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Duke Energy
22 июня, 00:32

EPA Chief Spent First Weeks Courting Fossil Fuel Execs, Exposing 'Fatal Flaw' At Agency

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); One month after taking office, Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt hosted BP’s U.S. chairman at his office to discuss issues the company “works with” the agency on. The next day, Pruitt met with two top executives from Chevron Corporation to discuss “regulatory reform.” The day after that, he spent two hours mingling with 45 CEOs from oil and gas companies at the Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C. It’s not unusual for the nation’s top environmental regulator to meet with leaders of some of the industries he or she regulates. But Pruitt, who came into the agency with a reputation for siding with fossil fuel interests, has virtually ignored conservation and public health advocates, according to calendars released under the Freedom of Information Act and first reported by E&E News. Pruitt’s calendars show far fewer meetings with environmental and public health advocates. On Earth Day, the agency issued a press release feting the “great natural resources that the United States is blessed with” and touting a meeting with The Nature Conservancy and the National Audubon Society. A church, an interfaith group and the Indiana chapter of the NAACP were also included on a list of 25 organizations Pruitt met with that an EPA spokeswoman provided to HuffPost.   That lopsided courting of fossil fuel executives lays bare a major shift in how the agency is operating, former EPA officials told HuffPost. It also demonstrates what one legal scholar described as the “fatal flaw” in administrative law that allows an industry-friendly agency boss to buddy up to polluters with little oversight. “It’s not surprising,” Liz Purchia, who left her post as the EPA’s communications director under President Barack Obama in January, told HuffPost. “It’s confirming everything that people who opposed Scott Pruitt all had expected.” Pruitt spent his six years as Oklahoma’s attorney general suing the EPA to block environmental regulations more than a dozen times, often at the behest of big oil and gas firms. In 2011, he allowed Oklahoma’s biggest natural gas driller to write a complaint to the EPA on his letterhead, which he then signed and sent as his own with few changes. Thousands of emails released just before Pruitt’s confirmation as the EPA’s 14th administrator revealed a deep, chummy alliance with oil, gas and utility companies forged during his years as Oklahoma’s attorney general. His administration would amount to a “fox guarding the henhouse,” League of Conservation Voters President Gene Karpinski warned in January. Pruitt battled the Obama EPA’s power plant rules on lawyerly technicalities, arguing that the agency had overstepped its regulatory authority and insisting that any need to curb global warming was beside the point. He is similarly operating within the bounds of the law now, legal scholars said. Agency chiefs are allowed to seek outside counsel through federal advisory committees, which must report their meetings to the public under federal law. The EPA has 23 committees, including a financial advisory board, scientific counselors and a council devoted to the Great Lakes. On Tuesday, Pruitt cleared the way to stack the EPA’s Board of Scientific Counselors with allies after he dismissed dozens of advisers, according to The Washington Post. But agency law gives Pruitt the right to seek counsel from anyone, as long as his meetings clear a low legal bar: If Pruitt isn’t meeting exclusively with one person or industry, he’s free to do as he wants ― provided he maintains what critics see as a fig leaf in groups like The Nature Conservancy and Audubon. “That’s the fatal flaw in this legal regime,” Sid Shapiro, the Fletcher chair of administrative law at the Wake Forest University School of Law, told HuffPost. “On the one hand, we want agencies to reach out and become more informed about issues and policies. But on the other hand, we’ve left them able to meet with a very selected group of people without any kind of legal remedy to those that might object.” Pruitt’s not just meeting with oil and gas executives. Lynn Good, chief executive of the utility giant Duke Energy, requested time with Pruitt to spell out her “policy priorities,” and got 45 minutes on March 9. Bob Murray, the bombastic coal baron who sued the EPA, booked two 30-minute meetings with Pruitt on March 28 and 29, though the topic of the meetings was not specified on the calendar. The first meeting took place the day after President Donald Trump signed an executive order instructing Pruitt to review the Obama administration’s signature policy to curb greenhouse gas emissions from power plants ― which Murray blamed last year for “virtually destroying” the coal industry. The Trump administration hasn’t been shy about courting the fossil fuel industry. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson spent the previous 40 years of his career at Exxon Mobil Corp., including the last nine as its chief executive. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke spoke in March at the same American Petroleum Institute confab at the Trump International Hotel that Pruitt attended. The White House issued an executive order overturning bans on oil exploration off the Arctic and Atlantic coasts, iced out funding for energy efficiency and climate programs in its proposed budget and axed rules requiring drillers to report methane pollution. “We’d try to always have a balance,” Stan Meiburg, a former acting deputy EPA administrator who spent 39 years at the agency before retiring in January, told HuffPost. “At least the appearance of balance.”   For years, Republicans lambasted the Obama administration for “picking winners and losers” by bolstering renewable energy like wind and solar to curb planet-warming emissions. By sidling up to fossil fuel companies, the Trump administration is raising new red flags that it is giving favor to heavily polluting industries, said Jordan Libowitz, a spokesman for Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, a watchdog group. “What is a concern is who’s getting the access,” Libowitz told HuffPost. “Is access to secretaries being offered out to everyone on that level, or is it just certain people? If it’s just certain people, that raises a question as to why.” We’d try to always have a balance. At least the appearance of balance. Stan Meiburg, former acting deputy EPA administrator. Now Pruitt is poised to name a deputy with the knowhow and experience to further cement his legal standing. He plans to nominate Jeff Holmstead, a long-time coal and oil lobbyist registered with the EPA, as his No. 2 sometime soon, Axios reported Monday. A partner at the corporate law titan Bracewell LLP, Holmstead served as assistant EPA administrator under President George W. Bush. During his tenure, the agency weakened environmental rules and attacked scientists, becoming “less independent than its predecessors and more closely tied to the White House’s ideology,” according to the educational nonprofit American Chemical Society. If confirmed, Holmstead could help Pruitt stave off a bevy of legal challenges from environmental groups fighting his deregulatory agenda. “Holmstead will probably understand that some of what they’re trying to do won’t pass legal muster,” Eric Schaeffer, executive director of the nonpartisan Environmental Integrity Project, told HuffPost. “But you’ll have bought the industry years of delay, which is the game in Washington.” Holmstead, whose auto-reply email said he is on vacation rafting in the Grand Canyon, did not respond to a request for comment. Unlike previous administrations, this White House seems unconcerned with courting critics in environmental circles, Schaeffer said. For now, the best environmental advocates can do is wait and hope the next administration will work hard to rectify the damage done by this one. “The agency is pretty much under occupation at this point,” Schaeffer said with a sigh. “I’m hoping there will be a strong political rebound and, once these guys are cleared out, that the agency will be in a stronger position than before they came.” type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related Coverage + articlesList=58fe2c1be4b00fa7de1665cb,58adda3ce4b03d80af71a4eb,58a71504e4b07602ad53f023,58b0618ee4b060480e075086,58ac7e76e4b0c4d51057164f -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

22 июня, 00:32

EPA Chief Spent First Weeks Courting Fossil Fuel Execs, Exposing 'Fatal Flaw' At Agency

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); One month after taking office, Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt hosted BP’s U.S. chairman at his office to discuss issues the company “works with” the agency on. The next day, Pruitt met with two top executives from Chevron Corporation to discuss “regulatory reform.” The day after that, he spent two hours mingling with 45 CEOs from oil and gas companies at the Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C. It’s not unusual for the nation’s top environmental regulator to meet with leaders of some of the industries he or she regulates. But Pruitt, who came into the agency with a reputation for siding with fossil fuel interests, has virtually ignored conservation and public health advocates, according to calendars released under the Freedom of Information Act and first reported by E&E News. Pruitt’s calendars show far fewer meetings with environmental and public health advocates. On Earth Day, the agency issued a press release feting the “great natural resources that the United States is blessed with” and touting a meeting with The Nature Conservancy and the National Audubon Society. A church, an interfaith group and the Indiana chapter of the NAACP were also included on a list of 25 organizations Pruitt met with that an EPA spokeswoman provided to HuffPost.   That lopsided courting of fossil fuel executives lays bare a major shift in how the agency is operating, former EPA officials told HuffPost. It also demonstrates what one legal scholar described as the “fatal flaw” in administrative law that allows an industry-friendly agency boss to buddy up to polluters with little oversight. “It’s not surprising,” Liz Purchia, who left her post as the EPA’s communications director under President Barack Obama in January, told HuffPost. “It’s confirming everything that people who opposed Scott Pruitt all had expected.” Pruitt spent his six years as Oklahoma’s attorney general suing the EPA to block environmental regulations more than a dozen times, often at the behest of big oil and gas firms. In 2011, he allowed Oklahoma’s biggest natural gas driller to write a complaint to the EPA on his letterhead, which he then signed and sent as his own with few changes. Thousands of emails released just before Pruitt’s confirmation as the EPA’s 14th administrator revealed a deep, chummy alliance with oil, gas and utility companies forged during his years as Oklahoma’s attorney general. His administration would amount to a “fox guarding the henhouse,” League of Conservation Voters President Gene Karpinski warned in January. Pruitt battled the Obama EPA’s power plant rules on lawyerly technicalities, arguing that the agency had overstepped its regulatory authority and insisting that any need to curb global warming was beside the point. He is similarly operating within the bounds of the law now, legal scholars said. Agency chiefs are allowed to seek outside counsel through federal advisory committees, which must report their meetings to the public under federal law. The EPA has 23 committees, including a financial advisory board, scientific counselors and a council devoted to the Great Lakes. On Tuesday, Pruitt cleared the way to stack the EPA’s Board of Scientific Counselors with allies after he dismissed dozens of advisers, according to The Washington Post. But agency law gives Pruitt the right to seek counsel from anyone, as long as his meetings clear a low legal bar: If Pruitt isn’t meeting exclusively with one person or industry, he’s free to do as he wants ― provided he maintains what critics see as a fig leaf in groups like The Nature Conservancy and Audubon. “That’s the fatal flaw in this legal regime,” Sid Shapiro, the Fletcher chair of administrative law at the Wake Forest University School of Law, told HuffPost. “On the one hand, we want agencies to reach out and become more informed about issues and policies. But on the other hand, we’ve left them able to meet with a very selected group of people without any kind of legal remedy to those that might object.” Pruitt’s not just meeting with oil and gas executives. Lynn Good, chief executive of the utility giant Duke Energy, requested time with Pruitt to spell out her “policy priorities,” and got 45 minutes on March 9. Bob Murray, the bombastic coal baron who sued the EPA, booked two 30-minute meetings with Pruitt on March 28 and 29, though the topic of the meetings was not specified on the calendar. The first meeting took place the day after President Donald Trump signed an executive order instructing Pruitt to review the Obama administration’s signature policy to curb greenhouse gas emissions from power plants ― which Murray blamed last year for “virtually destroying” the coal industry. The Trump administration hasn’t been shy about courting the fossil fuel industry. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson spent the previous 40 years of his career at Exxon Mobil Corp., including the last nine as its chief executive. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke spoke in March at the same American Petroleum Institute confab at the Trump International Hotel that Pruitt attended. The White House issued an executive order overturning bans on oil exploration off the Arctic and Atlantic coasts, iced out funding for energy efficiency and climate programs in its proposed budget and axed rules requiring drillers to report methane pollution. “We’d try to always have a balance,” Stan Meiburg, a former acting deputy EPA administrator who spent 39 years at the agency before retiring in January, told HuffPost. “At least the appearance of balance.”   For years, Republicans lambasted the Obama administration for “picking winners and losers” by bolstering renewable energy like wind and solar to curb planet-warming emissions. By sidling up to fossil fuel companies, the Trump administration is raising new red flags that it is giving favor to heavily polluting industries, said Jordan Libowitz, a spokesman for Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, a watchdog group. “What is a concern is who’s getting the access,” Libowitz told HuffPost. “Is access to secretaries being offered out to everyone on that level, or is it just certain people? If it’s just certain people, that raises a question as to why.” We’d try to always have a balance. At least the appearance of balance. Stan Meiburg, former acting deputy EPA administrator. Now Pruitt is poised to name a deputy with the knowhow and experience to further cement his legal standing. He plans to nominate Jeff Holmstead, a long-time coal and oil lobbyist registered with the EPA, as his No. 2 sometime soon, Axios reported Monday. A partner at the corporate law titan Bracewell LLP, Holmstead served as assistant EPA administrator under President George W. Bush. During his tenure, the agency weakened environmental rules and attacked scientists, becoming “less independent than its predecessors and more closely tied to the White House’s ideology,” according to the educational nonprofit American Chemical Society. If confirmed, Holmstead could help Pruitt stave off a bevy of legal challenges from environmental groups fighting his deregulatory agenda. “Holmstead will probably understand that some of what they’re trying to do won’t pass legal muster,” Eric Schaeffer, executive director of the nonpartisan Environmental Integrity Project, told HuffPost. “But you’ll have bought the industry years of delay, which is the game in Washington.” Holmstead, whose auto-reply email said he is on vacation rafting in the Grand Canyon, did not respond to a request for comment. Unlike previous administrations, this White House seems unconcerned with courting critics in environmental circles, Schaeffer said. For now, the best environmental advocates can do is wait and hope the next administration will work hard to rectify the damage done by this one. “The agency is pretty much under occupation at this point,” Schaeffer said with a sigh. “I’m hoping there will be a strong political rebound and, once these guys are cleared out, that the agency will be in a stronger position than before they came.” type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related Coverage + articlesList=58fe2c1be4b00fa7de1665cb,58adda3ce4b03d80af71a4eb,58a71504e4b07602ad53f023,58b0618ee4b060480e075086,58ac7e76e4b0c4d51057164f -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

21 июня, 16:06

Duke Energy (DUK) Selects 6 Sites for Readiness Program

Duke Energy (DUK) announced that six properties in North Carolina will participate in the first half of its 2017 Site Readiness Program

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14 июня, 00:40

Top Analyst Reports for Amazon, Visa, Verizon & Citigroup

Top Analyst Reports for Amazon, Visa, Verizon & Citigroup

13 июня, 17:11

Duke Energy, Siemens Agree to Build Gas Combustion Turbine

Duke Energy Corporation (DUK) has entered into an agreement with Siemens to design and build a new advanced gas combustion turbine.

13 июня, 12:21

Duke Energy (DUK) Up 4.4% Since Earnings Report: Can It Continue?

Duke Energy (DUK) reported earnings 30 days ago. What's next for the stock? We take a look at earnings estimates for some clues.

09 июня, 14:50

Celanese (CE) Updates on Ibn Sina JV Polyacetal Facility

Celanese (CE) has provided an update on its Ibn Sina JV and construction of a polyacetal manufacturing plant in Saudi Arabia.

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08 июня, 08:01

US utilities have pushed down their CO2 emissions largely on their own

Four big US utilities have each reported in recent days substantial carbon dioxide emission reductions over the past few years due principally to an increase in the use of natural gas, renewable generation and to the sale or closure of coal-fired assets. The four utilities — Duke Energy, Southern Company, American Electric Power and Xcel […] The post US utilities have pushed down their CO2 emissions largely on their own appeared first on The Barrel Blog.

02 июня, 14:38

Duke's Investments Impress, Stringent Regulations a Woe

On Jun 1, 2017, we updated a research report on Charlotte, NC-based Duke Energy Corporation (DUK).

22 мая, 16:30

Zacks Industry Outlook Highlights: NextEra Energy, Duke Energy, CenterPoint Energy, American Water Works and Aqua America

Zacks Industry Outlook Highlights: NextEra Energy, Duke Energy, CenterPoint Energy, American Water Works and Aqua America

19 мая, 21:53

Utility Stocks Make Secure Bets on Multiple Factors

Utility Stocks Make Secure Bets on Multiple Factors

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16 мая, 19:45

Donald Trump Is Scrapping Power Plant Rules, So Virginia Is Proposing Its Own

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Virginia became the first state since President Donald Trump abandoned rules to reduce power plant emissions to begin drafting rules to replace the federal mandate. At a press conference on Tuesday morning, Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D) ordered state air regulators to propose rules by the end of the year to scale back carbon dioxide emissions from the utility sector and increase renewable energy investments throughout the state.  “This should be done on the federal level,” McAuliffe told HuffPost by phone ahead of the announcement. “But obviously with the pronouncements now coming out of the Trump administration, we cannot rely on them to do it, so we will be taking it into our own hands on the state level.” The move lays the groundwork for a cap-and-trade system, which would set a fixed limit on the state’s carbon dioxide emissions and allow companies to buy and sell the rights to pollute. Once in place, Virginia will be allowed to participate in the carbon permit trading programs such as the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, which includes Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Rhode Island and Vermont.  The executive directive announced Tuesday comes 11 months after the governor signed an executive order instructing the state Department of Environmental Quality to assemble policies to reduce carbon pollution, which traps heat in the atmosphere and inflames respiratory illnesses such as asthma. After soliciting opinions from more than 8,000 stakeholders, state officials recommended limiting emission from the utility sector. Now, the State Air Pollution Control Board has until Dec. 31 to propose regulations aimed at taking the place of the Clean Power Plan, the sweeping Obama-era rule that restricted emissions from the utility sector nationwide. The regulation had yet to be implemented after being stayed last year by the Supreme Court. In March, Trump signed an executive order instructing Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt ― an unabashed fossil fuel ally who had sued to block the Clean Power Plan in his previous job as Oklahoma’s attorney general ― to rewrite the rule. “It’s clear now that the EPA has Administrator Pruitt, we’ll have to take our action ourselves,” McAuliffe said. By doing so, Virginia joins the ranks of states now challenging what the Guardian described as the Trump administration’s “blitzkrieg” against climate regulations and zero-emissions energy initiatives. California, Massachusetts and New York already have plans in place to virtually end the use of fossil fuels within the next few decades. Maryland last week announced plans to start vetting proposals to build offshore wind farms along the state’s coastline. Despite the partisan divide in Congress, the vast majority of Americans said they disagreed with Trump’s hard-line climate stances, according to a March HuffPost/YouGov poll. “If we’re going to continue making progress it’s going to happen because of leadership at the city and state level,” Bruce Nilles, senior director of the Sierra Club’s Beyond Coal campaign, told HuffPost by phone from San Francisco. “I’m looking forward to seeing the specifics of what gets proposed in Virginia.” Implementation of any proposed regulation will rest in the hands of whoever wins the Virginia governor’s mansion in November. McAuliffe’s term limit is up, and none of the three declared Republicans seeking to replace him are likely to support carbon regulations under a Republican White House bent on reviving coal production and increasing the use of fossil fuels. Last week, Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring issued a memo confirming that the governor has the authority to regulate carbon emissions through a statewide cap or “through other means.” Still, Republicans are likely to sue to block any such regulation. So far, that’s been a winning strategy. Pruitt sued to block environmental regulations at least 13 times as Oklahoma’s top cop. Now he leads the agency he previously nettled with lawsuits. The two Democrats competing in the June 13 primary told HuffPost they would enforce any carbon regulations that McAuliffe proposed. Ralph Northam, McAuliffe’s lieutenant governor, said his 25-year stint as a pediatric neurologist convinced him that children in the Commonwealth suffer from abnormally high levels of asthma and other air-quality related ailments. The well-funded Democrat, long considered the frontrunner for the nomination, vowed to enforce the utility regulation. “This is a great step, a big step, in the direction we need to go in,” Northam told HuffPost by phone on Tuesday morning. “This shouldn’t be a partisan issue, it’s something that’s one, in the best interest of the health of Virginia; two, in the best interest of our environment; and three, in the best interest of the economy.” His primary opponent, Tom Perriello, a former U.S. congressman and progressive backed by Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), said he too would support the regulation, but focused on the role it could play in creating more clean energy jobs throughout the state. Virginia ranked 20th in the solar industry, with 3,236 jobs last year, according to the Solar Energy Industries Association. That’s roughly double the size of the state’s coal mining industry. Perriello boasted being the only candidate from either party who has rejected donations from utility firms in a state where power companies are kingmakers. In February, state lawmakers voted down a bill to prohibit Dominion Energy, the state’s largest utility, from donating to public officials. “They’re the biggest donors to both political parties in Virginia,” Perriello told HuffPost by phone on Tuesday. “That isn’t just upsetting to a lot of Democrats, but to a lot of independents and conservatives, too. They’re looking for a leader to challenge that status quo. Given my refusal to take donations and my background fighting for clean energy, they’re going to have a champion in me if I win.” I can guarantee the Republican nominee will not support what I’m doing here today. Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe To be sure, investor-owned utility companies across the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic are ramping up efforts to slash greenhouse gases and invest in renewables amid pressure from ratepayers and shareholders. North Carolina-based Duke Energy Corp. told shareholders earlier this month that the utility giant will invest $11 billion into zero-emissions energy and natural gas over the next 10 years. Dominion recently outlined a plan to cut each residential customer’s carbon footprint by as much as 25 percent over the next eight years, according to an S&P Global Market Intelligence report. McAuliffe said the company was “clear what my intentions were from day one,” adding that he “spent a lot of time meeting with them” to discuss the regulatory plans.  Dominion said it has made “tremendous progress” reducing its carbon footprint and remains committed to bringing “a lot more renewable energy onto the grid.” “Dominion has been preparing for carbon regulation for some time now and appreciates being a part of the stake-holder engagement process,” David Botkins, a spokesman, told HuffPost by email. “It still looks like the regulatory uncertainty around carbon continues.” Big business is likely to support the regulation. Executives from Virginia-based candy and pet food conglomerate Mars Inc. and Coronal Energy, a solar firm that electronics giant Panasonic owns, flanked McAuliffe at Tuesday’s press conference. And tech giants like Amazon and Google seek out states with strong zero-emissions energy infrastructure to locate their electricity-thirsty data centers. No Republican candidates responded to requests for comment. The field includes former Republican National Committee chairman and frontrunner Ed Gillespie, state senator Frank Wagner and Prince William County board supervisor Corey Stewart, whose racism-singed campaign looks increasingly like a “lost cause.” “I can guarantee the Republican nominee will not support what I’m doing here today,” McAuliffe said. “I didn’t do this for political reasons, I did it with this timing because i thought the Clean Power Plan would be in place by now.” “This will be a major reason why people need to come out and vote,” he added. “If you believe in carbon reduction, if you believe in the environment, if you believe in job creation, you need to vote.” This article has been updated with comment from Dominion. type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related... + articlesList=58efd3e1e4b0bb9638e2769a,58dc06e5e4b05eae031ca879,58dec29ae4b0b3918c837cca,58b07ebae4b060480e079dc2,58eff284e4b0da2ff85f7c92 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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10 мая, 20:13

Duke Energy Misses Q1 Earnings Estimates: ETFs in Focus

Duke Energy missed Zacks Consensus Estimates on both top and bottom lines.

09 мая, 16:28

Duke Energy (DUK) Misses on Q1 Earnings, Keeps 2017 View

Duke Energy Corporation (DUK) reported first-quarter 2017 adjusted earnings of $1.04 per share, missing the Zacks Consensus Estimate of $1.06 by 1.9%.

09 мая, 15:30

Duke Energy (DUK) Misses Q1 Earnings & Revenue Estimates

Duke Energy Corporation (DUK) reported first-quarter 2017 adjusted earnings of $1.04 per share, missing the Zacks Consensus Estimate of $1.05 by 1%.

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08 мая, 15:14

Utility Stock Q1 Earnings Reports on May 9: DUK, SRE & More

Utility sector earnings are expected to improve 3.1% on 5.8% higher revenues this season.