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Charles Schwab
13 февраля, 20:25

Ask Carrie: What Does Love Cost?

Dear Readers, Don't think I'm unromantic, but as Valentine's Day approaches I can't help but think about how complicated today's relationships can be and how money can be one of the stickier points. On the journey from first date to happily ever after, there are a lot of financial concerns that can cause more than a few bumps in the road. Because, bottom line, love affects not only your heart but also your wallet. So while I'm a true believer in romance, I'm also very realistic about the importance of dealing with financial issues openly from day one. So in the spirit of helping today's couples understand how finances can impact a relationship, here are some thoughts on how to positively handle money questions at three crucial points in your love life. The dating game: Who pays for what? As if dating didn't come with enough uncertainties, money can add another layer of concern: Who pays for what? Traditionally, the male has been expected to pay. But changing gender and economic roles have pretty much tossed those traditions to the winds. So right up front, you need to think about how you'll handle the cost of getting to know each other. On a first date, it's not unusual for the person doing the asking to pick up the check. But it's also quite appropriate for the other person to chip in. As time goes on, sharing the costs of dating can make it easier on both parties. Whether a couple splits the tab or takes turns paying, unless one person's income is significantly greater than the other's, cost-sharing seems to be the fair thing to do. It doesn't have to be complicated. To me, it's just being considerate and conscious of the other person's budget--which sounds like a good start to a relationship. Moving in together: The financial side of sharing an address Moving in together is a big emotional step. It's also potentially a big financial step. From housing costs to day-to-day living expenses to entertainment, there are bills to pay. For the sake of your relationship, it's best to talk about these things in advance and decide how you want to spend your money individually and as a couple. For instance, if you're renting, will you split the rent 50-50? If one of you owns the home and has a mortgage, will the other contribute to the house payment? Then there are big-ticket items like furniture and appliances. Will you share the cost equally? Or each pay for different items? Likewise, day-to-day costs can trip you up if you don't agree on how you'll share them. Utilities, cable, Internet, cleaning services, groceries--these ongoing expenses can add up quickly. Figure out how you'll divide them. One approach is to come up with a monthly household budget and then each contribute an equal amount. If one of you earns more than the other, that person could offer to cover a greater percentage of the bills. Paying for entertainment and travel is also a point for discussion. It's fine for one person to treat the other now and then, but neither partner should feel taken advantage of. There's no right or wrong way go about any of this. Each couple needs to find the right balance. The main point is to think ahead--and be fair. Marrying your finances: Questions to ask In a marriage, you're a team, and having the same financial values can be an important part of your life together. So now is the time for some honest conversations. Here are just a few questions that can help you and your partner explore your personal feelings and behaviors around money. As you ask these (and other) questions of each other, be patient and open to a different point of view. The key is being honest and forthcoming as you cement your emotional and financial relationship. How did your parents handle money, and what did they teach you in the process? Do you agree? What's more important to you: having fun today (and worrying about money later) or saving for your future? If you get an unexpected bonus or other windfall, are you more inclined to spend or save it? How would you rank your various life goals: e.g., buying a house, having a secure retirement, travel, having kids and sending them to college, or philanthropy? What's the biggest money mistake you ever made? Your smartest decision? What did you learn from these experiences? How much debt do you have, and what is your philosophy on debt? How good are you at paying your bills on time? What's your credit rating? Are you inclined to keep your current assets separate, or do you want to combine everything? How about debt? As you discuss the last question, realize that as financially compatible as the two of you may be, saying "I do" doesn't mean you have to share everything. To me, it's important for every couple to find the right balance between togetherness and autonomy. That way, each person can maintain some financial independence. One way to do that is to take a "yours, mine and ours" approach, keeping separate accounts for personal expenses and a joint account for shared expenses. You could take the same approach to assets you already have, keeping those separate while sharing the assets you accumulate during the marriage. The exact formula you land on is completely up to the two of you. The key is finding a balance that feels uniquely correct to your circumstances and relationship. Taking care of each other--and yourself While it may not seem very romantic, being aware of what love costs--and the potential issues that money can raise--may be the very thing that helps love grow. So don't shy away from understanding one another financially. Rather, see it as an important part of taking care of each other, yourself, and the future of your relationship. Happy Valentine's Day! For more updates, follow Carrie on LinkedIn and Twitter. Looking for answers to your retirement questions? Check out Carrie's book, "The Charles Schwab Guide to Finances After Fifty: Answers to Your Most Important Money Questions." This article originally appeared on Schwab.com. You can e-mail Carrie at [email protected], or click here for additional Ask Carrie columns. This column is no substitute for an individualized recommendation, tax, legal or personalized investment advice. Where specific advice is necessary or appropriate, consult with a qualified tax advisor, CPA, financial planner or investment manager. COPYRIGHT 2017 CHARLES SCHWAB & CO., INC. (MEMBER SIPC.) (#0217-U4JK) -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

10 февраля, 17:08

TD Ameritrade's (AMTD) Daily Client Trades Rise in January

Omaha, NE-based online brokerage firm, TD Ameritrade Holding Corporation (AMTD) came up with average client trades per day of 521,000 in its activity report for Jan 2017.

09 февраля, 17:30

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Priceline, NextEra Energy, Schwab, Anadarko and Novo Nordisk

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Priceline, NextEra Energy, Schwab, Anadarko and Novo Nordisk

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09 февраля, 02:00

Markets, Economy, Politics: What to Watch in 2017

Abby Joseph Cohen of Goldman Sachs, Michael Batnick from Ritholtz Wealth Management and Liz Ann Sonders of Charles Schwab on what to watch for in 2017.   What to Watch in 2017   Goldman Sachs summarily dismissed AJC after seeing this video… (Just kidding) The post Markets, Economy, Politics: What to Watch in 2017 appeared first on The Big Picture.

08 февраля, 23:59

Top Analyst Reports for Priceline, Schwab & NextEera Energy

Top Analyst Reports for Priceline, Schwab & NextEera Energy

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07 февраля, 21:32

E*Trade not moving to match Schwab's price cuts: CFO

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Discount brokerage E*Trade does not plan to follow its competitor Charles Schwab's price cuts, the online trading platform's chief financial officer said on Tuesday at Credit...

06 февраля, 23:56

Charles Schwab To Cut Mutual Fund Expenses, Fuels Discount Brokerage Pricing War

Charles Schwab (SCHW) is slicing prices on their mutual fund expenses. Although great for persons who invest with them, stockholders are wary with the new move on speculation of reduced revenue.

06 февраля, 20:48

Ask Carrie: Millennials, Fire Away: What's Your Financial Question?

Dear Readers, I recently had an interesting conversation with the daughter of a friend of mine. Like so many in her Millennial generation, she has a real entrepreneurial spirit and was excited about a new business venture she was planning. When I asked her a couple of questions about how she would be balancing her own financial needs with the capital-intensive nature of starting a new business, she faltered for a moment, and then said she'd be hiring the best people to take care of all of that stuff and that she was laser-focused on her product. While I applauded her dedication to creating a superior product, I talked to her a little bit about how important it is to understand and control your own finances, even if it isn't your area of specialization. However, here's the dilemma. To learn about your finances, you first have to be willing to ask questions. And that's where a lot of people--especially young people--hesitate because they don't want to appear unknowledgeable. So how do you get past that obstacle? Start by focusing on the questions Whether managing your personal finances or starting a business, it's always great to get advice from true experts. But to make any conversation effective you need to know what questions to ask them. And there's no better way to understand what financial questions to ask than by, you guessed it, asking questions in the first place. This is also a good way to determine who is the right advisor--or hire--to help get you where you want to go. So don't worry about what you don't know. To put yourself ahead of the game, start by asking the basic questions and arm yourself with as much knowledge as you possibly can. There are many areas in your financial life where the right information can save you from making costly mistakes and accelerate your earnings. Every question is important What's the best way to save for retirement? How will the demands of starting a business affect your personal finances? Can you balance savings versus spending? Every question you have is worth asking because it can lead you to a greater understanding of the world of finances and help improve your ability to navigate that world to your best advantage. And that's the goal: understanding where you are with respect to your finances, knowing where you want to be in the future and creating an attainable road map to reach your destination. There's a popular adage 'fake it 'til you make it.' Let's be very clear that the folks offering this advice are not talking about financial decisions! So if you aren't sure about how much money you should be saving each month for retirement, but care about your future security, the best thing to do is ask. Don't know the difference between a CD and a bond? Find out. Uncertain whether to invest or simply save your money? Learn the pros and cons of each and how you can benefit from both. Whatever your question, don't hesitate to ask it. Ask a trusted source The Internet is full of advice and, while much of it is good, there's a lot of misinformation and conflicting information out there. So, yes, do your own online research, but remain skeptical. Also look for other sources. Ask your parents, or a trusted friend. Ask a financial professional (after you've understood how to vet them to make sure there's no conflict of interest). And please send me your questions. In the coming months I plan to focus more regularly on questions that are particularly relevant to Millennials. But, of course, youth is a state of mind. There's no age limit on types of questions or the value of just asking. Be your own advocate It's sometimes embarrassing to feel like you don't already know the answers to things you feel that you should. The real truth is that no one knows all of the answers, and you're your own best advocate. People can get into trouble by pretending they understand something they don't. A good way to avoid costly mistakes is to ask all of the questions that come to mind, even the ones you might think are silly. If you find a simple answer to a simple question, so much the better. But often what you'll find is a complicated series of choices you need to make depending on where you're starting from--and you'll be very glad you asked. For more updates, follow Carrie on LinkedIn and Twitter. Looking for answers to your retirement questions? Check out Carrie's book, "The Charles Schwab Guide to Finances After Fifty: Answers to Your Most Important Money Questions." This article originally appeared on Schwab.com. You can e-mail Carrie at [email protected], or click here for additional Ask Carrie columns. This column is no substitute for an individualized recommendation, tax, legal or personalized investment advice. Where specific advice is necessary or appropriate, consult with a qualified tax advisor, CPA, financial planner or investment manager. COPYRIGHT 2017 CHARLES SCHWAB & CO., INC. (MEMBER SIPC.) (#0217-TT35) -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

06 февраля, 17:30

Zacks Investment Ideas feature highlights: Amazon, Charles Schwab, Schwab S&P 500 Index Fund, Schwab Small-Cap Index Fund and Schwab U.S. TIPS

Zacks Investment Ideas feature highlights: Amazon, Charles Schwab, Schwab S&P 500 Index Fund, Schwab Small-Cap Index Fund and Schwab U.S. TIPS

06 февраля, 16:31

Finance Stocks Surge on Prospects of Lesser Regulations

The U.S. equity markets closed on a positive note on Friday, riding on the Finance sector's rally driven by prospects of easing regulations.

03 февраля, 21:04

How Charles Schwab Is Becoming the Amazon of Investing

How Charles Schwab Is Becoming the Amazon of Investing

03 февраля, 18:31

5 Top-Ranked No-Load Mutual Funds for 2017

Mutual funds with low expense ratio and no sales loads have always grabbed investors' attention.

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01 февраля, 06:50

Charles Schwab Lowers Fees On ETFs

Marie Chandoha, President and CEO, Charles Schwab Investment Management (CSIM) speaks with Julie Cooling, Founder and CEO, RIA Channel to discuss trends in the financial advisor and retail investment channels.

31 января, 02:12

3 Best Mutual Funds to Buy for Just $100

Believe it or not, investments can actually begin with just $100. Mutual funds are great options for investors looking for a relatively less risky way to earn at least more than what fixed income instruments offer

30 января, 21:03

Ask Carrie: Worried About Your Wallet? Here's How to Protect Your Finances in Uncertain Times

Dear Carrie, I can't help but feel worried about the coming year and how all the political changes may affect my finances. I don't have a lot of money, but I want to be smart about handling and protecting what I do have. Is there anything specific I can do? --A Reader Dear Reader, I'm getting a lot of questions from readers who are understandably apprehensive about what's in store for their money in the coming year. So much is up in the air: taxes, interest rates, health care choices and costs, the future of Medicare and Social Security. All of these things have the potential to impact the economy, the financial markets--and our wallets. But here's some good news. Although we can't predict or control the future, we can prepare ourselves by sticking to some time-tested basics of money management. After all, even though we may not be aware of it, we all live with uncertainty every day. Always have, always will. The best way I know to feel more in control is to take action. So here are some thoughts on things you can do to help ease your anxiety. Even as market forces change, these principles hold true. In fact, it's in times of uncertainty that they're probably the most valuable of all. Don't overreact Regardless of what's happening in government or politics, don't panic. Think back to the dramatic market decline of 2008. It was an extraordinarily stressful time, but the investors who suffered long-term were those who panicked and sold at a low. So don't let your emotions lead you astray. Instead, let your situation, your personality, and your goals be your guide--and choose your investments accordingly. Money that you know you'll need in the next three to five years shouldn't be in the stock market. And if you're close to retirement, make sure you have a healthy cash cushion. Cover these basics The unknown is always a little scary but there are some basic things you do have control over no matter where the political or economic winds blow. Here are three practical ways to protect yourself: Beef up your emergency fund. Everyone should have an emergency fund to cover at least three to six months of necessary spending. But if you're feeling uncertain about the future, and especially if you're nearing retirement, you may want to increase your cash reserves even more. Reduce your debt. An industry rule of thumb is that no more than 28 percent of your pretax income should go toward home mortgage debt, and no more than 36 percent should go toward all debt. However, in uncertain times, it may be wise to stay well below these levels. Certainly if you're carrying credit card or other expensive, nondeductible debt month to month, make a plan to pay it off as soon as possible. Be well insured. Insurance always seems like a colossal waste of money--until you need it. If you don't have great health insurance, get it now. Ditto on auto, disability, and homeowner's insurance, and possibly life or long-term-care insurance, depending on your situation. At the same time, be cautious about falling for sales pitches for products you don't need (e.g., life insurance for a child). Rebalance your portfolio Periodic rebalancing is always important--but it's probably even more crucial when markets adjust. This is because as "winning" investments gain in value and take up a larger portion of your portfolio, other investments shrink in comparison. This will change your asset allocation, potentially exposing you to increased risk. One way to compensate is to sell a percentage of the asset classes that have performed well and use that money to buy more of the asset classes that have done poorly. This way, you're not only taking profits, you're actually buying low and selling high. Alternatively, if you're adding money to your portfolio, you can invest in categories that have underperformed. Sounds counter-intuitive--but rebalancing is a cornerstone of smart investing. Make a plan Numerous studies have shown that planners prevail. They set goals, establish priorities, and obtain more wealth. To me, this just makes sense. Managing your money is too important to leave to chance. If you've never worked with a financial planner, this could be your year. A financial plan can be a great way to organize your finances and make sure all the pieces are working together. Or if you're not ready to go the formalized route, at a minimum take a hard look at your goals (Retirement? A new home? College?), and then crunch the numbers to make sure you're on the right path. Change can be disconcerting but it can also mean new opportunities. Yes, there are unknowns ahead. But if you're smart and diligent, you'll not only be able to roll with the punches and protect your money, you'll be able to help it grow. For more updates, follow Carrie on LinkedIn and Twitter. Looking for answers to your retirement questions? Check out Carrie's book, "The Charles Schwab Guide to Finances After Fifty: Answers to Your Most Important Money Questions." This article originally appeared on Schwab.com. You can e-mail Carrie at [email protected], or click here for additional Ask Carrie columns. This column is no substitute for an individualized recommendation, tax, legal or personalized investment advice. Where specific advice is necessary or appropriate, consult with a qualified tax advisor, CPA, financial planner or investment manager. COPYRIGHT 2017 CHARLES SCHWAB & CO., INC. (MEMBER SIPC.) (#0117-TJHK) -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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27 января, 15:46

E*TRADE (ETFC) Beats on Q4 Earnings; DARTs Improve Y/Y

E*TRADE Financial Corporation (ETFC) fourth-quarter 2016 adjusted earnings came in at 43 cents per share, beating the Zacks Consensus Estimate by a penny.

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26 января, 14:05

Raymond James' (RJF) Q1 Earnings Top; Expenses Increase

Raymond James (RJF) announced first-quarter fiscal 2017 (ended Dec 31) adjusted earnings per share of $1.07, which comfortably surpassed the Zacks Consensus Estimate of $1.00.

25 января, 22:17

Are Nontransparent Active ETFs in the Offing?

Inside the concept of nontransparent active ETFs that several issuers are pitching for.