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Денис О’Брайен
22 октября 2016, 03:35

Former Haitian Senate President Calls Clintons "Common Thieves Who Should Be In Jail"

Despite repeatedly bragging about all the good work the Clinton Foundation did to help Haiti recover from the devastating 2010 earthquake, at least one Haitian, former Senate President Bernard Sansaricq, thinks it was the Clintons, not the Hiatian people, who benefitted most from the Foundation's "charitable work" in Haiti.  Appearing on a radio show last week, Sansaricq offered a scathing assessment of the Clinton's track record in Haiti saying they are "nothing but common thieves...and they should be in jail."  Per PJ Media: Sandy Rios of American Family Radio interviewed former Haitian Senate President Bernard Sansaricq on Thursday, and the enraged Haitian had nothing good to say about the Clintons. He angrily claimed that they brought their "pay to play" politics to Haiti at the expense of the Haitian people.   Sansaricq said that the Clinton Foundation received 14.3 billion dollars in donation money to help with the relief effort. President Obama and UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon put the Clinton Foundation in charge of the reconstruction, but Haiti has seen no help. The money all went to friends of Bill Clinton.   "They are nothing but common thieves," the enraged Sansaricq told Rios. "And they should be in jail." As also highlighted in the movie "Clinton Cash," Sansaricq argued that the Clinton's did nothing more than bring their pay-to-play tactics to Haiti resulting in the enrichment of Clinton cronies, including Hillary's brother Anthony Rodham, whose company was awarded a lucrative gold mining contract. Sansaricq said although Bill Clinton was put in charge of the reconstruction, he did absolutely nothing but give contracts to his cronies and built a sweatshop next to a goldmine that was given to Hillary Clinton's brother, Anthony Rodham, in violation of the Haitian constitution.   He said he could go on for hours about the Clinton Foundation's destruction of the rice production in Haiti because they were importing rice from Clinton's cronies in Arkansas. And rice is something Haiti could really use right now.   The Clintons also awarded the country's only cell phone company to another crony, Denis O'Brien, using taxpayer dollars. O'Brien has made 265 million dollars, and a substantial portion of that  has gone back to the Clinton Foundation. Of course, these claims are hard to deny given that recently released emails, obtained through a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) lawsuit by the Republican National Committee, and subsequently shared with ABC News, reveal very open special treatment of "Friends of Bill" ("FOB" for short) by the State Department in granting access to recovery efforts in Haiti, in which $10 billion in emergency aid was spent after the 2010 earthquake.  The emails showed very close coordination between Caitlin Klevorick, a senior State Department official, and Amitabh Desai, the director of foreign policy for the Clinton Foundation, as they exchanged emails from Foundation donors looking to participate in the Haiti recovery efforts.  While many donors likely were just looking to make charitable contributions, others, as evidenced below, were simply looking to capture their "fair share" of $10 billion in emergency aid contracts doled out by the U.S. government.   The following exchange between Klevorick and Dasai, with the subject line "Haiti Assistance," shows the State Department very clearly asking for "Friends of Bill" to be flagged for special consideration. “Need you to flag when people are friends of WJC,” wrote Caitlin Klevorick, then a senior State Department official who was juggling incoming offers of assistance being funneled to the State Department by the Clinton Foundation. “Most I can probably ID but not all.”   Of course, this directly contradicts comments that Bill Clinton previously made to CBS' Charlie Rose just last month when he assured voters that "nothing was ever done for anybody because they were contributors to the foundation, nothing." In another Klevorick and Dasai exchange, the State Department official asks “Is this a FOB!” saying that "If not, she should go to cidi.org" (a general government website).   As also mentioned by Sansaricq, another series of messages uncovered the efforts of billionaire Denis O’Brien, a longtime donor to the Clinton Foundation and the CEO of the Jamaica-based telecom firm Digicel, to fly relief supplies into Port-au-Prince and get employees of his company out.  But when O'Brien couldn't get access to land in Port-au-Prince "through conventional channels" he turns to long-time Clinton aide Doug Band for help.  Shortly thereafter, the request was elevated to the State Department in an email with the subject line "Close friend of the Clintons."  “This WJC VIP just called again from Jamaica to say Digicel is being pushed by US Army to get comms back up but is not being cleared by [the U.S. government] to deploy into Haiti to do so,” Desai wrote in an email with the subject line “Close friend of Clintons.”   Later, O’Brien writes to longtime Clinton aide Doug Band to express frustration. “We’re finding it impossible to get landing slots,” he says. “I’m sorry to bother you but I am not making any progress through conventional channels.”   Band tasks Desai to “pls get on this,” telling O’Brien, “Never a bother.”   Desai then turns to Klevorick to help “a friend of President Clinton,” and the request is pushed up the chain of command to USAID officials organizing the relief effort. Of course, we have no doubt that these scandalous revelations, like many others circling the Clinton campaign at the moment, will quickly be brushed under the carpet so the mainstream media can go back to focusing on Trump's "accusers".

12 октября 2016, 03:20

New Emails Reveal "Friends Of Bill" Got Special Access From State For Haiti Recovery Contracts

Newly released emails obtained through a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) lawsuit by the Republican National Committee, and subsequently shared with ABC News, reveal very open special treatment of "Friends of Bill" ("FOB" for short) by the State Department in granting access to recovery efforts in Haiti, in which $10 billion in emergency aid was spent after the 2010 earthquake.  The emails show very close coordination between Caitlin Klevorick, a senior State Department official, and Amitabh Desai, the director of foreign policy for the Clinton Foundation, as they exchanged emails from Foundation donors looking to participate in the Haiti recovery efforts.  While many donors likely were just looking to make charitable contributions, others, as evidenced below, were simply looking to capture their "fair share" of $10 billion in emergency aid contracts doled out by the U.S. government.   The following exchange between Klevorick and Dasai, with the subject line "Haiti Assistance," shows the State Department very clearly asking for "Friends of Bill" to be flagged for special consideration. “Need you to flag when people are friends of WJC,” wrote Caitlin Klevorick, then a senior State Department official who was juggling incoming offers of assistance being funneled to the State Department by the Clinton Foundation. “Most I can probably ID but not all.”   Of course, this directly contradicts comments that Bill Clinton previously made to CBS' Charlie Rose just last month when he assured voters that "nothing was ever done for anybody because they were contributors to the foundation, nothing." In another Klevorick and Dasai exchange, the State Department official asks “Is this a FOB!” saying that "If not, she should go to cidi.org" (a general government website).   "I think when you look at both the State Department and the Clinton Foundation in Haiti, that line was pretty faint between the two,” said Jake Johnston, a Haiti analyst for the nonpartisan Center for Economic and Policy Research. “You had a lot of coordination and connection between the two, obviously. And I think that raises significant questions about how they were both operating.” As ABC points out, one series of messages uncovers the efforts of billionaire Denis O’Brien, a longtime donor to the Clinton Foundation and the CEO of the Jamaica-based telecom firm Digicel, to fly relief supplies into Port-au-Prince and get employees of his company out.  But when O'Brien couldn't get access to land in Port-au-Prince "through conventional channels" he turns to long-time Clinton aide Doug Band for help.  Shortly thereafter, the request was elevated to the State Department in an email with the subject line "Close friend of the Clintons."  “This WJC VIP just called again from Jamaica to say Digicel is being pushed by US Army to get comms back up but is not being cleared by [the U.S. government] to deploy into Haiti to do so,” Desai wrote in an email with the subject line “Close friend of Clintons.”   Later, O’Brien writes to longtime Clinton aide Doug Band to express frustration. “We’re finding it impossible to get landing slots,” he says. “I’m sorry to bother you but I am not making any progress through conventional channels.”   Band tasks Desai to “pls get on this,” telling O’Brien, “Never a bother.”   Desai then turns to Klevorick to help “a friend of President Clinton,” and the request is pushed up the chain of command to USAID officials organizing the relief effort.     The following exchange highlights a request from Clinton Foundation donor, Garry Mauro, who also ran Bill Clinton's presidential campaigns in Texas.  In this instance, DRC Emergency Services was seemingly compensated for their efforts with their website noting "having performed emergency response work at disasters around the globe, with over $2 billion in disaster response contracts." Desai forwarded a note to Klevorick from Garry Mauro, who served twice as the Texas state chairman for Bill Clinton’s presidential campaigns and has donated $25,000 to $50,000 to the Clinton Foundation. The offer was for “major assets in Haiti” from a company called DRC Emergency Services. On its website, the company boasts of having performed emergency response work at disasters around the globe, with over $2 billion in disaster response contracts. Desai noted that Mauro was “a friend of WJC.”   Klevorick replied, “also note hrc friend,” using initials for Hillary Rodham Clinton. The email chain does not indicate if Mauro’s recommendation led to a contract for DRC, though the company’s website states, “Within 24 hours of the earthquake’s occurrence, DRC assembled and mobilized a team of highly experienced and dedicated personnel to Port-au-Prince and the surrounding areas.”   Mauro told ABC News he approached the Clinton Foundation on behalf of DRC after seeing on television that former Presidents Clinton and George H.W. Bush were raising money for the disaster. DRC had already been doing temporary housing work in Haiti, and company officials thought the earthquake would open the door to a major business expansion.   “They wanted to get some of the business,” he said of DRC. “The Clinton Foundation was a facilitator. They didn’t have the money." Of course, we have no doubt that these scandalous revelations, like many others circling the Clinton campaign at the moment, will quickly be brushed under the carpet so the mainstream media can go back to focusing on Trump's "grab 'em by the pu$$y" comment.

29 сентября 2016, 03:05

Trump launches 'follow the money' attack

COUNCIL BLUFFS, Iowa — In an effort to go steady his campaign after this week’s shaky debate, Donald Trump on Wednesday launched a coordinated attack casting Hillary Clinton as a corrupt pawn of major donors and special interests.The attack — rolled out in a campaign speech here, followed by a barrage of press releases and a video, all of which made heavy use of the catchphrase “follow the money” — foreshadows a “renewed focus on populist themes in battleground states,” said a person close to the campaign.It is similar to an argument that Republicans have been pushing him to embrace for months, and echoes perhaps his best exchange at the first debate, when he pressed Clinton on her support of trade deals and their effect on states like Pennsylvania and Ohio.On Wednesday, Trump picked up the theme again, telling an enthusiastic midday crowd “Everything you need to know about Hillary Clinton can be understood by this simple phrase: follow the money.”As the speech proceeded, the campaign blasted out five press releases in the span of 25 minutes, with the “follow the money” heading, starting with an overview of “ethical red flags” at the Clinton Foundation.It was followed by detailed indictments of a uranium deal approved by Clinton’s state department after her foundation received large donations from people with stakes in the deal; Clinton’s relationship with Irish telecom billionaire Denis O’Brien; Clinton’s six-figure speaking engagements; and a 2009 deal over disclosing the identities of American account-holders that the State Department concluded with Swiss bank UBS, a Clinton Foundation donor. Later Wednesday evening, the campaign posted a video on its Instagram and Facebook accounts highlighting an Associated Press report that half of the private individuals who landed meetings with Clinton during her tenure at State were Clinton Foundation donors. After eschewing many standard messaging tools for most of its run, the campaign has occasionally coordinated the themes of Trump’s prepared remarks with bursts of press releases during his speeches in recent weeks. The tactic returned again with Wednesday’s Iowa rally, and campaign spokesman Jason Miller said that the Trump campaign would be following the money right up to Election Day, highlighting new episodes of alleged corruption along the way.“We’re going to go to anybody who has had financial dealings with the Clinton Foundation. Anybody who’s paid the Clintons who then received favors and official actions in return. Anybody who’s gotten rich by being friends with the Clintons based off of these official actions,” he said.During the rally, Trump’s account retweeted a message from his “Official Team Trump” that included #FollowTheMoney and later on Wednesday, campaign manager Kellyanne Conway sent POLITICO a screenshot showing use of the hashtag across the United States, remarking, “This one is pretty cool.”But at least one Republican operative close to the campaign, still fuming over Trump’s debate performance, was unimpressed with the attempt to turn the page.“I think it’s a complete waste of time,” said the operative. “It’s not something like Benghazi that resonates with voters. I still can’t believe that Trump just completely dropped the ball on that.”