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Compass Group
Выбор редакции
22 ноября, 22:53

Годовая доналоговая прибыль Compass Group выросла на 14% г/г

Compass Group, крупнейшая в мире компания, работающая в сфере общественного питания, отчиталась о 14%-ном повышении годовой доналоговой прибыли. Так, по итогам фискального года с окончанием 30 сентября, доналоговая прибыль компании выросла с 1,16 млрд фунтов стерлингов годом ранее до 1,32 млрд фунтов ($1,62 млрд). Выручка в рассматриваемом периоде повысилась с 17,6 млрд фунтов до 19,61 млрд фунтов. Сообщается, что размер годовых дивидендов составил 31,7 пенса на акцию по сравнению с 29,4 пенса на одну бумагу годом ранее.

Выбор редакции
Выбор редакции
22 ноября, 12:28

Годовая доналоговая прибыль Compass Group выросла на 14% г/г

Compass Group, крупнейшая в мире компания, работающая в сфере общественного питания, отчиталась о 14%-ном повышении годовой доналоговой прибыли. Так, по итогам фискального года с окончанием 30 сентября, доналоговая прибыль компании выросла с 1,16 млрд фунтов стерлингов годом ранее до 1,32 млрд фунтов ($1,62 млрд). Выручка в рассматриваемом периоде повысилась с 17,6 млрд фунтов до 19,61 млрд фунтов. Сообщается, что размер годовых дивидендов составил 31,7 пенса на акцию по сравнению с 29,4 пенса на одну бумагу годом ранее.

04 ноября, 01:59

This May Be The Most Sweeping Set Of Animal Protections Ever Announced

In the realm of animal protection, the chickens that we eat, known as broilers, have been the proverbial elephant in the room. Their numbers are almost inconceivably vast. Roughly 9 billion chickens are slaughtered every year in the United States, making up well over 90 percent of the land animals killed for food. Yet broiler chickens have mostly not benefited from a wave of improvements to farm animal welfare policies announced in recent years by large meat producers and food chains. On Thursday, that changed. Within an hour of each other, two of the world’s largest food services companies, Compass Group USA and Aramark, announced sweeping new welfare improvements for broiler chickens in their supply chains. Both companies manage dining operations at thousands of hospitals, universities and other large institutions. Together, their new policies will improve the wellbeing of over 100 million animals every year.  “I’m not aware of another day in U.S. history that produced policies that affected more animals than the ones announced today,” said Josh Balk, food policy director at the Humane Society of the United States. “If there is one, I’m not aware of it. I can’t think of one that comes close.” As it stands, the lives of broiler chickens in the U.S. are nasty, brutish and short. They are mere babies when we eat them, slaughtered about six weeks after birth. They spend their brief lives ballooning to immense proportions, over six times their natural weight, a result of intense genetic selection. (In human terms, this is akin to a 160-pound adult male bred to weigh about a thousand pounds.) As a consequence, academic and industry studies have found, they suffer. Their underdeveloped bones often cannot handle their own body’s unnatural mass. Many experience painful skeletal disorders and bowed or fractured legs. These birds will barely walk, or sit stationary for much of their lives. They’re housed in barren, tightly packed warehouses with limited natural light and few if any enrichments, like hay or perches, that would allow them to perform basic instinctual behaviors.  And then they’re off to the slaughterhouse, where extensive research has found that the electric stunning method used by U.S. processors is not consistently effective. As a result, scientists say, hundreds of millions of chickens at minimum likely experience intense suffering when they are slaughtered. The most extensive footage of modern broiler farming comes from a former contract farmer for Perdue, one of the largest U.S. poultry companies, who became a whistleblower and opened his farm to cameras a few years ago. In June, Perdue became the first major poultry company to announce its own welfare improvements for broiler chickens. In their announcements, both Compass Group USA and Aramark committed to reforming each of these practices in their supply chains.  First, they pledged to shift to healthier genetic strains of broiler chickens that grow more slowly. The strains will be approved by an independent animal welfare certification group, the Global Animal Partnership. Second, they said they’ll require suppliers to provide new minimum space requirements for their birds and introduce housing enrichments, including hay bales, perches and natural light. Finally, they agreed to order suppliers to replace electric stunning with a slaughter method that is overwhelmingly viewed as more humane. Under the alternative system, known as “controlled atmosphere killing,” birds are exposed to a rising concentration of gas (typically carbon dioxide) until they lose consciousness.  The new policies were developed in coordination with the Humane Society of the United States and Compassion in World Farming, and they followed a public campaign targeting Aramark launched in September by a third group, The Humane League. Balk said it was remarkable for such a major policy shift to first be adopted by some of the largest poultry buyers in the country. “This is going to propel the industry to start making these changes overall,” he said. “Every policy change brings about another policy change. The suppliers, the large poultry companies, will have to shift their operations to meet the demand of Compass and Aramark.” Nico Pitney is a senior editor at The Huffington Post. Tips? Feedback? Email him at nico.pitney [at] huffingtonpost.com. type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related... + articlesList=577304f6e4b0352fed3e5b16,580e3d35e4b000d0b157bf98,57fd7e2ee4b044be30160d0d,57fac5c5e4b0e655eab5485d,57f4414be4b0325452623771,580a5aefe4b0b1bd89fdb1d0 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

04 ноября, 01:59

This May Be The Most Sweeping Set Of Animal Protections Ever Announced

In the realm of animal protection, the chickens that we eat, known as broilers, have been the proverbial elephant in the room. Their numbers are almost inconceivably vast. Roughly 9 billion chickens are slaughtered every year in the United States, making up well over 90 percent of the land animals killed for food. Yet broiler chickens have mostly not benefited from a wave of improvements to farm animal welfare policies announced in recent years by large meat producers and food chains. On Thursday, that changed. Within an hour of each other, two of the world’s largest food services companies, Compass Group USA and Aramark, announced sweeping new welfare improvements for broiler chickens in their supply chains. Both companies manage dining operations at thousands of hospitals, universities and other large institutions. Together, their new policies will improve the wellbeing of over 100 million animals every year.  “I’m not aware of another day in U.S. history that produced policies that affected more animals than the ones announced today,” said Josh Balk, food policy director at the Humane Society of the United States. “If there is one, I’m not aware of it. I can’t think of one that comes close.” As it stands, the lives of broiler chickens in the U.S. are nasty, brutish and short. They are mere babies when we eat them, slaughtered about six weeks after birth. They spend their brief lives ballooning to immense proportions, over six times their natural weight, a result of intense genetic selection. (In human terms, this is akin to a 160-pound adult male bred to weigh about a thousand pounds.) As a consequence, academic and industry studies have found, they suffer. Their underdeveloped bones often cannot handle their own body’s unnatural mass. Many experience painful skeletal disorders and bowed or fractured legs. These birds will barely walk, or sit stationary for much of their lives. They’re housed in barren, tightly packed warehouses with limited natural light and few if any enrichments, like hay or perches, that would allow them to perform basic instinctual behaviors.  And then they’re off to the slaughterhouse, where extensive research has found that the electric stunning method used by U.S. processors is not consistently effective. As a result, scientists say, hundreds of millions of chickens at minimum likely experience intense suffering when they are slaughtered. The most extensive footage of modern broiler farming comes from a former contract farmer for Perdue, one of the largest U.S. poultry companies, who became a whistleblower and opened his farm to cameras a few years ago. In June, Perdue became the first major poultry company to announce its own welfare improvements for broiler chickens. In their announcements, both Compass Group USA and Aramark committed to reforming each of these practices in their supply chains.  First, they pledged to shift to healthier genetic strains of broiler chickens that grow more slowly. The strains will be approved by an independent animal welfare certification group, the Global Animal Partnership. Second, they said they’ll require suppliers to provide new minimum space requirements for their birds and introduce housing enrichments, including hay bales, perches and natural light. Finally, they agreed to order suppliers to replace electric stunning with a slaughter method that is overwhelmingly viewed as more humane. Under the alternative system, known as “controlled atmosphere killing,” birds are exposed to a rising concentration of gas (typically carbon dioxide) until they lose consciousness.  The new policies were developed in coordination with the Humane Society of the United States and Compassion in World Farming, and they followed a public campaign targeting Aramark launched in September by a third group, The Humane League. Balk said it was remarkable for such a major policy shift to first be adopted by some of the largest poultry buyers in the country. “This is going to propel the industry to start making these changes overall,” he said. “Every policy change brings about another policy change. The suppliers, the large poultry companies, will have to shift their operations to meet the demand of Compass and Aramark.” Nico Pitney is a senior editor at The Huffington Post. Tips? Feedback? Email him at nico.pitney [at] huffingtonpost.com. type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related... + articlesList=577304f6e4b0352fed3e5b16,580e3d35e4b000d0b157bf98,57fd7e2ee4b044be30160d0d,57fac5c5e4b0e655eab5485d,57f4414be4b0325452623771,580a5aefe4b0b1bd89fdb1d0 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

11 октября, 19:53

Grisly Undercover Video Shows Chickens Being Starved To Produce More Eggs

An animal protection group has released graphic undercover footage of an industrial chicken farm in Mexico, where hens spend their lives trapped in minuscule cages and are intentionally starved to induce egg production. The video, produced by Animal Equality, kicks off a broad new effort to end some of the cruelest practices of modern animal agriculture in countries outside the United States. It is funded in large part by Facebook co-founder Dustin Moskovitz and his wife Cari Tuna through the Open Philanthropy Project. In the undercover video, egg-laying hens are held in wire cages so small they cannot stretch their limbs, let alone perform basic instinctual behavior. Many of the hens are filthy, covered in other birds’ droppings, and confined with other chickens that are dead or dying. They are also subjected to “forced molting,” a practice to induce stress in hens by depriving them of light and starving them for days on end. The stress causes birds to shed and regrow their feathers. They temporarily stop laying eggs, providing their reproductive systems time to recuperate, and subsequently they produce better quality eggs. WARNING: The video below shows graphic content including injured and deceased chickens. It may be disturbing to some viewers.  Roughly five billion egg-laying chickens are raised globally each year, and the vast majority spend their lives confined in these small enclosures, called battery cages.  Recent campaigns to end the use of battery cages in the U.S. have been the most successful in the history of farm animal welfare, advocates say. In the last two years alone, every major grocery and fast-food chain in the country has committed to selling only cage-free eggs. Aiming to replicate this success abroad, the Open Philanthropy Project last week announced nearly $4 million in grants to animal groups to pursue international cage-free campaigns. “A lot of the factory farming practices that cause so much suffering to animals in the U.S. have now been exported around the globe,” said Lewis Bollard, who oversees the project’s farm animal welfare grants. “We don’t want to make progress in the U.S. only to see it undermined by a continuation and expansion of the practices abroad.” Latin America is a major focus. Mexico and Brazil are two of the world’s leading egg-producing countries and conditions for hens there are even worse than in the United States. Forced molting remains standard practice in Latin America (it is uncommon in the U.S. and illegal in Europe), and egg-laying chickens are packed about 30 percent more tightly than in U.S. factory farms. A typical hen raised in Mexico will live out its one- or two-year existence within the space of 48 square inches. Sharon Nunez, executive director of Animal Equality, said the undercover video was the Mexican public’s first glimpse inside their country’s factory farms.  Animal Equality is not identifying food companies that purchase eggs from the facility shown in the video. Rather, Nunez said, the footage would first be used to privately pressure companies to voluntarily adopt new welfare policies. Beyond Latin America, the Open Philanthropy Project is funding new advocacy work in India, Japan and Germany, as well as campaigns targeting multinational food companies headquartered in Europe. The project targets high-impact causes that aren’t getting sufficient funding from other charitable donors. The largest grants were awarded to Humane Society International, the Humane League and Mercy for Animals, and they’ve already built some early momentum. The world’s largest and second-largest food services corporations ― Compass Group and Sodexo ― each recently announced timelines for converting their entire global operations to cage-free eggs. And two weeks ago, Burger King became the first major fast-food brand to commit to using only cage-free eggs in its Latin America supply chain. type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related Coverage + articlesList=577304f6e4b0352fed3e5b16,57f4414be4b0325452623771,575b0adde4b00f97fba8406f,57ec4405e4b082aad9b921e8 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

11 октября, 19:53

Grisly Undercover Video Shows Chickens Being Starved To Produce More Eggs

An animal protection group has released graphic undercover footage of an industrial chicken farm in Mexico, where hens spend their lives trapped in minuscule cages and are intentionally starved to induce egg production. The video, produced by Animal Equality, kicks off a broad new effort to end some of the cruelest practices of modern animal agriculture in countries outside the United States. It is funded in large part by Facebook co-founder Dustin Moskovitz and his wife Cari Tuna through the Open Philanthropy Project. In the undercover video, egg-laying hens are held in wire cages so small they cannot stretch their limbs, let alone perform basic instinctual behavior. Many of the hens are filthy, covered in other birds’ droppings, and confined with other chickens that are dead or dying. They are also subjected to “forced molting,” a practice to induce stress in hens by depriving them of light and starving them for days on end. The stress causes birds to shed and regrow their feathers. They temporarily stop laying eggs, providing their reproductive systems time to recuperate, and subsequently they produce better quality eggs. WARNING: The video below shows graphic content including injured and deceased chickens. It may be disturbing to some viewers.  Roughly five billion egg-laying chickens are raised globally each year, and the vast majority spend their lives confined in these small enclosures, called battery cages.  Recent campaigns to end the use of battery cages in the U.S. have been the most successful in the history of farm animal welfare, advocates say. In the last two years alone, every major grocery and fast-food chain in the country has committed to selling only cage-free eggs. Aiming to replicate this success abroad, the Open Philanthropy Project last week announced nearly $4 million in grants to animal groups to pursue international cage-free campaigns. “A lot of the factory farming practices that cause so much suffering to animals in the U.S. have now been exported around the globe,” said Lewis Bollard, who oversees the project’s farm animal welfare grants. “We don’t want to make progress in the U.S. only to see it undermined by a continuation and expansion of the practices abroad.” Latin America is a major focus. Mexico and Brazil are two of the world’s leading egg-producing countries and conditions for hens there are even worse than in the United States. Forced molting remains standard practice in Latin America (it is uncommon in the U.S. and illegal in Europe), and egg-laying chickens are packed about 30 percent more tightly than in U.S. factory farms. A typical hen raised in Mexico will live out its one- or two-year existence within the space of 48 square inches. Sharon Nunez, executive director of Animal Equality, said the undercover video was the Mexican public’s first glimpse inside their country’s factory farms.  Animal Equality is not identifying food companies that purchase eggs from the facility shown in the video. Rather, Nunez said, the footage would first be used to privately pressure companies to voluntarily adopt new welfare policies. Beyond Latin America, the Open Philanthropy Project is funding new advocacy work in India, Japan and Germany, as well as campaigns targeting multinational food companies headquartered in Europe. The project targets high-impact causes that aren’t getting sufficient funding from other charitable donors. The largest grants were awarded to Humane Society International, the Humane League and Mercy for Animals, and they’ve already built some early momentum. The world’s largest and second-largest food services corporations ― Compass Group and Sodexo ― each recently announced timelines for converting their entire global operations to cage-free eggs. And two weeks ago, Burger King became the first major fast-food brand to commit to using only cage-free eggs in its Latin America supply chain. type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related Coverage + articlesList=577304f6e4b0352fed3e5b16,57f4414be4b0325452623771,575b0adde4b00f97fba8406f,57ec4405e4b082aad9b921e8 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

15 сентября, 11:56

Европа: индексы не продемонстрировали значительных изменений

В среду, 14 сентября, ключевые фондовые индексы Европы не продемонстрировали значительных изменений. Стоит отметить, что удорожание акций горнодобывающих компаний частично компенсировало негатив от снижения бумаг производителей товаров класса "люкс".  Из вышедшей накануне в регионе макроэкономической статистики можно отметить данные по промышленному производству еврозоны. Так, данный показатель сократился в июле на 1,1% м/м, тогда как ожидалось -0,9% м/м. Отметим, что предыдущее изменение данного показателя было пересмотрено с +0,6% м/м до +0,8% м/м.

Выбор редакции
14 сентября, 10:12

Compass Group up 1.6% after ratings upgrade at J.P. Morgan Cazenove

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news.

11 июля, 18:09

Here Comes a New Record for the S&P 500: Global Week Ahead

Bolstering the week's S&P 500's bullish trading tone from abroad -- long-term government bond yields hover at record lows thanks to the ECB. The benchmark risk-free U.S. 10-yr Treasury trades under this induced stress at 1.40%.

15 июня, 15:19

Yum! Brands' Pizza Hut Launches Summer Special Treat Box

Pizza Hut, a division of Kentucky-based Yum! Brands Inc. (YUM), has introduced a summer picnic basket as a follow up of the Triple Treat Box introduced last year.

13 июня, 19:44

3 New Strong Buy Growth Stocks for June 13th

Here are 3 newly-added Strong Buy stocks that have great growth potential and an A Growth Style Score to show for it.

Выбор редакции
11 мая, 16:09

Compass Group beats expectations

Contract caterer posts rise in half-year revenues and profits with strong North America performance

04 февраля, 13:00

The Senate Has Plenty Of Racial Diversity, But Not The Kind You Brag About

WASHINGTON -- To a casual observer, the halls of Congress look pretty white. But according to Anthony Thomas, people of color abound there, so long as you know where to find them. "It's all black and Hispanic people downstairs," said Thomas, a 23-year-old African-American from the suburb of New Carrollton, Maryland. Thomas works as a dishwasher in the Senate cafeteria in the basement of the Dirksen building. His duties include catering special parties held in the Capitol and the Senate office buildings, where lawmakers and staff rub elbows with lobbyists and other power brokers. Though there are exceptions, it's mostly white people drinking and dining, and people of color like Thomas cleaning up after them, he said. A report released in December by the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies found that the most influential Senate staffers are disproportionately white. Among senior-level Senate staff -- chiefs of staff, legislative directors and other folks who ultimately shape the laws we all live by -- a mere 7.1 percent are people of color, researchers found. Yet people of color comprise 36 percent of the U.S. public at large. (There may well be more diversity among mid- and low-level Senate staff, but no such numbers are available.) So where is all the Senate's diversity? Apparently, much of it is concentrated at the opposite end of the power structure. For the past year and a half, a group called Good Jobs Nation, funded by the Change to Win federation of labor unions, has been organizing janitorial and food workers in the Senate offices and the U.S. Capitol Visitor Center. The group compiled a database of 160 rank-and-file employees it assumes would be eligible to vote if workers filed for a union election. (SEIU, a member of Change to Win, lost a union election among Senate dining employees three years ago, though the union could file for another election.) When the group examined demographics, it found the makeup of the service workforce to be the exact opposite of the senior-level Senate staff. The low-wage workers were almost exclusively people of color -- a whopping 97 percent, according to a demographic breakdown Good Jobs Nation provided to The Huffington Post (the breakdown did not identify individual workers). That number shouldn't be all the surprising, given the demographics of D.C. -- a majority of residents are people of color -- and the way low-wage food and janitorial jobs already skew heavily toward minorities in the U.S. at large, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. A caveat: This was not a scientific study. The database was compiled through on-the-ground outreach done by the group's organizers, not through government records or an official survey. And since the group is only organizing rank-and-file employees, the numbers don't account for middle management, where the workforce appears more mixed. Yet the figures should ring true for anyone who's taken a close look at the workers cleaning the dishes and mopping the floors in the Senate. "I think what's happening at the Capitol reflects a larger trend in our economy -- the gap between the knowledge economy workers and the service-sector workers," said Joseph Geevarghese, director of Good Jobs Nation. "You've got a class of workers who are higher paid, and then you have an underclass of service workers who are low-paid and struggling to make ends meet." Geevarghese's group has been agitating for raises for the workers at the Capitol, along with a host of other federal sites around Washington, including the Smithsonian and Union Station. It has succeeded in pressuring President Barack Obama to issue an executive order mandating a minimum wage of $10.10 per hour for workers on federal contracts. It also has gotten a lot of U.S. senators on board with the call for a $15 wage floor and a union in the Senate buildings, with Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt) and Democrats sending a stern letter to one of the main Capitol contractors, food giant Compass Group. There's a simple explanation for the campaign's growing political support: It's embarrassing that many of the people who take out lawmakers' trash and make their lunches are struggling to cover basic needs in one of the country's most expensive cities. It's also emblematic of larger trends in income inequality around the country. As The Washington Post reported last year, one employee, Charles Gladden, has periodically been homeless while working as a janitor in the Senate. The racial disparity should be just as unsettling, said the Rev. J. Herbert Nelson, director of the Presbyterian Office of Public Witness, which leads the church's social justice efforts. Nelson has been a backer of the campaign, showing up for rallies and strikes to speak to workers. "These people are really unseen in the public square, and there's no real intermingling across economic lines -- not just in the Senate buildings, but out in society," Nelson said. "We have some significant struggles with regards to race, wage earning and how individuals are selected to serve in positions of power. Work is racialized, and that's the great challenge that we have." Arhmed Claggette, 30, works as a janitor cleaning bathrooms in the Senate buildings, earning $11.83 per hour, a wage that he said doesn't cut it in Washington. He said he took part in one-day walkouts because many of his colleagues have gotten only small raises after years on the job. He said the racial disparity between those who run the Senate and those who clean it is hard to miss. "It would make a difference if the people who work with the senators could shed a little light on what it's like for people like me to struggle," Claggette said. The Senate cafeteria workers recently won a raise through a new contract. The average pay for the 115 workers under the contract is supposed to rise from $13 to $14.50, though some workers have claimed they were quickly reclassified into different positions, negating the pay hikes. Under federal contracts, workers' wages fall within a certain range for their occupations, so a lesser title means less pay. One cook told The Washington Post he was downgraded to a "food service worker," which amounts to a difference of nearly $3 per hour. Anthony Thomas, the dishwasher, said his base pay recently went up a dollar, to $13.30, and believes the recent protests played a big role in the raise. But even with the bump, he said he feels he should earn more, given the nights and odd hours he has to work for special events. His goal is to rise to the position of cook, to be in a better position to support his fiancee and their 6-month-old son. The splendor of the Capitol, he said, has a way of reminding him of his financial struggles. "Sometimes I'll walk around and think, 'That column right there is worth more than my salary,'" he said. Also on HuffPost: -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

22 декабря 2015, 01:53

Why It Matters That Shake Shack Is Switching To Cage-Free Eggs

Score another win for the nation’s hens. Fast-casual food chain Shake Shack on Monday joined the ever-growing list of major businesses that have announced plans to switch to using cage-free eggs. The chain's 66 locations around the world will make the transition to cage-free eggs by the end of next year, according to an announcement from animal advocacy group the Humane League. Taco Bell announced a similarly accelerated transition last month and committed to all its stores using cage-free eggs by December 2016.   Other companies switching to cage-free eggs are expected to take a bit longer to follow through on their announcements. Fast-food giant McDonald’s, as well as Dunkin’ Donuts, Qdoba and Jack in the Box, say the planned transition will take a decade. Despite the delay in implementation, Humane League executive director David Coman-Hidy said he feels “very optimistic” about how many food chains and major egg buyers, such as food service providers Aramark and Compass Group, have committed to changing their policies.  “Ultimately it’s about signaling to the egg industry that the writing is on the wall at this point,” Coman-Hidy told The Huffington Post. “I think we’re going to see change continue more rapidly than we’re expecting even now.” So, if the writing is on the wall, why is it taking so long for some companies to make the switch? Put bluntly, there is significant demand from consumers asking for better treatment of farm animals, but the supply still has a long way to go to catch up. Only 8.6 percent of the commercial egg-laying hens in the country live in cage-free environments, according to the latest data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Though this is a dramatic increase from the same time last year, the overwhelming majority of hens are still being held in battery cages that are barely larger than they are. Maro Ibarburu, an associate scientist and business analyst at Iowa State University’s Egg Industry Center, said it will take many egg suppliers more than a decade to switch to a cage-free system, partly because getting rid of battery cages is an expensive change for farmers to self-finance. “This is not a trivial decision,” Ibarburu told HuffPost. “The farmer has to come up with the money to make the change and as far as I know there’s no help to make the transition.” Another factor to the delay has been the patchwork legislative approach to the egg industry’s reliance on battery cages. Only five states have so far passed any legislation banning or restricting the use of the cages. Among them is California, the only state that has banned the sale of eggs from caged hens. Animal welfare groups are pushing a ballot initiative in Massachusetts that would prohibit the sale of such eggs by 2022.  By comparison, the European Union approved a sweeping law banning battery cages in all its member countries in 1999. That law allowed egg producers 13 years to switch their systems over.  Often missing from the press releases from the likes of Shake Shack and Starbucks is that cage-free egg production systems come with their own problems -- and that “cage-free” is not synonymous with “free-range.” Cage-free systems -- where hens are housed in an enclosed barn, not outdoors -- have a hen mortality rate more than double that of traditional systems, according to a three-year analysis released by University of California, Davis researchers earlier this year. Also, the eggs they produce are 30 to 40 percent more expensive than eggs produced through traditional systems. While Joy Mench, a professor of animal science and one of the UC Davis researchers behind that study, argued that such concerns are not “insurmountable,” manufacturers still face a sharp learning curve in addressing the challenges cage-free systems present. “Cage-free systems are much more complicated to manage,” Mench said. “We may not get some of these health concerns down to the level at which they occur in cages, but we can conduct research and the more experience producers gain with the systems, the more they will be reduced.” Meanwhile, the progress on cage-free eggs also seems to be having a spillover effect animal welfare groups should also take heart in. As more chains have gone cage-free, Coman-Hidy said, many are also adding more vegetarian options to their menus and phasing out their use of pork products from gestation crates, two other high-priority issues for groups like the Humane League. After a banner year of almost nonstop movement on cage-free eggs, Coman-Hidy expects to see even more changes in coming years. “We’re not just seeing momentum on this issue. We’re seeing momentum across the board,” he said. “When the average person learns about battery cages, they don’t want to support the farms that use them. No one wants to be behind McDonald’s on an animal cruelty issue.” Joseph Erbentraut covers promising innovations and challenges in the areas of food and water. In addition, Erbentraut explores the evolving ways Americans are identifying and defining themselves. Tips? Email [email protected]   Also on HuffPost: -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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24 ноября 2015, 19:12

Compass Group опубликовала финансовые результаты за фискальный год

Compass Group, крупнейшая в мире компания, работающая в сфере общественного питания, представила результаты финансового года, завершившегося 30 сентября. Согласно отчету компании, прибыль до уплаты налогов составила 1,16 млрд фунтов стерлингов ($1,75 млрд) по сравнению с 1,14 млрд фунтов годом ранее. При этом операционная прибыль достигла 1,26 млрд фунтов стерлингов по сравнению с 1,21 млрд фунтов годом ранее. Выручка за рассматриваемый период составила 17,59 млрд фунтов, тогда как в прошлом году находилась на уровне 16,85 млрд фунтов.

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24 ноября 2015, 11:17

Compass Group опубликовала финансовые результаты за фискальный год

Compass Group, крупнейшая в мире компания, работающая в сфере общественного питания, представила результаты финансового года, завершившегося 30 сентября. Согласно отчету компании, прибыль до уплаты налогов составила 1,16 млрд фунтов стерлингов ($1,75 млрд) по сравнению с 1,14 млрд фунтов годом ранее. При этом операционная прибыль достигла 1,26 млрд фунтов стерлингов по сравнению с 1,21 млрд фунтов годом ранее. Выручка за рассматриваемый период составила 17,59 млрд фунтов, тогда как в прошлом году находилась на уровне 16,85 млрд фунтов.

13 ноября 2015, 20:06

Bernie Sanders, Senate Democrats Demand Capitol Contractor Let Workers Unionize

Cafeteria workers employed in the U.S. Senate have spent the last several months agitating for higher wages and union representation, taking part in strikes and protests to highlight their demands. Now a group of senators have joined their cause. In a letter sent Friday, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and 33 Democrats asked that Compass Group, the company that provides food services in the Capitol, voluntarily recognize a union for the workers if a majority of them ask for one. What the senators appear to be calling for is commonly known as "card check" -- an arrangement that allows workers to avoid a secret-ballot union election, as well as any attendant pressure from management to vote against the union. "Employees working full time in the U.S. Senate should not be living in poverty," the letter says. "Yet with the cost of living in the Washington metropolitan area among the highest in the United States, there have been numerous reports of Senate cafeteria workers forced to take a second job, rely on public assistance programs, and in at least one instance, into homelessness." The lawmakers accused the company of having "resisted" the workers' desire to unionize, noting charges of unfair labor practices that have been filed with the National Labor Relations Board. "The time has come for the Compass Group to ensure Senate cafeteria workers have a model employer that addresses its workers’ legitimate concerns," the letter continues. Compass Group could not immediately be reached for comment. The U.K.-based multinational is the largest foodservice company in the world by revenue, ahead of other giants such as Aramark and Sodexo. Many of the Senate cafeteria workers are affiliated with a group called Good Jobs Nation, which has been organizing food workers at federal properties in and around the nation's capital. Good Jobs Nation is funded by the Service Employees International Union. That's the same union that has spearheaded the Fight for $15 campaign, which has coordinated worker strikes and called for a $15 minimum wage and union representation in fast food. On Tuesday, Senate cafeteria staffers hosted a protest on Capitol grounds that was part of the Fight for $15's nationwide demonstrations. The protest included a speech from Sanders, who's running for the Democratic presidential nomination and penned Friday's letter. "What you are doing and workers all over the United States are doing, you are having a profound impact,” Sanders told the workers. “People are raising the minimum wage to 15 bucks an hour. And you know who started it? You did. You started the movement." -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

13 ноября 2015, 20:06

Bernie Sanders, Senate Democrats Demand Capitol Contractor Let Workers Unionize

Cafeteria workers employed in the U.S. Senate have spent the last several months agitating for higher wages and union representation, taking part in strikes and protests to highlight their demands. Now a group of senators have joined their cause. In a letter sent Friday, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and 33 Democrats asked that Compass Group, the company that provides food services in the Capitol, voluntarily recognize a union for the workers if a majority of them ask for one. What the senators appear to be calling for is commonly known as "card check" -- an arrangement that allows workers to avoid a secret-ballot union election, as well as any attendant pressure from management to vote against the union. "Employees working full time in the U.S. Senate should not be living in poverty," the letter says. "Yet with the cost of living in the Washington metropolitan area among the highest in the United States, there have been numerous reports of Senate cafeteria workers forced to take a second job, rely on public assistance programs, and in at least one instance, into homelessness." The lawmakers accused the company of having "resisted" the workers' desire to unionize, noting charges of unfair labor practices that have been filed with the National Labor Relations Board. "The time has come for the Compass Group to ensure Senate cafeteria workers have a model employer that addresses its workers’ legitimate concerns," the letter continues. Compass Group could not immediately be reached for comment. The U.K.-based multinational is the largest foodservice company in the world by revenue, ahead of other giants such as Aramark and Sodexo. Many of the Senate cafeteria workers are affiliated with a group called Good Jobs Nation, which has been organizing food workers at federal properties in and around the nation's capital. Good Jobs Nation is funded by the Service Employees International Union. That's the same union that has spearheaded the Fight for $15 campaign, which has coordinated worker strikes and called for a $15 minimum wage and union representation in fast food. On Tuesday, Senate cafeteria staffers hosted a protest on Capitol grounds that was part of the Fight for $15's nationwide demonstrations. The protest included a speech from Sanders, who's running for the Democratic presidential nomination and penned Friday's letter. "What you are doing and workers all over the United States are doing, you are having a profound impact,” Sanders told the workers. “People are raising the minimum wage to 15 bucks an hour. And you know who started it? You did. You started the movement." -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

09 ноября 2015, 22:25

Statoil Contracts ESS Offshore and 14forty for UK Operations

Statoil ASA (STO) has given contracts for the catering and facilities services for its U.K. offshore and onshore operations to ESS Offshore and 14forty.