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25 февраля, 00:39

25 Most Hated Players in NBA History

There have been plenty of hated sports figures over the years, so we took a look at the 25 most hated NBA players of all time.

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24 февраля, 22:31

These 10 NFL Teams Have the Easiest Schedules in 2017

A favorable schedule can be exactly what a struggling NFL franchise needs to turn things around. These 10 teams will have the easiest schedules in 2017.

24 февраля, 18:32

Johnny Sexton’s endurance faces tough examination by robust France

French pack do not hide the fact they paint a target on Ireland fly-half’s back and Warren Gatland will be anxious to learn how the Lions prospect faresPerhaps it is for the best Warren Gatland will be in Edinburgh rather than Dublin on Saturday. He will be anxious to learn how Johnny Sexton’s comeback for Ireland progresses but, judging by the fly-half’s recent history against France, it may not make for comfortable viewing.First he was knocked out when trying to tackle Mathieu Bastareaud in 2014 and he endured similar problems with the bulldozing centre a year later. At the World Cup it was Louis Picamoles who put him out of action and last year’s meeting in Paris saw Sexton cynically targeted by the French – Yoann Maestri’s off-the-ball shoulder badly shook him up before he hobbled off in the second half. Continue reading...

24 февраля, 17:00

Italy’s Conor O’Shea: ‘We’re going into our Colosseum this weekend’

Two heavy home Six Nations defeats have given the new Italy head coach an early experience of the pitfalls of the job, but also extra motivation for the daunting prospect of facing England at Twickenham on SundayConor O’Shea knows how Italian rugby is perceived by many outsiders. He has been the Azzurri’s head coach for only eight months but the noises off are wearily familiar. “Everybody is having a pop,” says O’Shea, clearly irritated beneath his ever-positive exterior. “People look for cheap and easy headlines. I would question whether some actually believe it but the world in which we live has no grey areas, only black and white. We know that.”If this was just a case of a national team losing a couple of early home matches to Wales and Ireland, the barbs could be largely dismissed. Some of the dagger-sharp verdicts on Italy’s status prior to Sunday’s date with England, however, would make a latter-day Brutus wince, with Georgia’s position above them in the world rankings having further revved up the perennial Six Nations relegation debate. Even as O’Shea offers the Guardian his own snappy soundbite – “We’re going into our Colosseum this weekend” – he is keenly aware where his players risk being thrown. Continue reading...

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24 февраля, 14:30

Manolo Gabbiadini makes striking Saints start after cold shoulder at Napoli | David Hytner

The Italian forward was out of favour with Maurizio Sarri in Naples but he has the chance to realise his potential with Southampton and is set to lead the line in the EFL Cup final on SundayIt read a little like one of those Oscar acceptance speeches. Manolo Gabbiadini, the Italy striker, who had swapped Napoli for Southampton in a €17m (£14.6m) deal on the final day of the January transfer window, had a lot of people to thank and he would try not to forget anybody.There was the city of Naples, the people there and, specifically, the fans of Napoli. There was the club’s president, Aurelio De Laurentiis, and the former coach, Rafael Benítez, under whom he had played for the first six months. There were the members of staff and, of course, his team-mates. But Gabbiadini did forget somebody in his Facebook post or, more precisely, he chose to ignore him. Continue reading...

24 февраля, 13:51

Claudio Ranieri: my dream died with Leicester sacking

• Craig Shakespeare denies player mutiny forced out manager• Leicester chairman Vichai Srivaddhanaprabha urges fans to respect decisionClaudio Ranieri has admitted “his dream died” when he was sacked by Leicester City, with the Italian paying tribute to the club’s supporters for the “amazing adventure” which led to them being crowned Premier League champions last season for the first time.As numerous figures from the Manchester United manager, José Mourinho, to England Rugby’s head coach, Eddie Jones, expressed their solidarity following his departure on Thursday, Ranieri released a statement via the League Managers Association in which he expressed his sadness at leaving the role he had occupied since replacing Nigel Pearson in July 2015. Continue reading...

24 февраля, 12:00

Life hacks: Surviving Russian winters in the memoirs of foreign travellers

Line your sleigh with felt Portrait of Adam Olearius by Jürgen Ovens. Source: Public domain The German geographer, historian and mathematician Adam Olearius first arrived in Russia in 1633 as secretary to a diplomatic mission. He spoke Russian, and subsequently made several more trips to Russia. In his book Travels of the Ambassadors sent by Frederick, Duke of Holstein, to the Great Duke of Muscovy and the King of Persia, he described what it meant to travel by sleigh, the typical mode of transport of those times: "Some of us lined the floor of the sleigh with felt and we lay on it in our long sheepskin coats, which can be acquired very cheaply there, and on top we covered the sleigh with a felt or woolen rug: this kept us warm and we even sweated and slept as the peasants drove our sleigh onward." Put a stove in the privy Kodayu and Isokichi, two Japanese casteways returned by Adam Laxman, 1792. Source: Public domain After he was shipwrecked off Russian shores in 1783, the Japanese ship's captain Daikokuya Kodayu spent ten years in Russia, met Catherine II and carried out cartographic studies. In his reminiscences, A Brief Account of a Northern Drift, he described, with a characteristic directness, the smallest details of everyday life in this unfamiliar civilization - for instance, the particularities of Russian lavatories at the end of the 18th century and how they were used in winter. He enthusiastically recalled how the Russian nobility lived: "The upper classes even install stoves in their privies to keep them warm." Spend more time at home Elizabeth Vigée-Lebrun. Self-portrait in a Straw Hat. Source: National Gallery London Artist Elizabeth Vigée Le Brun, fled the French Revolution and settled in Russia, where she painted dozens of portraits of the Imperial family and St. Petersburg high society. She published her memoirs upon return home, and recalled that: "the Russians have perfected ways of heating their houses to such an extent that in St. Petersburg you can be completely unaware of the cold if you avoid leaving the house with the onset of winter. The stoves everywhere are so good there is actually no need for fireplaces; they are mere objects of luxury." Furthermore, she was struck by the winter gardens which the grandees of Catherine's time built in their palaces: "For Russians it is not enough to have spring-like temperatures in their rooms in winter; many rooms are adjacent to glazed galleries filled with the best flowers, which we only get to see in May. "We must go spend the winter in Russia to avoid the cold," was how the artist summed up her observations after returning to a snowy Paris. A bearskin coat and a sable hat will keep the frost at bay Portrait of Louis-Philippe de Ségur (1753-1830). Source: Palace of Versailles Historian and diplomat Count Louis-Philippe de Ségur was French ambassador to the court of Catherine II. He accompanied her on her celebrated "Taurida Progress" - a more-than-six-month journey across Russia, unprecedented for its time, which the Empress carried out with a retinue of 3,000. He left valuable memoirs of that period describing the customs of the time. This is how he described the winter leg of the journey: "Our carriages seemed to fly along on their high runners. To protect ourselves from the cold, we wrapped ourselves in bearskin furs, which we wore over finer and more valuable clothes also made of fur; our heads were covered with sable hats. As a result, we did not notice the cold even when it was 20 degrees below freezing. The coaching stations were so well heated that we were more likely to suffer from excessive heat than cold." Ignore the weather Astolphe de CustineI. Source: Public domain French writer and traveller Marquis Astolphe de Custine was famous as the author of the book, Russia in 1839, published in Paris in 1843, which became a bestseller. The book was even banned in Russia, so harsh and critical was his account of Russian realities and the lifestyle of the local upper classes. Custine did not forget to mention the frosts which "granite is helpless to resist." "The buildings standing in a semicircle opposite the imperial palace are nothing but a failed attempt to mimic an antique amphitheater; they need to be viewed from a distance; from close up you see only decorations which need to be plastered and painted each year to make the damage wreaked by the harsh winter less noticeable. The ancients built edifices using enduring materials under a benign sky; here, in a destructive climate, people build palaces with logs, houses from wooden boards and churches of plaster; this means that Russian workers do nothing but repair in the summer what was damaged in the winter; nothing can withstand the local weather - even seemingly very old buildings were rebuilt only yesterday; stone here is as durable as in other countries lime." "People who live in a country where summer and winter temperatures vary by up to 60 degrees should abandon the architecture of southern countries," was the writer's advice. "But Russians have got used to treating nature herself as their handmaiden and not to care about the weather." Read more: How Russia survived the big chill>>>

23 февраля, 23:40

How Tom Brady Looks 29 at 39

New England Patriots' quarterback Tom Brady is playing some of his best football at age 39, and looks younger than ever doing so. Here are his secrets.

23 февраля, 22:52

Tottenham v Gent: Europa League last 32 – live!

Live updates from the second leg of the Europa League tieScoreboard: all the latest from Thursday’s matchesEmail Scott here with your musingsKane: Wembley atmosphere even better than White Hart Lane 9.56pm GMT 90 min +2: Vertonghen lumps long. Kalinic comes to the edge of his box to claim. Mitrovic rises and heads the ball past him, but fortunately for Gent it’s wide right of the goal. It’s not even going out for a corner. 9.55pm GMT 90 min +1: The first of three added minutes. Coulibaly is booked for a foul on Walker in the middle of the park. After the restart, Kane turns tightly on the left-hand corner of the Gent box, and curls a fine effort inches wide of the right-hand post. That’s a glorious effort, but this is over. Continue reading...

23 февраля, 22:26

What You Can Learn About Mindset From Tom Brady And The Patriots

“My job is to play quarterback, and I’m going to do that the best way I know how, because I owe that to my teammates regardless of who is out there on the field with me.” - Tom Brady I am not a New England Patriots fan. Nor am I fondly interested in American football. After all, being born and raised in Italy, I know that the “real” football is soccer – but we’ll leave that talking point aside for the sake of this article. But despite the fact that American football has never captured my heart the way it has so many Americans’, Tom Brady’s winning performance in the 2017 Super Bowl was a potent reminder for me why I love sports so much. I love, love, love sports. Even for a soccer fan like me, it was a blast to watch this year’s Super Bowl – especially the second half, when the Patriots came out of nowhere and took the game into the first-ever overtime in Super Bowl history and went on to smoke the Atlanta Falcons in a game that many thought they had clenched. (Note: the next few sentences may hurt my Falcons fans, so I am sorry in advance if this is painful for you, my friends). One of the best teachers of our time, David Deida, likens the activity of watching epic sports games to ancient “masculine” traditions like going to war, hunting for food, fighting for women, etc. So if this modern tradition of the Super Bowl satisfies ancient human urges, what is there to learn from Brady’s epic comeback? The Epic ComebackAt halftime, the Patriots were down and no one expected them to win... No one (with the possible exception of die-hard Patriots fans and presumably Brady and the team itself).I can only imagine what it must have been like in the Patriots locker room during half time. I can only imagine the conversation going on among coaches and players, the adrenaline rushing, Lady Gaga’s music pounding through the walls. I can imagine how difficult those moments must have been. But somehow, whatever happened during those halftime conversations sparked life back into the game. And that’s when the magic really started to work. By the end of the third quarter, the Patriots were still down by 25 points. And yet, against the odds, Brady sent the game into overtime by leading his team on two eight-point drives (including one that covered 91 yards) during the fourth quarter. And finally, he led the team into a winning 75-yard drive in overtime. It was incredible to watch. This man set all kinds of records and became the first quarterback to earn a fifth Super Bowl ring. He claimed his fourth Super Bowl MVP title in a forever 34-28 victory.Even for me, an uninterested soccer fan, it was an inspiration. The Patriots somehow tapped into their purpose and expressed it in the real world during the fourth quarter and overtime. They lived their purpose. Live Your PurposeMany people struggle with this. Once you’ve found your purpose, how do you give it life? The answer is by creating and maintaining a vision for it. Tom Brady and his team were living on purpose, they were expressing their vision through their stance on the field. Bob Proctor, a great teacher, says that, “Vision is what you do with your life. Vision is the strategy behind the fulfillment of your purpose. You accomplish this strategy by creating several short-term goals to keep you on course.” This is true in life as well as on the field – you saw it in action during the Super Bowl. The Patriots had a vision; they were intentional, they were on purpose. How purposeful is your life? How much vision do you carry within yourself? Are you clear with your vision? These are questions I ask myself regularly, and you must ask yourself, too. Fortunately, Tom Brady and his team have set an incredible example as a reference. What I learned from their relentless and epic win are these five lessons that are worthy of reflection:The Power of EnvisioningThe team had a vision of winning and nothing was going to take that away, even a halftime deficit that would have frozen the most optimistic of their fans. True, it takes a minute to shift and change momentum, especially when you have a plan and a vision. This happens in life as well as in sports; momentum is everything if you know where you are going... and Tom Brady knew that. His teammates knew that. The Power of Persistence Nothing could distract this team from their process. They played every moment as if it were their last – and it very well could have been! I bet they focused on one play at a time, without considering the dramatic points gap. One play at a time and persistence, consistency and discipline got them to the goal. The Power of Letting GoTom Brady and his teammates were able to be utterly present in the second half of the game despite the numbers on the scoreboard. The only way they could have pulled off their big win was to quickly let go of “the judgment of a poor performance.” They let go of missed opportunities, and ultimately they let go of a hope for a better first half. Letting go and shifting their mindset is the only way they could win.The Power of Mental ToughnessAllowing the winning mindset to take over can come only from mental toughness. It’s a practice that is achieved by constant application of mental tools such as positive reframing: turning challenges into opportunities. Brady certainly saw the challenges... but he also saw the opportunities to make history, and rose to the occasion with a mind that way full of possibilities. The Power of Trust and FaithThis is a big lesson for me, as it is for all of us. You must have faith in yourself just like the Patriots did; that is the only way to execute. Without execution you can’t get anywhere. Ultimately, when you believe in yourself and trust in your abilities, you allow magic to flow. Did you see any of the last plays of the fourth quarter? That’s what I call magic. You must have so much faith in yourself as a player and a human being that it goes beyond logic and almost transcends into a spiritual experience. Allow your true nature of greatness to take over and carry you to the finish line, one yard at a time. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

23 февраля, 20:12

NFL Rumors: 10 Potential Landing Spots For Rob Gronkowski in 2017

The New England Patriots won Super Bowl 51 without tight end Rob Gronkowski. Here is a look at 10 potential landing spots for the four-time NFL All-Pro.

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23 февраля, 17:59

Johnny Sexton to start for Ireland in Six Nations clash with France

• Fly-half has been sidelined with calf trouble since last month• Player has not featured for Ireland since autumn New Zealand defeatJoe Schmidt, the Ireland head coach, has tipped Johnny Sexton to shake off his latest injury absence and complete yet another comeback victory against France on Saturday.Sexton has finally beaten his month-long calf problem in time to start Ireland’s Six Nations match with France in Dublin. The fly-half was told in midweek he had no “divine right” to selection by the assistant coach Richie Murphy, but has still been parachuted back into the starting lineup at Paddy Jackson’s expense. Continue reading...

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23 февраля, 15:00

Eddie Jones’s rotation by instinct shows there’s no substitute for nous | The Breakdown

How coaches handle their replacements is becoming increasingly decisive in the Six Nations, from England’s following his hunches to Wales’s use of dataThe former footballer Rodney Marsh once said that the players a manager had to keep happy were the ones in the reserves. Those in the first team were content for that reason. Continue reading...

23 февраля, 13:00

Ricardo La Volpe, baseball's worst pitches and MMA showboating gone wrong | Classic YouTube

This week’s roundup also features footballers downing tools, a gnarly garden, and a Hot Wheels psychedelic nightmare1) It’s tough being a gaffer – stuck on the touchline, unable to let loose on opponents. Full marks, then, to the Club América coach Ricardo La Volpe, who makes his own rules and does his own tackling – dispossessing the Chivas right-back Jesús Sánchez in Mexico’s Clásico Nacional. He joins a big list of managers who can’t help but get involved, including: Alan Pardew, of course (with bonus coverage on Sky from Paul Merson: “Something’s gone on here, Jeff, something’s gone on”); the Ayachucho manager Rolando Chilavert beating Garcilaso’s Iván Santillán to a long ball; Fiorentina’s Delio Rossi weighing up then reacting to his own player Adem Ljajic sarcastically applauding his substitution; Nigel Pearson giving James McArthur a quick strangle; Paolo Di Canio calming down then taking on Leon Clarke; and, at the top end of the scale, the Turkish club Ankaragucu’s manager Umit Ozat dealing with a pitch invader. He was fined and banned.2) And here’s another Pardew tribute, from an unlikely source: the British MMA fighter Joe Harding taking time out to taunt his opponent John Segas with a Pardew-at-Wembley dance. It doesn’t end well. Continue reading...

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23 февраля, 12:19

Over/with

You connect with someone. But you exert power over someone. You can dance and communicate and engage with a partner. It's a two way street, a partnership. On the other hand, you either exert control over someone, or you are under their control. If you want to be an Olympic wrestler, you need to be comfortable (not necessarily in favor of, but willing to live with) the idea that you will spend time under. For thousands of years, we've built our culture to teach people to not only tolerate a powerful overlord, but in a vacuum, to seek one out. We build school around the idea of powerful teachers, coaches and authority figures telling us what to do. We go to the placement office to seek a job, instead of starting our own thing, because we've been taught that this is the way it works, it's reliable, it's safer. And so we're pushed to begin with under, not with. The connection economy begins to undermine this dynamic. But it's frightening. It's frightening to have your own media channel, your own platform, your own ability to craft a community and 1,000 true fans. So instead, we seek out someone to tell us what to do, to trade this for that. I think it's becoming clear that power doesn't scale like it used to. Too many unders and not enough withs. But, each of us can change our perspective, as soon as we're ready. Find your with.        

23 февраля, 08:59

Greatest NBA Players in Every Franchise’s History

There have been a lot of great players in the NBA, and we have the best player who has worn the uniform of each NBA franchise.

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23 февраля, 07:46

Jimmy Garoppolo Is The Smartest QB Investment NFL Teams Can Make This Offseason

In a league where quarterback play gets coaches fired or promoted, every penny counts. For my money, I'd take a risk on Garoppolo and bank on his experience with Brady and Belichick.

23 февраля, 07:25

The 25 Best NBA Players Who Were Kentucky Wildcats

John Calipari has been the master of turning college kids into NBA stars. We looked at the 25 best NBA players to come from the University of Kentucky.