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Duke Energy
22 мая, 16:30

Zacks Industry Outlook Highlights: NextEra Energy, Duke Energy, CenterPoint Energy, American Water Works and Aqua America

Zacks Industry Outlook Highlights: NextEra Energy, Duke Energy, CenterPoint Energy, American Water Works and Aqua America

19 мая, 21:53

Utility Stocks Make Secure Bets on Multiple Factors

Utility Stocks Make Secure Bets on Multiple Factors

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16 мая, 19:45

Donald Trump Is Scrapping Power Plant Rules, So Virginia Is Proposing Its Own

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Virginia became the first state since President Donald Trump abandoned rules to reduce power plant emissions to begin drafting rules to replace the federal mandate. At a press conference on Tuesday morning, Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D) ordered state air regulators to propose rules by the end of the year to scale back carbon dioxide emissions from the utility sector and increase renewable energy investments throughout the state.  “This should be done on the federal level,” McAuliffe told HuffPost by phone ahead of the announcement. “But obviously with the pronouncements now coming out of the Trump administration, we cannot rely on them to do it, so we will be taking it into our own hands on the state level.” The move lays the groundwork for a cap-and-trade system, which would set a fixed limit on the state’s carbon dioxide emissions and allow companies to buy and sell the rights to pollute. Once in place, Virginia will be allowed to participate in the carbon permit trading programs such as the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, which includes Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Rhode Island and Vermont.  The executive directive announced Tuesday comes 11 months after the governor signed an executive order instructing the state Department of Environmental Quality to assemble policies to reduce carbon pollution, which traps heat in the atmosphere and inflames respiratory illnesses such as asthma. After soliciting opinions from more than 8,000 stakeholders, state officials recommended limiting emission from the utility sector. Now, the State Air Pollution Control Board has until Dec. 31 to propose regulations aimed at taking the place of the Clean Power Plan, the sweeping Obama-era rule that restricted emissions from the utility sector nationwide. The regulation had yet to be implemented after being stayed last year by the Supreme Court. In March, Trump signed an executive order instructing Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt ― an unabashed fossil fuel ally who had sued to block the Clean Power Plan in his previous job as Oklahoma’s attorney general ― to rewrite the rule. “It’s clear now that the EPA has Administrator Pruitt, we’ll have to take our action ourselves,” McAuliffe said. By doing so, Virginia joins the ranks of states now challenging what the Guardian described as the Trump administration’s “blitzkrieg” against climate regulations and zero-emissions energy initiatives. California, Massachusetts and New York already have plans in place to virtually end the use of fossil fuels within the next few decades. Maryland last week announced plans to start vetting proposals to build offshore wind farms along the state’s coastline. Despite the partisan divide in Congress, the vast majority of Americans said they disagreed with Trump’s hard-line climate stances, according to a March HuffPost/YouGov poll. “If we’re going to continue making progress it’s going to happen because of leadership at the city and state level,” Bruce Nilles, senior director of the Sierra Club’s Beyond Coal campaign, told HuffPost by phone from San Francisco. “I’m looking forward to seeing the specifics of what gets proposed in Virginia.” Implementation of any proposed regulation will rest in the hands of whoever wins the Virginia governor’s mansion in November. McAuliffe’s term limit is up, and none of the three declared Republicans seeking to replace him are likely to support carbon regulations under a Republican White House bent on reviving coal production and increasing the use of fossil fuels. Last week, Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring issued a memo confirming that the governor has the authority to regulate carbon emissions through a statewide cap or “through other means.” Still, Republicans are likely to sue to block any such regulation. So far, that’s been a winning strategy. Pruitt sued to block environmental regulations at least 13 times as Oklahoma’s top cop. Now he leads the agency he previously nettled with lawsuits. The two Democrats competing in the June 13 primary told HuffPost they would enforce any carbon regulations that McAuliffe proposed. Ralph Northam, McAuliffe’s lieutenant governor, said his 25-year stint as a pediatric neurologist convinced him that children in the Commonwealth suffer from abnormally high levels of asthma and other air-quality related ailments. The well-funded Democrat, long considered the frontrunner for the nomination, vowed to enforce the utility regulation. “This is a great step, a big step, in the direction we need to go in,” Northam told HuffPost by phone on Tuesday morning. “This shouldn’t be a partisan issue, it’s something that’s one, in the best interest of the health of Virginia; two, in the best interest of our environment; and three, in the best interest of the economy.” His primary opponent, Tom Perriello, a former U.S. congressman and progressive backed by Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), said he too would support the regulation, but focused on the role it could play in creating more clean energy jobs throughout the state. Virginia ranked 20th in the solar industry, with 3,236 jobs last year, according to the Solar Energy Industries Association. That’s roughly double the size of the state’s coal mining industry. Perriello boasted being the only candidate from either party who has rejected donations from utility firms in a state where power companies are kingmakers. In February, state lawmakers voted down a bill to prohibit Dominion Energy, the state’s largest utility, from donating to public officials. “They’re the biggest donors to both political parties in Virginia,” Perriello told HuffPost by phone on Tuesday. “That isn’t just upsetting to a lot of Democrats, but to a lot of independents and conservatives, too. They’re looking for a leader to challenge that status quo. Given my refusal to take donations and my background fighting for clean energy, they’re going to have a champion in me if I win.” I can guarantee the Republican nominee will not support what I’m doing here today. Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe To be sure, investor-owned utility companies across the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic are ramping up efforts to slash greenhouse gases and invest in renewables amid pressure from ratepayers and shareholders. North Carolina-based Duke Energy Corp. told shareholders earlier this month that the utility giant will invest $11 billion into zero-emissions energy and natural gas over the next 10 years. Dominion recently outlined a plan to cut each residential customer’s carbon footprint by as much as 25 percent over the next eight years, according to an S&P Global Market Intelligence report. McAuliffe said the company was “clear what my intentions were from day one,” adding that he “spent a lot of time meeting with them” to discuss the regulatory plans.  Dominion said it has made “tremendous progress” reducing its carbon footprint and remains committed to bringing “a lot more renewable energy onto the grid.” “Dominion has been preparing for carbon regulation for some time now and appreciates being a part of the stake-holder engagement process,” David Botkins, a spokesman, told HuffPost by email. “It still looks like the regulatory uncertainty around carbon continues.” Big business is likely to support the regulation. Executives from Virginia-based candy and pet food conglomerate Mars Inc. and Coronal Energy, a solar firm that electronics giant Panasonic owns, flanked McAuliffe at Tuesday’s press conference. And tech giants like Amazon and Google seek out states with strong zero-emissions energy infrastructure to locate their electricity-thirsty data centers. No Republican candidates responded to requests for comment. The field includes former Republican National Committee chairman and frontrunner Ed Gillespie, state senator Frank Wagner and Prince William County board supervisor Corey Stewart, whose racism-singed campaign looks increasingly like a “lost cause.” “I can guarantee the Republican nominee will not support what I’m doing here today,” McAuliffe said. “I didn’t do this for political reasons, I did it with this timing because i thought the Clean Power Plan would be in place by now.” “This will be a major reason why people need to come out and vote,” he added. “If you believe in carbon reduction, if you believe in the environment, if you believe in job creation, you need to vote.” This article has been updated with comment from Dominion. type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related... + articlesList=58efd3e1e4b0bb9638e2769a,58dc06e5e4b05eae031ca879,58dec29ae4b0b3918c837cca,58b07ebae4b060480e079dc2,58eff284e4b0da2ff85f7c92 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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10 мая, 20:13

Duke Energy Misses Q1 Earnings Estimates: ETFs in Focus

Duke Energy missed Zacks Consensus Estimates on both top and bottom lines.

09 мая, 16:28

Duke Energy (DUK) Misses on Q1 Earnings, Keeps 2017 View

Duke Energy Corporation (DUK) reported first-quarter 2017 adjusted earnings of $1.04 per share, missing the Zacks Consensus Estimate of $1.06 by 1.9%.

09 мая, 15:30

Duke Energy (DUK) Misses Q1 Earnings & Revenue Estimates

Duke Energy Corporation (DUK) reported first-quarter 2017 adjusted earnings of $1.04 per share, missing the Zacks Consensus Estimate of $1.05 by 1%.

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08 мая, 15:14

Utility Stock Q1 Earnings Reports on May 9: DUK, SRE & More

Utility sector earnings are expected to improve 3.1% on 5.8% higher revenues this season.

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05 мая, 20:14

Duke Energy Customers’ Smart Meter Problems And Complaints—Do You Have Any Meter Complaints?

By Catherine J. Frompovich AMI meters and smart meters are one and the same meter!  Don’t let any utility company employee or sub-contractor tell you...

05 мая, 20:02

A Positive & Reassuring Earnings Picture

A Positive & Reassuring Earnings Picture

03 мая, 16:59

Southern Company (SO) Q1 Earnings and Sales Beat Estimates

The Southern Company reported first-quarter 2017 earnings per share (excluding certain one-time items) of 66 cents, beating the Zacks Consensus Estimate of 58 cents and the year-ago adjusted profit of 58 cents

03 мая, 16:30

Zacks Industry Outlook Highlights: Duke Energy, NRG Energy, SunPower, First Solar and JA Solar Holdings

Zacks Industry Outlook Highlights: Duke Energy, NRG Energy, SunPower, First Solar and JA Solar Holdings

02 мая, 23:16

Will Global Investments Boost Alternative Energy Stocks?

Will Global Investments Boost Alternative Energy Stocks?

02 мая, 18:59

West Virginia’s Biggest Utility Eyes Renewables Over Coal, Despite Trump

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); For West Virginia’s biggest utility company, coal is no longer king. Rather, like many deposed regents, it’s now in a power-sharing coalition. Chris Beam, 48, the newly minted chief executive of Appalachian Power, is looking to build solar and wind farms despite favorable new coal policies coming down from the governor’s mansion and the White House. “The current administration in Washington, D.C., is very pro-coal, which is a good thing, but they run in four-year increments,” Beam told HuffPost by phone last week. “The last administration was not pro-coal. So, what we try to do as a company is we try to look more long-term.” Beam, a native of Wheeling, West Virginia, who has spent 27 years at Appalachian Power, said the company plans in 20- to 40-year increments ― and looking out that far, the plummeting price of renewables makes solar and wind more attractive investments. “Our investments have to span what could be multiple governors in the governor’s mansion or multiple presidents sitting in Washington, D.C.,” Beam said. “We don’t get into the four-year swing based on who is sitting in what chair, but more around what is the best thing to do from our customers’ perspective.”  Appalachian Power already has 495 megawatts of wind energy, bolstered by its purchase of a 20-year contract for 120 megawatts last June. For now, it doesn’t sell any solar energy. The Charleston Gazette-Mail first reported on Appalachian Power’s plans.  Part of the company’s push into renewables comes from a desire to attract more corporate customers, like Google, Amazon or Walmart, which have set goals for powering their operations with 100 percent zero-emissions energy. Beam declined to name any specific companies he’s been courting. “These corporations are setting targets that they have to meet from a renewables perspective, and that’s being driven by their boards of directors,” Beam said. “That’s an input for us.” Appalachian Power is far from alone. This week, Virginia’s largest utility announced plans to power 1.3 million Virginia and North Carolina homes with solar by 2042. Last week, Duke Energy Corporation, headquartered in Charlotte, North Carolina, said it wants to cut coal use by one-third. Even a coal museum in Kentucky went solar last month, citing it as a cheaper energy source than coal.  Still, Beam shies away from the debate over climate change invigorated by President Donald Trump, who has dismissed global warming as a Chinese hoax. In its first 100 days, the Trump administration relaxed rules on methane emissions, lifted a temporary moratorium on federal coal leasing and signed an order to review the Clean Power Plan, the sweeping Obama-era regulation to cut emissions from the utility sector. Hard-line denialists are pushing the White House to withdraw from the Paris Agreement, the historic 195-country deal to slash greenhouse gases. References to climate change have disappeared from federal websites. House Republicans have invited industry lobbyists to help rewrite rules on how agencies use science. Even outside government, climate denialism has gained an upper hand. Last week, The New York Times defended poaching a notorious climate science critic from The Wall Street Journal as a “diversity” hire.  We’re past the argument on climate change. Chris Beam, Appalachian Power CEO To be clear, an overwhelming body of peer-reviewed research indicates that a huge increase in greenhouse gas emissions, chiefly caused by the burning of fossil fuels, is warming the planet and altering the climate. The uptick in violent storms, droughts and the rapid retreat of glaciers are already tangible symptoms of climate change, scientists say. Yet a decades-long Big Tobacco-style disinformation campaign orchestrated by oil and gas interests means there’s still a political debate over the issue. The swift collapse of the coal mining industry over the last decade has also led to political sparring. Coal was once the economic engine of Appalachian states like West Virginia and Kentucky, but demand has plummeted as cleaner-burning natural gas ― made cheap by advancements in hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, technology ― has become the go-to fuel for the utility sector. Coal’s decline was hastened by a nosedive in demand from China, which until 2012 purchased U.S. coal at a rapid pace to fuel its booming steel industry and double-digit economic growth. As China shifts away from coal, laying off thousands of its own miners, demand seems unlikely to return anytime soon, if ever. But coal executives and their mostly Republican allies, including Trump, have blamed environmental regulations for coal’s decline, saying the Obama administration waged a “war on coal.” Rules like the Clean Power Plan certainly didn’t help, but the coal industry was crowded out of the market, not suffocated by regulations ― as everyone from the libertarian magazine Reason to billionaire Bloomberg L.P. CEO Michael Bloomberg to coal companies themselves agree. As energy issues become even more politicized, Beam said he prefers to avoid the debate altogether. But he should have significant support for investing in renewables: Fifty-four percent of West Virginia adults believe global warming is already happening, though a little less than half recognize that it’s mostly caused by human activity. Seventy-five percent support funding research into renewables, and 67 percent favor regulating carbon dioxide as a pollutant. “We’re past the argument on climate change,” Beam said. “What we’re trying to do is the right thing for the environment. We believe reducing our CO2 footprint is a good thing to do.” Yet even as more energy sources come into play, coal still reigns supreme in West Virginia. In 2014, 95.5 percent of the state’s power came from coal-fired plants, and that ratio hasn’t changed much over the last three years. “We still burn a lot of coal,” Beam said. “We are also pro-coal. We don’t want anybody to lose sight of the coal facilities we have.” “We’re not saying we’re going to walk away from that,” he added. “But the thing is, as we solicit the market, we’re starting to see wind and solar be competitive with natural gas and coal. And price is always going to be a very high determining factor.” type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related Coverage + articlesList=58b07ebae4b060480e079dc2,58f76a49e4b029063d3590a9,58da777ae4b018c4606b99f9,5903b95fe4b05c39767fa198,58fe2c1be4b00fa7de1665cb -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

02 мая, 18:59

West Virginia’s Biggest Utility Eyes Renewables Over Coal, Despite Trump

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); For West Virginia’s biggest utility company, coal is no longer king. Rather, like many deposed regents, it’s now in a power-sharing coalition. Chris Beam, 48, the newly minted chief executive of Appalachian Power, is looking to build solar and wind farms despite favorable new coal policies coming down from the governor’s mansion and the White House. “The current administration in Washington, D.C., is very pro-coal, which is a good thing, but they run in four-year increments,” Beam told HuffPost by phone last week. “The last administration was not pro-coal. So, what we try to do as a company is we try to look more long-term.” Beam, a native of Wheeling, West Virginia, who has spent 27 years at Appalachian Power, said the company plans in 20- to 40-year increments ― and looking out that far, the plummeting price of renewables makes solar and wind more attractive investments. “Our investments have to span what could be multiple governors in the governor’s mansion or multiple presidents sitting in Washington, D.C.,” Beam said. “We don’t get into the four-year swing based on who is sitting in what chair, but more around what is the best thing to do from our customers’ perspective.”  Appalachian Power already has 495 megawatts of wind energy, bolstered by its purchase of a 20-year contract for 120 megawatts last June. For now, it doesn’t sell any solar energy. The Charleston Gazette-Mail first reported on Appalachian Power’s plans.  Part of the company’s push into renewables comes from a desire to attract more corporate customers, like Google, Amazon or Walmart, which have set goals for powering their operations with 100 percent zero-emissions energy. Beam declined to name any specific companies he’s been courting. “These corporations are setting targets that they have to meet from a renewables perspective, and that’s being driven by their boards of directors,” Beam said. “That’s an input for us.” Appalachian Power is far from alone. This week, Virginia’s largest utility announced plans to power 1.3 million Virginia and North Carolina homes with solar by 2042. Last week, Duke Energy Corporation, headquartered in Charlotte, North Carolina, said it wants to cut coal use by one-third. Even a coal museum in Kentucky went solar last month, citing it as a cheaper energy source than coal.  Still, Beam shies away from the debate over climate change invigorated by President Donald Trump, who has dismissed global warming as a Chinese hoax. In its first 100 days, the Trump administration relaxed rules on methane emissions, lifted a temporary moratorium on federal coal leasing and signed an order to review the Clean Power Plan, the sweeping Obama-era regulation to cut emissions from the utility sector. Hard-line denialists are pushing the White House to withdraw from the Paris Agreement, the historic 195-country deal to slash greenhouse gases. References to climate change have disappeared from federal websites. House Republicans have invited industry lobbyists to help rewrite rules on how agencies use science. Even outside government, climate denialism has gained an upper hand. Last week, The New York Times defended poaching a notorious climate science critic from The Wall Street Journal as a “diversity” hire.  We’re past the argument on climate change. Chris Beam, Appalachian Power CEO To be clear, an overwhelming body of peer-reviewed research indicates that a huge increase in greenhouse gas emissions, chiefly caused by the burning of fossil fuels, is warming the planet and altering the climate. The uptick in violent storms, droughts and the rapid retreat of glaciers are already tangible symptoms of climate change, scientists say. Yet a decades-long Big Tobacco-style disinformation campaign orchestrated by oil and gas interests means there’s still a political debate over the issue. The swift collapse of the coal mining industry over the last decade has also led to political sparring. Coal was once the economic engine of Appalachian states like West Virginia and Kentucky, but demand has plummeted as cleaner-burning natural gas ― made cheap by advancements in hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, technology ― has become the go-to fuel for the utility sector. Coal’s decline was hastened by a nosedive in demand from China, which until 2012 purchased U.S. coal at a rapid pace to fuel its booming steel industry and double-digit economic growth. As China shifts away from coal, laying off thousands of its own miners, demand seems unlikely to return anytime soon, if ever. But coal executives and their mostly Republican allies, including Trump, have blamed environmental regulations for coal’s decline, saying the Obama administration waged a “war on coal.” Rules like the Clean Power Plan certainly didn’t help, but the coal industry was crowded out of the market, not suffocated by regulations ― as everyone from the libertarian magazine Reason to billionaire Bloomberg L.P. CEO Michael Bloomberg to coal companies themselves agree. As energy issues become even more politicized, Beam said he prefers to avoid the debate altogether. But he should have significant support for investing in renewables: Fifty-four percent of West Virginia adults believe global warming is already happening, though a little less than half recognize that it’s mostly caused by human activity. Seventy-five percent support funding research into renewables, and 67 percent favor regulating carbon dioxide as a pollutant. “We’re past the argument on climate change,” Beam said. “What we’re trying to do is the right thing for the environment. We believe reducing our CO2 footprint is a good thing to do.” Yet even as more energy sources come into play, coal still reigns supreme in West Virginia. In 2014, 95.5 percent of the state’s power came from coal-fired plants, and that ratio hasn’t changed much over the last three years. “We still burn a lot of coal,” Beam said. “We are also pro-coal. We don’t want anybody to lose sight of the coal facilities we have.” “We’re not saying we’re going to walk away from that,” he added. “But the thing is, as we solicit the market, we’re starting to see wind and solar be competitive with natural gas and coal. And price is always going to be a very high determining factor.” type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related Coverage + articlesList=58b07ebae4b060480e079dc2,58f76a49e4b029063d3590a9,58da777ae4b018c4606b99f9,5903b95fe4b05c39767fa198,58fe2c1be4b00fa7de1665cb -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

18 апреля, 14:00

The Saga of North Carolina’s Contaminated Water

The state’s GOP leadership tried to make the state more business-friendly. Now residents are saying their water isn’t safe to drink.

17 апреля, 17:06

Ameren Corp's Subsidiary Files for Electric Rate Decrease

Ameren Corporation's subsidiary Ameren Illinois has filed for an electric rate decrease with the Illinois Commerce Commission

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