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Devon Energy
29 ноября, 19:01

Trump Picks Elaine Chao As Transportation Secretary

In the first of what Mike Pence called "several very important announcements," Politico reports that former Labor Secretary Elaine Chao is set to be announced later Tuesday as President-elect Donald Trump’s choice to lead the Department of Transportation. The other contender for the position was former Democratic U.S. Representative from Tennessee Harold Ford. As Politico adds: Chao, who ran the Labor Department under President George W. Bush, met with the incoming president at Trump Tower last week and discussed labor and transportation policy, Trump’s transition team said then.   The formal announcement is expected at 1 p.m., one source said.   The wife of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), Chao is the first Asian-American woman to hold a Cabinet-level position. She also served as deputy secretary of transportation under President George H.W. Bush. Chao was also a member of Trump’s Asian Pacific American Advisory Council during the campaign. So here is where we stand for now... POSTS ALREADY FILLED WHITE HOUSE CHIEF OF STAFF * Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus CHIEF WHITE HOUSE STRATEGIST AND SENIOR COUNSELOR * Steve Bannon, former head of the conservative website Breitbart News ATTORNEY GENERAL * Jeff Sessions, Republican U.S. senator from Alabama and senior member of the Senate Judiciary Committee (subject to Senate confirmation) CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY DIRECTOR * Republican U.S. Representative Mike Pompeo from Kansas (subject to Senate confirmation) NATIONAL SECURITY ADVISER * Michael Flynn, retired Army lieutenant general and former director of the Defense Intelligence Agency UNITED NATIONS AMBASSADOR * Nikki Haley, Republican South Carolina governor (subject to Senate confirmation) EDUCATION SECRETARY * Betsy DeVos, Republican donor and former chair of the Michigan Republican Party HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES SECRETARY * Tom Price, Republican U.S. representative from Georgia, orthopedic surgeon\ TRANSPORTATION SECRETARY * Elaine Chao, former labor secretary and deputy transportation secretary under Republican Presidents George W. Bush and George H.W. Bush, respectively. Chao is married to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell *  *  * CONTENDERS Below are people mentioned as contenders for senior roles as the Republican president-elect works to form his administration before taking office on Jan. 20, according to Reuters sources and media reports. TREASURY SECRETARY * Steven Mnuchin, former Goldman Sachs Group Inc executive and Trump's campaign finance chairman * Jeb Hensarling, Republican U.S. representative from Texas and chairman of the House Financial Services Committee * Tom Barrack, founder and chairman of Colony Capital Inc * John Allison, former chief executive officer of BB&T Corp * David McCormick, president of hedge fund Bridgewater Associates LP SECRETARY OF STATE * Mitt Romney, 2012 Republican presidential nominee and former Massachusetts governor * Rudy Giuliani, former Republican mayor of New York City * John Bolton, former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations under Republican President George W. Bush * Bob Corker, Republican U.S. senator from Tennessee and chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee * Zalmay Khalilzad, former U.S. ambassador to Iraq DEFENSE SECRETARY * James Mattis, retired Marine general * David Petraeus, former CIA director and retired Army general * Tom Cotton, Republican U.S. senator from Arkansas * Jon Kyl, former Republican U.S. senator from Arizona * Duncan Hunter, Republican U.S. representative from California and early Trump supporter, member of the House Armed Services Committee * Jim Talent, former Republican U.S. senator from Missouri who was on the Senate Armed Services Committee * Rick Perry, former Republican Texas governor * Stephen Hadley, former national security adviser under President George W. Bush HOMELAND SECURITY SECRETARY * Michael McCaul, Republican U.S. representative from Texas and chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee * David Clarke, Milwaukee county sheriff and vocal Trump supporter * Joe Arpaio, outgoing Maricopa County, Arizona, sheriff who campaigned for Trump * Kris Kobach, Kansas secretary of state * Frances Townsend, homeland security and counterterrorism adviser to former Republican President George W. Bush ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY ADMINISTRATOR * Jeff Holmstead, energy lawyer, former EPA official during George W. Bush administration * Robert Grady, venture capitalist, partner in private equity firm Gryphon Investors * Leslie Rutledge, Republican Arkansas attorney general * Carol Comer, commissioner of the Indiana Department of Environmental Management * Scott Pruitt, Oklahoma attorney general ENERGY SECRETARY * Harold Hamm, Oklahoma oil and gas mogul, chief executive of Continental Resources Inc * Kevin Cramer, Republican U.S. Representative from North Dakota * Robert Grady, venture capitalist, partner in private equity firm Gryphon Investors * Larry Nichols, co-founder of Devon Energy Corp * James Connaughton, chief executive of Nautilus Data Technologies and a former environmental adviser to President George W. Bush * Rick Perry, former Republican Texas governor INTERIOR SECRETARY * Sarah Palin, former Alaska governor, 2008 Republican vice presidential nominee * Jan Brewer, former Republican Arizona governor * Forrest Lucas, founder of oil products company Lucas Oil * Harold Hamm, Oklahoma oil and gas mogul, chief executive of Continental Resources Inc * Robert Grady, venture capitalist, partner in private equity firm Gryphon Investors * Mary Fallin, Republican Oklahoma governor * Ray Washburne, chief executive of investment company Charter Holdings * Cathy McMorris Rodgers, U.S. representative from Washington state and Republican Conference chair COMMERCE SECRETARY * Wilbur Ross, billionaire investor, chairman of Invesco Ltd subsidiary WL Ross & Co * Linda McMahon, former World Wrestling Entertainment executive and two-time Republican Senate candidate DIRECTOR OF NATIONAL INTELLIGENCE * Admiral Mike Rogers, director of the National Security Agency * Ronald Burgess, retired lieutenant general and former Defense Intelligence Agency chief * Robert Cardillo, director of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency * Pete Hoekstra, former Republican U.S. representative from Michigan * Rudy Giuliani, former Republican mayor of New York City U.S. TRADE REPRESENTATIVE * Dan DiMicco, former chief executive of steel producer Nucor Corp LABOR SECRETARY * Andrew Puzder, chief executive officer of CKE Restaurants * Victoria Lipnic, U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission commissioner and former Labor Department official during the George W. Bush administration HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SECRETARY * Dr. Ben Carson, former 2016 Republican presidential candidate and retired neurosurgeon SUPREME COURT VACANCY The Trump transition team confirmed he would choose from a list of 21 names he drew up during his campaign, including Republican U.S. Senator Mike Lee of Utah, and William Pryor, a federal judge with the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

29 ноября, 08:13

Speculation Soars As Mike Pence Says "There Will Be Very Important Announcements Tomorrow"

With the Trump cabinet filling up, but a number of key positions still to be announced, vice-president-elect Mike Pence told Fox News tonight that "there will be very important announcements tomorrow."   Vice President-elect @mike_pence: There will be very important announcements tomorrow. #NewsAlert pic.twitter.com/VOAXMsBhMa — Fox News (@FoxNews) November 29, 2016   So who will it be? POSTS ALREADY FILLED WHITE HOUSE CHIEF OF STAFF * Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus CHIEF WHITE HOUSE STRATEGIST AND SENIOR COUNSELOR * Steve Bannon, former head of the conservative website Breitbart News ATTORNEY GENERAL * Jeff Sessions, Republican U.S. senator from Alabama and senior member of the Senate Judiciary Committee (subject to Senate confirmation) CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY DIRECTOR * Republican U.S. Representative Mike Pompeo from Kansas (subject to Senate confirmation) NATIONAL SECURITY ADVISER * Michael Flynn, retired Army lieutenant general and former director of the Defense Intelligence Agency UNITED NATIONS AMBASSADOR * Nikki Haley, Republican South Carolina governor (subject to Senate confirmation) EDUCATION SECRETARY * Betsy DeVos, Republican donor and former chair of the Michigan Republican Party HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES SECRETARY * Tom Price, Republican U.S. representative from Georgia, orthopedic surgeon *  *  * CONTENDERS Below are people mentioned as contenders for senior roles as the Republican president-elect works to form his administration before taking office on Jan. 20, according to Reuters sources and media reports. TREASURY SECRETARY * Steven Mnuchin, former Goldman Sachs Group Inc executive and Trump's campaign finance chairman * Jeb Hensarling, Republican U.S. representative from Texas and chairman of the House Financial Services Committee * Tom Barrack, founder and chairman of Colony Capital Inc * John Allison, former chief executive officer of BB&T Corp * David McCormick, president of hedge fund Bridgewater Associates LP SECRETARY OF STATE * Mitt Romney, 2012 Republican presidential nominee and former Massachusetts governor * Rudy Giuliani, former Republican mayor of New York City * John Bolton, former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations under Republican President George W. Bush * Bob Corker, Republican U.S. senator from Tennessee and chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee * Zalmay Khalilzad, former U.S. ambassador to Iraq DEFENSE SECRETARY * James Mattis, retired Marine general * David Petraeus, former CIA director and retired Army general * Tom Cotton, Republican U.S. senator from Arkansas * Jon Kyl, former Republican U.S. senator from Arizona * Duncan Hunter, Republican U.S. representative from California and early Trump supporter, member of the House Armed Services Committee * Jim Talent, former Republican U.S. senator from Missouri who was on the Senate Armed Services Committee * Rick Perry, former Republican Texas governor * Stephen Hadley, former national security adviser under President George W. Bush HOMELAND SECURITY SECRETARY * Michael McCaul, Republican U.S. representative from Texas and chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee * David Clarke, Milwaukee county sheriff and vocal Trump supporter * Joe Arpaio, outgoing Maricopa County, Arizona, sheriff who campaigned for Trump * Kris Kobach, Kansas secretary of state * Frances Townsend, homeland security and counterterrorism adviser to former Republican President George W. Bush ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY ADMINISTRATOR * Jeff Holmstead, energy lawyer, former EPA official during George W. Bush administration * Robert Grady, venture capitalist, partner in private equity firm Gryphon Investors * Leslie Rutledge, Republican Arkansas attorney general * Carol Comer, commissioner of the Indiana Department of Environmental Management * Scott Pruitt, Oklahoma attorney general ENERGY SECRETARY * Harold Hamm, Oklahoma oil and gas mogul, chief executive of Continental Resources Inc * Kevin Cramer, Republican U.S. Representative from North Dakota * Robert Grady, venture capitalist, partner in private equity firm Gryphon Investors * Larry Nichols, co-founder of Devon Energy Corp * James Connaughton, chief executive of Nautilus Data Technologies and a former environmental adviser to President George W. Bush * Rick Perry, former Republican Texas governor INTERIOR SECRETARY * Sarah Palin, former Alaska governor, 2008 Republican vice presidential nominee * Jan Brewer, former Republican Arizona governor * Forrest Lucas, founder of oil products company Lucas Oil * Harold Hamm, Oklahoma oil and gas mogul, chief executive of Continental Resources Inc * Robert Grady, venture capitalist, partner in private equity firm Gryphon Investors * Mary Fallin, Republican Oklahoma governor * Ray Washburne, chief executive of investment company Charter Holdings * Cathy McMorris Rodgers, U.S. representative from Washington state and Republican Conference chair COMMERCE SECRETARY * Wilbur Ross, billionaire investor, chairman of Invesco Ltd subsidiary WL Ross & Co * Linda McMahon, former World Wrestling Entertainment executive and two-time Republican Senate candidate DIRECTOR OF NATIONAL INTELLIGENCE * Admiral Mike Rogers, director of the National Security Agency * Ronald Burgess, retired lieutenant general and former Defense Intelligence Agency chief * Robert Cardillo, director of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency * Pete Hoekstra, former Republican U.S. representative from Michigan * Rudy Giuliani, former Republican mayor of New York City U.S. TRADE REPRESENTATIVE * Dan DiMicco, former chief executive of steel producer Nucor Corp LABOR SECRETARY * Andrew Puzder, chief executive officer of CKE Restaurants * Victoria Lipnic, U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission commissioner and former Labor Department official during the George W. Bush administration TRANSPORTATION SECRETARY * Elaine Chao, former labor secretary and deputy transportation secretary under Republican Presidents George W. Bush and George H.W. Bush, respectively. Chao is married to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell * Harold Ford, former Democratic U.S. Representative from Tennessee HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SECRETARY * Dr. Ben Carson, former 2016 Republican presidential candidate and retired neurosurgeon SUPREME COURT VACANCY The Trump transition team confirmed he would choose from a list of 21 names he drew up during his campaign, including Republican U.S. Senator Mike Lee of Utah, and William Pryor, a federal judge with the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

25 ноября, 17:05

Why Devon Energy (DVN) Could Be Positioned for a Surge

Devon Energy (DVN) could be a solid choice for investors as it has seen estimates moving sharply higher over the past four weeks.

19 ноября, 01:30

Lobbyists leave Trump transition team after new ethics rule

At least three lobbyists have left the Trump transition after a new ethics policy would have required them to drop all their clients.

Выбор редакции
17 ноября, 03:32

Interior Cancels Oil Leases On Sacred Tribal Lands In Montana

WASHINGTON — In a rare win for Native American rights over the oil industry, the Department of the Interior canceled 15 oil and gas leases in the Badger-Two Medicine area of northwest Montana, land that the Blackfeet Nation considers sacred. The 130,000 acres are in the Lewis and Clark National Forest, near Glacier National Park. The federal land is home to the Blackfeet tribe’s creation story. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell said Wednesday that she was righting a historic wrong in retiring the leases. In the 1980s, under the Reagan administration, the Interior Department issued 47 oil and gas drilling leases in the Badger-Two Medicine region. Although the leases were never developed by the oil production companies that owned them, the possibility has long troubled members of the Blackfeet Nation. When the leases were issued over 30 years ago, the Interior Department did not consult the Blackfeet Nation or consider the environmental impact. “I’m sorry it took so long to get to this point,” Jewell said in an event at her office Wednesday, adding that the leases “never should have been allowed.” Jewell said the reversal “honors sacred tribal lands and conserves important resources.” Jewell had recently visited and hiked in the area, and noted its rich ecological resources as well as its cultural and historical significance. In March, Jewell announced the cancellation of another lease in the Badger-Two Medicine area. There are still two more active leases, though Jewell and Sen. Jon Tester (D-Mont.) expressed their commitment to retiring those leases as well. (They have to track down the lease owners first.) Several leaders of the Blackfeet tribe wore traditional clothing for the announcement. The tribe’s chief prayed and performed a song in his native language. “I’d like to say it’s a victory for the Blackfeet tribe, but it’s not. It’s a victory for the people of Montana, it’s a victory for the people of the United States and the world,” said Harry Barnes, chairman of Blackfeet Nation. Dave Hager, president and CEO of Devon Energy Corp., said canceling the leases was “simply the right thing to do.” His company owned 15 of the 17 remaining leases, a 32,000-acre portion of Badger-Two Medicine. Jewell will soon leave her post to make way for President-elect Donald Trump’s new secretary of the interior. Trump has not appointed anyone to the position yet, but his shortlist includes oil executive Forrest Lucas of Lucas Oil and former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin. Jewell, who declined to comment about her potential successor, said she believed her team had “demonstrated the right path forward” for a new secretary.  function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Jewell was also asked about the escalating protests over the Dakota Access Pipeline in North Dakota. The Standing Rock Sioux and supporters have questioned the process used to approve the pipeline, which they say will damage tribal land and waters. Jewell said the solidarity many Americans have shown with those protesting the pipeline project demonstrates the importance of establishing and following a process to avoid conflicts over tribal lands. “If we do things right upfront, we don’t end up with uncertainty for industry,” she said. “If we don’t do things right upfront, we have uncertainty for industry, as was exhibited in Badger-Two Medicine and as I think is playing out right now on the pipeline.” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

16 ноября, 21:05

Trump transition appears to have flouted internal ethics rule on lobbyists

A copy of the transition team's code of ethics includes a rule barring lobbyists with overlapping work.

16 ноября, 02:55

Latest Short List For Trump Cabinet Positions - It's A "Knife Fight"

As Donald Trump's transition team continues to debate who will fill key cabinet positions, the competition between potential appointees is growing more fierce with one insider describing it as a "knife fight."  So far, Trump has named RNC head Reince Priebus as Chief Of Staff and the controversial Breitbart executive, Steve Bannon, as Chief Strategist.   While the transition team has been guarded so far about who will fill the remaining roles, communications adviser Jason Miller confirmed that Trump's cabinet will be anything but "traditional": "You're going to see a number of different names that are ultimately becoming a part of the President-elect's administration.  There will be non-traditional names, a number of people who have had wide-ranging success in a number of different fields; wide-ranging success in business ... People will be excited when they see the type of leaders the President-elect brings into this administration." Of the key open positions, John Bolton and Rudy Giuliani are the rumored favorites for Secretary of State and Senator Jeff Sessions is thought to be the front-runner for Attorney General.  With that said, per Reuters, here is a short list of people thought to be in the running for the various cabinet positions that need to be filled over the coming months: SECRETARY OF STATE Bob Corker, Tennessee senator and chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee John Bolton, former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations under President George W. Bush Newt Gingrich, Republican former U.S. House Speaker Zalmay Khalilzad, former U.S. ambassador to Iraq Rudy Giuliani, Republican former mayor of New York City ATTORNEY GENERAL Rudy Giuliani Jeff Sessions, senior member of the Senate Judiciary Committee who takes a hard line on immigration Chris Christie, Republican New Jersey governor Pam Bondi, Republican Florida Attorney General Trey Gowdy, Republican congressman from South Carolina who headed the House committee that investigated the 2012 attacks on the U.S. mission in Benghazi, Libya TREASURY SECRETARY Steven Mnuchin, former Goldman Sachs executive and Trump's campaign finance chairman Jeb Hensarling, Texas Republican congressman and chairman of the House Financial Services Committee Jamie Dimon, JPMorgan Chase & Co chief executive officer Tom Barrack, founder and chairman of Colony Capital Inc DEFENSE SECRETARY Lieutenant General Michael Flynn, former director of the Defense Intelligence Agency Stephen Hadley, former national security adviser under President George W. Bush Jon Kyl, former Republican senator from Arizona Jeff Sessions, Republican senator from Alabama and early Trump supporter, member of the Senate Armed Services Committee Kelly Ayotte, outgoing Republican senator from New Hampshire and member of the Senate Armed Services Committee Duncan Hunter, Republican congressman from California and early Trump supporter, member of House Armed Services Committee Jim Talent, former Republican senator from Missouri who was on the Senate Armed Services Committee HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES SECRETARY Ben Carson, former neurosurgeon and 2016 Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich Rich Bagger, former pharmaceutical executive and former top aide to New Jersey Governor Chris Christie Bobby Jindal, former Louisiana governor HOMELAND SECURITY SECRETARY Michael McCaul, U.S. Republican congressman from Texas and chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee David Clarke, Milwaukee county sheriff and vocal Trump supporter Joe Arpaio, outgoing Maricopa County, Arizona, sheriff who campaigned for Trump HEAD OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Myron Ebell, a climate change skeptic at the libertarian Competitive Enterprise Institute who is overseeing environmental policy on Trump's transition team Robert Grady, venture capitalist, partner in private equity firm Gryphon Investors Leslie Rutledge, Arkansas attorney general Carol Comer, commissioner of the Indiana Department of Environmental Management ENERGY SECRETARY Harold Hamm, Oklahoma oil and gas mogul, CEO of Continental Resources Inc Larry Nichols, co-founder of Devon Energy Corp James Connaughton, CEO of Nautilus Data Technologies and a former environmental adviser to President George W. Bush U.S. Representative Kevin Cramer, of North Dakota Robert Grady INTERIOR SECRETARY Sarah Palin, Republican former Alaska governor who ran for vice president in 2008 Jan Brewer, former Arizona governor Forrest Lucas, founder of oil products company Lucas Oil Harold Hamm Robert Grady COMMERCE SECRETARY Linda McMahon, former world Wrestling Entertainment executive and two-time Senate candidate CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY DIRECTOR Lieutenant General Michael Flynn Mike Rogers, Republican former representative from Michigan who chaired the House Intelligence Committee Pete Hoekstra, Republican former representative from Michigan NATIONAL SECURITY ADVISER Lieutenant General Michael Flynn Stephen Hadley UNITED NATIONS AMBASSADOR Kelly Ayotte Richard Grenell, former spokesman for the United States at the United Nations Peter King, Republican representative from New York U.S. TRADE REPRESENTATIVE Dan DiMicco, former chief executive of steel producer Nucor Corp VETERANS AFFAIRS SECRETARY Jeff Miller, retiring congressman from Florida and chairman of the Veterans Affairs committee

15 ноября, 23:35

Top Research Reports for 15th November, 2016

Top Research Reports for 15th November, 2016

11 ноября, 22:40

The Trump Swamp: Government By The Lobbyists

As we walked down my Washington DC block on election eve, before the returns starting coming in, a stranger in a darkened doorway suddenly addressed me and my friends. "Are you ready," he asked tauntingly, "to drain the swamp?" A few hours later, the remark seemed ominous. But of course, just days after, it has proved to be ridiculous. Because Donald J. Trump, who promised his working class supporters he would fight for them, seems to be building an administration dominated by the same revolving door corporate lobbyists who have made our nation's capital a corrupt cesspool. Politicians from both parties have used the phrase "drain the swamp" to express their contempt for a system controlled by special interests. Running an outsider campaign, Trump embraced the metaphor, tweeting in October: "I will Make Our Government Honest Again -- believe me. But first, I'm going to have to #DrainTheSwamp in DC." The pledge to clean up Washington likely solidified Trump's support, especially among white working class voters. Like Bernie Sanders, Trump appealed to many Americans who believe the economic system is rigged, that policy is dictated by the wealthy. I believe Hillary Clinton has been committed to economic justice. But some voters saw her as a symbol of the insiders who have gotten richer in an America that has left many people behind. It didn't help that many of Clinton's campaign advisors, bundlers, and vocal supporters were revolving-door influence-peddlers for oil and gas companies, Wall Street banks, predatory for-profit colleges, multi-level marketing scams, sugary drinks, and other special interests -- people like Tom Nides, Heather Podesta, Steve Elmendorf, Anita Dunn, Ed Rendell, Lanny Davis, etc. But by Thursday, Trump's working class / outsider facade had been torn down, and it was clear that his transition operation was stacked with Binders Full of Lobbyists. The list of potential Trump cabinet members had been revealed to include lobbyists and executives of  big corporations, such as former senator and coal industry lobbyist Jim Talent and oil and gas CEO Harold Hamm. Meanwhile, his transition team, as recounted by the New York Times, includes: Michael Catanzaro, a lobbyist whose clients include Devon Energy and Encana Oil and Gas, holds the "energy independence" portfolio. Michael Torrey, a lobbyist who runs a firm that has earned millions of dollars helping food industry players such as the American Beverage Association and the dairy giant Dean Foods, is helping set up the new team at the Department of Agriculture. Michael McKenna, another lobbyist helping to pick key administration officials who will oversee energy policy, has a client list that this year has included the Southern Company, one of the most vocal critics of efforts to prevent climate change by putting limits on emissions from coal-burning power plants. Martin Whitmer, who is overseeing "transportation and infrastructure" for the Trump transition.... He is the chairman of a Washington law firm whose lobbying clients include the Association of American Railroads and the National Asphalt Pavement Association. David Malpass, the former chief economist at Bear Stearns, the Wall Street investment bank that collapsed during the 2008 financial crisis, is overseeing the "economic issues" portfolio of the transition, as well as operations at the Treasury Department. Mr. Malpass now runs a firm called Encima Global, which sells economic research to institutional investors and corporate clients. [Jeffrey] Eisenach, as a telecom industry consultant, has worked to help major cellular companies fight back against regulations proposed by the F.C.C.that would mandate so-called net neutrality -- requiring providers to give equal access to their networks to outside companies. He is now helping to oversee the rebuilding of the staff at the F.C.C. The triumvirate of politicians most associated with Trump have also been in the game. Former New York mayor Rudy Giuliani presides over a law firm that lobbies on behalf of fossil fuel industries -- oil, gas, and coal -- and that has been at the forefront of efforts to strike down in court President Obama's climate change regulations. Ex-House Speaker Newt Gingrich has worked for, among others, the mortgage giant Freddie Mac, advising its lobbying team, although he preferred to call himself the company's "historian," and he has shilled for the disgraced predatory for-profit college industry. Chris Christie, meanwhile, while still the governor of New Jersey, has held a series of meetings with Washington trade groups and lobbyists on behalf of Trump, in one meeting reportedly reassuring banking lobbyists that while Trump had endorsed reinstating the Glass-Steagall law, according to CNN "Trump is often open to changing his mind when he gets input from people with expertise." Most striking was this analysis, offered to the Times, from the always folksy and always ridiculous Trent Lott, the former Senate Republican Leader and now a lobbyist for a wide range of corporations: "Trump has pledged to change things in Washington -- about draining the swamp. He is going to need some people to help guide him through the swamp -- how do you get in and how you get out? We are prepared to help do that." Blatant lies and deception have always been powerful currencies in Washington, but Lott's statement is hard to top: one of the highest paid revolving door lobbyists in the city -- who resigned from the Senate a few weeks early in order to avoid new government ethics legislation -- offering to guide Trump in cleaning up Washington. Lott and his firm, Squire Patton Boggs, received $1.44 million over four years, ending in late 2015, to lobby for the for-profit college trade group APSCU, which has included in recent years many of the industry's most troubled companies, such as Corinthian, Education Management Corp. (EDMC), ITT Tech, Kaplan, Career Education Corporation (CEC), DeVry, and Bridgepoint Education. APSCU also included ATI, which was shut down by the Justice Department in 2013 for systematic fraud, and FastTrain College, whose CEO was sentenced to eight years in prison in May 2016 for defrauding the government. The head of that now heavily-discredited trade group, former congressman Steve Gunderson, who has thundered against the alleged "ideological bias" of the Obama Administration (actually bias against the deceptive practices in his industry that have ruined the economic futures of veterans, single mothers, and others seeking a better life through education), seems to be over the moon about the Trump victory. Trump's campaign was one long con, directed by a candidate experienced in pitching non-existent condo resorts, a multi-level marketing company selling "video phones," and the fraudulent Trump University. Now it should be clear to all that the one redeeming aspect of Trump's platform -- the commitment to fight against the special interest dominance of Washington -- was just one more lie. So we're left with an unfit president who is ready to instead accelerate the corruption of policy by big money. Since the GOP leaders in Congress also are under the thumb of the business interests that fund their campaigns, the outlook for federal laws, regulations, and enforcement is bleak -- in terms of slowing climate change, fighting pollution, protecting against financial, consumer, and education scams, and much more. What we will have left -- in addition to the authorities of some public-minded state attorneys general -- is something pure and simple: the truth. Our media outlets -- from the Times and Wall Street Journal, to bloggers like The Intercept's Lee Fang and the team at DeSmog, to the brilliant John Oliver and Samantha Bee programs -- will be essential.  Investigative reporting about corporate abuses -- scam lenders, scam colleges, scam marketers, defective products, toxic spills -- can educate consumers, investors, and voters, and make it harder for Washington to behave so badly. Activism can carry those truths forward, along with truths about racial injustice, abuse of immigrants and LGBT communities, sexual assault, and all the other stark concerns raised by the rise of Trump. This article also appears on Republic Report.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

11 ноября, 13:07

Insurgent Trump taps GOP insiders, lobbyists for transition

Veterans of two Bush administrations and Romney transition lay the groundwork for his presidency.

05 ноября, 14:00

Senate Races Flooded With Never-Before-Seen Sums Of Super PAC Cash

WASHINGTON ― Unprecedented spending by super PACs, dark money nonprofits and other outside groups is swamping Senate races as the battle to control the chamber that votes on Supreme Court nominees enters its final days. Outside group spending has surged past $490 million with four days still to go, surpassing the $400 million dropped on Senate races in 2014. The huge sums have overwhelmed candidates’ efforts, leaving them practically bit players in their own campaigns. In the seven races expected to decide control of the Senate, outside groups have already poured in more money than the candidates, according to a report by the campaign finance reform group Democracy 21. The key contests are being run in Florida, Indiana, Missouri, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina and Pennsylvania. This is the new normal for campaigns in the post-Citizens United world. In 2010, the Supreme Court opened the door to unlimited electoral spending by corporations and unions so long as they remain ostensibly independent from the candidates they support. A subsequent lower-court ruling extended this decision to individuals, and afterward super PACs were created to serve as vehicles for these unlimited contributions. A system of barely independent unlimited-money groups soon emerged to process giant contributions from billionaires, corporations and unions aiming to influence elections. In this electoral cycle, the biggest actors in the Senate races are two super PACs directly connected to party leaders. Outside Group Spending On Senate Races (2010-2016) Senate Majority PAC is a Democratic entity that was formed by close aides to Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) in 2010. It is slowly being taken over by former aides to Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.), who is expected to replace the retiring Reid as the next Democratic leader. The super PAC is the fourth most active outside group, having spent more than $74 million on the 2016 races. The Senate Leadership Fund, recently founded by former aides to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), is even busier. It’s run by Steven Law, who also heads the Karl Rove-founded super PAC American Crossroads and the affiliated nonprofit Crossroads GPS. The Senate Leadership Fund is the third highest spending super PAC in 2016, with $85 million already pumped into the effort to save the Republican majority. (Its nonprofit arm, One Nation, dropped additional tens of millions of dollars on issue ads attacking Democratic Senate candidates from 2015 into the spring of 2016. That spending is not included in the totals mentioned here.) The two opposing Senate super PACs rely on massive donations from a small pool of mega-donors. So far, donors giving more than $500,000 to super PACs in the 2016 election have combined to contribute over $1 billion. That’s a record that will only increase when final donation totals are revealed after the election. The biggest donor paying to elect Senate Republicans is casino oligarch Sheldon Adelson. The billionaire and his wife Miriam have donated at least $20 million to the Senate Leadership Fund; $1.5 million to Granite State Solutions, a super PAC that only supports Sen. Kelly Ayotte (R-N.H.); and $1.2 million to Arizona Grassroots Action, a super PAC that only supports Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.). Adelson backs Israel’s current right-wing government, opposes the Iran nuclear deal and has casually mused about using nuclear weapons as a means of applying pressure on Iran. He is also a major proponent of banning online gambling, which would presumably help his business’s bottom line. Republicans in both the House and Senate have introduced exactly the legislation against online gambling that he would like. There are other major donors who have their own issues before Congress. Hedge fund billionaire Paul Singer has given $4 million to the Senate Leadership Fund. He has also pumped money into the parade of super PACs supporting individual candidates. These donations include $750,000 to the Fighting for Ohio Fund, which backs Sen. Rob Portman (R-Ohio); $400,000 to Independent Voice for Illinois, which supports Sen. Mark Kirk (R-Ill.); and $350,000 to Arizona Grassroots Action for McCain. In May, Singer and a handful of his fellow billionaires launched a new lobbying group called CIRCA to further entrench their power in the nation’s capital. The group is designed to fight on behalf of wealthy activist investors like Singer, Carl Icahn, Dan Loeb and Bill Ackman. McConnell’s super PAC has also received large contributions from fossil fuel energy corporations fighting to roll back environmental regulations and forestall any new effort to tackle the threat of climate change. Chevron, the oil and gas giant that ranks 14th on the Fortune 500, donated $2 million. Coal company Devon Energy gave $750,000, electric utility company NextEra Energy gave $750,000 and fracking giant Continental Resources gave $250,000. All have lobbyists working to influence Congress as well. Zuffa LLC, the parent company of Ultimate Fighting Championship, is another donor with lobbying interests. Zuffa donated $500,000 to the Senate Leadership Fund, while owners Frank and Lorenzo Fertitta gave $250,000 each. Another $500,000 came from the Fertitta brothers’ company Station Casinos. Zuffa is currently lobbying against extending to individual mixed martial arts competitors certain protections that Congress gave to boxers in 2000. The largest donation to the Senate Leadership Fund was $11 million from its sister nonprofit, One Nation. That’s the single biggest contribution ever from a dark money group to a super PAC. The ultimate source of the money, the entity that gave it to One Nation, remains undisclosed. On the smaller end of contributions, the tobacco company Altria donated $75,000 to the Senate Leadership Fund ― even as it has worked with lawmakers to pass legislation exempting e-cigarettes from Food and Drug Administration oversight. Senate Republicans have also been boosted by Freedom Partners Action Fund, a super PAC run by the billionaire brothers Charles and David Koch. Charles Koch is the top donor to Freedom Partners Action Fund at $6 million. The biggest donor to the Democrats’ Senate Majority PAC is NewsWeb Corporation chairman Fred Eychaner, who has given $11 million so far. He’s a big supporter of the LGBTQ community. Other mega-donors to the Democratic group include some familiar names. James Simons, a New York-based hedge fund billionaire, gave $5 million. Billionaire and GOP bête noire George Soros pitched in $1.5 million, while his son Alexander Soros gave $2.25 million. Thomas Murphy, the father of Florida Senate candidate Patrick Murphy (D), gave $2 million. Laurene Powell Jobs, the widow of Apple CEO Steve Jobs and a major proponent of charter schools, donated $1.5 million. And perhaps the largest collective contribution from a group with a Washington agenda is the $17.9 million given by labor unions to Senate Majority PAC. Like its Republican counterpart, the Democratic group has also received contributions from corporations with interests in Washington. There was $175,000 from U.S. Sugar Corporation and $100,000 from Florida Crystals Company, both of which lobby to maintain their government subsidies and fight back against negative stories about the health effects of sugar. There was also $150,000 from the food and beverage company Delaware North, which lobbies on tax issues. The Entertainment Software Association, the lobbying arm of the video game industry, donated $100,000 to endorse a hang-out space at the Democratic National Convention. For the most part, Democratic Senate candidates have centralized their super PAC funding through Senate Majority PAC. But Republican candidates also boast their own personal super PACs, often run by their former aides. The pro-Ayotte Granite State Solutions is the only one of these groups to receive most of its money ― $19.6 million ― from the Senate Leadership Fund. The others rely on their own sets of donors. The second best-financed personal super PAC among Senate Republicans is the pro-Portman Fighting for Ohio Fund. But its largest donor is shrouded in mystery. One dark money group, FreedomVote Inc., has given the Portman super PAC nearly $2 million. Other dark money donations include $135,000 from Citizens for a Working America, $90,000 from The Government Integrity Fund, $75,000 from the American Policy Coalition, and $80,000 from Americans United for Values, a super PAC funded entirely by the American Policy Coalition. All of these dark money groups are connected to the same Ohio-based consultant: David Langdon. The secretive Langdon was described in Politico as a rock-ribbed social conservative. His groups have also given $175,000 to the pro-McCain Arizona Grassroots Action. Another major supporter of the Portman super PAC is controversial venture capitalist Peter Thiel. The Donald Trump supporter gave $1 million. In Wisconsin, Sen. Ron Johnson (R) is backed by two super PACs, Reform America Fund and Let America Work. The top donor to Reform America Fund is Diane Hendricks, the richest person in the state, who gave $5.4 million. She is also a staunch supporter of Gov. Scott Walker (R), who advocates the traditional conservative agenda of lower taxation, less regulation and no more collective bargaining rights for unions. Reform America Fund received another $100,000 from tobacco giant Reynolds American. Like Altria, Reynolds has lobbied Congress to pass legislation ensuring that e-cigarettes avoid regulation. The North Carolina-based company has also contributed $100,000 to Grow NC Strong, a super PAC supporting Sen. Richard Burr (R-N.C.). Prosperity for Pennsylvania is the super PAC supporting Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) in his challenging bid for re-election. The coal companies Murray Energy and Consol Energy, both with hired lobbyists in Washington, have given $110,000 and $100,000, respectively, to the group. There is currently only one super PAC backing a single Democratic Senate candidate. Floridians for a Strong Middle Class supports Patrick Murphy. Its top donors are his father with $450,000 and his father’s company, Coastal Construction, with $300,000. HUFFPOST READERS: What’s happening in your state or district? The Huffington Post wants to know about all the campaign ads, mailers, robocalls, candidate appearances and other interesting campaign news happening by you. Email any tips, videos, audio files or photos [email protected] Editor’s note: Donald Trump regularly incites political violence and is a serial liar, rampant xenophobe, racist, misogynist and birther who has repeatedly pledged to ban all Muslims — 1.6 billion members of an entire religion — from entering the U.S. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

05 ноября, 14:00

Senate Races Flooded With Never-Before-Seen Sums Of Super PAC Cash

WASHINGTON ― Unprecedented spending by super PACs, dark money nonprofits and other outside groups is swamping Senate races as the battle to control the chamber that votes on Supreme Court nominees enters its final days. Outside group spending has surged past $490 million with four days still to go, surpassing the $400 million dropped on Senate races in 2014. The huge sums have overwhelmed candidates’ efforts, leaving them practically bit players in their own campaigns. In the seven races expected to decide control of the Senate, outside groups have already poured in more money than the candidates, according to a report by the campaign finance reform group Democracy 21. The key contests are being run in Florida, Indiana, Missouri, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina and Pennsylvania. This is the new normal for campaigns in the post-Citizens United world. In 2010, the Supreme Court opened the door to unlimited electoral spending by corporations and unions so long as they remain ostensibly independent from the candidates they support. A subsequent lower-court ruling extended this decision to individuals, and afterward super PACs were created to serve as vehicles for these unlimited contributions. A system of barely independent unlimited-money groups soon emerged to process giant contributions from billionaires, corporations and unions aiming to influence elections. In this electoral cycle, the biggest actors in the Senate races are two super PACs directly connected to party leaders. Outside Group Spending On Senate Races (2010-2016) Senate Majority PAC is a Democratic entity that was formed by close aides to Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) in 2010. It is slowly being taken over by former aides to Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.), who is expected to replace the retiring Reid as the next Democratic leader. The super PAC is the fourth most active outside group, having spent more than $74 million on the 2016 races. The Senate Leadership Fund, recently founded by former aides to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), is even busier. It’s run by Steven Law, who also heads the Karl Rove-founded super PAC American Crossroads and the affiliated nonprofit Crossroads GPS. The Senate Leadership Fund is the third highest spending super PAC in 2016, with $85 million already pumped into the effort to save the Republican majority. (Its nonprofit arm, One Nation, dropped additional tens of millions of dollars on issue ads attacking Democratic Senate candidates from 2015 into the spring of 2016. That spending is not included in the totals mentioned here.) The two opposing Senate super PACs rely on massive donations from a small pool of mega-donors. So far, donors giving more than $500,000 to super PACs in the 2016 election have combined to contribute over $1 billion. That’s a record that will only increase when final donation totals are revealed after the election. The biggest donor paying to elect Senate Republicans is casino oligarch Sheldon Adelson. The billionaire and his wife Miriam have donated at least $20 million to the Senate Leadership Fund; $1.5 million to Granite State Solutions, a super PAC that only supports Sen. Kelly Ayotte (R-N.H.); and $1.2 million to Arizona Grassroots Action, a super PAC that only supports Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.). Adelson backs Israel’s current right-wing government, opposes the Iran nuclear deal and has casually mused about using nuclear weapons as a means of applying pressure on Iran. He is also a major proponent of banning online gambling, which would presumably help his business’s bottom line. Republicans in both the House and Senate have introduced exactly the legislation against online gambling that he would like. There are other major donors who have their own issues before Congress. Hedge fund billionaire Paul Singer has given $4 million to the Senate Leadership Fund. He has also pumped money into the parade of super PACs supporting individual candidates. These donations include $750,000 to the Fighting for Ohio Fund, which backs Sen. Rob Portman (R-Ohio); $400,000 to Independent Voice for Illinois, which supports Sen. Mark Kirk (R-Ill.); and $350,000 to Arizona Grassroots Action for McCain. In May, Singer and a handful of his fellow billionaires launched a new lobbying group called CIRCA to further entrench their power in the nation’s capital. The group is designed to fight on behalf of wealthy activist investors like Singer, Carl Icahn, Dan Loeb and Bill Ackman. McConnell’s super PAC has also received large contributions from fossil fuel energy corporations fighting to roll back environmental regulations and forestall any new effort to tackle the threat of climate change. Chevron, the oil and gas giant that ranks 14th on the Fortune 500, donated $2 million. Coal company Devon Energy gave $750,000, electric utility company NextEra Energy gave $750,000 and fracking giant Continental Resources gave $250,000. All have lobbyists working to influence Congress as well. Zuffa LLC, the parent company of Ultimate Fighting Championship, is another donor with lobbying interests. Zuffa donated $500,000 to the Senate Leadership Fund, while owners Frank and Lorenzo Fertitta gave $250,000 each. Another $500,000 came from the Fertitta brothers’ company Station Casinos. Zuffa is currently lobbying against extending to individual mixed martial arts competitors certain protections that Congress gave to boxers in 2000. The largest donation to the Senate Leadership Fund was $11 million from its sister nonprofit, One Nation. That’s the single biggest contribution ever from a dark money group to a super PAC. The ultimate source of the money, the entity that gave it to One Nation, remains undisclosed. On the smaller end of contributions, the tobacco company Altria donated $75,000 to the Senate Leadership Fund ― even as it has worked with lawmakers to pass legislation exempting e-cigarettes from Food and Drug Administration oversight. Senate Republicans have also been boosted by Freedom Partners Action Fund, a super PAC run by the billionaire brothers Charles and David Koch. Charles Koch is the top donor to Freedom Partners Action Fund at $6 million. The biggest donor to the Democrats’ Senate Majority PAC is NewsWeb Corporation chairman Fred Eychaner, who has given $11 million so far. He’s a big supporter of the LGBTQ community. Other mega-donors to the Democratic group include some familiar names. James Simons, a New York-based hedge fund billionaire, gave $5 million. Billionaire and GOP bête noire George Soros pitched in $1.5 million, while his son Alexander Soros gave $2.25 million. Thomas Murphy, the father of Florida Senate candidate Patrick Murphy (D), gave $2 million. Laurene Powell Jobs, the widow of Apple CEO Steve Jobs and a major proponent of charter schools, donated $1.5 million. And perhaps the largest collective contribution from a group with a Washington agenda is the $17.9 million given by labor unions to Senate Majority PAC. Like its Republican counterpart, the Democratic group has also received contributions from corporations with interests in Washington. There was $175,000 from U.S. Sugar Corporation and $100,000 from Florida Crystals Company, both of which lobby to maintain their government subsidies and fight back against negative stories about the health effects of sugar. There was also $150,000 from the food and beverage company Delaware North, which lobbies on tax issues. The Entertainment Software Association, the lobbying arm of the video game industry, donated $100,000 to endorse a hang-out space at the Democratic National Convention. For the most part, Democratic Senate candidates have centralized their super PAC funding through Senate Majority PAC. But Republican candidates also boast their own personal super PACs, often run by their former aides. The pro-Ayotte Granite State Solutions is the only one of these groups to receive most of its money ― $19.6 million ― from the Senate Leadership Fund. The others rely on their own sets of donors. The second best-financed personal super PAC among Senate Republicans is the pro-Portman Fighting for Ohio Fund. But its largest donor is shrouded in mystery. One dark money group, FreedomVote Inc., has given the Portman super PAC nearly $2 million. Other dark money donations include $135,000 from Citizens for a Working America, $90,000 from The Government Integrity Fund, $75,000 from the American Policy Coalition, and $80,000 from Americans United for Values, a super PAC funded entirely by the American Policy Coalition. All of these dark money groups are connected to the same Ohio-based consultant: David Langdon. The secretive Langdon was described in Politico as a rock-ribbed social conservative. His groups have also given $175,000 to the pro-McCain Arizona Grassroots Action. Another major supporter of the Portman super PAC is controversial venture capitalist Peter Thiel. The Donald Trump supporter gave $1 million. In Wisconsin, Sen. Ron Johnson (R) is backed by two super PACs, Reform America Fund and Let America Work. The top donor to Reform America Fund is Diane Hendricks, the richest person in the state, who gave $5.4 million. She is also a staunch supporter of Gov. Scott Walker (R), who advocates the traditional conservative agenda of lower taxation, less regulation and no more collective bargaining rights for unions. Reform America Fund received another $100,000 from tobacco giant Reynolds American. Like Altria, Reynolds has lobbied Congress to pass legislation ensuring that e-cigarettes avoid regulation. The North Carolina-based company has also contributed $100,000 to Grow NC Strong, a super PAC supporting Sen. Richard Burr (R-N.C.). Prosperity for Pennsylvania is the super PAC supporting Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) in his challenging bid for re-election. The coal companies Murray Energy and Consol Energy, both with hired lobbyists in Washington, have given $110,000 and $100,000, respectively, to the group. There is currently only one super PAC backing a single Democratic Senate candidate. Floridians for a Strong Middle Class supports Patrick Murphy. Its top donors are his father with $450,000 and his father’s company, Coastal Construction, with $300,000. HUFFPOST READERS: What’s happening in your state or district? The Huffington Post wants to know about all the campaign ads, mailers, robocalls, candidate appearances and other interesting campaign news happening by you. Email any tips, videos, audio files or photos [email protected] Editor’s note: Donald Trump regularly incites political violence and is a serial liar, rampant xenophobe, racist, misogynist and birther who has repeatedly pledged to ban all Muslims — 1.6 billion members of an entire religion — from entering the U.S. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

03 ноября, 15:42

WPX Energy (WPX) Reports Narrower-than-Expected Q3 Loss

WPX Energy Inc. (WPX) reported a loss of 17 cents per share in the third quarter of 2016, narrower than the Zacks Consensus Estimate of a loss of 18 cents.

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02 ноября, 15:51

Devon (DVN) Beats on Q3 Earnings, Cost Savings on Track

Devon Energy Corp. (DVN) reported third-quarter 2016 adjusted earnings per share of 9 cents, beating the Zacks Consensus Estimate of 5 cents by 80%.

02 ноября, 15:09

Noble Energy (NBL) Posts Narrower-than-Expected Q3 Loss

Noble Energy, Inc. (NBL) reported adjusted loss of 7 cents per share for the third quarter of 2016

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31 октября, 17:30

Oil Stocks Q3 Earnings Slated for Nov 1: PXD, DVN, NFX, FANG

Compilation of earnings preview for oil stocks slated for Nov 1: PXD, DVN, NFX, FANG

28 октября, 21:43

Can Emerge Energy Services (EMES) Surprise Q3 Earnings?

Fracking sand player Emerge Energy Services L.P. (EMES) is set to release its third-quarter results before the opening bell on Wednesday, Nov 2.