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Consol Energy
12 мая, 19:33

Foresight Energy (FELP) Reports Wider-than-Expected Loss

Foresight Energy LP (FELP) reported first-quarter 2017 adjusted loss of 12 cents per unit. The figure was wider than the Zacks Consensus Estimate of a loss of a penny.

Выбор редакции
10 мая, 20:49

Natural Resource (NRP) Q1 Earnings, Revenues Miss Estimates

Natural Resource Partners (NRP) reported first-quarter 2017 adjusted earnings of 3 cents per unit, missing the Zacks Consensus Estimate of $1.57 by a very wide margin.

02 мая, 22:46

CONSOL (CNX) Beats Q1 Earnings & Revenue Estimates, Guidance Up

CONSOL Energy Inc. (CNX) reported earnings of 17 cents per share in first-quarter 2017, beating the Zacks Consensus Estimate of 11 cents by 54.5%.

Выбор редакции
02 мая, 15:15

CONSOL Energy (CNX) Beats on Q1 Earnings, Ups View

CONSOL Energy (CNX) reported adjusted earnings of 17 cents per share in first quarter beating the Zacks Consensus Estimate of 11 cents by 54.5%.

29 апреля, 00:43

Jesus, It's Only Been 100 Days

Like what you read below? Sign up for HUFFPOST HILL and get a cheeky dose of political news every evening! Donald Trump said the presidency has been “more work than in my previous life — I thought it would be easier,” which is a sentiment typically expressed by newly made Mafia capos or teenaged parents. John Kasich said we need to “eradicate” North Korea’s leadership but refused to say anything more on the matter, presumably because he needed to go slather mud on his face, bite a combat knife with his teeth and slowly submerge himself into a lagoon near the DMZ. And Milo Yiannopoulos is starting an “ugly for-profit troll circus,” though considering the New York Times sent out a push notification today advertising an essay by a climate change denier, we’re pretty sure Milo’s late to the party. This is HUFFPOST HILL for Friday, April 28th, 2017: CAN FIRMLY KICKED - Sources close to the road say the can has relocated a modest distance. Matt Fuller: “Still lacking an agreement on an omnibus spending deal to keep the government open, Congress passed a one-week funding measure on Friday so that Republicans and Democrats could continue negotiations…. Republicans were also hoping that passing an omnibus deal this week would allow President Donald Trump to tout the agreement as an accomplishment in his first 100 days, even if there are hardly any wins in the deal for Republicans. The House easily passed the bill by a vote of 382-30, and then the Senate passed it by voice vote later Friday afternoon. Now the stopgap bill moves to Trump’s desk for his signature before midnight to avoid a government shutdown. With the extra time gained and barring any unexpected hiccups, lawmakers sound confident they can come to an agreement next week on legislation that will fund the government until October.” [HuffPost] TRUMP MARKS APPROACHING 100-DAY MARK BY NOT CHANGING A SINGLE THING - Then again, if you’re going to behave in a wildly unpresidential manner, you might as well do so in a room full of overly enthused gun nuts that you voluntarily chose to enter. Amanda Terkel: “President Donald Trump warned attendees at the National Rifle Association’s annual convention on Friday that they probably won’t like the Democrats running for president in 2020. He used a derogatory nickname to specifically call out Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.). ‘I have a feeling that in the next election, you’re going to be swamped with candidates, but you’re not going to be wasting your time,’ said Trump, the first sitting president to address the NRA’s convention since Ronald Reagan. ‘You’ll have plenty of those Democrats coming over and you’re going to say, ‘No, sir. No, thank you. No, ma’am.’ Perhaps “ma’am.” It may be Pocahontas, remember that. And she is not big for the NRA, that I can tell you. But you came through for me, and I am going to come through for you.’ The crowd booed when he mentioned Warren.” [HuffPost] Our data team took a look at Trump’s first 100 days. And HuffPost’s J.M. Rieger made a video  of what you see when you close your eyes at night in the Trump era. At least we know Trump is capable of writing down his name. “On Day 89 of his presidency, Donald Trump set down his felt-tipped pen and did what he’s done most and best so far in his new job: held up a piece of paper he had just signed for news cameras to record for posterity. More than four dozen times since taking office, Trump has invited the media he regularly attacks to show off his distinctive cursive on a presidential document ―  a document that, the vast majority of the time, has been completely unnecessary to accomplish the stated goal. Previous presidents have signed executive orders and memoranda. None appeared to be compelled to hold them up and show off their penmanship.” [HuffPost’s S.V. Date] REPUBLICANS TRYING TO KEEP COAL COMPANIES FROM PAYING HEALTH CLAIMS - Hey, it looks like the GOP is finally down with government-sponsored health care! Laura Barrón-López: “Under a new measure being floated in the House, companies like Consol Energy would be able to shift their obligations to cover the health care costs of retired coal miners on to the federal government, which already pays for other retirees’ coverage. The measure, pushed by Rep. Tim Murphy (R-Pa.), could jeopardize efforts to finalize a separate provision that would permanently fund health benefits for retired United Mine Workers. Those benefits, which pertain only to mine workers who worked for now-bankrupt companies, are set to expire in a matter of days. There remains a dispute over how to pay for a permanent fix. But the Murphy text, lawmakers warn, could complicate those already difficult negotiations as Congress tries to keep the government funded this week.” [HuffPost] GORKA ON THE WAY OUT: REPORT - Just some news about that crypto-fascist who, you know, has been employed by the White House. Lachlan Markay and Asawin Suebsaeng: “The Trump administration is actively exploring options to remove controversial national security aide Sebastian Gorka from the White House and place him at another federal agency, multiple sources tell The Daily Beast. Two senior administration officials familiar with the situation say it is exploring a new role for Gorka elsewhere in the administration. Another said he has been entirely excluded from day-to-day policy-making at the National Security Council in the meantime. Gorka’s looming departure from the White House, which one of the sources described as imminent, comes amid mounting controversy over his involvement with a far-right Hungarian group notorious for its collaboration with the Nazi regime during the second world war.” [Daily Beast] Like HuffPost Hill? Then order Eliot’s book, The Beltway Bible: A Totally Serious A-Z Guide To Our No-Good, Corrupt, Incompetent, Terrible, Depressing, and Sometimes Hilarious Government Does somebody keep forwarding you this newsletter? Get your own copy. It’s free! Sign up here. Send tips/stories/photos/events/fundraisers/job movement/juicy miscellanea to [email protected] Follow us on Twitter - @HuffPostHill PRESIDENT REALIZES HE’S PRESIDENT - It’s a shame the “*freeze frame*” meme is kind of old now, because this whole article is one big version of it. Stephen J. Adler, Jeff Mason and Steve Holland: “President Donald Trump on Thursday reflected on his first 100 days in office with a wistful look at his life before the White House. ‘I loved my previous life. I had so many things going,’ Trump told Reuters in an interview. ‘This is more work than in my previous life. I thought it would be easier.’ … More than five months after his victory and two days shy of the 100-day mark of his presidency, the election is still on Trump’s mind. Midway through a discussion about Chinese President Xi Jinping, the president paused to hand out copies of what he said were the latest figures from the 2016 electoral map. ‘Here, you can take that, that’s the final map of the numbers,’ the Republican president said from his desk in the Oval Office, handing out maps of the United States with areas he won marked in red. ‘It’s pretty good, right? The red is obviously us.’” [Reuters] LEWANDOWSKI GRABBING WASHINGTON FIRMLY BY THE ARM - Kenneth Vogel and Josh Dawsey: “A firm co-founded by Donald Trump’s original campaign manager Corey Lewandowski appears to have been pitching clients around the world by offering not only policy and political advice, but also face time with President Trump, Vice President Mike Pence and senior members of their administration, according to documents and interviews. A document provided to an Eastern European politician by an international consulting firm that Lewandowski co-founded this year promises to arrange ‘meetings with well-established figures,’ including Trump, Pence, ‘key members of the U.S. Administration’ and outside Trump allies.”  [Politico] BIPARTISAN GROUP WANTS TO TALK ABOUT WASHINGTON’S BEST ACRONYM: AUMF -  Jennifer Bendery: “A bipartisan group of 46 lawmakers wrote to House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) on Friday, urging him to schedule a debate on Congress’ role in authorizing wars ― and on the need for President Donald Trump to get their approval before he takes any further military action overseas. ‘It’s long past time for Congress to take responsibility for the war against ISIS by finally holding a debate and vote on whether to authorize any future military action,’ said Rep. Jim McGovern (D-Mass.), a leading voice on the issue who signed Friday’s letter. ‘With his recent military strike against Syria, we are also declaring that President Trump must not undertake any new military operations without the approval of Congress,’ he said…. Today...Trump can use a 16-year-old war authorization to unilaterally take military action in Syria or anywhere else in the Middle East, if he can make the case that Islamic State or al Qaeda targets are there.” [HuffPost] MEMBER OF CONGRESS DELIVERS 2017’S MOST INTENSE ‘NO HOMO’ - President Trump has had the effect of making us forget just how truly insane members of Congress can be. Curtis M. Wong: “A Texas congressman choked back tears at an event in Washington, D.C. this week as he begged God to forgive the U.S. for legalizing same-sex marriage. Rep. Randy Weber (R-TX) was one of 20 different members of Congress who spoke at the sixth annual ‘Washington ― A Man of Prayer’ event, held at the U.S. Capitol’s Statuary Hall, on Wednesday night. He opened his remarks with a politically charged slant on the Lord’s Prayer, before pleading with God to forgive the country for the ‘sins’ of marriage equality and abortion, Right Wing Watch reports.” [HuffPost] YIKES, JOHN KASICH - Philip Rucker: “In a discussion with reporters in Washington, Kasich evaluated the escalating tensions on the Korean Peninsula and suggested that Trump devise a plan to swiftly eliminate North Korea’s leadership. ‘How do you deal with this? I think there might be a way, and that has to do with taking out the North Korean leadership,’ ‘Kasich said. He added, ‘I believe the best way to solve this problem is to eradicate the leadership. I’m talking about those who are closest to making the decisions that North Korea’s following now.’ Kasich stopped short of explicitly recommending that U.S. forces assassinate North Korea’s leaders, but what he described would be a military and intelligence exercise.” [WaPo] DEMINT DEFIRED - Okay, not yet, but still. Nancy Cook, Kenneth P. Vogel and Eliana Johnson: “The controversial president of The Heritage Foundation, former Sen. Jim DeMint, may soon be out of a job, following a dispute with board members about the direction of conservative think tank, according to three people with knowledge of the situation.” [Politico] THE NEW HAMPSHIRE LEGISLATURE IS THE REDDIT OF LEGISLATURES - This is almost too on the nose. Bonnie Bacarisse: “Last November, voters in New Hampshire’s Lakes Region re-elected to the state house of representatives a man who appears to be one of the secret architects of the internet’s misogynistic ‘Manosphere.’ The homegrown son of a preacher, 31-year-old Robert Fisher is a Republican who represents New Hampshire’s Belknap County District 9…. An investigation into Fisher’s online aliases found a trail of posts linking the lawmaker to the username Pk_atheist, the creator of The Red Pill — an online Reddit community of nearly 200,000 subscribers that promotes itself as a ‘discussion of sexual strategy in a culture increasingly lacking a positive identity for men.’” [Daily Beast] BECAUSE YOU’VE READ THIS FAR - Here are a bunch of kittens. MILO TO START FOR-PROFIT TROLL ENTERPRISE, THOUGH WE’RE PRETTY SURE THAT’S JUICERO - America’s foremost Alt-Right troll has a new business. Tina Nguyen: “Milo Inc., according to a press release, will be based in Miami, with a planned staff of 30. It will be in the business of what can be best described as corporatized trolling via live entertainment, with Yiannopoulos and his investors hosting events featuring right-wing talent. ‘The business of Madonna became touring,’ said Yiannopoulos in a phone interview, citing the artist’s deal with Live Nation. ‘I’m doing the same thing, but instead of signing up with Live Nation, I’m building one. I’m building it for libertarian and conservative comedians, writers, stand-up comics, intellectuals, you name it.’” [Vanity Fair] COMFORT FOOD - America’s 50 best independent bookstores. - What it’s like to be the last player chosen in the NFL draft. - Wow, this guy really wants to sell his ‘96 Suzuki Vitara. TWITTERAMA 1. B...oyz II Men2. E...nya 3. N...irvana4. G...reen Day5. H...oobastank6. A...erosmith7. Z...Z Too8. I...ncubus9.10. Never again— Laura Bassett (@LEBassett) April 28, 2017 Legitimately don't understand people who are upset the Times hired another op-ed person to ignore but not when they put peas in guacamole.— Aaron Mehta (@AaronMehta) April 28, 2017 I'm just sitting here on the beach with my flawless body. But my spiritual sufferings are enormous— KimKierkegaardashian (@KimKierkegaard) April 28, 2017 Got something to add? Send tips/quotes/stories/photos/events/fundraisers/job movement/juicy miscellanea to Eliot Nelson ([email protected]) -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

28 апреля, 21:44

The Tech Sector's Strong Earnings Power

The Tech Sector's Strong Earnings Power

28 апреля, 15:45

Cloud Peak (CLD) Incurs Loss in Q1, Revenues Lag Estimates

Coal producer, Cloud Peak Energy (CLD) reported a loss of 30 cents per share in the first quarter of 2017

28 апреля, 14:35

What's in the Cards for CONSOL Energy (CNX) in Q1 Earnings?

CONSOL Energy Inc. (CNX) is expected to report first-quarter 2017 results before the market opens on May 2.

28 апреля, 03:24

GOP-Backed Measure Would Let Coal Companies Transfer Cost Of Sick Miners To U.S. Taxpayers

WASHINGTON ― Profitable coal companies may get a bailout in the government spending bill that lawmakers are trying to pass next week, and it could place Congress at the brink of a shutdown. Under a new measure being floated in the House, companies like Consol Energy would be able to shift their obligations to cover the health care costs of retired coal miners on to the federal government, which already pays for other retirees’ coverage. The measure, pushed by Rep. Tim Murphy (R-Pa.), could jeopardize efforts to finalize a separate provision that would permanently fund health benefits for retired United Mine Workers. Those benefits, which pertain only to mine workers who worked for now-bankrupt companies, are set to expire in a matter of days. There remains a dispute over how to pay for a permanent fix. But the Murphy text, lawmakers warn, could complicate those already difficult negotiations as Congress tries to keep the government funded this week. “Consol is probably one of the premier coal companies we’ve ever had in West Virginia and I’m very appreciative of all they’ve done, all the good jobs they’ve provided,” Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) told HuffPost on Thursday. “But this bill, the way it’s been configured, the way it’s been worked, is not a place for that right now because they still have a viable company, an ongoing company.” Manchin said the current measure to permanently fix health benefits for United Mine Workers and their widows is “truly a bill that protects orphans.” “These are people who were left behind, their companies went bankrupt, they left the system,” he said. “There’s no way to get any type of payment.” But if Murphy’s language is attached to the current miner fix, Manchin warned, it would make Democrats and possibly a number of Republicans abandon ship. “To do that at this time would not be advised at all,” Manchin said. “I think the Senate is pretty much resolved in where we are and I think that’s been transmitted to the House pretty clearly.” At the heart of the dispute is a promise the government made 70 years ago to protect the health care of United Mine Workers. Under the 1992 Coal Act, the government agreed to cover the cost of health care for United Mine Worker retirees and their widows. But the language only covers miners who retired before the fall of 1994, and stipulates that still-profitable coal companies have to pay the health care costs for their miners who retired after that date. Murphy’s push would change that. Currently, coal companies that remain afloat and by all appearances financially healthy are paying for roughly 20,000 retirees protected under the Coal Act. His measure would move those costs ― likely in the billions of dollars ― to the taxpayers. The congressman confirmed to HuffPost that he is drafting language that would make it so Consol and other companies don’t have to pay for the health coverage of their retirees even though they remain solvent. His text is expected to be included in the omnibus spending bill to fund the government that Congress will consider after first passing a short-term resolution to keep the government open this week. Asked if it was just to help out Consol Energy, Murphy said his measure would be for “a number of coal companies” to ensure that “all of the things aren’t placed on the shoulders of existing companies.” The congressman said he’s in talks with his colleagues and a lot of people in the mining industry about the language he’s drafting. Murphy spokeswoman Carly Atchison said in an email that he supports following through on the promise the government made to the United Mine Workers in 1946. “However, he is also concerned that our active coal companies, who were burdened with legacy retiree healthcare obligations mandated by Congress, will not be able to sustain competitiveness over the long term,” Atchison wrote. “That is why he is working on language to protect all of our coal miners by addressing the retiree healthcare needs of today while avoiding [a] crisis tomorrow by placing our active coal producers at a competitive disadvantage and push more coal companies into bankruptcy.” Consol Energy did not respond to multiple requests for comment. Murphy received $32,450 in contributions from the mining industry during his 2016 re-election campaign, and has received $353,039 from the industry over the course of his career in Congress, according to Open Secrets. Consol Energy and a number of its high-ranking employees appear to have contributed more than $70,000 to Murphy’s campaigns during his time in the House. The effort launched by Murphy and coal companies in the past 24 hours didn’t sit well with the United Mine Workers of America, which has been working with Manchin and others in both chambers to get a permanent health benefits fix through Congress for years. The current language pulls from the bipartisan Miners Protection Act, authored by Manchin, Sen. Shelley Moore Capito (R-W.Va.) and a handful of other coal-state senators. “Some elements of the coal industry have come in at the last minute to try to steal health care and pension funding from retirees,” said Cecil Roberts, president of the United Mine Workers of America. “They have not gone through regular order like the Miners Protection Act has at the request of the Senate Majority Leader. Congress must decide if they want to save lives or pad bottom lines.” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

26 апреля, 16:42

Noble Energy (NBL) to Post Q1 Earnings: What's in Store?

Noble Energy (NBL) is scheduled to release first-quarter 2017 earnings on May 1.

21 апреля, 00:56

SunCoke Energy (SXC) Beats on Q1 Earnings, Revenues Miss

SunCoke Energy (SXC) reported earnings of 2 cents per share in the first quarter of 2017, compared with the Zacks Consensus Estimate of a loss of 10 cents.

19 апреля, 15:55

Companies with issues before government wrote big checks for Trump's inauguration

Trump's inaugural committee brought in a record $106.7 million, double the amount of Obama's first ceremony.

14 апреля, 05:02

Scott Pruitt Heads To Coal Mine To Pitch New EPA Agenda

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); SYCAMORE, Pennsylvania — The head of the Environmental Protection Agency chose a Pennsylvania coal mine with a history of violating environmental laws as his venue for unveiling a new plan to refocus his agency in a way that he says will both protect the planet and promote economic growth.   Ignoring the fact that the U.S. coal industry’s troubles are primarily the result of market forces, Scott Pruitt offered roughly 75 miners at the Harvey Mine this hopeful message: The “regulatory assault” on coal is over. It was here in Appalachian coal country, at North America’s largest producing underground coal complex, that Pruitt formally launched the EPA’s “Back-To-Basics agenda.” But instead of sharing details about that plan, he commiserated with those in the room. What happened to coal under former President Barack Obama, Pruitt said in a four-minute address, is “really sad.” Pruitt, a climate change denier and longtime ally of the fossil fuel industry, claimed that coal, oil and gas companies are both pro-environment and pro-growth. Now that Obama is out of office, he said, America doesn’t have to chose between the two. “It’s been said — I think you’ve heard it said — you can’t have your cake and eat it too,” Pruitt said. “I’ll tell you, whoever says that doesn’t know what you’re supposed to do with cake.” Pruitt’s message wasn’t surprising, but his choice of venue was somewhat baffling. Consol Energy was fined $3 million just last year for dumping mine wastewater into Ohio River tributaries. Consol Energy owns the Bailey Mine Complex, which includes Harvey Mine. The company exceeded its daily or monthly effluent limit more than 300 times between 2006 and 2015, according to the EPA complaint. Consol, which now focuses primarily on natural gas production, has voiced its intent to sell off its remaining coal assets. Patrick Grenter, a senior campaign representative for the Sierra Club’s Beyond Coal Campaign, told The Huffington Post that Consol has operated recklessly for many years. In a 2005 settlement, the company paid $36 million to replace a dam that it was accused of damaging with its operations.  Grenter called Pruitt’s visit to Harvey Mine “very concerning.” He said the only reasonable conclusion he could draw is that “’back-to-basics’ means back to promoting polluters over public health.” Pruitt’s visit to coal country comes a little over two weeks after President Donald Trump, surround by coal miners, signed an executive order instructing the EPA to review Obama’s Clean Power Plan, a policy limiting greenhouse gas emissions from power plants. The order also took measures to further protect the coal industry, namely by instructing the Department of the Interior to lift a temporary ban on coal leasing on federal lands that the Obama administration put in place last year. The American Federation of Government Employees, which represents 700,000 federal and D.C. government employees, including EPA workers, has called the order the latest in “a continued assault on the country’s top-line of defense for community health.” Miners, most of whom were in their 30s and 40s and many of whom were covered in dust from their morning shift below ground, began to gather inside a large common area of the portal building before Pruitt’s address. At one end, workers wearing headlamps, hardhats and reflective suits came and went from a silver elevator shaft. On a long wall, a board covered in tags indicated who was on shift. “[It’s] no lie that the [coal] industry in the last eight years, we’ve all felt a lot of pain,” said Jimmy Brock, CEO of CNX Coal Resources, which operates the Harvey Mine. But the Bailey complex persevered somehow, he said.  “It’s easy to be optimistic now,” Brock said following Pruitt’s speech. He added that coal miners should never apologize for the work they do. "You guys are a handsome crew," @EPAScottPruitt tells @CNXCoal miners. pic.twitter.com/sD1VM3i2GQ— Chris D'Angelo (@c_m_dangelo) April 13, 2017 Other miners in attendance seemed to share Brock’s optimism about the future of coal. Eben McClay, of the nearby town Claysville, has worked at the Bailey complex for a decade. He told HuffPost that he sees Trump as being “all about America” and likes to see the administration standing up for coal and bringing jobs and industry back to the U.S.  “The coal mine produces a lot of money and a lot of jobs for this area — for a lot of families,” he said.  Harvey Mine is located in Pennsylvania’s Green County, which has a population of just over 35,000. The coal industry here employs between 7,000 and 8,000 people, according to Robbie Matesic, executive director of the county’s Department of Economic Development. The county probably couldn’t withstand a sudden death of the industry, she said, but added that she is seriously concerned about climate change and believes coal companies must be held accountable for the environmental damage they cause.  “Here’s our problem: We have an economy dependent on it,” she said. “The truth is our economy is not healthy because of the way it is dependent on the energy industry.” The community has been working hard to diversify its economy for the last several years, Matesic said. But it needs more time.  Mark Kusky, a coal miner who has been with Consol for 11 years, said it’s encouraging to see Trump follow though on his campaign promise. Asked about climate change and the argument for cutting carbon emissions and moving toward renewable energy, Kusky said all energy sources have their downsides. He added that he’s hopeful coal will make a comeback, but that only time will tell if it can become the powerhouse it once was. “The future looks bright from where we’re standing,” he said. Matesic, however, said the only way to have healthy economies is to diversify ― meaning Trump and Pruitt are giving the coal industry, and communities like her own, false hope.  “If the Trump administration is really concerned about the economic health and the environmental health of this country — if they really are — they’re not going about it the right way,” she said. See more about EPA’s “Back-To-Basics” Agenda here.   How will Trump’s first 100 days impact you? Sign up for our weekly newsletter and get breaking updates on Trump’s presidency by messaging us here. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

14 апреля, 05:02

Scott Pruitt Heads To Coal Mine To Pitch New EPA Agenda

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); SYCAMORE, Pennsylvania — The head of the Environmental Protection Agency chose a Pennsylvania coal mine with a history of violating environmental laws as his venue for unveiling a new plan to refocus his agency in a way that he says will both protect the planet and promote economic growth.   Ignoring the fact that the U.S. coal industry’s troubles are primarily the result of market forces, Scott Pruitt offered roughly 75 miners at the Harvey Mine this hopeful message: The “regulatory assault” on coal is over. It was here in Appalachian coal country, at North America’s largest producing underground coal complex, that Pruitt formally launched the EPA’s “Back-To-Basics agenda.” But instead of sharing details about that plan, he commiserated with those in the room. What happened to coal under former President Barack Obama, Pruitt said in a four-minute address, is “really sad.” Pruitt, a climate change denier and longtime ally of the fossil fuel industry, claimed that coal, oil and gas companies are both pro-environment and pro-growth. Now that Obama is out of office, he said, America doesn’t have to chose between the two. “It’s been said — I think you’ve heard it said — you can’t have your cake and eat it too,” Pruitt said. “I’ll tell you, whoever says that doesn’t know what you’re supposed to do with cake.” Pruitt’s message wasn’t surprising, but his choice of venue was somewhat baffling. Consol Energy was fined $3 million just last year for dumping mine wastewater into Ohio River tributaries. Consol Energy owns the Bailey Mine Complex, which includes Harvey Mine. The company exceeded its daily or monthly effluent limit more than 300 times between 2006 and 2015, according to the EPA complaint. Consol, which now focuses primarily on natural gas production, has voiced its intent to sell off its remaining coal assets. Patrick Grenter, a senior campaign representative for the Sierra Club’s Beyond Coal Campaign, told The Huffington Post that Consol has operated recklessly for many years. In a 2005 settlement, the company paid $36 million to replace a dam that it was accused of damaging with its operations.  Grenter called Pruitt’s visit to Harvey Mine “very concerning.” He said the only reasonable conclusion he could draw is that “’back-to-basics’ means back to promoting polluters over public health.” Pruitt’s visit to coal country comes a little over two weeks after President Donald Trump, surround by coal miners, signed an executive order instructing the EPA to review Obama’s Clean Power Plan, a policy limiting greenhouse gas emissions from power plants. The order also took measures to further protect the coal industry, namely by instructing the Department of the Interior to lift a temporary ban on coal leasing on federal lands that the Obama administration put in place last year. The American Federation of Government Employees, which represents 700,000 federal and D.C. government employees, including EPA workers, has called the order the latest in “a continued assault on the country’s top-line of defense for community health.” Miners, most of whom were in their 30s and 40s and many of whom were covered in dust from their morning shift below ground, began to gather inside a large common area of the portal building before Pruitt’s address. At one end, workers wearing headlamps, hardhats and reflective suits came and went from a silver elevator shaft. On a long wall, a board covered in tags indicated who was on shift. “[It’s] no lie that the [coal] industry in the last eight years, we’ve all felt a lot of pain,” said Jimmy Brock, CEO of CNX Coal Resources, which operates the Harvey Mine. But the Bailey complex persevered somehow, he said.  “It’s easy to be optimistic now,” Brock said following Pruitt’s speech. He added that coal miners should never apologize for the work they do. "You guys are a handsome crew," @EPAScottPruitt tells @CNXCoal miners. pic.twitter.com/sD1VM3i2GQ— Chris D'Angelo (@c_m_dangelo) April 13, 2017 Other miners in attendance seemed to share Brock’s optimism about the future of coal. Eben McClay, of the nearby town Claysville, has worked at the Bailey complex for a decade. He told HuffPost that he sees Trump as being “all about America” and likes to see the administration standing up for coal and bringing jobs and industry back to the U.S.  “The coal mine produces a lot of money and a lot of jobs for this area — for a lot of families,” he said.  Harvey Mine is located in Pennsylvania’s Green County, which has a population of just over 35,000. The coal industry here employs between 7,000 and 8,000 people, according to Robbie Matesic, executive director of the county’s Department of Economic Development. The county probably couldn’t withstand a sudden death of the industry, she said, but added that she is seriously concerned about climate change and believes coal companies must be held accountable for the environmental damage they cause.  “Here’s our problem: We have an economy dependent on it,” she said. “The truth is our economy is not healthy because of the way it is dependent on the energy industry.” The community has been working hard to diversify its economy for the last several years, Matesic said. But it needs more time.  Mark Kusky, a coal miner who has been with Consol for 11 years, said it’s encouraging to see Trump follow though on his campaign promise. Asked about climate change and the argument for cutting carbon emissions and moving toward renewable energy, Kusky said all energy sources have their downsides. He added that he’s hopeful coal will make a comeback, but that only time will tell if it can become the powerhouse it once was. “The future looks bright from where we’re standing,” he said. Matesic, however, said the only way to have healthy economies is to diversify ― meaning Trump and Pruitt are giving the coal industry, and communities like her own, false hope.  “If the Trump administration is really concerned about the economic health and the environmental health of this country — if they really are — they’re not going about it the right way,” she said. See more about EPA’s “Back-To-Basics” Agenda here.   How will Trump’s first 100 days impact you? Sign up for our weekly newsletter and get breaking updates on Trump’s presidency by messaging us here. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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