed to help your company execute its strategy. Second, rethink costs in terms of capabilities. In many companies, the investments you make in capabilities are hidden within an array of functional budgets. Unravel these budgets and sort out the strategic implications of your current spending patterns. It’s not easy to do, since most conventional expense-tracking systems don’t assign costs to capabilities. It will likely ruffle some cultural and operational feathers, but it can lead to great success because it creates a meaningful discussion among executives about what you really need in order to win in the market. Third, list all the expenses related to the activities of the enterprise, move them into a metaphorical “parking lot,” and then, one by one, decide whether to let them back in. Distinctive capabilities will get the resources they need to realize their full potential. You’ll pay for them by cutting everything else. We call this “zero basing”; it enables you to break free of the budgetary practices of the past, which at many companies amount to variations on the theme of “last year plus X percent.” Fourth, make your cost-management plan sustainable. Build financial systems that create more transparency around “good” costs, those associated with differentiating capabilities, and dispensable “bad” costs, leveraging your culture to increase awareness of the difference. Closely link your budgeting process with your strategic planning process to ensure that differentiating capabilities continue to receive disproportionate investment, while other expenses are tightly managed. In a true “ownership culture,” cost-consciousness becomes an organizational capability and a shared mindset, rather than a bunch of rules that are resented and resisted. Even when no one is watching, employees treat every spending decision as if the money comes from their own pocket. Last, be proactive. Fix the roof while the sun is shining. Once you’re in trouble, you may not have the luxury of making the right kinds of decisions. Creating a continuous cost-management mindset that connects costs to strategy is the best way to ensure that your company never gets out of shape. Managing cost in this way will give your organization the freedom to make the right choices over the long term, choices that are required to close the gap between strategy and execution — and the rewards are immense.

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02 марта, 18:58

Mexican company: We'll provide cement for border wall

Mexican materials company CEMEX, one of the world's largest sellers of concrete, says it's willing to provide cement for the construction of the border wall President Trump wants to build.

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06 февраля, 11:16

В Италии дан старт строительству нового завода по переработке РАО

В Италии осуществлена заливка бетона в фундамент нового завода Cemex, который предназначен для цементирования радиоактивных отходов, накопившихся в прошлом в результате деятельности экспериментального завода Eurex. Напомним, в Италии, начиная с 1960-х годов, эксплуатировались 4 одноблочных атомных электростанции – Гарильяно, Латина, Каорсо и Энрико Ферми. Однако на референдуме, прошедшем после чернобыльской...

31 января, 17:31

The Art Of The New Deal: How Trump Is Using Mexican Company Cemex's Concrete To Build The Wall And Profit Both Countries

The press has been ablaze with reports that Mexico is stonewalling against Trump’s demands that they pay, in one form or another, for the wall. Some speculate that the wall will not be built at all. But research by Disobedient Media indicates that not only will the wall be built, but that it has strong support among certain Mexican business interests such as cement producer Cemex who has been actively lobbying to ensure that Trump and his allies take office and begin construction. I. Cemex Is Best Positioned To Benefit From The Wall, And Does Not Have A Major Competitor In The United States According to information published by the Global Cement Directory, Cemex is the largest producer of cement in North American and does not have any American competitors of equal size. It has been described in a diplomatic cable released by Wikileaks as being one of "Mexico's monopolists" with a market share of 87.6%. Data collected using the installed capacity of companies’ integrated cement plants shows that the US does not even break the top ten list of cement producers globally. Cemex, however, ranks fifth, far ahead of their only Western competitor in Brazil. Source: Global Cement Directory Cemex is a major producer, with plants and operations in over 50 countries worldwide. It has acquired a number of assets in the United States. With quarries on both sides of US-Mexico border it is positioned better than any other firm to act as the main supplier of raw materials for Trump’s wall. The map below shows the location of quarries belonging Cemex and other corporations on the border. Source: Financial Times The logistical and economic nightmare of having to move cement further than 200 miles means that Cemex is ideally positioned to be the primary supplier for Trump's wall. Additionally, contracting with dozens of American companies to provide cement would greatly complicate the building process. Trump, a man who prides himself on completing projects under budget and ahead of schedule, is unlikely to shun Cemex when seeking materials. While Trump has made the creation of American jobs the central selling point of his Presidency, he has also stated that the wall will “help” Mexico. In the case of Cemex, it becomes clear how the wall will, at least in part, help Mexico: no matter which country pays for it, some of the funds will return to Mexican firms who help the United States with construction. Contracting with Cemex for the concrete used to build the wall is a win-win situation for both Cemex and Trump. Cemex employs thousands of Americans in their U.S. operations. By contracting with Cemex, Trump is able to deliver on his promise not just to benefit Mexico financially, but to also help ensure that American jobs are retained and possibly more created by Cemex as it ramps up operations to meet American textile demands for the wall. II. How Cemex And Trump Mutually Benefit From The Wall Donald Trump’s presidential victory signals a new direction in the relationship between the United States and Mexico. Beyond the wall, both states stand to fare well from Trump’s plans to overhaul the U.S. economy and renegotiate America’s trade deals. Financial sources are already beginning to speculate that Mexico could help the United States return a greater percentage of its trade deficit to North America. At the moment, over 90% of America's trade deficit is held by countries outside the continent. At the same time, companies such as Cemex will benefit from the weakening Peso, which has dropped since Trump’s election. The dropping Peso has been held out by some as a sign that Trump's Presidency is having a negative effect on Mexico. However, the weakened currency actually makes the products sold by companies such as Cemex more attractive to foreign buyers. Not only will the weak Peso make a better deal for Trump and the United States, but it also gives added assurance to Cemex that their concrete will be used to build the wall. The payout, estimated to be over $700 million for concrete and $240 million for cement, would be greatly welcomed by Cemex in the aftermath of their first reported quarterly profit in over seven years as they ride a surge in their company's valuation on the stock market. Source: seekingalpha.com Cemex is one of many building material companies who have seen a major rise in the aftermath of Trump's reiteration of his desire to build the wall. Beyond operations on the border, the wall's construction would signal a general increase in infrastructure investment. Source: Bloomberg III. Cemex Provided Political Support For Trump Allies In what appears to be a political game of deal making, a Cemex affiliated PAC run by Executive Vice President Frank Craddock was found to have engaged in a campaign of support for political candidates who were most likely to help ensure that the wall would become a reality. Information compiled by the Center for Responsive Politics from data provided by the Federal Election Commission shows that the Cemex Inc. Employee Political Action Committee donated more than 80% of its funds during the 2016 cycle to Republican candidates. The majority of the Republican recipients listed as having received donations from Cemex have either expressed political support for Donald Trump or for the policy of building a security wall on the border with Mexico. This revelation clearly indicates that Cemex sought to help ensure that Trump would have a Republican majority both in the House and Senate to make certain that construction of the wall would proceed. Aside from the political boost Cemex's donations have given to Trump in the long run, there is no indication that the favor was returned in any type of pay for play arrangement. However, it is interesting to note that Newt Gingrich, who supported a tariff which negatively Cemex in the 1990's, was not offered a senior position on Trump's staff. The relationship between Cemex and the United States is the perfect illustration of Donald Trump's dealmaking diplomacy. With a shrewd eye for business, Trump is able to pick out valuable regional players and encourage partnerships which will not only benefit the United States and deliver on his campaign promises, but also help inject capital into foreign firms and boost employment rates across their nations. The media on both sides of the border will likely continue to cast shadows on the likelihood of a wall and a Mexican-American agreement on how it will be funded. But as evidenced by Cemex's rising fortunes and willingness to reach out and assist Trump financially and politically, Trump's New Deal is one that nobody wants to refuse. This article was originally posted at www.disobedientmedia.com

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19 декабря 2016, 16:29

Sempra Energy (SRE) Unit Buys Ventika Facility in Mexico

Sempra Energy's (SRE) Mexican unit, Infraestructura Energetica Nova, S.A.B. de C.V. ("IEnova") has closed the acquisition of the Ventika I and Ventika II wind generation facilities in the country.

09 декабря 2016, 14:00

Nearly 5 Million U.S. Jobs Depend on Trade With Mexico

Arguments that policies such as NAFTA have killed American manufacturing jobs often ignore the many other American jobs that such deals create and support.

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30 ноября 2016, 16:00

Why Top Management Should Listen to Activist Investors

Activist investors who expect to raise returns by influencing strategic decisions are having a meaningful impact on many industries from consumer-packaged goods to aerospace and defense. And the odds that your company, or industry, may find itself targeted by an activist are going up. Activists launched 159 campaigns in 2015 focused on shareholder value maximization, nearly double the 88 that were launched the year before. If you are a senior executive in a company concerned about activists, you have two potential paths: take the defensive (and perhaps expected) posture of defending your current strategy, or embrace the challenge and reassess your company’s path to value creation. Activists’ interventions are often described, favorably or not depending on your point of view, as slashing and burning, taking out cost, and engaging in financial engineering. But that’s an unfair oversimplification. Many activists are asking some very tough and fundamental strategic questions: Are the company’s investments in the right place?  Is the company’s portfolio too diverse?  Are there difficult moves that must be made to create a winning strategy?  Senior executives should consider these questions carefully, since the rise of corporate activism is unlikely to slow any time soon — either way — these very basic but important strategic questions must be addressed. Simply improving short-term performance by cutting costs across the board isn’t the answer – activists can do that themselves, simply by taking out 10% from your company’s cost baseline. You need to look at costs as strategic investments that ultimately drive growth: which costs, if cut, would actually destroy shareholder value by diminishing growth or competitive advantage? And as an insider with the right perspective and access to granular company data, you can match or exceed what outsiders may be able to offer your investors. Take the time to reassess your company’s path to value creation. You have clearly thought about these strategic questions before, but constraints on your business and short-term issues may have stood in the way of  the answers – or at least at looking at the questions as an outsider might, and possibly arriving at different conclusions about the business. Now, you will have to translate your strategic thinking into a value creation plan that your management team and board will embrace.  You will have to be clear-minded about such questions as: What are the simple approaches to value creation that have worked in the industry, and do they still apply? What advantage do we have — or can we create — in the market, and how do we maintain and extend this advantage? What is our company great at doing? What is our promise to the market and to customers? What is needed to execute against that promise? Defining your aspirations that way and combining them with the capabilities required to fulfill those aspirations will give your company the best chance to create long-term value … and to address activists’ concerns and capitalize on the opportunities and ideas they bring. For our recent book we studied companies from a broad range of industries that operate this way, including Apple, CEMEX, Danaher, Haier, IKEA, Inditex (known for its Zara apparel business), Starbucks and many others. These companies may do business in a dozen different sectors, but everything they do nonetheless fits together in a coherent way. Apple’s online services, smartphones, and computers, for example, all rely on the same capabilities for design and integration. Starbucks applies its capabilities in talent management and distinctive retailing to everything it does. Danaher designs, manufactures, and markets industrial and consumer products in industries including dental, industrial technologies, environmental, and life science and diagnostics, and has distinguished itself by its outstanding shareholder return and its focus on continual improvement, across all its businesses. When your company has developed that kind of clear identity, you have leverage and insight that other companies –and activist investors –do not have. When investor Carl Icahn wrote to Tim Cook in 2014, with concerns about insufficient cash growth and share undervaluation at Apple, Cook’s response was measured. He eventually did buy back stock and increase shareholder dividends, but his response about television and cars was such that Icahn stated publicly that whatever Tim Cook decided was completely Tim Cook’s decision. Danaher, similarly, has good relationships with activist investors. In fact, the company was formed by Steven and Mitchell Rales, who were corporate raiders and understood the value of coherence from the start. Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini described the positive impact of coherence on stock value: “The magic question is: Are your business fundamentals sound enough so that you can consistently deliver a product to customers that they will continue to buy over time? If people believe your business fundamentals are sustainable, it will move the stock price higher.” Some CEOs might resist this approach: they may feel locked into the constraints given to them, or may simply want to avoid the risk of change — hoping that potential disruption or industry structure changes that activists initiate will leave them unharmed. But we’ve seen that movie over and over, and we know how it ends. The better course is to build a case for your company’s fundamental advantage, and lay out your plans for improving it and driving value creation.

24 ноября 2016, 17:38

Компания из Мексики поможет Трампу построить стену

Компания-производитель цемента из Мексики заявила о готовности оказать свои услуги новоизбранному американскому президенту Дональду Трампу, который ранее заявлял о намерении возвести стену на границе между США и Мексикой для борьбы с потоком мигрантов.

24 ноября 2016, 17:38

Компания из Мексики поможет Трампу построить стену

Компания-производитель цемента из Мексики заявила о готовности оказать свои услуги новоизбранному американскому президенту Дональду Трампу, который ранее заявлял о намерении возвести стену на границе между США и Мексикой для борьбы с потоком мигрантов.

12 ноября 2016, 16:00

The Companies Trump Has Criticized

How are they doing now?