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Devon Energy
Выбор редакции
20 апреля, 19:42

Ritenour named executive vice-president, CFO for Devon Energy

Jeffrey L. Ritenour has been named executive vice-president and chief financial officer for Devon Energy Corp., Oklahoma City.

13 апреля, 01:00

Trump eyes climate skeptic for key White House environmental post

President Donald Trump may tap a vocal critic of climate change science to serve as the highest-ranking environmental official in the White House.Kathleen Hartnett White, who says carbon emissions are harmless and should not be regulated, is a top contender to run the Council on Environmental Quality, the White House’s in-house environmental policy shop, sources close to the administration told POLITICO. White House officials brought White in for an interview late last month, according to a person familiar with the hiring process, and Trump met with White at Trump Tower in November when she was under consideration to lead the Environmetal Protection Agency. Adding White to the administration would be a major win for Steve Bannon, Trump's chief strategist, and other hard-line conservatives in the White House, who have been feuding behind the scenes for weeks with the more moderate forces in the West Wing over issues like climate change. And her nomination could appease Trump’s climate skeptic supporters, who have criticized EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt for hesitating to revisit his agency's conclusion that global warming threatens public health.Trump administration officials are divided over whether White is the best person for the job, and they are also considering other candidates to lead CEQ, sources said. A White House spokeswoman declined to comment, saying, "We will let you know when we have an announcement."Like Pruitt, the former Oklahoma attorney general and fossil fuel ally, White would be another voice from a large oil and gas producing state in charge of climate change and environmental policy.White is a former chairwoman of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality who now works for a conservative think tank in the Lone Star State. Energy Secretary Rick Perry, a former Texas governor, is said to be advocating on White’s candidacy behind the scenes.Tapping White would only deepen environmentalists’ fears that the new administration will implement a wholesale reversal of former President Barack Obama's approach to climate change as a serious, long-term threat to the environment and national security.White sat on Trump’s economic advisory council during his campaign and since 2008 has worked at the Austin-based conservative think tank Texas Public Policy Foundation, which has received funding from Koch Industries, ExxonMobil, Chevron, ConocoPhillips, Devon Energy and other energy companies and utilities. White, who was a registered lobbyist with the group until Nov. 29, has long been a major voice in the niche industry of public figures who question climate science data or downplay the risks of global warming.“Carbon dioxide is not a pollutant, and carbon is certainly not a poison. Carbon is the chemical basis of all life on earth. Our bones and blood are made out of carbon,” White wrote in a June op-ed. She added that CO2 is the “gas of life” because it is a nutrient used by plants — an argument frequently raised by climate skeptics that most scientists say distracts from the climate-changing components of the gas.White’s position contrasts sharply with established climate science. In its most recent comprehensive report, the United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the leading scientific body on global warming, concluded that the Earth is warming because of human-generated emissions — and that time is running short to stave off the worst risks of climate change, including increased temperatures, more extreme weather, sea level rise and ocean acidification.Similar findings have been reached by U.S. authorities, including EPA, NASA and NOAA — all agencies that would be subject to guidance White would issue as CEQ chair, if she were confirmed by the Senate.In an interview with POLITICO in September, White proposed establishing a "blue ribbon commission" to relitigate climate science, underscoring her unorthodox belief that the science showing human-induced climate change is unsettled.The commission, she said, would develop an "alternative scientific methodology" to the IPCC, whose usefulness she said has "reached its peak.”If nominated, White would likely be an advocate within the administration of reopening the foundation of Obama's climate change agenda: EPA’s 2009 “endangerment finding,” a scientific conclusion that greenhouse gases constitute a threat to public health or welfare.Trump told an industry-backed think tank last year that he will “review” the endangerment finding, a potentially difficult task given the scientific consensus on the issue. Any withdrawal of the finding would be challenged by environmentalists in court. Pruitt has so far declined to reopen the endangerment finding, a decision that has infuriated some of Trump's conservative supporters. White would be able to play a key role in shaping the Trump administration's overall approach to climate change, and she has been clear that she does not think the issue should be addressed by EPA. In 2015, she argued that Obama's rules to limit carbon emissions from power plants marked "an unprecedented expansion of federal administrative power" with "no measurable climate benefits.” And last May, she urged House Speaker Paul Ryan to pass a bill that would block EPA from regulating carbon dioxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons or other greenhouse gases.At CEQ, White could direct other agencies to turn their attention away from climate change, and she would be in charge of implementing recent executive orders on energy development and regulatory streamlining. Last month, Trump ordered the council to revoke recently issued guidance directing all federal agencies to consider climate change when they conduct environmental reviews under the National Environmental Policy Act, a decision that would be difficult to challenge in court. And in January, the president told CEQ to come up with a plan to expedite environmental reviews for major infrastructure projects. While environmentalists have long accused GOP officials of dragging their feet on climate change, White is by far the most outspoken critic of the underlying science — and the most ardent defender of fossil fuels — that Trump has considered to serve in his administration.In a 2014 blog post, White took aim at an article in The Nation by MSNBC host Chris Hayes, whose "recommendation to avert global warming, like most warmist policies, toys with the greatest advance made by mankind," she wrote. In White's view, there is a connection between “the abolition of slavery and humanity's first widespread use of energy from fossil fuels.” The rise of coal and oil, she argued, provided economic incentive to end the practice of slavery in the U.S. and elsewhere. (One critic fired back that the industrial revolution actually “exacerbated” slavery by increasing the demands for slave-produced goods such as cotton.)Putting a permanent CEQ chair in place would also raise the question of where Trump wants decision-making on environmental issues to happen — in the White House or at agencies. The Obama administration shifted major environmental responsibilities from CEQ to EPA and some other agencies as it sought aggressive action on climate change. It remains unclear whether Trump’s CEQ will continue in that vein or have a greater role in policymaking, though outside Republicans have encouraged Trump aides to grant the council wide latitude. The council was run from 2015 through the end of Obama's term by Christy Goldfuss, an unconfirmed managing director. Obama never nominated a replacement for his first CEQ chair, Nancy Sutley, who left in 2014.White’s criticisms of Obama environmental regulations go beyond climate change.She said in 2015 that EPA’s Waters of the U.S. rule, which determines which bodies of water are subject to federal oversight, “is about amending the definitions of well understood words into tortured versions of themselves so that the EPA can seize control of dry land where water may flow after heavy rains.”She also criticized the new ozone standard of 70 parts per billion, calling the rule’s scientific conclusions “a statistical house of cards” and predicting it “may be the straw that breaks the back of our struggling economy.” White, who received her bachelor's and master’s degrees from Stanford University, was a commissioner at the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality from 2001 to 2007, serving as chairman for the last four years of that term. She previously sat on the Texas Water Development Board.Environmentalists do give White some credit for advances made during her tenure at TCEQ.Luke Metzger, director of Environment Texas, told POLITICO that she helped implement a legislative order to create an online reporting system for major emissions events, which is still used by green activists to track noncompliance by major energy companies. Metzger also credited her with a "slightly improved" enforcement policy, though he noted that she blocked an effort by a fellow TCEQ commissioner in 2006 to boost penalties.In 2008, White joined the Texas Public Policy Foundation, where she directs its Armstrong Center for Energy & the Environment.

23 марта, 22:54

Нефтегигантам США не понадобилась помощь Трампа

Администрация Трампа объявила о снижении экологических требований, что позволит США нарастить добычу нефти и уйти от зависимости от иностранных энергоносителей.

23 марта, 22:54

Нефтегигантам США не понадобилась помощь Трампа

Администрация Трампа объявила о снижении экологических требований, что позволит США нарастить добычу нефти и уйти от зависимости от иностранных энергоносителей.

19 марта, 08:46

Канада теряет нефтяных инвесторов

Многие слышали про битумные пески Канады. А также множество благополучных прогнозов на счет того, что наша планета еще на долгие годы обеспечена нефтью благодаря запасам канадской провинции Альберта, исчисляемым триллионами баррелей. Но почему инвесторы покидают этот, на первый взгляд, гарантированно рентабельный регион?

17 марта, 16:55

Should You Hold EOG Resources (EOG) Stock in Your Portfolio?

We issued an updated research report on EOG Resources Inc. (EOG) on Mar 17, 2017.

17 марта, 14:40

Why Is Devon Energy (DVN) Down 7% Since the Last Earnings Report?

Devon Energy (DVN) reported earnings 30 days ago. What's next for the stock? We take a look at earnings estimates for some clues.

15 марта, 01:11

How Falling Oil Prices Could Affect theJob Market

The oil price plunge isn't all good news for President Trump's ambitious plans to bring back jobs and growth.

10 марта, 01:38

5 Energy Growth Stocks to Buy on the Sell-Off

While we cheer the U.S. bull market's 8-year anniversary, oil prices tumbled to their lowest levels of 2017 yesterday.

08 марта, 17:39

Anadarko Unveils 2017 Guidance, Focus on US to Boost Results

Anadarko Petroleum Corporation (APC) unveiled 2017 guidance and initial capital expenditures for the year, which is primarily focused toward domestic operations.

03 марта, 02:53

EPA Scraps Rule Requiring Oil And Gas Industry To Report Methane Pollution

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); In May, the Environmental Protect Agency issued a new rule requiring oil and gas companies to report what equipment they use and how much methane ― a greenhouse gas 40 times more potent than carbon dioxide ― their drilling sites emit. On Thursday, the agency’s newly sworn-in administrator, Scott Pruitt, scrapped a regulation deemed crucial to cutting planet-warming emissions as part of the Paris climate deal.   The decision, one of Pruitt’s first since the Senate narrowly confirmed his nomination last month, underscores the former Oklahoma attorney general’s deep, friendly ties to an industry he’s now tasked with policing. The move comes days after The Huffington Post reported on the White House’s proposal to slash a quarter of the EPA’s budget and pink-slip 1 in 5 agency employees. “By taking this step, EPA is signaling that we take these concerns seriously and are committed to strengthening our partnership with the states,” Pruitt said in a statement. “Today’s action will reduce burdens on businesses while we take a closer look at the need for additional information from this industry.” Pruitt’s relationship with oil and gas players became a flashpoint after President Donald Trump nominated him to lead an agency he sued 13 times as the Sooner State’s top cop. Pruitt repeatedly joined oil, gas and coal players ― including Oklahoma Gas & Electric and the Domestic Energy Producers Alliance, an industry-backed group ― in filing lawsuits to stop federal regulations. In 2011, Pruitt allowed Devon Energy Corporation, the Oklahoma City-based natural gas giant, to write a three-page complaint to the EPA under his letterhead, which he later signed.  Trump picked the worst group of cabinet nominees in the modern history of America. But EPA nominee Scott Pruitt is the worst of the worst.— Bernie Sanders (@SenSanders) February 16, 2017 Last week, the Oklahoma attorney general’s office released emails under court order that shed new light on how chummy relations between Pruitt and the oil and gas industry became during his six years as the state’s attorney general. The office sued to block the release of more emails that were scheduled to be disclosed this month, and the Oklahoma Supreme Court on Tuesday granted a stay, giving the new attorney general’s office more time to produce the correspondence.  The first batch of 7,564 documents released last week renewed concerns that Pruitt would use his new post to benefit his industry allies, who have donated more than $300,000 to his campaigns between 2002 and 2016. Even more money went to a political action committee and super PAC that paid for Pruitt’s trips to Hawaii and New Orleans. The now-infamous 2011 Devon Energy letter, published in 2014 by The New York Times, specifically criticized EPA estimates on methane emissions from drilling rigs as inaccurate or too high in hopes of preventing further regulation. Two spokesmen for Devon Energy did not immediately return calls and emails requesting comment on Thursday evening.  Natural gas emits less carbon than other fossil fuels, such as oil or coal, and utility companies are increasingly relying on it to produce electricity as hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, technology has made it much cheaper. The shift from coal- to gas-burning power plants has helped to limit the carbon footprint of the utility sector, by far the biggest emitter in the country, but not by much.  But the fracking industry is relatively new, and its effects on the environment are still being studied. Oklahoma is now dogged by man-made earthquakes caused by fracking, which involves cracking bedrock with highly-pressurized, sand- and chemical-laced water to unleash gas trapped below. Methane leaks, which can cause dizziness and headaches, remain what The Economist called the industry’s “dirty little secret.” Earlier this week, an underwater pipeline in Alaska began leaking natural gas into the scenic Cook Inlet. A massive leak last year in a suburb of Los Angeles, dubbed an “invisible tsunami,” became the biggest natural disaster since the BP’s Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010.  “We must reject as a nation the false paradigm that if you’re pro-energy, you’re anti-environment or if you’re pro-environment, you’re anti-energy,” Pruitt said during his Senate confirmation hearing last month. “I reject that.” Yet so far, Pruitt’s time at the helm of the EPA has been marked by plans to eviscerate the agency’s budget, halt climate change action and ease restraints on corporate polluters. During his first speech to agency staff last week, Pruitt mentioned a “toxic environment” only once ― to refer to the political rhetoric of his critics. He did not mention pollution, climate change or environmental destruction at all.  type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related Coverage + articlesList=58b715f8e4b019d36d100897,58b0618ee4b060480e075086,58adda3ce4b03d80af71a4eb,58ac7e76e4b0c4d51057164f,58a71504e4b07602ad53f023 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

24 февраля, 20:44

EPA Chief Scott Pruitt's Allies Move To Block Release Of More Emails

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); The Oklahoma attorney general’s office has asked the state’s highest court to block the release of more emails between energy companies and Scott Pruitt, the state’s former top cop who became Environmental Protection Agency chief. The initial batch of 7,564 documents made public on Tuesday by the Wisconsin-based watchdog group Center for Media and Democracy revealed a chummy relationship between Pruitt and oil and gas players whose pollution he’s now tasked with policing as the nation’s top environmental regulator. Now the office that Pruitt occupied until the Senate approved his confirmation last Friday has requested a stay on District Court of Oklahoma County Judge Aletia Haynes Timmons’ order to release another trove of documents by next week.  “This maneuver is just more stonewalling by Team Pruitt to prevent the American people from seeing public records of national interest that should have been turned over prior to Pruitt’s confirmation as head of the EPA,” said Lisa Graves, executive director of the Center for Media and Democracy, in a statement. “Pruitt’s office had many months to provide his emails with corporate polluters, but is now complaining they don’t have enough time.” The Oklahoma Supreme Court will consider the stay request at a hearing scheduled for Tuesday. If the court declines the request, the attorney general’s office has until March 3 to release the documents.  President Donald Trump filled his Cabinet with climate science skeptics and fossil fuel allies, moves that riled environmental groups and Democrats. Still, Pruitt’s nomination stood apart. The former Oklahoma attorney general made his national reputation suing the EPA 13 times, repeatedly joining oil, gas and coal companies in legal challenges to rules meant to curb planet-warming greenhouse gases and pollution.  In 2011, he signed his name to a three-page complaint to the EPA that lawyers at Devon Energy Corporation, an oil and gas giant in Oklahoma City, wrote under his letterhead.  “We must reject as a nation the false paradigm that if you’re pro-energy, you’re anti-environment or if you’re pro-environment, you’re anti-energy,” Pruitt said during his Senate confirmation hearing last month. “I reject that.” But so far, he has failed to make his case to environmentalists who fear his tenure will be marked by budget cuts, weak enforcement and lax treatment for corporate polluters. During his first speech to agency staff on Tuesday, Pruitt mentioned a “toxic environment” just once. He was referring to the political rhetoric wielded by his critics. He did not mention climate change or environmental destruction at all.  type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related... + articlesList=58adda3ce4b03d80af71a4eb,58a71504e4b07602ad53f023,58ac7e76e4b0c4d51057164f,587fdf43e4b00d44838cda6e,5878ad15e4b0b3c7a7b0c29c -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

23 февраля, 17:21

WPX Energy (WPX) Q4 Loss Narrower than Expected, Sales Lag

WPX Energy Inc. (WPX) reported a loss of 16 cents per share in the fourth quarter of 2016, narrower than the Zacks Consensus Estimate of a loss of 17 cents.

22 февраля, 23:26

Emails Reveal Chummy Relations Between EPA Chief And Industries He Now Regulates

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); During his time as Oklahoma attorney general, Scott Pruitt, the newly sworn-in Environmental Protection Agency chief, forged an alliance with industry players to fortify oil, gas and utility companies’ legal challenges against Obama-era regulations that they said amounted to a “war on carbon,” according to more than 7,500 pages of emails published Wednesday. The public release of the emails was ordered last week by a judge in Oklahoma and comes just five days after the Senate narrowly voted to confirm Pruitt as EPA administrator. Pruitt’s nomination faced fierce protests from environmentalists and some Democrats, who argued that his confirmation vote should be delayed until after the release of the emails. The emails reveal a chummy relationship between Pruitt and the companies whose pollution he’s now tasked with reining in. The document dump sheds new light on Pruitt’s frequent strategizing with Devon Energy Corporation, the Oklahoma City-based oil and gas giant. Pruitt’s ties to the company, uncovered in a similar email dump published in 2014 by The New York Times, became a flashpoint during his confirmation process. In particular, critics railed against Pruitt’s 2011 decision to allow the company to write a three-page complaint to the EPA under his letterhead. In 2013, Pruitt’s office solicited feedback from the company before suing the federal Bureau of Land Management over proposed rules to curb emissions from methane, a potent natural gas. In a victory for Pruitt, other state attorneys general and the oil and gas lobby, a judge struck down the regulation last June. “I thought we should insert a sentence or two regarding the recent EPA report indicating their initial estimates on methane emissions were too high,” P. Clayton Eubanks, who served as Pruitt’s deputy solicitor general, wrote in an email to William Whitsitt, then an executive vice president of Devon. “Any suggestions?” The document release did not include attachments to the emails, although sometimes the names of attached files are listed, so it’s unclear to what extent Devon’s edits made it into the attorney general’s final letter. But as DeSmogBlog noted, Pruitt’s deputy later wrote: “thanks for all your help on this.” In July 2013, Pruitt gave lawyers at Devon a first crack at a letter he planned to send criticizing proposed federal restrictions on methane emissions from natural gas drilling sites. Brent Rockwood, a director at Devon, suggested edits even on a granular level. “[O]ur legal team took another review of the AG letter, and a good recommendation was made to include footnotes to source the quotes/legal arguments,” Rockwood wrote in an email sent to Pruitt’s office and Whitsitt, the Devon executive. “The attached version is the same one I originally sent to you, and which we just discussed, with the exception of the added footnotes.” “Thanks for putting the AG letter into action,” he added. “I think that this letter will make a strong statement and a real difference.” The emails also show Pruitt was in contact not just with individual companies but with fossil fuel industry groups as well. Pruitt met with the lobbying group American Fuel and Petroleum Manufacturers to discuss ozone limits and the renewable fuel regulations in 2013 in Washington, D.C. After the meeting, Pruitt had his assistant put Eubanks in touch with Sarah Magruder Lyle, then a top executive at the AFPM. Lyle sent Pruitt’s staff industry talking points and research on those topics, which argued among other things that clean air standards hurt the refining industry. (Lyle now runs a group that is sponsored by pipeline companies and utilities.) Pruitt later opposed the Obama administration’s Renewable Fuel Standard and ozone limits. The White House on Wednesday did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Pruitt’s emails. Pruitt made his name suing the EPA 13 times, repeatedly joining oil, gas and coal players ― including Oklahoma Gas & Electric and the Domestic Energy Producers Alliance, an industry-backed group ― in filing lawsuits to stop federal regulations. Pruitt championed the rights of Exxon Mobil Corp. in investigations into whether the oil giant committed fraud by covering up evidence that burning fossil fuels changes the climate. During his confirmation hearing, he claimed he was unsure how much lead was safe for humans to consume. Between 2002 and 2016, he received more than $300,000 in donations from the fossil fuel industry, and even more money went to a political action committee and a super PAC that paid for the former Oklahoma attorney general’s trips to Hawaii and New Orleans. “The newly released emails reveal a close and friendly relationship between Scott Pruitt’s office and the fossil fuel industry, with frequent meetings, calls, dinners and other events,” said Nick Surgey, research director at the Center for Media and Democracy, the watchdog group that sued to release the emails. “And our work doesn’t stop here,” Surgey added. “We will keep fighting until all of the public records involving Pruitt’s dealings with energy corporations are released ― both those for which his office is now asserting some sort of privilege against public disclosure and the documents relevant to our eight other Open Records Act requests.” Pruitt didn’t just practice a pro-fossil fuel agenda, he preached it too. In 2014, Pruitt gave a 20-minute presentation at a panel on climate regulations at George Mason University. Ahead of the event, Henry Butler, dean of the college’s law school, set the tone of the discussions in an email sent to Pruitt and other panelists. “For purposes of our discussion, please assume that there is a war on carbon and that there are some benefits to the reduction in carbon emissions,” he wrote. “What is often missing from the policy discussion is the costs.” And just in case the energy industry and conservative backers needed reminding that they had Pruitt’s pen, and full support was at their disposal, Pruitt’s office pushed press clips praising his work against climate regulation out to some of the same organizations that helped to direct Pruitt’s efforts. In July 2013, conservative magazine The Weekly Standard published an article praising Pruitt and other Republican attorneys general as “the unsung heroes in challenging the Obama agenda.” Two days after the story came out, Aaron Cooper, Pruitt’s director of public affairs, forwarded the link to Matt Ball, the Oklahoma director of Americans for Prosperity, a conservative political advocacy group that receives funding from the Koch brothers. “It’s a good read and possibly worthy of use on social media. :),” Cooper wrote. Later that day, Ball responded, saying, “Just tweeted this from AFP acct.” This article was updated to include comment from Surgey.  Sign up for the HuffPost Must Reads newsletter. Each Sunday, we will bring you the best original reporting, long form writing and breaking news from The Huffington Post and around the web, plus behind-the-scenes looks at how it’s all made. Click here to sign up! -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

22 февраля, 23:26

Emails Reveal Chummy Relations Between EPA Chief And Industries He Now Regulates

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); During his time as Oklahoma attorney general, Scott Pruitt, the newly sworn-in Environmental Protection Agency chief, forged an alliance with industry players to fortify oil, gas and utility companies’ legal challenges against Obama-era regulations that they said amounted to a “war on carbon,” according to more than 7,500 pages of emails published Wednesday. The public release of the emails was ordered last week by a judge in Oklahoma and comes just five days after the Senate narrowly voted to confirm Pruitt as EPA administrator. Pruitt’s nomination faced fierce protests from environmentalists and some Democrats, who argued that his confirmation vote should be delayed until after the release of the emails. The emails reveal a chummy relationship between Pruitt and the companies whose pollution he’s now tasked with reining in. The document dump sheds new light on Pruitt’s frequent collusion with Devon Energy Corporation, the Oklahoma City-based oil and gas giant. Pruitt’s ties to the company, uncovered in a similar email dump published in 2014 by The New York Times, became a flashpoint during his confirmation process. In particular, critics railed against Pruitt’s 2011 decision to allow the company to write a three-page complaint to the EPA under his letterhead. In 2013, Pruitt’s office solicited feedback from the company before suing the federal Bureau of Land Management over proposed rules to curb emissions from methane, a potent natural gas. In a victory for Pruitt, other state attorneys general and the oil and gas lobby, a judge struck down the regulation last June. “I thought we should insert a sentence or two regarding the recent EPA report indicating their initial estimates on methane emissions were too high,” P. Clayton Eubanks, who served as Pruitt’s deputy solicitor general, wrote in an email to William Whitsitt, then an executive vice president of Devon. “Any suggestions?” The document release did not include attachments to the emails, although sometimes the names of attached files are listed, so it’s unclear to what extent Devon’s edits made it into the attorney general’s final letter. But as DeSmogBlog noted, Pruitt’s deputy later wrote: “thanks for all your help on this.” In July 2013, Pruitt gave lawyers at Devon a first crack at a letter he planned to send criticizing proposed federal restrictions on methane emissions from natural gas drilling sites. Brent Rockwood, a director at Devon, suggested edits even on a granular level. “[O]ur legal team took another review of the AG letter, and a good recommendation was made to include footnotes to source the quotes/legal arguments,” Rockwood wrote in an email sent to Pruitt’s office and Whitsitt, the Devon executive. “The attached version is the same one I originally sent to you, and which we just discussed, with the exception of the added footnotes.” “Thanks for putting the AG letter into action,” he added. “I think that this letter will make a strong statement and a real difference.” The emails also show Pruitt was in contact not just with individual companies but with fossil fuel industry groups as well. Pruitt met with the lobbying group American Fuel and Petroleum Manufacturers to discuss ozone limits and the renewable fuel regulations in 2013 in Washington, D.C. After the meeting, Pruitt had his assistant put Eubanks in touch with Sarah Magruder Lyle, then a top executive at the AFPM. Lyle sent Pruitt’s staff industry talking points and research on those topics, which argued among other things that clean air standards hurt the refining industry. (Lyle now runs a group that is sponsored by pipeline companies and utilities.) Pruitt later opposed the Obama administration’s Renewable Fuel Standard and ozone limits. The White House on Wednesday did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Pruitt’s emails. Pruitt made his name suing the EPA 13 times, repeatedly joining oil, gas and coal players ― including Oklahoma Gas & Electric and the Domestic Energy Producers Alliance, an industry-backed group ― in filing lawsuits to stop federal regulations. Pruitt championed the rights of Exxon Mobil Corp. in investigations into whether the oil giant committed fraud by covering up evidence that burning fossil fuels changes the climate. During his confirmation hearing, he claimed he was unsure how much lead was safe for humans to consume. Between 2002 and 2016, he received more than $300,000 in donations from the fossil fuel industry, and even more money went to a political action committee and a super PAC that paid for the former Oklahoma attorney general’s trips to Hawaii and New Orleans. Pruitt didn’t just practice a pro-fossil fuel agenda, he preached it too. In 2014, Pruitt gave a 20-minute presentation at a panel on climate regulations at George Mason University. Ahead of the event, Henry Butler, dean of the college’s law school, set the tone of the discussions in an email sent to Pruitt and other panelists. “For purposes of our discussion, please assume that there is a war on carbon and that there are some benefits to the reduction in carbon emissions,” he wrote. “What is often missing from the policy discussion is the costs.” And just in case the energy industry and conservative backers needed reminding that they had Pruitt’s pen, and full support was at their disposal, Pruitt’s office pushed press clips praising his work against climate regulation out to some of the same organizations that helped to direct Pruitt’s efforts. In July 2013, conservative magazine The Weekly Standard published an article praising Pruitt and other Republican attorneys general as “the unsung heroes in challenging the Obama agenda.” Two days after the story came out, Aaron Cooper, Pruitt’s director of public affairs, forwarded the link to Matt Ball, the Oklahoma director of Americans for Prosperity, a conservative political advocacy group that receives funding from the Koch brothers. “It’s a good read and possibly worthy of use on social media. :),” Cooper wrote. Later that day, Ball responded, saying, “Just tweeted this from AFP acct.” Sign up for the HuffPost Must Reads newsletter. Each Sunday, we will bring you the best original reporting, long form writing and breaking news from The Huffington Post and around the web, plus behind-the-scenes looks at how it’s all made. Click here to sign up! -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

22 февраля, 22:24

Pruitt emails show close ties to oil, gas interests

Many of the regulations discussed in the emails still sit before EPA today, putting them squarely in Pruitt's lap.

22 февраля, 02:17

Oil & Gas Stock Roundup: Devon, Marathon's Q4, Matador's Midstream JV and More

It was a week where oil prices logged a modest decline and natural gas futures sank to a three-month low.

21 февраля, 21:44

Scott Pruitt Goes After Critics, His Own Staff In First Speech To EPA

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt mentioned a “toxic environment” just once during his first address Tuesday to the embattled agency staff. But he wasn’t talking about industry pollution or conserving nature. He was referring to his critics’ political rhetoric. “Forgive the reference, but it’s a very toxic environment,” the controversial new administrator said in the speech, which lasted under 20 minutes.   “Civility is something I believe in very much,” he added. “We ought to be able to get together and wrestle through some issues in a civil manner.” Then, at last, he began to outline his vision for the EPA. He described an agency that prioritized making it easier for polluters to comply with regulations. He promised to listen intently to companies before saddling them with new regulations. He admonished his new employees, some fearing layoffs amid looming budget cuts, for acting outside the agency’s legal mandate and running roughshod over states’ rights. “Regulations ought to make things regular,” Pruitt said. “Regulations exist to give certainty to those they regulate. Those we regulate ought to know what’s expected of them so they can place and allocate resources to comply.” He did not mention climate change or environmental destruction. Pruitt, the former attorney general of Oklahoma, was sworn in last Friday after the Senate voted 52-46 to confirm his nomination. His confirmation came a day after Judge Aletia Haynes Timmons of the District Court of Oklahoma County ruled that the Oklahoma attorney general’s office must turn over more than 2,500 emails and correspondence between Pruitt and oil and gas firms. The ruling was in response to a lawsuit from watchdog group Center for Media and Democracy and the American Civil Liberties Union alleging that his office had violated Oklahoma’s open records law. “Scott Pruitt’s going to have a lot of questions to answer,” said Nick Surgey, the director of research at the Madison, Wisconsin-based Center for Media and Democracy, referring to the emails. “The head of the Environmental Protection Agency, on day three, is already talking about putting the interests of the environment against the interests of industry.” Democrats had sought to delay a vote on his confirmation until after those documents were released. Pruitt’s former office is expected to respond by the judge’s Tuesday evening deadline. Pruitt made his reputation suing the EPA 13 times, repeatedly joining oil, gas and coal players ― including Oklahoma Gas & Electric and the Domestic Energy Producers Alliance, an industry-backed group ― in filing lawsuits to halt regulations. He forged what The New York Times in 2014 called an “unprecedented, secretive alliance” between Republican attorneys general and oil and gas companies to undermine environmental regulations. In 2011, he allowed Devon Energy, an Oklahoma oil and gas firm, to write a three-page complaint to the EPA under his letterhead, which he signed. Pruitt also championed the rights of Exxon Mobil Corp. in investigations into whether the oil giant committed fraud by covering up evidence that burning fossil fuels changes the climate. In turn, the fossil fuel industry donated more than $300,000 to Pruitt between 2002 and 2016, and even more money to a political action committee and a super PAC that paid for the former Oklahoma attorney general’s trips to Hawaii and New Orleans.  “I believe we as an agency and we as a nation can be both pro-energy and jobs and pro-environment,” Pruitt said Tuesday, regurgitating a line he used during his confirmation hearing last month. “We don’t have to choose between the two.” Pruitt’s contentious confirmation drew scorn from a variety of critics. He even plans to request an around-the-clock bodyguard from his agency, according to a report by E&E News. A senior energy official at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the country’s largest trade group with a history of combatting environmental rules, warned the new administration against repealing a 2009 EPA endangerment finding that classified greenhouse gases as a threat to public health and welfare. The comment underscores growing acceptance of the science of man-made global warming, particularly given that the Chamber’s official policy priorities for 2017 “oppose EPA efforts to regulate greenhouse gases under the existing Clean Air Act, including the endangerment finding.” “There’s going to be hell to pay from, you know, soccer moms and soccer dads all throughout the country,” Christopher Guith, the energy official, said last month, according to a transcript published by the nonprofit Energy and Policy Institute. “People who probably voted for Donald Trump.” President Donald Trump has made slashing environmental restrictions a top priority, and the EPA is a prime target of his regulatory bushwhacking. He tapped Myron Ebell, a once-fringe contrarian who peddles conspiracy theories about climate change, to lead the EPA transition team. Soon after the inauguration, the White House ordered the EPA to freeze grants, putting a vast array of projects and personnel in limbo. That freeze has been lifted, but the White House is considering gutting the EPA’s budget, which makes up just 0.22 percent of federal spending. A policy memo leaked to Axios proposed deep cuts to the EPA’s budget, including axing hundreds of millions from grants to states and Native American tribes, climate programs, and environmental programs and management. Trump’s transition team also instructed agency employees to halt all press releases, social media, blog posts and external speaking engagements ― giving rise to rogue Twitter accounts claiming to represent the views of the silenced regulators. The team announced plans to review all EPA studies before publication, stoking fears that the new administration might stifle research on issues such as climate change. Inside EPA reported earlier this month that Trump is weighing closing the agency’s Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance, which handles both civil and criminal enforcement of the country’s core environmental laws, including the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, the Oil Pollution Act and the Safe Drinking Water Act. The move would be part of a broader attack on regulations, including an executive order signed last month requiring agencies to suggest two rules to be axed for every new one proposed. For some, Trump’s proposed cuts may not go far enough. Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-Fla.) introduced a bill to “completely abolish” the EPA by the end of next year, as HuffPost reported. Now that Pruitt is in place, Trump is expected to issue executive orders undoing Obama-era EPA rules on climate and water pollution as early as this week. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

21 февраля, 21:44

Scott Pruitt Goes After Critics, EPA In His First Speech To The Agency

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt mentioned a “toxic environment” just once during his first address Tuesday to the embattled agency staff. But he wasn’t talking about industry pollution or conserving nature. He was referring to his critics’ political rhetoric. “Forgive the reference, but it’s a very toxic environment,” the controversial new administrator said in the speech, which lasted under 20 minutes.   “Civility is something I believe in very much,” he added. “We ought to be able to get together and wrestle through some issues in a civil manner.” Then, at last, he began to outline his vision for the EPA. He described an agency that prioritized making it easier for polluters to comply with regulations. He promised to listen intently to companies before saddling them with new regulations. He admonished his new employees, some fearing layoffs amid looming budget cuts, for acting outside the agency’s legal mandate and running roughshod over states’ rights. “Regulations ought to make things regular,” Pruitt said. “Regulations exist to give certainty to those they regulate. Those we regulate ought to know what’s expected of them so they can place and allocate resources to comply.” He did not mention climate change or environmental destruction. Pruitt, the former attorney general of Oklahoma, was sworn in last Friday after the Senate voted 52-46 to confirm his nomination. His confirmation came a day after Judge Aletia Haynes Timmons of the District Court of Oklahoma County ruled that the Oklahoma attorney general’s office must turn over more than 2,500 emails and correspondence between Pruitt and oil and gas firms. The ruling was in response to a lawsuit from watchdog group Center for Media and Democracy and the American Civil Liberties Union alleging that his office had violated Oklahoma’s open records law. “Scott Pruitt’s going to have a lot of questions to answer,” said Nick Surgey, the director of research at the Madison, Wisconsin-based Center for Media and Democracy, referring to the emails. “The head of the Environmental Protection Agency, on day three, is already talking about putting the interests of the environment against the interests of industry.” Democrats had sought to delay a vote on his confirmation until after those documents were released. Pruitt’s former office is expected to respond by the judge’s Tuesday evening deadline. Pruitt made his reputation suing the EPA 13 times, repeatedly joining oil, gas and coal players ― including Oklahoma Gas & Electric and the Domestic Energy Producers Alliance, an industry-backed group ― in filing lawsuits to halt regulations. He forged what The New York Times in 2014 called an “unprecedented, secretive alliance” between Republican attorneys general and oil and gas companies to undermine environmental regulations. In 2011, he allowed Devon Energy, an Oklahoma oil and gas firm, to write a three-page complaint to the EPA under his letterhead, which he signed. Pruitt also championed the rights of Exxon Mobil Corp. in investigations into whether the oil giant committed fraud by covering up evidence that burning fossil fuels changes the climate. In turn, the fossil fuel industry donated more than $300,000 to Pruitt between 2002 and 2016, and even more money to a political action committee and a super PAC that paid for the former Oklahoma attorney general’s trips to Hawaii and New Orleans.  “I believe we as an agency and we as a nation can be both pro-energy and jobs and pro-environment,” Pruitt said Tuesday, regurgitating a line he used during his confirmation hearing last month. “We don’t have to choose between the two.” Pruitt’s contentious confirmation drew scorn from a variety of critics. He even plans to request an around-the-clock bodyguard from his agency, according to a report by E&E News. A senior energy official at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the country’s largest trade group with a history of combatting environmental rules, warned the new administration against repealing a 2009 EPA endangerment finding that classified greenhouse gases as a threat to public health and welfare. The comment underscores growing acceptance of the science of man-made global warming, particularly given that the Chamber’s official policy priorities for 2017 “oppose EPA efforts to regulate greenhouse gases under the existing Clean Air Act, including the endangerment finding.” “There’s going to be hell to pay from, you know, soccer moms and soccer dads all throughout the country,” Christopher Guith, the energy official, said last month, according to a transcript published by the nonprofit Energy and Policy Institute. “People who probably voted for Donald Trump.” President Donald Trump has made slashing environmental restrictions a top priority, and the EPA is a prime target of his regulatory bushwhacking. He tapped Myron Ebell, a once-fringe contrarian who peddles conspiracy theories about climate change, to lead the EPA transition team. Soon after the inauguration, the White House ordered the EPA to freeze grants, putting a vast array of projects and personnel in limbo. That freeze has been lifted, but the White House is considering gutting the EPA’s budget, which makes up just 0.22 percent of federal spending. A policy memo leaked to Axios proposed deep cuts to the EPA’s budget, including axing hundreds of millions from grants to states and Native American tribes, climate programs, and environmental programs and management. Trump’s transition team also instructed agency employees to halt all press releases, social media, blog posts and external speaking engagements ― giving rise to rogue Twitter accounts claiming to represent the views of the silenced regulators. The team announced plans to review all EPA studies before publication, stoking fears that the new administration might stifle research on issues such as climate change. Inside EPA reported earlier this month that Trump is weighing closing the agency’s Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance, which handles both civil and criminal enforcement of the country’s core environmental laws, including the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, the Oil Pollution Act and the Safe Drinking Water Act. The move would be part of a broader attack on regulations, including an executive order signed last month requiring agencies to suggest two rules to be axed for every new one proposed. For some, Trump’s proposed cuts may not go far enough. Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-Fla.) introduced a bill to “completely abolish” the EPA by the end of next year, as HuffPost reported. Now that Pruitt is in place, Trump is expected to issue executive orders undoing Obama-era EPA rules on climate and water pollution as early as this week. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

13 февраля, 17:09

Energy Stocks' Earnings Lineup for Feb 14: DVN, NBL, FANG

Following eight back-to-back quarters of earnings decline, analysts said that the sector was likely to get recover in the fourth quarter and clock its first positive earnings growth after years.