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Compass Group
31 декабря 2016, 01:20

Feds Go After Concessions Company That Shorted Senate Workers $1 Million

The Labor Department wants to bar a concessions company from receiving new federal contracts, after the company allegedly stiffed low-wage workers inside the U.S. Senate out of $1 million. In June, the department announced that Restaurant Associates, a subsidiary of the food service conglomerate Compass Group, would repay 674 Senate workers back wages after the company failed to pay employees the prevailing wage under federal law and didn’t compensate employees for all the hours they worked. Restaurant Associates has since paid back the workers. But the department went a step further on Thursday, filing a complaint requesting that the company be forbidden from receiving new contracts for a period of three years. The request will now go before an administrative law judge. If approved, it will only affect future contracts, not the current one at the Senate building, which runs through 2029, according to the Labor Department filing. In a statement, Oscar L. Hampton III, a solicitor with the Labor Department, said that “doing business with the federal government is a privilege and not a right.” He said the agency filed the disbarment request “to ensure a fair and level competitive playing field for all federal contractors and a fair day’s pay for a fair day’s work.” When private contractors get public money, they’re often held to prevailing wage laws that mandate minimum wages for particular jobs. The idea is to keep contractors from underbidding one another and driving down wages in the local economy. The workers in the Senate building are entitled to certain minimum rates according to their positions ― “Level 1 cook,” “Level 2 cook,” “food service worker,” etc. According to the Labor Department, Restaurant Associates misclassified workers by putting them in lower job categories, resulting in lower pay. The company said the misclassification was an honest mistake, resulting from “administrative technicalities related to [workers’] evolving day-to-day work responsibilities.” In a statement Friday, Restaurant Associates said it was “surprised and disappointed” that the Labor Department was seeking disbarment: “Restaurant Associates, which had no history of previous [prevailing wage] violations, fully cooperated in the investigation. The company immediately paid all back wages owed and made all changes to pay practices going forward as requested by DOL. ... DOL’s decision is unprecedented in these circumstances.” Workers get shorted on pay all the time, but this case was most notable for where it happened ― right inside the U.S. Senate. Good Jobs Nation, a labor group trying to unionize workers on federal properties, said the allegations were emblematic of a much bigger problem. “If federal contractors believe they can get away with breaking federal laws right under the nose of lawmakers, imagine what they’re doing all across the U.S.,” Joseph Geevarghese, the group’s director, told HuffPost in July. The Labor Department’s investigation came on the heels of a complaint filed by Good Jobs Nation on behalf of the workers. In recent years, the group has spearheaded protests and one-day strikes by low-wage workers at buildings including the Capitol, the Smithsonian and the Pentagon, where people work in fast-food restaurants, catering and janitorial services. Some prominent liberal lawmakers have showed up at rallies to support the workers, including Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Rep. Keith Ellison (D-Minn.). The protesting workers say that they earn too little money to get by in the Washington region, and that federal contractors should be held to higher standards than they currently are. Their arguments persuaded President Barack Obama to issue several executive orders related to contractors, including one that set a minimum wage of $10.10 per hour. Another executive order, currently tied up in court, would make it easier to prevent companies from getting contracts if they have a documented history of wage theft or workplace hazards. Though hailed by advocates for low-wage workers, the executive orders will be at the mercy of President-elect Donald Trump when he takes office next month.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

31 декабря 2016, 01:20

Feds Go After Concessions Company That Shorted Senate Workers $1 Million

The Labor Department wants to bar a concessions company from receiving new federal contracts, after the company allegedly stiffed low-wage workers inside the U.S. Senate out of $1 million. In June, the department announced that Restaurant Associates, a subsidiary of the food service conglomerate Compass Group, would repay 674 Senate workers back wages after the company failed to pay employees the prevailing wage under federal law and didn’t compensate employees for all the hours they worked. Restaurant Associates has since paid back the workers. But the department went a step further on Thursday, filing a complaint requesting that the company be forbidden from receiving new contracts for a period of three years. The request will now go before an administrative law judge. If approved, it will only affect future contracts, not the current one at the Senate building, which runs through 2029, according to the Labor Department filing. In a statement, Oscar L. Hampton III, a solicitor with the Labor Department, said that “doing business with the federal government is a privilege and not a right.” He said the agency filed the disbarment request “to ensure a fair and level competitive playing field for all federal contractors and a fair day’s pay for a fair day’s work.” When private contractors get public money, they’re often held to prevailing wage laws that mandate minimum wages for particular jobs. The idea is to keep contractors from underbidding one another and driving down wages in the local economy. The workers in the Senate building are entitled to certain minimum rates according to their positions ― “Level 1 cook,” “Level 2 cook,” “food service worker,” etc. According to the Labor Department, Restaurant Associates misclassified workers by putting them in lower job categories, resulting in lower pay. The company said the misclassification was an honest mistake, resulting from “administrative technicalities related to [workers’] evolving day-to-day work responsibilities.” In a statement Friday, Restaurant Associates said it was “surprised and disappointed” that the Labor Department was seeking disbarment: “Restaurant Associates, which had no history of previous [prevailing wage] violations, fully cooperated in the investigation. The company immediately paid all back wages owed and made all changes to pay practices going forward as requested by DOL. ... DOL’s decision is unprecedented in these circumstances.” Workers get shorted on pay all the time, but this case was most notable for where it happened ― right inside the U.S. Senate. Good Jobs Nation, a labor group trying to unionize workers on federal properties, said the allegations were emblematic of a much bigger problem. “If federal contractors believe they can get away with breaking federal laws right under the nose of lawmakers, imagine what they’re doing all across the U.S.,” Joseph Geevarghese, the group’s director, told HuffPost in July. The Labor Department’s investigation came on the heels of a complaint filed by Good Jobs Nation on behalf of the workers. In recent years, the group has spearheaded protests and one-day strikes by low-wage workers at buildings including the Capitol, the Smithsonian and the Pentagon, where people work in fast-food restaurants, catering and janitorial services. Some prominent liberal lawmakers have showed up at rallies to support the workers, including Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Rep. Keith Ellison (D-Minn.). The protesting workers say that they earn too little money to get by in the Washington region, and that federal contractors should be held to higher standards than they currently are. Their arguments persuaded President Barack Obama to issue several executive orders related to contractors, including one that set a minimum wage of $10.10 per hour. Another executive order, currently tied up in court, would make it easier to prevent companies from getting contracts if they have a documented history of wage theft or workplace hazards. Though hailed by advocates for low-wage workers, the executive orders will be at the mercy of President-elect Donald Trump when he takes office next month.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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22 ноября 2016, 22:53

Годовая доналоговая прибыль Compass Group выросла на 14% г/г

Compass Group, крупнейшая в мире компания, работающая в сфере общественного питания, отчиталась о 14%-ном повышении годовой доналоговой прибыли. Так, по итогам фискального года с окончанием 30 сентября, доналоговая прибыль компании выросла с 1,16 млрд фунтов стерлингов годом ранее до 1,32 млрд фунтов ($1,62 млрд). Выручка в рассматриваемом периоде повысилась с 17,6 млрд фунтов до 19,61 млрд фунтов. Сообщается, что размер годовых дивидендов составил 31,7 пенса на акцию по сравнению с 29,4 пенса на одну бумагу годом ранее.

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Выбор редакции
22 ноября 2016, 12:28

Годовая доналоговая прибыль Compass Group выросла на 14% г/г

Compass Group, крупнейшая в мире компания, работающая в сфере общественного питания, отчиталась о 14%-ном повышении годовой доналоговой прибыли. Так, по итогам фискального года с окончанием 30 сентября, доналоговая прибыль компании выросла с 1,16 млрд фунтов стерлингов годом ранее до 1,32 млрд фунтов ($1,62 млрд). Выручка в рассматриваемом периоде повысилась с 17,6 млрд фунтов до 19,61 млрд фунтов. Сообщается, что размер годовых дивидендов составил 31,7 пенса на акцию по сравнению с 29,4 пенса на одну бумагу годом ранее.

04 ноября 2016, 01:59

This May Be The Most Sweeping Set Of Animal Protections Ever Announced

In the realm of animal protection, the chickens that we eat, known as broilers, have been the proverbial elephant in the room. Their numbers are almost inconceivably vast. Roughly 9 billion chickens are slaughtered every year in the United States, making up well over 90 percent of the land animals killed for food. Yet broiler chickens have mostly not benefited from a wave of improvements to farm animal welfare policies announced in recent years by large meat producers and food chains. On Thursday, that changed. Within an hour of each other, two of the world’s largest food services companies, Compass Group USA and Aramark, announced sweeping new welfare improvements for broiler chickens in their supply chains. Both companies manage dining operations at thousands of hospitals, universities and other large institutions. Together, their new policies will improve the wellbeing of over 100 million animals every year.  “I’m not aware of another day in U.S. history that produced policies that affected more animals than the ones announced today,” said Josh Balk, food policy director at the Humane Society of the United States. “If there is one, I’m not aware of it. I can’t think of one that comes close.” As it stands, the lives of broiler chickens in the U.S. are nasty, brutish and short. They are mere babies when we eat them, slaughtered about six weeks after birth. They spend their brief lives ballooning to immense proportions, over six times their natural weight, a result of intense genetic selection. (In human terms, this is akin to a 160-pound adult male bred to weigh about a thousand pounds.) As a consequence, academic and industry studies have found, they suffer. Their underdeveloped bones often cannot handle their own body’s unnatural mass. Many experience painful skeletal disorders and bowed or fractured legs. These birds will barely walk, or sit stationary for much of their lives. They’re housed in barren, tightly packed warehouses with limited natural light and few if any enrichments, like hay or perches, that would allow them to perform basic instinctual behaviors.  And then they’re off to the slaughterhouse, where extensive research has found that the electric stunning method used by U.S. processors is not consistently effective. As a result, scientists say, hundreds of millions of chickens at minimum likely experience intense suffering when they are slaughtered. The most extensive footage of modern broiler farming comes from a former contract farmer for Perdue, one of the largest U.S. poultry companies, who became a whistleblower and opened his farm to cameras a few years ago. In June, Perdue became the first major poultry company to announce its own welfare improvements for broiler chickens. In their announcements, both Compass Group USA and Aramark committed to reforming each of these practices in their supply chains.  First, they pledged to shift to healthier genetic strains of broiler chickens that grow more slowly. The strains will be approved by an independent animal welfare certification group, the Global Animal Partnership. Second, they said they’ll require suppliers to provide new minimum space requirements for their birds and introduce housing enrichments, including hay bales, perches and natural light. Finally, they agreed to order suppliers to replace electric stunning with a slaughter method that is overwhelmingly viewed as more humane. Under the alternative system, known as “controlled atmosphere killing,” birds are exposed to a rising concentration of gas (typically carbon dioxide) until they lose consciousness.  The new policies were developed in coordination with the Humane Society of the United States and Compassion in World Farming, and they followed a public campaign targeting Aramark launched in September by a third group, The Humane League. Balk said it was remarkable for such a major policy shift to first be adopted by some of the largest poultry buyers in the country. “This is going to propel the industry to start making these changes overall,” he said. “Every policy change brings about another policy change. The suppliers, the large poultry companies, will have to shift their operations to meet the demand of Compass and Aramark.” Nico Pitney is a senior editor at The Huffington Post. Tips? Feedback? Email him at nico.pitney [at] huffingtonpost.com. type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related... + articlesList=577304f6e4b0352fed3e5b16,580e3d35e4b000d0b157bf98,57fd7e2ee4b044be30160d0d,57fac5c5e4b0e655eab5485d,57f4414be4b0325452623771,580a5aefe4b0b1bd89fdb1d0 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

04 ноября 2016, 01:59

This May Be The Most Sweeping Set Of Animal Protections Ever Announced

In the realm of animal protection, the chickens that we eat, known as broilers, have been the proverbial elephant in the room. Their numbers are almost inconceivably vast. Roughly 9 billion chickens are slaughtered every year in the United States, making up well over 90 percent of the land animals killed for food. Yet broiler chickens have mostly not benefited from a wave of improvements to farm animal welfare policies announced in recent years by large meat producers and food chains. On Thursday, that changed. Within an hour of each other, two of the world’s largest food services companies, Compass Group USA and Aramark, announced sweeping new welfare improvements for broiler chickens in their supply chains. Both companies manage dining operations at thousands of hospitals, universities and other large institutions. Together, their new policies will improve the wellbeing of over 100 million animals every year.  “I’m not aware of another day in U.S. history that produced policies that affected more animals than the ones announced today,” said Josh Balk, food policy director at the Humane Society of the United States. “If there is one, I’m not aware of it. I can’t think of one that comes close.” As it stands, the lives of broiler chickens in the U.S. are nasty, brutish and short. They are mere babies when we eat them, slaughtered about six weeks after birth. They spend their brief lives ballooning to immense proportions, over six times their natural weight, a result of intense genetic selection. (In human terms, this is akin to a 160-pound adult male bred to weigh about a thousand pounds.) As a consequence, academic and industry studies have found, they suffer. Their underdeveloped bones often cannot handle their own body’s unnatural mass. Many experience painful skeletal disorders and bowed or fractured legs. These birds will barely walk, or sit stationary for much of their lives. They’re housed in barren, tightly packed warehouses with limited natural light and few if any enrichments, like hay or perches, that would allow them to perform basic instinctual behaviors.  And then they’re off to the slaughterhouse, where extensive research has found that the electric stunning method used by U.S. processors is not consistently effective. As a result, scientists say, hundreds of millions of chickens at minimum likely experience intense suffering when they are slaughtered. The most extensive footage of modern broiler farming comes from a former contract farmer for Perdue, one of the largest U.S. poultry companies, who became a whistleblower and opened his farm to cameras a few years ago. In June, Perdue became the first major poultry company to announce its own welfare improvements for broiler chickens. In their announcements, both Compass Group USA and Aramark committed to reforming each of these practices in their supply chains.  First, they pledged to shift to healthier genetic strains of broiler chickens that grow more slowly. The strains will be approved by an independent animal welfare certification group, the Global Animal Partnership. Second, they said they’ll require suppliers to provide new minimum space requirements for their birds and introduce housing enrichments, including hay bales, perches and natural light. Finally, they agreed to order suppliers to replace electric stunning with a slaughter method that is overwhelmingly viewed as more humane. Under the alternative system, known as “controlled atmosphere killing,” birds are exposed to a rising concentration of gas (typically carbon dioxide) until they lose consciousness.  The new policies were developed in coordination with the Humane Society of the United States and Compassion in World Farming, and they followed a public campaign targeting Aramark launched in September by a third group, The Humane League. Balk said it was remarkable for such a major policy shift to first be adopted by some of the largest poultry buyers in the country. “This is going to propel the industry to start making these changes overall,” he said. “Every policy change brings about another policy change. The suppliers, the large poultry companies, will have to shift their operations to meet the demand of Compass and Aramark.” Nico Pitney is a senior editor at The Huffington Post. Tips? Feedback? Email him at nico.pitney [at] huffingtonpost.com. type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related... + articlesList=577304f6e4b0352fed3e5b16,580e3d35e4b000d0b157bf98,57fd7e2ee4b044be30160d0d,57fac5c5e4b0e655eab5485d,57f4414be4b0325452623771,580a5aefe4b0b1bd89fdb1d0 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

11 октября 2016, 19:53

Grisly Undercover Video Shows Chickens Being Starved To Produce More Eggs

An animal protection group has released graphic undercover footage of an industrial chicken farm in Mexico, where hens spend their lives trapped in minuscule cages and are intentionally starved to induce egg production. The video, produced by Animal Equality, kicks off a broad new effort to end some of the cruelest practices of modern animal agriculture in countries outside the United States. It is funded in large part by Facebook co-founder Dustin Moskovitz and his wife Cari Tuna through the Open Philanthropy Project. In the undercover video, egg-laying hens are held in wire cages so small they cannot stretch their limbs, let alone perform basic instinctual behavior. Many of the hens are filthy, covered in other birds’ droppings, and confined with other chickens that are dead or dying. They are also subjected to “forced molting,” a practice to induce stress in hens by depriving them of light and starving them for days on end. The stress causes birds to shed and regrow their feathers. They temporarily stop laying eggs, providing their reproductive systems time to recuperate, and subsequently they produce better quality eggs. WARNING: The video below shows graphic content including injured and deceased chickens. It may be disturbing to some viewers.  Roughly five billion egg-laying chickens are raised globally each year, and the vast majority spend their lives confined in these small enclosures, called battery cages.  Recent campaigns to end the use of battery cages in the U.S. have been the most successful in the history of farm animal welfare, advocates say. In the last two years alone, every major grocery and fast-food chain in the country has committed to selling only cage-free eggs. Aiming to replicate this success abroad, the Open Philanthropy Project last week announced nearly $4 million in grants to animal groups to pursue international cage-free campaigns. “A lot of the factory farming practices that cause so much suffering to animals in the U.S. have now been exported around the globe,” said Lewis Bollard, who oversees the project’s farm animal welfare grants. “We don’t want to make progress in the U.S. only to see it undermined by a continuation and expansion of the practices abroad.” Latin America is a major focus. Mexico and Brazil are two of the world’s leading egg-producing countries and conditions for hens there are even worse than in the United States. Forced molting remains standard practice in Latin America (it is uncommon in the U.S. and illegal in Europe), and egg-laying chickens are packed about 30 percent more tightly than in U.S. factory farms. A typical hen raised in Mexico will live out its one- or two-year existence within the space of 48 square inches. Sharon Nunez, executive director of Animal Equality, said the undercover video was the Mexican public’s first glimpse inside their country’s factory farms.  Animal Equality is not identifying food companies that purchase eggs from the facility shown in the video. Rather, Nunez said, the footage would first be used to privately pressure companies to voluntarily adopt new welfare policies. Beyond Latin America, the Open Philanthropy Project is funding new advocacy work in India, Japan and Germany, as well as campaigns targeting multinational food companies headquartered in Europe. The project targets high-impact causes that aren’t getting sufficient funding from other charitable donors. The largest grants were awarded to Humane Society International, the Humane League and Mercy for Animals, and they’ve already built some early momentum. The world’s largest and second-largest food services corporations ― Compass Group and Sodexo ― each recently announced timelines for converting their entire global operations to cage-free eggs. And two weeks ago, Burger King became the first major fast-food brand to commit to using only cage-free eggs in its Latin America supply chain. type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related Coverage + articlesList=577304f6e4b0352fed3e5b16,57f4414be4b0325452623771,575b0adde4b00f97fba8406f,57ec4405e4b082aad9b921e8 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

11 октября 2016, 19:53

Grisly Undercover Video Shows Chickens Being Starved To Produce More Eggs

An animal protection group has released graphic undercover footage of an industrial chicken farm in Mexico, where hens spend their lives trapped in minuscule cages and are intentionally starved to induce egg production. The video, produced by Animal Equality, kicks off a broad new effort to end some of the cruelest practices of modern animal agriculture in countries outside the United States. It is funded in large part by Facebook co-founder Dustin Moskovitz and his wife Cari Tuna through the Open Philanthropy Project. In the undercover video, egg-laying hens are held in wire cages so small they cannot stretch their limbs, let alone perform basic instinctual behavior. Many of the hens are filthy, covered in other birds’ droppings, and confined with other chickens that are dead or dying. They are also subjected to “forced molting,” a practice to induce stress in hens by depriving them of light and starving them for days on end. The stress causes birds to shed and regrow their feathers. They temporarily stop laying eggs, providing their reproductive systems time to recuperate, and subsequently they produce better quality eggs. WARNING: The video below shows graphic content including injured and deceased chickens. It may be disturbing to some viewers.  Roughly five billion egg-laying chickens are raised globally each year, and the vast majority spend their lives confined in these small enclosures, called battery cages.  Recent campaigns to end the use of battery cages in the U.S. have been the most successful in the history of farm animal welfare, advocates say. In the last two years alone, every major grocery and fast-food chain in the country has committed to selling only cage-free eggs. Aiming to replicate this success abroad, the Open Philanthropy Project last week announced nearly $4 million in grants to animal groups to pursue international cage-free campaigns. “A lot of the factory farming practices that cause so much suffering to animals in the U.S. have now been exported around the globe,” said Lewis Bollard, who oversees the project’s farm animal welfare grants. “We don’t want to make progress in the U.S. only to see it undermined by a continuation and expansion of the practices abroad.” Latin America is a major focus. Mexico and Brazil are two of the world’s leading egg-producing countries and conditions for hens there are even worse than in the United States. Forced molting remains standard practice in Latin America (it is uncommon in the U.S. and illegal in Europe), and egg-laying chickens are packed about 30 percent more tightly than in U.S. factory farms. A typical hen raised in Mexico will live out its one- or two-year existence within the space of 48 square inches. Sharon Nunez, executive director of Animal Equality, said the undercover video was the Mexican public’s first glimpse inside their country’s factory farms.  Animal Equality is not identifying food companies that purchase eggs from the facility shown in the video. Rather, Nunez said, the footage would first be used to privately pressure companies to voluntarily adopt new welfare policies. Beyond Latin America, the Open Philanthropy Project is funding new advocacy work in India, Japan and Germany, as well as campaigns targeting multinational food companies headquartered in Europe. The project targets high-impact causes that aren’t getting sufficient funding from other charitable donors. The largest grants were awarded to Humane Society International, the Humane League and Mercy for Animals, and they’ve already built some early momentum. The world’s largest and second-largest food services corporations ― Compass Group and Sodexo ― each recently announced timelines for converting their entire global operations to cage-free eggs. And two weeks ago, Burger King became the first major fast-food brand to commit to using only cage-free eggs in its Latin America supply chain. type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related Coverage + articlesList=577304f6e4b0352fed3e5b16,57f4414be4b0325452623771,575b0adde4b00f97fba8406f,57ec4405e4b082aad9b921e8 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

15 сентября 2016, 11:56

Европа: индексы не продемонстрировали значительных изменений

В среду, 14 сентября, ключевые фондовые индексы Европы не продемонстрировали значительных изменений. Стоит отметить, что удорожание акций горнодобывающих компаний частично компенсировало негатив от снижения бумаг производителей товаров класса "люкс".  Из вышедшей накануне в регионе макроэкономической статистики можно отметить данные по промышленному производству еврозоны. Так, данный показатель сократился в июле на 1,1% м/м, тогда как ожидалось -0,9% м/м. Отметим, что предыдущее изменение данного показателя было пересмотрено с +0,6% м/м до +0,8% м/м.

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14 сентября 2016, 10:12

Compass Group up 1.6% after ratings upgrade at J.P. Morgan Cazenove

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news.

11 июля 2016, 18:09

Here Comes a New Record for the S&P 500: Global Week Ahead

Bolstering the week's S&P 500's bullish trading tone from abroad -- long-term government bond yields hover at record lows thanks to the ECB. The benchmark risk-free U.S. 10-yr Treasury trades under this induced stress at 1.40%.

15 июня 2016, 15:19

Yum! Brands' Pizza Hut Launches Summer Special Treat Box

Pizza Hut, a division of Kentucky-based Yum! Brands Inc. (YUM), has introduced a summer picnic basket as a follow up of the Triple Treat Box introduced last year.

13 июня 2016, 19:44

3 New Strong Buy Growth Stocks for June 13th

Here are 3 newly-added Strong Buy stocks that have great growth potential and an A Growth Style Score to show for it.

Выбор редакции
11 мая 2016, 16:09

Compass Group beats expectations

Contract caterer posts rise in half-year revenues and profits with strong North America performance

04 февраля 2016, 13:00

The Senate Has Plenty Of Racial Diversity, But Not The Kind You Brag About

WASHINGTON -- To a casual observer, the halls of Congress look pretty white. But according to Anthony Thomas, people of color abound there, so long as you know where to find them. "It's all black and Hispanic people downstairs," said Thomas, a 23-year-old African-American from the suburb of New Carrollton, Maryland. Thomas works as a dishwasher in the Senate cafeteria in the basement of the Dirksen building. His duties include catering special parties held in the Capitol and the Senate office buildings, where lawmakers and staff rub elbows with lobbyists and other power brokers. Though there are exceptions, it's mostly white people drinking and dining, and people of color like Thomas cleaning up after them, he said. A report released in December by the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies found that the most influential Senate staffers are disproportionately white. Among senior-level Senate staff -- chiefs of staff, legislative directors and other folks who ultimately shape the laws we all live by -- a mere 7.1 percent are people of color, researchers found. Yet people of color comprise 36 percent of the U.S. public at large. (There may well be more diversity among mid- and low-level Senate staff, but no such numbers are available.) So where is all the Senate's diversity? Apparently, much of it is concentrated at the opposite end of the power structure. For the past year and a half, a group called Good Jobs Nation, funded by the Change to Win federation of labor unions, has been organizing janitorial and food workers in the Senate offices and the U.S. Capitol Visitor Center. The group compiled a database of 160 rank-and-file employees it assumes would be eligible to vote if workers filed for a union election. (SEIU, a member of Change to Win, lost a union election among Senate dining employees three years ago, though the union could file for another election.) When the group examined demographics, it found the makeup of the service workforce to be the exact opposite of the senior-level Senate staff. The low-wage workers were almost exclusively people of color -- a whopping 97 percent, according to a demographic breakdown Good Jobs Nation provided to The Huffington Post (the breakdown did not identify individual workers). That number shouldn't be all the surprising, given the demographics of D.C. -- a majority of residents are people of color -- and the way low-wage food and janitorial jobs already skew heavily toward minorities in the U.S. at large, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. A caveat: This was not a scientific study. The database was compiled through on-the-ground outreach done by the group's organizers, not through government records or an official survey. And since the group is only organizing rank-and-file employees, the numbers don't account for middle management, where the workforce appears more mixed. Yet the figures should ring true for anyone who's taken a close look at the workers cleaning the dishes and mopping the floors in the Senate. "I think what's happening at the Capitol reflects a larger trend in our economy -- the gap between the knowledge economy workers and the service-sector workers," said Joseph Geevarghese, director of Good Jobs Nation. "You've got a class of workers who are higher paid, and then you have an underclass of service workers who are low-paid and struggling to make ends meet." Geevarghese's group has been agitating for raises for the workers at the Capitol, along with a host of other federal sites around Washington, including the Smithsonian and Union Station. It has succeeded in pressuring President Barack Obama to issue an executive order mandating a minimum wage of $10.10 per hour for workers on federal contracts. It also has gotten a lot of U.S. senators on board with the call for a $15 wage floor and a union in the Senate buildings, with Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt) and Democrats sending a stern letter to one of the main Capitol contractors, food giant Compass Group. There's a simple explanation for the campaign's growing political support: It's embarrassing that many of the people who take out lawmakers' trash and make their lunches are struggling to cover basic needs in one of the country's most expensive cities. It's also emblematic of larger trends in income inequality around the country. As The Washington Post reported last year, one employee, Charles Gladden, has periodically been homeless while working as a janitor in the Senate. The racial disparity should be just as unsettling, said the Rev. J. Herbert Nelson, director of the Presbyterian Office of Public Witness, which leads the church's social justice efforts. Nelson has been a backer of the campaign, showing up for rallies and strikes to speak to workers. "These people are really unseen in the public square, and there's no real intermingling across economic lines -- not just in the Senate buildings, but out in society," Nelson said. "We have some significant struggles with regards to race, wage earning and how individuals are selected to serve in positions of power. Work is racialized, and that's the great challenge that we have." Arhmed Claggette, 30, works as a janitor cleaning bathrooms in the Senate buildings, earning $11.83 per hour, a wage that he said doesn't cut it in Washington. He said he took part in one-day walkouts because many of his colleagues have gotten only small raises after years on the job. He said the racial disparity between those who run the Senate and those who clean it is hard to miss. "It would make a difference if the people who work with the senators could shed a little light on what it's like for people like me to struggle," Claggette said. The Senate cafeteria workers recently won a raise through a new contract. The average pay for the 115 workers under the contract is supposed to rise from $13 to $14.50, though some workers have claimed they were quickly reclassified into different positions, negating the pay hikes. Under federal contracts, workers' wages fall within a certain range for their occupations, so a lesser title means less pay. One cook told The Washington Post he was downgraded to a "food service worker," which amounts to a difference of nearly $3 per hour. Anthony Thomas, the dishwasher, said his base pay recently went up a dollar, to $13.30, and believes the recent protests played a big role in the raise. But even with the bump, he said he feels he should earn more, given the nights and odd hours he has to work for special events. His goal is to rise to the position of cook, to be in a better position to support his fiancee and their 6-month-old son. The splendor of the Capitol, he said, has a way of reminding him of his financial struggles. "Sometimes I'll walk around and think, 'That column right there is worth more than my salary,'" he said. Also on HuffPost: -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

06 октября 2014, 18:46

Великобритания: ритейлер Tesco назначил двух новых членов совета директоров без исполнительных полно

Британский оператор сети супермаркетов Tesco назначил двух новых членов совета директоров без исполнительных полномочий на фоне внутреннего расследования, проводимого в связи с ошибками бухгалтерского учета компании. Так, с 1 ноября текущего года в совет директоров компании войдут Ричард Казинс (Richard Cousins), занимающий должность исполнительного директора в Compass Group, а также исполнительный директор IKEA Group Майкл Олсон (Mikael Ohlsson).

Выбор редакции
06 октября 2014, 16:16

Великобритания: ритейлер Tesco назначил двух новых членов совета директоров без исполнительных полно

Британский оператор сети супермаркетов Tesco назначил двух новых членов совета директоров без исполнительных полномочий на фоне внутреннего расследования, проводимого в связи с ошибками бухгалтерского учета компании. Так, с 1 ноября текущего года в совет директоров компании войдут Ричард Казинс (Richard Cousins), занимающий должность исполнительного директора в Compass Group, а также исполнительный директор IKEA Group Майкл Олсон (Mikael Ohlsson).

15 мая 2014, 16:01

Frontrunning: May 15

More than 20 dead, doctor says, as anti-China riots spread in Vietnam (Reuters) Russia's Gazprom plans Singapore stock exchange listing (Reuters) Inside Europe’s Plan Z (FT) Ukraine slides deeper toward war as Russia warns to vote (BBG) Fast-Food Protests Spread Overseas (NYT) Meanwhile, Cremonini Emerges as Billionaire Making Burgers in Italy (BBG) BOJ Beat, Officials Could Upgrade Outlook for Capex (WSJ) Euro-Zone Economy Shows Weaker-Than -Expected Expansion (WSJ) Yahoo to YouTube Ads Spreading Viruses Rile Lawmakers (BBG) New York Times Ousts Jill Abramson as Executive Editor, Names Dean Baquet (BBG) NYT Publisher Said to Always Have Clashed With Abramson (BBG) Google gets take-down requests after European court ruling - source (Reuters) Endo to Pay Executive’s $60 Million Tax Bill in Move (BBG) EU East-West Defense Divide Makes Putin Bold (BBG) Job market debate rages at Fed, likely keeping rates on hold (Reuters)   Overnight Media Digest WSJ * Global bond rates dropped to their lowest levels of the year Wednesday, as central bankers signaled their determination to jolt the world's largest economies out of their malaise. Investors piled into U.S., German and British government bonds, used to price everything from mortgages to car loans, driving down their yields. (http://r.reuters.com/faw39v) * Citigroup Inc Chief Executive Michael Corbat said in a memo Wednesday that the bank had fired 11 employees in its Banamex unit in connection with the loan losses from Mexico's Oceanografia SA de CV that the bank has blamed on fraud. (http://r.reuters.com/raw39v) * AT&T Inc's internal merger team is active again with talks to buy satellite-television provider DirecTV in a deal that could be valued at nearly $50 billion, people familiar with the matter said. AT&T has hired investment bank Lazard Ltd for advice on the deal, the people said. (http://r.reuters.com/gew39v) * French Prime Minister Manuel Valls has signed a decree giving him extended authority to block foreign takeovers of companies deemed strategic, a move that could strengthen the government's hand in the battle for Alstom SA's energy assets, sought by General Electric Co. (http://r.reuters.com/tew39v) * In a significant move to streamline its process for dealing with counterfeits, Alibaba Group Holding Ltd this month began automatically removing from its biggest shopping site products that some brands have flagged as fake. (http://r.reuters.com/huw39v) * Richard Perry's Perry Capital increased its stake in Herbalife Ltd, the nutritional supplements maker that hedge-fund manager William Ackman of Pershing Square Capital Management has been campaigning against since December 2012. (http://r.reuters.com/kuw39v) * AerCap Holdings N.V. on Wednesday established itself as the world's second-largest jet leasing company by assets, completing its $7.6 billion purchase of the aircraft leasing unit of American International Group Inc. (http://r.reuters.com/muw39v)   FT The British Bankers' Association has warned that the Bank of England's proposals to impose the world's toughest rules for clawing back bonuses from bankers could be unenforceable in the UK and would be illegal in some countries. Western banks are imposing tougher lending restrictions on Russian companies as sanctions against the country start to bite. Citigroup has fired 11 staff, including four managing directors, in Mexico after a two-month internal investigation at its Mexican subsidiary, Banamex, into an alleged $400 million fraud that forced the U.S. bank to cut its 2013 earnings. Bank of England Governor Mark Carney played down expectations of an imminent rise in interest rates even as new figures show the British economy is producing new jobs at the fastest rate on record. GlaxoSmithKline was accused by Chinese authorities of earning billions of renminbi in "illegal revenues" through a programme of "massive and systemic bribery" as more pressure was mounted on the pharmaceuticals group following a 10-month long corruption investigation.   NYT * Even though fast-food workers have staged several one-day strikes in the last 18 months, the protests have not swayed McDonald's or other major restaurant chains to raise their employees' pay. So on Thursday, the fast-food workers' movement wants to broaden its reach as it pushes for a $15-an-hour wage that restaurant companies say is unrealistic. The movement leaders say support protests will take place in 80 cities in more than 30 countries, from Dublin to Venice to Casablanca to Seoul to Panama City. (http://r.reuters.com/rew39v) * The New York Times dismissed Jill Abramson as executive editor on Wednesday, replacing her with Dean Baquet, the managing editor, in an abrupt change of leadership. Arthur Sulzberger, the publisher of the paper and the chairman of The New York Times Co, told a stunned newsroom that he had made the decision because of "an issue with management in the newsroom." (http://r.reuters.com/xyv39v) * Citigroup Inc has fired 11 employees, including four high-ranking executives in Mexico, in connection with a $400 million fraud involving a large Banamex client. The bank fired many because they had not taken steps to detect the fraud or had ignored warning signs about the client. (http://r.reuters.com/zyv39v) * The ruling by Europe's highest court that Google can be forced to remove links from certain searches will be carried out by data privacy regulators at 28 different agencies across the European Union. However, since the court gave the agencies little guidance in applying the ruling, people in different European countries could receive different treatment. (http://r.reuters.com/baw39v) * Macy's Inc reported a sluggish first quarter on Wednesday, dampening hopes for more positive spring spending news after an exceptionally frigid, difficult winter. It said profit rose a modest 3 percent in the quarter but that sales dropped 1.7 percent from the year before. (http://r.reuters.com/haw39v) * The Retail Industry Leaders Association, along with several top retailers, like Gap and Walgreen, on Wednesday opened an intelligence-sharing center focused on the prevention of cybercrimes against retailers. According to the retail group, the center will allow retailers to share information about data breaches and potential threats. (http://r.reuters.com/jaw39v) * Valero Energy Partners reported a 28 percent drop in first-quarter net income on Wednesday, as a rough winter curbed demand for the petroleum products that flow through its pipelines. The San Antonio company, spun out of the Valero Energy Corp last year, reported net income of $10.5 million, or 18 cents per unit, in its first full quarter as a publicly traded company. (http://r.reuters.com/maw39v)   Canada THE GLOBE AND MAIL * The Conservative government is preparing to keep Canadian warplanes on a NATO mission in Romania for another three months and possibly until late 2014. The government has declined to give Canadians a timeline for its new military commitment to NATO's reassurance mission in Europe. (http://r.reuters.com/dux39v) * A report by the City of Vancouver says Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain pipeline pitch falls short on details. Among the gaps, it says Vancouver Coastal Health cannot fully assess Kinder Morgan's claims that there are minimal health risks because the company has not provided assessment reports. (http://r.reuters.com/fux39v) Reports in the business section: * Edmonton-born Greg Abel, who serves as one of Warren Buffett's chief lieutenants, is making a big bet on the economic potential of Alberta, amid speculation that he might one day succeed the famed investor at the helm of Berkshire Hathaway Inc . (http://r.reuters.com/jux39v) NATIONAL POST * New Democratic Party leader Tom Mulcair is set to appear before a House of Commons committee on Thursday to answer allegations that the New Democrats misused taxpayer funds to set up partisan satellite offices in Quebec. (http://r.reuters.com/tux39v) * Alberta Wildrose leader Danielle Smith accused Jim Prentice on Wednesday of trying to eliminate her party as a threat before he even enters the race to become premier. Smith says a member of Prentice's inner circle has approached someone on her team pitching a merger if Prentice wins the Progressive Conservative leadership contest. (http://r.reuters.com/wux39v) FINANCIAL POST * Sears Canada's demise seems inevitable after news emerged that its biggest shareholder may pull its stake out of the ailing department store chain. But with no single retailer seen as an obvious suitor to acquire the entire operation, it is likely that Sears Canada will continue to operate, even if Sears Holdings Corp sells its 51 percent ownership in the business. (http://r.reuters.com/hyx39v) * Builders of Toronto condominiums get as little respect these days as the embattled mayor, according to one of the city's largest high-rise developers. Toronto, whose mayor entered a rehabilitation center after admitting smoking crack cocaine, is in the midst of a building boom. (http://r.reuters.com/kyx39v)   China SHANGHAI SECURITIES NEWS - The Shanghai Stock Exchange will conduct test trading on Saturday for stock options linked to individual shares, sources told the paper. Test trading is the last step before the official roll-out of such products, the sources said. - Several provinces and cities are making plans to implement "One Road, One Strip", a long-term economic and political strategy that aims to promote economic ties and regional integration between countries along the traditional Silk Road, sources familiar with matter said. CHINA SECURITIES JOURNAL - The State Council, China's cabinet, said the government would implement a range of policies to support "production-oriented" service industries, including research and development, industrial design, commercial services, sales and marketing, and after-sales service.   21ST CENTURY BUSINESS HERALD - China Reinsurance Group Corp has started preparing for its initial public offering (IPO) and is expected to list as early as next year, multiple sources told the paper. Given the current long waiting list for IPOs in the mainland stock market, the company may consider listing in Hong Kong, another person close to the matter said. CHINA DAILY - Beijing will impose a new levy on the discharge of certain organic compounds, aiming to increase environmental awareness in the city's industrial enterprises, municipal officials said. The money collected from the levy will be used to improve the city's air quality, they added. PEOPLE'S DAILY - Members of the Communist Party should insist on their political beliefs and have the courage to criticize wrong thoughts, the paper which acts as the party's mouthpiece said in an editorial.   Britain The Telegraph BANK OF ENGLAND IN NO RUSH TO RAISE INTEREST RATES Interest rates will remain on hold this year, the Bank of England has signalled, but households must be prepared for a gradual increase in borrowing costs amid a backdrop of "robust" growth and rapidly falling unemployment. (http://link.reuters.com/nav39v) PFIZER RESEARCH BOSS CALLS ON TOP UK SCIENTISTS TO SUPPORT ASTRA DEAL Pfizer's top scientist Mikael Dolsten on Wednesday embarked on a whistlestop tour of Britain's leading scientific figures to garner support for an AstraZeneca deal. (http://link.reuters.com/pav39v) The Guardian UK UNEMPLOYMENT AT FIVE-YEAR LOW AMID JOBS BOOM Britain's jobs boom accelerated in the first three months of the year as unemployment reached a five-year low, fuelled by a surge in self-employed workers. (http://link.reuters.com/qav39v) ASTRAZENECA ADMITS A HIGHER BID FROM PFIZER COULD SUCCEED AstraZeneca boss Pascal Soriot has undermined the drug maker's campaign to stay independent, by admitting that an increased takeover bid from U.S. rival Pfizer could outweigh concerns over the needs of cancer patients. (http://link.reuters.com/rav39v) The Times ANGRY SHAREHOLDERS SPRING NEW REVOLT ON EXECUTIVE PAY Two of Britain's best known companies, bus, coach and train operator National Express and broadcaster ITV PLC , were hit by substantial shareholder revolts over executive pay. (http://link.reuters.com/dev39v) COMPASS SERVES UP ANOTHER 1 BLN POUND TO ITS HUNGRY INVESTORS Compass Group Plc, the world's biggest contract catering company, is to hand back 1 billion pound to shareholders in a special dividend payout. (http://link.reuters.com/fev39v) The Independent GLAXOSMITHKLINE'S FORMER CHINA CHIEF MARK REILLY CHARGED WITH BRIBERY Chinese police have charged the British former head of GlaxoSmithKline with bribery and fraud in connection with a long-standing scheme to boost drug sales in China. (http://link.reuters.com/gev39v) PATISSERIE VALERIE LOW PRICED FLOAT SPARKS LISTING FEARS Patisserie Valerie listed at the bottom of its price range - although shares then rose nearly 9 percent- prompting fears that investor enthusiasm for new listings is wearing off. (http://link.reuters.com/jev39v)     Fly On The Wall 7:00 AM Market Snapshot ECONOMIC REPORTS Domestic economic reports scheduled today include: Empire State manufacturing survey for May at 8:30--consensus 5.0 Consumer Price Index for April at 8:30--consensus up 0.3% for the month Jobless claims for week of May 10 at 8:30--consensus 317K Industrial production for April at 9:15--consensus up 0.4% for the month Philadelphia Fed survey for May at 10:00--consensus 14.3 ANALYST RESEARCH Upgrades Acxiom (ACXM) upgraded to Market Perform from Underperform at BMO Capital EarthLink (ELNK) upgraded to Outperform from Perform at Oppenheimer Heartland Payment (HPY) upgraded to Outperform from Neutral at RW Baird Kinder Morgan (KMI) upgraded to Conviction Buy from Buy at Goldman L-3 Communications (LLL) upgraded to Buy from Neutral at BofA/Merrill Miller Energy (MILL) assumed with a Buy from Hold at Brean Capital Nimble Storage (NMBL) upgraded to Buy from Neutral at Goldman Parkway Properties (PKY) upgraded to Buy from Hold at Stifel Pernix Therapeutics (PTX) upgraded to Strong Buy from Buy at Needham Range Resources (RRC) upgraded to Conviction Buy from Neutral at Goldman Steel Dynamics (STLD) upgraded to Outperform from Market Perform at Cowen Tandem Diabetes (TNDM) upgraded to Buy from Hold at Deutsche Bank (pre-open) Twitter (TWTR) upgraded to Neutral from Underweight at Atlantic Equities Zimmer (ZMH) upgraded to Buy from Neutral at SunTrust Downgrades American Capital Mortgage (MTGE) downgraded to Market Perform at JMP Securities Anglo American (AAUKY) downgraded to Neutral from Outperform at Credit Suisse BE Aerospace (BEAV) downgraded to Neutral from Buy at UBS Bristol-Myers (BMY) downgraded to Market Perform from Outperform at BMO Capital Columbia Property (CXP) downgraded to Equal Weight from Overweight at Morgan Stanley Huntington Ingalls (HII) downgraded to Neutral from Buy at BofA/Merrill ITC Holdings (ITC) downgraded to Neutral from Overweight at JPMorgan LATAM Airlines (LFL) downgraded to Market Perform from Outperform at Raymond James PhotoMedex (PHMD) downgraded to Hold from Buy at Ascendiant Southwestern Energy (SWN) downgraded to Neutral from Conviction Buy at Goldman Urban Outfitters (URBN) downgraded to Market Perform from Outperform at FBR Capital VOXX International (VOXX) downgraded to Neutral from Buy at B. Riley Vodafone (VOD) downgraded to Neutral from Buy at Goldman Initiations ACADIA (ACAD) initiated with an Overweight at JPMorgan Cherokee (CHKE) initiated with a Buy at B. Riley Magellan Petroleum (MPET) initiated with a Buy at B. Riley Rackspace (RAX) assumed with an Overweight at JPMorgan COMPANY NEWS Kindred Healthcare (KND) proposed to acquire Gentiva Health (GTIV) for $14.00 per share Cisco (CSCO) reported better-than-expected Q3 results and forecast Q4 revenue down 1%-3% on adjusted EPS of 51c-53c; Cisco forecast "several more quarters" before growth in overall switching JPMorgan (JPM) reported April net credit losses 3.05% vs. 3.07% last month Capital One (COF) reported April net charge-off rate 3.98% vs. 4.18% last month Incyte (INCY) posted an abstract regarding a Phase 2 study of its pancreatic cancer drug at ASCO Jack in the Box (JACK) initiated a quarterly dividend of 20c per share and forecast Q3 SSS up 2%-3%  after reporting Q2 earnings that beat expectations EARNINGS Companies that beat consensus earnings expectations last night and today include: Fifth Street Senior (FSFR), Prestige Brands (PBH), Teekay (TK), TowerJazz (TSEM), Dangdang (DANG), WuXi PharmaTech (WX), CafePress (PRSS), Cvent (CVT), Radiant Logistics (RLGT), Acxiom (ACXM), Opower (OPWR), Vipshop (VIPS), Gevo (GEVO), Xencor (XNCR), Cisco (CSCO), Reed's (REED) Companies that missed consensus earnings expectations include: Arctic Cat (ACAT), Luxoft (LXFT), NetEase.com (NTES), eLong (LONG), Ultrapetrol (ULTR), DragonWave (DRWI), VOXX International (VOXX), ExOne (XONE), Applied Genetic (AGTC), CM Finance (CMFN), Cypress Energy (CELP), Eagle Materials (EXP), TriVascular (TRIV), Jack in the Box (JACK), Agilent (A), Metabolix (MBLX), SeaWorld (SEAS), StemCells (STEM) NEWSPAPERS/WEBSITES AT&T (T) works with Lazard (LAZ) amid DirecTV (DTV) takeover negotiations, Reuters reports Murphy Oil (MUR) looking to sell Malaysia oil and gas assets, WSJ reports Departure of New York Times (NYT) editor 'not a mutual decision,' FT reports European court rules Google (GOOG) to grant take-down requests, Reuters says Teva (TEVA) loses bid to block approval of generic Copaxone, Bloomberg reports Trian says PepsiCo (PEP) CEO Nooyi made 'major mistake,' Fortune reports Macy's (M) looks cheap, Barron's says SYNDICATE ANI Pharmaceuticals (ANIP) files to sell 3.5M shares for holders Daqo New Energy (DQ) 2M share Secondary priced at $29.00 Delek US (DK) 9.2M share Secondary priced at $30.00 LDR Holding (LDRH) 3.97M share Secondary priced at $24.50 Select Income REIT (SIR) 9M share Spot Secondary priced at $29.00 Sorrento Therapeutics (SRNE) 4.765M share Spot Secondary priced at $5.25 The Dixie Group (DXYN) 2.5M share Secondary priced at $10.65 US Rare Earths (UREE) files to sell $23M in common stock Zendesk (ZEN) 11.11M share IPO priced at $9.00    

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27 марта 2014, 18:29

США: Compass прогнозирует 4%-ный рост органической выручки в первом полугодии

Compass Group, крупнейшая в мире компания, работающая в сфере общественного питания, прогнозирует рост органической выручки в первом полугодии на уровне чуть более 4%. Compass при этом отметила, что 0,4% из 4% приходится на период празднования Пасхи.