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Дуайт Эйзенхауэр
26 апреля, 15:28

Гордость, ставшая позором. Как сложилась судьба советских авианосцев?

Из девяти авианесущих кораблей ВМФ СССР один сегодня служит России, два – Китаю и Индии, два превращены в гостиницу и аттракцион, а остальные разделаны на металлом.

26 апреля, 15:12

HMM: Full Senate heads to rare classified meeting at the White House on North Korea. Congressiona…

HMM: Full Senate heads to rare classified meeting at the White House on North Korea. Congressional aides told Reuters that the meeting was originally scheduled to take place at a secured room at the Capitol, but President Trump asked to move the meeting to the White House. Salon reported that the meeting will occur in […]

26 апреля, 04:19

Trump to order review of national monuments

President Donald Trump is set to order the review of tens of millions of acres of land and water set aside as national monuments by the past three presidents on Wednesday, a move that environmental groups warn will undermine a crucial conservation tool and open up sensitive areas to fossil fuel development. The review will be conducted by Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, who told reporters it would encompass up to 40 monuments created over the past 21 years, although the main focus will be on President Barack Obama's designation last year of Bears Ears National monument, as well as the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument protected by President Bill Clinton in 1996. Both of those are in Utah, and the state's lawmakers have pressed to revoke the monument status for the two sites, which are believed to hold fossil fuel resources. But Zinke sought to quell concerns that the executive order would roll back conservation protections provided by 1906 Antiquities Act, saying the Trump's order "does not strip any monument ... or loosen any environmental conservation on any land or marine areas." Yet environmental groups fear the review is a simply a pretense to unwind the federal protections in the future, since both Trump and Zinke have supported growing U.S. fossil fuel output. The Antiquities Act is "one of our country's kind of bedrock conservation laws," said Daniel Ritzman, Sierra Club western public lands protection campaign director. Sixteen different presidents have used the law "to protect some of our country's most special places. You know places like the Grand Canyon [National Park] started out out as a national monument," he said. "And it's not just our important landscapes that have been protected, it's also used to protect some unique American cultural sites, especially Native American cultural sites."Presidents have also used the law to block off areas from fossil-fuel development, such as coal mining at Grand Staircase, but environmental and conservation groups worry those protections will be tossed aside as Trump looks for additional ways to unleash energy development on public lands and waters. "This administration has made it clear that they're going to do the bidding of the oil and gas industry," said Jennifer Rokala, executive director of the Center for Western Priorities, a Colorado-based conservation group.The order gives Zinke 45 days to file an interim recommendations, and 120 days to issue suggestions for legislation or for Trump to revoke or slim down the size of any monuments that cover 100,000 acres or more that were created under the Antiquities Act.The order does not make any assertions as to the scope of Trump's authority to revoke monuments, Zinke said and he reiterated his belief that presidents can revise the scope of monument designations, though that the broader authority to delist monuments remains untested in courts. While presidents have tweaked the size of their predecessor's monument designations — President Dwight D. Eisenhower, for example, reduced Colorado's Great Sand Dunes National Monument by 25 percent — none have fully revoked the status for existing monuments entirely. Environmental groups and tribal officials say they stand ready to sue over any attempts by Trump to change the footprint or eliminate existing monuments. Obama used the power under the Antiquities Act to to protect more land than any previous president, from underwater canyons and mountains off Cape Cod to the vast Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument in the Pacific Ocean. His aggressive use of the Act drew scathing criticism from Republicans, who complained the White House abused the law to override local opposition and restrict development and usage of the lands. Groups have already challenged two of Obama's monument designations, including a lawsuit by fisheries groups over the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts National Marine Monument off the East Coast, but neither of the cases address the scope of a president's authority to revoke a monument.Meanwhile, the energy industry has been lobbying for access to more public lands — as well revisions to ease the environmental reviews and other permitting processes. The American Petroleum Institute in a January letter to lawmakers urged Congress to revamp the Antiquities Act, arguing the increasing use of the law presents "threats to responsible and balanced use of federal lands offshore and onshore.""There's absolutely interest in developing oil and natural gas resources on public lands," said Erik Milito, API's director of upstream and industry operations."There's highly prospective areas for the industry and we've seen considerable development on state and private lands in the vicinity of public lands, which would demonstrate that there could be far greater opportunities if we had a more streamlined process and more opportunities by eliminating these types of obstacles to development."

25 апреля, 16:18

President Trump's 100 Days of Historic Accomplishments

GETTING GOVERNMENT OUT OF THE WAY: President Donald J. Trump has done more to stop the Government from interfering in the lives of Americans in his first 100 days than any other President in history. President Trump has signed 13 Congressional Review Act (CRA) resolutions in his first 100 days, more than any other President. These resolutions nullified unnecessary regulations and block agencies from reissuing them. Since CRA resolutions were introduced under President Clinton, they’ve been used only once, under President George W. Bush. The Wall Street Journal editorial: “So far the Trump Administration is a welcome improvement, rolling back more regulations than any President in history.” TAKING EXECUTIVE ACTION: In office, President Trump has accomplished more in his first 100 days than any other President since Franklin Roosevelt. President Trump will have signed 30 executive orders during his first 100 days. President Obama signed 19 executive orders during his first 100 days. President George W. Bush signed 11 executive orders during his first 100 days. President Clinton signed 13 executive orders during his first 100 days. President George H.W. Bush signed 11 executive orders during his first 100 days. President Reagan signed 18 executive orders during his first 100 days. President Carter signed 16 executive orders during his first 100 days. President Nixon signed 15 executive orders during his first 100 days. President Johnson signed 26 executive orders during his first 100 days. President Kennedy signed 23 executive orders during his first 100 days. President Eisenhower signed 20 executive orders during his first 100 days. President Truman signed 25 executive orders during his first 100 days. President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed 9 executive orders during his first 100 days. A SLEW OF LEGISLATION SIGNED: Despite historic Democrat obstructionism, President Trump has worked with Congress to pass more legislation in his first 100 days than any President since Truman. President Trump has worked with Congress to enact 28 laws during the first 100 days of his Administration. President Obama enacted 11 laws during his first 100 days. President George W. Bush enacted 7 laws during his first 100 days. President Clinton enacted 24 laws during his first 100 days. President George H.W. Bush enacted 18 laws during his first 100 days. President Reagan enacted 9 laws during his first 100 days. President Carter enacted 22 laws during his first 100 days. President Nixon enacted 9 laws during his first 100 days. President Johnson enacted 10 laws during his first 100 days. President Kennedy enacted 26 laws during his first 100 days. President Eisenhower enacted 22 laws during his first 100 days. President Truman enacted 55 bills laws during his first 100 days.

24 апреля, 11:55

100 дней Трампа: низкая популярность и новый кризис

Федеральное правительство в настоящий момент финансируется в соответствии с резолюцией, срок действия которой истекает 28 апреля 2017 г., а это будет 99-й день президентского срока Дональда Трампа.

24 апреля, 11:55

100 дней Трампа: низкая популярность и новый кризис

Федеральное правительство в настоящий момент финансируется в соответствии с резолюцией, срок действия которой истекает 28 апреля 2017 года, а это будет 99 день президентского срока Дональда Трампа.

24 апреля, 07:44

Обогнал Эйзенхауэра: Трамп обвинил «фейковые СМИ» в своем упавшем рейтинге

Авторитет американского президента Дональда Трампа сильно пошатнулся.

23 апреля, 22:27

Трамп стал самым непопулярным президентом США за 65 лет

Рейтинг одобрения действий Дональда Трампа в первые 100 дней его президентства составил 42%

23 апреля, 19:51

Трамп на посту президента США побил антирекорд 65-летней давности

Рейтинг одобрения работы Дональда Трампа на посту президента США в первые 100 дней стал самым низким за последние 65 лет. Об этом говорят результаты соцопроса.

23 апреля, 18:15

Трамп в первые сто дней президентства стал самым непопулярным лидером за 65 лет

Рейтинг одобрения действий президента США Дональда Трампа в первые сто дней во главе Белого дома находится на уровне 42 процентов. Это рекордно низкий показатель за последние 65 лет — со времен президента Дуайта Эйзенхауэра. Опрос проводился телеканалом ABC News и газетой Washington Post.

23 апреля, 18:11

Рейтинг одобрения Трампа стал самым низким со времен Эйзенхауэра

Более половины опрошенных американцев не склонны доверять своему лидеру

23 апреля, 18:04

Трамп накануне 100 дней президентства стал самым непопулярным лидером США с 1945 года

Рейтинг одобрения действий президента США составил 42% - это стало самым низким показателем среди президентов со времен Дуайта Эйзенхауэра в 1945 году. Первые действия Обамы поддерживали 69% американцев.

23 апреля, 10:00

Как корпорации США уходят от налогов

Благоразумный автор избегает прилагательных «умопомрачительный», особенно при описании политических или экономических проблем. Но никакое другое слово, видимо, не подходит для описания реального корпоративного налогообложения в современной Америке, и писать это надо кричащим жирным курсивом с восклицательными знаками, подобно знаменитому Рипли - «Хотите верьте, хотите нет». Стилистическая гипербола? Ознакомьтесь с этими 13-ю фактами и вы, возможно, […]

21 апреля, 17:41

How America Shed the Taboo Against Preventive War

If Harry Truman, Dwight Eisenhower, or Ronald Reagan were transported to 2017, they would be shocked that the United States is considering an attack on North Korea.

19 апреля, 19:01

Trump’s US$107m donations record

POWERED by billionaires and corporations, President Donald Trump raised US$107 million for his inaugural festivities, documents filed with the Federal Election Commission show, and nearly double the record

Выбор редакции
19 апреля, 01:40

Как матрица Эйзенхауэра помогла прекратить конфликты между отделами

Конфликты и напряженность в отношениях между разными подразделениями случаются сплошь и рядом. Конфликты часто возникают потому, что один отдел задерживает работу другого. К примеру, юридический отдел слишком долго согласовывает договоры с клиентами, а менеджеры по продажам вынуждены ждать. Или смежники отвлекают специалистов других отделов просьбами сделать для них какую-то работу.

Выбор редакции
19 апреля, 01:40

Советы менеджера: Как прекратить соперничество между отделами с помощью матрицы Эйзенхауэра

Конфликты и напряженность в отношениях между разными подразделениями случаются сплошь и рядом. Конфликты часто возникают потому, что один отдел задерживает работу другого. К примеру, юридический отдел слишком долго согласовывает договоры с клиентами, а менеджеры по продажам вынуждены ждать. Или смежники отвлекают специалистов других отделов просьбами сделать для них какую-то работу.

18 апреля, 12:12

Why We're Offering Paid Time Off For Politics

In December 1942, with global democracy at risk, Polaroid’s founder Edwin Land gathered his staff in Harvard Square with a startling and inspirational message. “We have no purpose now except to win this war.” Polaroid redirected its factories for the war effort, producing millions of anti-glare goggles – a crucial piece of kit for allied fighter pilots who would often be blinded by the sun. Land understood intuitively that his company existed in a context much greater than itself, and he believed very strongly in his civic duties. Long after World War II ended successfully, thanks in part to the technological edge provided by Polaroid, Land continued to serve as an advisor to seven U.S. presidents. He worked closely with Dwight Eisenhower to develop the U-2 spy plane. None of this extracurricular activity stopped Polaroid becoming the Apple of its day, a ubiquitous brand loved by families and artists alike. Political engagement did not detract from Polaroid’s core purpose, which was to enable expression through magic technology. Last summer, my co-founder Frederick Blackford and I launched Polaroid Swing, based in Silicon Valley and London. It’s an app – with hardware coming soon – that lets you create ‘living’ photos. Together with our chairman, Twitter founder Biz Stone, we wanted to continue Land’s quest to “make available a new medium of expression.” We inherited rich values: insist on the impossible, reinvent photography, champion artists. In the past few months, it has not been possible for our colleagues in the U.S. and UK to focus entirely on that artistic vision. There is a consensus in the Swing team that shared values of equality and openness are at stake across the world. People don’t leave those thoughts behind when they come to work, and we don’t want them to. That’s why today we are launching paid time off for civic engagement. In addition to vacation days, sick leave and family time, we will support our employees who want to volunteer, run for office, write letters or protest. Over 60 million Americans volunteer each year. They need greater support from employers, as do private sector workers who want to get involved in politics in their spare time. We think it’s the right thing to do. We are announcing the policy publicly in the hope that other technology companies join us. We also think there is a commercial imperative to act. Research for my book ‘Connect: How Companies Succeed by Engaging Radically With Society’ found that deep societal engagement helped corporations outperform peers on the stock market by 20 percent over a decade. Tomorrow’s business leaders will be ‘tri-sector athletes’, as versed in government and social sectors as they are in the commercial world. A common theme among the 80 CEOs Lord Browne, Robin Nuttall and I interviewed for ‘Connect’ was their lack of preparedness to deal with societal stakeholders when they reached the top job. That needs to change. So we think paid time off for civic engagement is win-win. But more importantly than that, it is our duty as a company which benefits from advanced societies and rides the wave of an unparalleled technology boom. Edwin Land’s comrade Dwight Eisenhower said it best: “Politics ought to be the part-time profession of every citizen who would protect the rights and privileges of free people.” Tommy Stadlen is the co-founder of Polaroid Swing and co-author with Lord Browne and Robin Nuttall of the international best-seller ‘Connect: How Companies Succeed by Engaging Radically With Society’ -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

18 апреля, 12:12

Why We're Offering Paid Time Off For Politics

In December 1942, with global democracy at risk, Polaroid’s founder Edwin Land gathered his staff in Harvard Square with a startling and inspirational message. “We have no purpose now except to win this war.” Polaroid redirected its factories for the war effort, producing millions of anti-glare goggles – a crucial piece of kit for allied fighter pilots who would often be blinded by the sun. Land understood intuitively that his company existed in a context much greater than itself, and he believed very strongly in his civic duties. Long after World War II ended successfully, thanks in part to the technological edge provided by Polaroid, Land continued to serve as an advisor to seven U.S. presidents. He worked closely with Dwight Eisenhower to develop the U-2 spy plane. None of this extracurricular activity stopped Polaroid becoming the Apple of its day, a ubiquitous brand loved by families and artists alike. Political engagement did not detract from Polaroid’s core purpose, which was to enable expression through magic technology. Last summer, my co-founder Frederick Blackford and I launched Polaroid Swing, based in Silicon Valley and London. It’s an app – with hardware coming soon – that lets you create ‘living’ photos. Together with our chairman, Twitter founder Biz Stone, we wanted to continue Land’s quest to “make available a new medium of expression.” We inherited rich values: insist on the impossible, reinvent photography, champion artists. In the past few months, it has not been possible for our colleagues in the U.S. and UK to focus entirely on that artistic vision. There is a consensus in the Swing team that shared values of equality and openness are at stake across the world. People don’t leave those thoughts behind when they come to work, and we don’t want them to. That’s why today we are launching paid time off for civic engagement. In addition to vacation days, sick leave and family time, we will support our employees who want to volunteer, run for office, write letters or protest. Over 60 million Americans volunteer each year. They need greater support from employers, as do private sector workers who want to get involved in politics in their spare time. We think it’s the right thing to do. We are announcing the policy publicly in the hope that other technology companies join us. We also think there is a commercial imperative to act. Research for my book ‘Connect: How Companies Succeed by Engaging Radically With Society’ found that deep societal engagement helped corporations outperform peers on the stock market by 20 percent over a decade. Tomorrow’s business leaders will be ‘tri-sector athletes’, as versed in government and social sectors as they are in the commercial world. A common theme among the 80 CEOs Lord Browne, Robin Nuttall and I interviewed for ‘Connect’ was their lack of preparedness to deal with societal stakeholders when they reached the top job. That needs to change. So we think paid time off for civic engagement is win-win. But more importantly than that, it is our duty as a company which benefits from advanced societies and rides the wave of an unparalleled technology boom. Edwin Land’s comrade Dwight Eisenhower said it best: “Politics ought to be the part-time profession of every citizen who would protect the rights and privileges of free people.” Tommy Stadlen is the co-founder of Polaroid Swing and co-author with Lord Browne and Robin Nuttall of the international best-seller ‘Connect: How Companies Succeed by Engaging Radically With Society’ -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

18 апреля, 00:00

Are We on the Brink of a Second Korean War?

Niall Ferguson, Boston GlobeBrinkmanship is back — and the world is back on the brink of war. In the 1950s, the word came to be associated with John Foster Dulles, secretary of state for President Dwight Eisenhower.. But brinkmanship fell into disrepute in the wake of the Berlin and Cuban Missile Crises under Eisenhower’s successor. As far as John F. Kennedy was concerned, in those two crises the United States and the Soviet Union had come far too close to jumping over the brink into nuclear Armageddon.