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14 июля, 22:21

DaVita Medical Group Buys Dr. Rahn Shaw Practices in Orlando

DaVita Inc. (DVA) recently acquired Dr. Rahn Shaw's practices, Park Avenue Medical, Inc. and Winter Park Health Center, Inc., each located in Orlando.

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26 июня, 16:27

DaVita downgraded to hold from buy at Jefferies

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news.

26 июня, 16:05

DaVita Banks on Acquisitions, Escalating Expenses a Concern

On Jun 23, we issued an updated research report on Denver, CO-based DaVita HealthCare Partners Inc. (DVA).

20 июня, 16:50

Is DaVita a Suitable Stock for Value Investors?

Let's focus on DaVita Inc. (DVA) stock and find out if it is a good choice for value-oriented investors right now or not.

18 июня, 15:00

Even the Insured Often Can't Afford Their Medical Bills

The debate over the future of healthcare is obscuring a more pedestrian reality: Insurance may handle most costs, but many Americans still need to turn to charity for help when they get sick.

16 июня, 14:50

DaVita (DVA) Rolls Out Alliance Site Network for CKD Trial

DaVita Inc (DVA), through its subsidiary DaVita Clinical Research (DCR), recently announced the expansion of its research services to include Alliance Site Network.

02 июня, 23:36

Quintiles IMS Holdings (Q) Holds Secondary Offering (revised)

Q held a secondary offering of 10.6m shares, of which they repurchased $300m worth.

30 мая, 16:10

Quintiles IMS Holdings (Q) to Repurchase 10.6M Common Share

Quintiles IMS Holdings, Inc. (Q) announced that it will repurchase 10,571,003 shares of its common stock.

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30 мая, 11:20

Amgen (AMGN) Down 4.5% Since Earnings Report: Can It Rebound?

Amgen (AMGN) reported earnings 30 days ago. What's next for the stock? We take a look at earnings estimates for some clues.

25 мая, 01:11

A California Bill Could Totally Disrupt The Dialysis Industry

HBO’s John Oliver took on the dialysis industry a couple of weeks ago, highlighting a pair of companies that have a near-monopoly on keeping your kidney functions going. Between them, these two businesses ― one based in Colorado and one in Germany ― control 70 percent of all the dialysis centers in the U.S. In 2015, they saw a combined $2.9 billion in profit, in no small part thanks to a 45-year-old Medicare amendment that guarantees dialysis coverage for everyone and costs the nation a full 1 percent of the federal budget each year.  But Oliver neglected to mention the biggest thing happening in dialysis reform: a state bill in California that could overhaul the way dialysis providers operate. The bill, introduced by state Sen. Ricardo Lara (D-Bell Gardens), would do several things. It would establish minimum staffing levels, require that employees get 45 minutes to “transition between patients” ― in other words, to clean the equipment properly ― and require inspections to be conducted annually, instead of the current standard of once every six years. California dialysis center workers and patients rallied Tuesday in a show of support for the legislation. But Lara’s bill is opposed by a coalition of doctors, patients, and dialysis centers who claim it is redundant to existing safety measures, and who argue it will harm patients, close down centers, and make dialysis treatment harder to get. According to a statement by the California Dialysis Council, dialysis centers already satisfy 346 federal regulations to ensure the safety of their patients and the quality of the treatments they deliver. The bill’s opponents also point to California dialysis centers’ “report card”  with Medicare. About 47 percent of the state’s clinics have 4- or 5-star ratings, while the national average is just 40 percent. But looking at that statistic another way, it also means that 60 percent of the nation’s dialysis centers don’t score very high marks ― and that the situation in the Golden State is only a little better than in most of the U.S.  Two companies control the marketplace Each year, more than 63,000 Californians ― and about 650,000 people nationwide ― receive hemodialysis, the process by which a machine filters impurities from the blood when the kidneys fail. It is clearly a big business, one created by a last-minute amendment to a Medicare bill in 1972 that in just a few paragraphs mandated coverage for dialysis for anyone who needed it. As Oliver pointed out on HBO, that makes your kidneys the only organs in your body to have universal health coverage. Two for-profit private dialysis companies, Colorado-based DaVita Healthcare Partners and German conglomerate Fresenius Medical Care, control about 70 percent of the U.S. market. In 2015 alone, they saw a combined profit of $2.9 billion from their dialysis business. Together they operate about 3,900 locations nationwide — “roughly the same number of Target, Best Buy, and Publix Super Market stores combined,” according to The New England Journal of Medicine’s Catalyst publication last year. For patients who need dialysis, the procedure is all that stands between them and certain death. But there is another side to dialysis ― namely, that the leading cause of death among dialysis patients has been infection, which is the impetus for the California measure. The California bill says that low and inadequate staffing levels at dialysis centers have led to hospitalizations, medical errors, and “unnecessary and avoidable deaths.” Dialysis workers say their caseloads are too heavy, and that they sometimes feel like they’re working on a factory assembly line. They contend that there often isn’t enough time between patients to properly prepare the dialysis stations. In one case, three patients contracted an infection at a dialysis clinic in Los Angeles County after workers didn’t adequately clean and disinfect the machines, according to a report in the American Journal of Infection Control.  As the California bill moves toward a vote by June 2, the hope is that California will serve as a model for nationwide legislation, said Sean Wherley, spokesman for the Service Employees International Union’s United Healthcare Workers West. While eight other states have established standards for dialysis care in the form of health department regulations, California would be the first state to actually legislate those minimal care standards. Of the 468,000 people nationwide getting dialysis, 14 percent of them are in California, according to Wherley. “Once again, California is taking a leadership role in health care by developing legislation to regulate the dialysis industry,” he said. “Judging from the resistance that the dialysis industry is mounting, there is no question that this has national implications.” DaVita did not respond to a request for comment. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

25 мая, 01:11

A California Bill Could Totally Disrupt The Dialysis Industry

HBO’s John Oliver took on the dialysis industry a couple of weeks ago, highlighting a pair of companies that have a near-monopoly on keeping your kidney functions going. Between them, these two businesses ― one based in Colorado and one in Germany ― control 70 percent of all the dialysis centers in the U.S. In 2015, they saw a combined $2.9 billion in profit, in no small part thanks to a 45-year-old Medicare amendment that guarantees dialysis coverage for everyone and costs the nation a full 1 percent of the federal budget each year.  But Oliver neglected to mention the biggest thing happening in dialysis reform: a state bill in California that could overhaul the way dialysis providers operate. The bill, introduced by state Sen. Ricardo Lara (D-Bell Gardens), would do several things. It would establish minimum staffing levels, require that employees get 45 minutes to “transition between patients” ― in other words, to clean the equipment properly ― and require inspections to be conducted annually, instead of the current standard of once every six years. California dialysis center workers and patients rallied Tuesday in a show of support for the legislation. But Lara’s bill is opposed by a coalition of doctors, patients, and dialysis centers who claim it is redundant to existing safety measures, and who argue it will harm patients, close down centers, and make dialysis treatment harder to get. According to a statement by the California Dialysis Council, dialysis centers already satisfy 346 federal regulations to ensure the safety of their patients and the quality of the treatments they deliver. The bill’s opponents also point to California dialysis centers’ “report card”  with Medicare. About 47 percent of the state’s clinics have 4- or 5-star ratings, while the national average is just 40 percent. But looking at that statistic another way, it also means that 60 percent of the nation’s dialysis centers don’t score very high marks ― and that the situation in the Golden State is only a little better than in most of the U.S.  Two companies control the marketplace Each year, more than 63,000 Californians ― and about 468,000 people nationwide ― receive hemodialysis, the process by which a machine filters impurities from the blood when the kidneys fail. It is clearly a big business, one created by a last-minute amendment to a Medicare bill in 1972 that in just a few paragraphs mandated coverage for dialysis for anyone who needed it. As Oliver pointed out on HBO, that makes your kidneys the only organs in your body to have universal health coverage. Two for-profit private dialysis companies, Colorado-based DaVita Healthcare Partners and German conglomerate Fresenius Medical Care, control about 70 percent of the U.S. market. In 2015 alone, they saw a combined profit of $2.9 billion from their dialysis business. Together they operate about 3,900 locations nationwide — “roughly the same number of Target, Best Buy, and Publix Super Market stores combined,” according to The New England Journal of Medicine’s Catalyst publication last year. For patients who need dialysis, the procedure is all that stands between them and certain death. But there is another side to dialysis ― namely, that the leading cause of death among dialysis patients has been infection, which is the impetus for the California measure. The California bill says that low and inadequate staffing levels at dialysis centers have led to hospitalizations, medical errors, and “unnecessary and avoidable deaths.” Dialysis workers say their caseloads are too heavy, and that they sometimes feel like they’re working on a factory assembly line. They contend that there often isn’t enough time between patients to properly prepare the dialysis stations. In one case, three patients contracted an infection at a dialysis clinic in Los Angeles County after workers didn’t adequately clean and disinfect the machines, according to a report in the American Journal of Infection Control.  As the California bill moves toward a vote by June 2, the hope is that California will serve as a model for nationwide legislation, said Sean Wherley, spokesman for the Service Employees International Union’s United Healthcare Workers West. While eight other states have established standards for dialysis care in the form of health department regulations, California would be the first state to actually legislate those minimal care standards. Of the 468,000 people nationwide getting dialysis, 14 percent of them are in California, according to Wherley. “Once again, California is taking a leadership role in health care by developing legislation to regulate the dialysis industry,” he said. “Judging from the resistance that the dialysis industry is mounting, there is no question that this has national implications.” CORRECTION: A previous version of this story stated there are about 650,000 patients receiving dialysis in the United States. That is the total number of patients with end stage renal failure; 468,000 of them receive dialysis. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

15 мая, 21:11

One of Warren Buffett's favorite companies is attacked

DaVita, an owner of dialysis centers that Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway is invested in, was criticized by HBO's John Oliver for urging patients to not get kidney transplants.

08 мая, 14:51

What the Best Transformational Leaders Do

Companies that claim to be “transforming” seem to be everywhere. But when you look more deeply into whether those organizations are truly redefining what they are and what they do, stories of successful change efforts are exceptionally rare. In a study of S&P 500 and Global 500 firms, our team found that those leading the most successful transformations, creating new offerings and business models to push into new growth markets, share common characteristics and strategies. Before describing those, let’s look at how we identified the exceptional firms that rose to the top of our ranking, a group we call the Transformation 10. Whereas most business lists analyze companies by traditional metrics such as revenue or by subjective assessments such as “innovativeness,” our ranking evaluates the ability of leaders to strategically reposition the firm. Some companies that made the list were obvious choices; for example, the biggest online retailer now gets most of its profit from cloud services (Amazon). But others were surprising, given their states before embarking on transformation. The list includes a health care company that was once near bankruptcy (DaVita), a software firm whose stock price stagnated for a decade (Microsoft), a travel website that faced overwhelming competition (Priceline), a food giant that seemed to lose its focus (Danone), and a steel company that faced new pressure from lower-cost rivals (ThyssenKrupp). The team began by identifying 57 companies that have made substantial progress toward transformation. We then narrowed the list to 18 finalists using three sets of metrics: New growth. How successful has the company been at creating new products, services, and business models? This was gauged by assessing the percent of revenue outside the core that can be attributed to new growth. Core repositioning. How effectively has the company adapted its legacy business to change and disruption, giving it new life? Financial performance. How have the firm’s growth, profits, and stock performance compared to a relevant benchmark (NASDAQ for a tech company, for example, or DAX Index for a German firm) during the transformation period? We recruited a panel of expert judges (see the list below), who evaluated the companies through the lens of their own expertise and gauged which transformations were most durable and had the highest impact in their industries. (For more on our methods, see the sidebars below.) With these criteria in mind, our final list is as follows:   Our analysis revealed characteristics shared by the winning firm’s leaders as well as common strategies they employed. Transformational CEOs Tend to be “Insider Outsiders” The list is topped by companies headed by visionary founders with no prior experience in their industries; Jeff Bezos came from the world of finance, and Reed Hastings from software. As it turned out, having no predetermined way of doing things turned out to be an asset when it came to reinventing retailing and television, and these leaders kept that outsider’s perspective even through waves of growth. We see an interesting pattern across the professionally managed companies, those whose CEOs were hired by the board. These CEOs are what we call “insider outsiders.” Make no mistake, they have substantial relevant experience. They had 14 years of tenure on average before getting the top job. That knowledge helped them understand how to make change happen inside an organization. Yet these executives also had an outsider role where they worked on an emerging growth business or consciously explored external opportunities, giving them critical distance from the core. After becoming CEO, that insider-outsider perspective helped them explore new paths to growth without being constrained by yesterday’s success formula. Satya Nadella, for instance, joined Microsoft in 1992 and worked his way up to running its cloud computing effort, building that business unit into a viable new growth platform before becoming CEO, in 2014. He got the top job because of that, and then as CEO he accelerated cloud-business development to make it the company’s primary strategy. The same was true of Adobe’s Shantanu Narayen. He joined the creativity applications vendor in 1997, and got the CEO job a decade later largely because he was able to articulate a vision for pursuing digital marketing services as the new growth path. The Transformation 10 JudgesChris Chadwick, former CEO of Boeing Defense Clay Christensen, Professor at Harvard Business School and Innosight co-founder Scott Cook, founder and chairman of Intuit Matthew Eyring, Chief Strategy & Innovation Officer of Vivint Inc. A.G. Lafley, former CEO of Procter & Gamble Rita McGrath, Professor at Columbia Business School TEO Ming Kian, Director at Temasek and Chairman at Vertex Holdings Theodor Weimer, Country Chairman at UniCredit At Priceline, Glenn Fogel joined in 2000 and became head of strategy. Long before becoming CEO, in 2016, he was searching for new growth in the hypercompetitive travel reservations market, coming across a pair of small European startups with a business model opposite to Priceline’s in two key ways: Instead of taking an up-front 25% commission on a hotel reservation, the startups charged only 15% after check-out. Instead of focusing on major hotel brands, they pursued the long tail, engaging with more than 1 million inns, B&Bs, and apartment buildings in 200 countries. The result was the Booking.com platform. What started with a $200 million investment a decade ago now accounts for most of Priceline’s new growth as well as its rise past $80 billion in market valuation. And at Danone, Emmanuel Faber, an insider for 17 years, won the CEO job, in 2014, because he was one of the architects of the firm’s 2020 vision to transform from a food and beverage conglomerate into a family health and medical nutrition company that emphasized sustainable agriculture. That vision prompted Danone to divest product lines such as biscuits and beer while broadening its core dairy franchise. For new growth, in 2007 Faber helped form a new business unit called Nutricia, anchored off a $17 billion acquisition, to pursue baby foods, protein bars, and health shakes. Today this unit accounts for 29% of revenue. They Strategically Pursue Two Separate Journeys Many firms that have tried to transform have failed. A common reason why is that leaders approach the change as one monolithic process, during which the old company becomes a new one. That doesn’t work for a host of practical reasons. An organization that grew up producing newspapers, for instance, not only lacks key skills to build a digital content company but also might actively resist embracing the new in order to protect the business it knows and loves. Success requires repositioning the core business while actively investing in the new growth business. Apple serves as the classic model of such “dual transformation.” With the iMac and iBook, Steve Jobs reinvigorated the core Macintosh franchise by injecting a new sense of design and rethinking what computers would be used for in the age of the internet. On a separate track, he launched the device and content ecosystem, starting with iPod and iTunes, that would become the company’s new growth engine. It’s a strategy that has also worked for others on the list. While Amazon has expanded its core retailing platform into new categories, such as food and streaming content, in parallel it has built the world’s largest cloud computing enterprise. Amazon Web Services CEO Andy Jassy has been with the effort since it began as an internal challenge to scale IT infrastructure. Established as a separate division in 2006, AWS ultimately addressed a long-standing analyst complaint about Amazon — that its core was only barely profitable. Today AWS accounts for just 10% of Amazon’s $150 billion in revenue, but generates close to $1 billion in quarterly operating profit. German steel maker ThyssenKrupp, facing pricing pressure from Asian competitors, likewise embraced a dual transformation strategy. In 2011 the board selected as the new CEO one of its own members, Heinrich Hiesinger, a Siemens executive with experience supplying technology to many industries. From day one, Hiesinger began executing a plan for repositioning the declining core of steel manufacturing by divesting less profitable product lines, focusing on higher-margin custom manufacturing, and even opening 3D printing centers to fashion components such as parts for wind turbines. For new growth areas that now make up 47% of sales, it moved into industrial solutions and digital services, creating systems such as internet-connected elevators. They Use Culture Change to Drive Engagement Microsoft is a case in point. In the four years since Satya Nadella came on as CEO, he has been credited with transforming Microsoft’s cautious, insular culture. In the old world, large teams would work for years on the next major version of a franchise program like Windows and Word, leading to a risk-averse environment. In the new world of “infrastructure on demand,” dozens of new features and improvements would need to be introduced per month — and no one would fully know ahead of time what they might be. This required a culture of risk taking and exploration. In this way, Nadella was unlike his predecessors, in that he built his reputation as a hands-on engineer, not as a visionary like Bill Gates or a Type-A salesman like Steve Ballmer. Instead, Nadella was known for listening, learning, and analyzing. His idea of how to engage and motivate employees wasn’t by making a speech but rather by leading a company-wide hackathon, and empowering employees to work on projects they were passionate about. This new level of employee engagement has helped drive Microsoft’s expansion into cloud services and artificial intelligence, areas that now account for 32% of revenue. MethodsWe began the process of identifying candidates for the Transformation 10 by screening companies in the S&P 500 and Global 500 according to the following questions. Has this company exemplified strategic transformation? Has this transformation had impact on customers and its industry in the past decade? Does the company show potential to sustain its transformation over the next decade? During this first phase of the methodology, a small team of Innosight consultants pored over the S&P 500 and Global 500 to arrive at a list of 57 companies that had made a clear commitment to strategic transformation within the past 10 years. Our team rated each company using a set of criteria measuring their financials (notably revenue growth and stock performance), the degree to which they had built meaningful new growth businesses, and the degree to which they had repositioned their core business. During phase two, we used these comparative metrics to narrow the list to 18 finalist candidates. For each of company, we created a one-page judging profile. We then sent that presentation of profiles along with instructions out to our panel of judges, who scored each company on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being the best example of a successful strategic transformation. The story of Kent Thiry, CEO of the kidney care firm DaVita, also illustrates the role of employee engagement in successful transformations. In 1999 Thiry came with a strong track record in the kidney dialysis industry to salvage a near-bankrupt company called Total Renal Care, whose market cap was sinking below $200 million. In addition to finding ways to stem losses, he led a six-month effort to create a new identity and set of values, to reengage the company’s dispirited workforce and generate enthusiasm for his growth plans. He chose the name DaVita, Italian for “giving life,” and settled on a list of core values that included service excellence, teamwork, accountability, and fun. As any manager knows, a generic-sounding list of values won’t move the culture needle unless leadership brings it to life. To that end, Thiry and senior managers performed skits in costumes — for instance dressing as the Three Musketeers and leading call-and-response chants of “All for one, one for all.” To honor employee heroism, he became the emcee of awards banquets that had all the music, stagecraft, and emotional speeches of the Oscars, and he celebrated “village victories” around milestones like achieving a five-star quality rating for dialysis delivery from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The success in turning around DaVita’s core business caught the attention of Warren Buffett, whose Berkshire Hathaway became DaVita’s largest shareholder. But it was DaVita’s move into new growth areas that earned it a spot on our list. Starting with an acquisition of 50 physician offices, DaVita worked to build an “integrated delivery network” that contracts for the full spectrum of care, using the value-based care model of being paid to keep patients healthy rather than accepting fee-for-service — resulting in new growth that now represents 30% of revenue. They Communicate Powerful Narratives About the Future To change the culture and move into new growth areas, the CEO needs to become “the storyteller in chief,” says Aetna’s Mark Bertolini. That means telling different aspects of the same transformation narrative to all the constituencies and stakeholders in the company. “The CEO’s responsibility is to create a stark reality of what the future holds,” says Bertolini, “and then to build the plans for the organization to meet those realities.” In Aetna’s case, this meant building a narrative of how the move away from fee-for-service reimbursement to the new business model of value-based care would change the nature of health insurance, and one day possibly render it obsolete. Instead of simply reinforcing the story about strengthening Aetna’s current businesss, Bertolini developed a narrative about building new skills to help consumers make better health choices — and about building a new organization that can make money doing so. Telling that kind of story about the future is not a one-time event. “It’s easy to underestimate the amount of communication that is needed,” he adds. “You have to be tireless about it, consistent and persistent, and keep battering the core messages home week after week. Your leaders have to as well, and they have to tailor the message so it has the appropriate level of fidelity relevant to each part of the organization. A person working in a call center might need a different set of messages than a line manager does to understand how he docks into the big picture.” They Develop a Road Map Before Disruption Takes Hold Because dual transformations typically take years, we used a 10-year time frame in our analysis. Indeed, transformations often can’t be completed during the average tenure of a CEO. These long time horizons mean that there’s no time to waste in getting started. Many of the most notable disrupted companies — from Blockbuster, to Borders, to Blackberry, to Kodak — ran into their deepest troubles a decade or more after some of the first warning signs appeared. None of their leaders developed effective transformation plans in time to halt the decline. At the other end of the spectrum is Reed Hastings of Netflix. Even as the original DVD-by-mail business grew quickly to dominate the industry, Hastings believed that a new wave of disruption could be rolling in. “My greatest fear at Netflix,” he says, “has been that we wouldn’t make the leap from success in DVDs to success in streaming.” That’s why he laid the groundwork for a transformation as far back as 2007, when he started negotiating deals with Hollywood to test online streaming of movies and TV shows. Famously, Hastings moved too quickly to spin off the core and focus only on streaming, when Netflix announced plans in 2011 to create a stand-alone mail-based DVD company called Qwikster. This prompted a backlash from angry customers — and triggered a humbling apology from Hastings. But the mistake he made was preferable to waiting too long. He reformulated his plan, this time to extend the life of the core DVD business while aggressively rolling out the new streaming service in parallel. It proved to be such a winning strategy that it funded a big move into original content. Now, with membership of 100 million homes in 190 countries, Netflix is the leader of a reconfigured movie and television landscape that it helped shape. As all these cases show, transformation is not just about changing an enterprise’s cost structure or turning analog processes into digital ones. Rather, it’s about pursuing a multiphase strategy to reposition today’s business while finding new ways to grow. That’s why we believe the companies that made the Transformation 10 list deserve to be seen as models to help other leaders create the future.   Editor’s note: Every ranking or index is just one way to analyze and compare companies or places, based on a specific methodology and data set. At HBR, we believe that a well-designed index can provide useful insights, even though by definition it is a snapshot of a bigger picture. We always urge you to read the methodology carefully.

03 мая, 17:00

DaVita (DVA) Earnings Miss Estimates, Revenues Beat in Q1

DaVita Inc. (DVA) reported first-quarter 2017 adjusted operating earnings of 79 cents per share that missed the Zacks Consensus Estimate of 82 cents.

01 мая, 17:14

Healthcare Q1 Earnings Slated on May 2: AET, HCA & More

The healthcare sector has been in the limelight since the change of power at the White House.

01 мая, 13:17

DaVita (DVA): What's in the Cards this Earnings Season?

DaVita HealthCare Partners Inc (DVA), is expected to report first-quarter fiscal 2017 results on May 2, after market close.

11 апреля, 16:27

DaVita Banks on Acquisitions, Escalating Expenses a Concern

On Apr 10, we issued an updated research report Denver, CO-based DaVita HealthCare Partners Inc. (DVA), a leading provider of dialysis services in the U.S. to patients suffering from chronic kidney failure.

10 апреля, 13:00

4 Kinds of Workplaces, and How to Know Which Is Best for You

We all want to be part of a great organization and a high-performance workplace. We want to be at our best, surrounded by colleagues who help us and challenge us, doing work that is financially rewarding and personally meaningful. But there’s more than one kind of successful organization, and there are many kinds of productive workplaces. What matters at work is whether the value proposition that drives your company is in sync with the values that motivate you, whether the culture that defines life inside an organization is compatible with your personal style, and whether the people with whom you work make you think, grow, even laugh. Which means that all of us, no matter where we are in our careers or what sort of work we do, have to reflect on the kind of workplace that works for us. Do we thrive on the rush of external and internal competition, or are we at our best in an environment built on collaboration? Do we hunger for individual achievement and personal recognition, or do we revel in team spirit and collective success? Are we prepared to sacrifice emotional and psychological satisfaction for financial rewards, or is doing something meaningful more important than making money? I’ve had the opportunity, over the last two decades, to immerse myself in some of the world’s most creative, energetic, and productive workplaces, from health care to financial services, from Silicon Valley to Madison Avenue. These organizations have achieved tremendous success in the marketplace with vastly different approaches to the workplace. As I reflect on the many businesses I’ve visited and studied, I’ve identified four distinct kinds of workplaces, and I’ve come up with a set of 16 questions to help you figure out which kind works for you. There are no right answers to these questions, of course; there’s no perfect workplace for everyone. Each of us has to figure out what kind of workplace gives us the best chance to do great work. What are those four kinds of workplaces? The company as community. This kind of workplace exudes an all-for-one, one-for-all spirit in which trust, teamwork, and peer-to-peer loyalty are bedrock principles rather than mere rhetoric. Customers matter, of course, as do the interests of partners and investors. But this workplace elevates the needs of employees above all other constituencies. The formula for business success starts with what’s right for the people in the business. For example, at Davita, a hugely successful health care provider based in Denver, Colorado, CEO Kent Thiry likes to say that his organization is a “community first and a company second.” He explains: “We have flipped the means and the ends. Having an adequately profitable business is the means. Building a real community of human beings is the end.” A constellation of stars. These organizations are a collection of hard-driving, fiercely competitive individuals who measure their success against personal goals, and even against one another. The ethos is up-or-out, sink-or-swim, rank-and-yank. It’s a tough environment, but it’s the right environment for talented people who aspire to be superstars. Many investment banks and hedge funds operate this way, as do some law firms, consulting outfits, and tech titans. “Someone who is exceptional in their role is not just a little better than someone who is pretty good,” Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg famously told the New York Times. “They are 100 times better.” In workplaces built for stars, organizational success relies on individual achievement. Not just a company, a cause. In this environment, employees worry less about personal happiness or individual triumphs and more about their collective impact. There is a self-effacing quality to these workplaces, a willingness to make sacrifices and go to extraordinary lengths to keep promises to customers and other constituencies. The spirit is “mission first” — do whatever it takes to get the job done. No company better captures this model than USAA, the fabulously successful financial services company that does business exclusively with active and retired military members and their families. USAA has become a passion brand, renowned for its out-of-this-world service, because grassroots employees identify so thoroughly with soldiers and their families, and put those interests above their own. That’s what it means to be a cause, as opposed to just a company. Small is beautiful. Certain people, whether they’re motivated by a sense of mission or a thirst for individual achievement, are at their best in environments that are easy to navigate, where there are few obstacles between ideas and action, where a sense of urgency defines the pace of life. Last October entrepreneurship guru Bo Burlingham published the 10th-anniversary edition of his business classic, Small Giants: Companies That Choose to Be Great Instead of Big. The book’s title and subtitle capture the spirit of this kind of workplace, where human scale matters more than massive revenue and big market share. In a world where smaller and smaller groups of people can achieve bigger and bigger things, size really does matter — and smaller can often be more rewarding than bigger. There’s nothing like doing work that matters, but that means finding a company, organization, or team with a workplace that’s right for you. In a world with so much interesting and important work to do, we all deserve the chance to be at our best and to be surrounded by colleagues who bring out the best in us. Author’s note: I’ve created a 16-question quiz on my website to help you figure out the best workplace for you. It’s free, but you do have to enter your email address to get your results.

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21 марта, 14:35

Why Is DaVita (DVA) Up 4.8% Since the Last Earnings Report?

DaVita (DVA) reported earnings 30 days ago. What's next for the stock? We take a look at earnings estimates for some clues.