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06 декабря, 16:15

Известный бизнесмен силой отвоевал себе место возле Сагинтаева

Выходка лауреата спецпремии «Парыз», бизнесмена Айдына Рахимбаева, позабавила присутствующих на чествовании в Астане лучших бизнесменов года, передает ИА «NewTimes.kz». Бакытжан Сагинтаев. Фото today.kz Курьез приключился на сцене, когда лучшие представители отечественного бизнес-сообщества начали готовиться к коллективному фотографированию с главой правительства Бакытжаном Сагинтаевым. Как водится в таких случаях, премьеру было предложено место в центре группы. За место рядом с ним и полез в борьбу лауреат «Парыза» Рахимбаев. Он оттолкнул от премьер-министра одного из победителей и резво переместился на его место. Фото newtimes.kz Фото newtimes.kz Впрочем, никто на Рахимбаева не обиделся. Выпад бизнесмена лишь от души развеселил присутствующих. Фото akorda.kz Участие в презентации проектов Карты индустриализации и церемонии награждения победителей конкурсов «Алтын сапа», «Парыз» принял также президент Казахстана Нурсултан Назарбаев. Фото akorda.kz В рамках мероприятия президент  вручил специальные премии конкурса «Алтын сапа»: «Лучший индустриальный проект» - председателю совета директоров ТОО «АтырауНефтеМаш» Сагату Тугельбаеву; Фото akorda.kz «Лучший инновационный проект» - директору АО «Химфарм» Рустаму Байгарину; «Лидер качества» - председателю совета менеджеров ERG Александру Машкевичу; Фото akorda.kz Победителем в данной номинации признано АО «Казахстанский электролизный завод». Премия гран-при конкурса «Парыз» вручена президенту АО «Аксайгазсервис» Тлеку Шектебаеву.

13 октября, 06:00

This Is Your Brain on Podcasts

Neuroscientists still have a great deal to learn about the human brain. One recent MRI study sheds some light, finding that that a certain kind of storytelling stimulates enormous activity across broad swaths of the brain. The takeaway is obvious: you should be listening to even more podcasts. The post This Is Your Brain on Podcasts appeared first on Freakonomics.

11 октября, 12:05

U.S. Latinos Feel They Can’t Be Themselves at Work

Hispanic Heritage Month, which is generally observed from September 15th-October 15th, is a time to celebrate the contributions and unique heritage of Hispanics and Latinos — except, according to many Latinos, in the workplace. According to a new study published by the Center for Talent Innovation, Latinos at Work: Unleashing the Power of Culture, most Latinos in the U.S. do not feel that they can bring their whole selves to the office. We found the vast majority of Latinos (76%) repress parts of their personas at work. They modify their appearance, body language, and communication style — all components of executive presence (EP), that intangible element that defines leadership material. “You’re always moderating yourself,” agrees a Latina executive, who feels Latinas “are always tagged with the emotional thing. They’re always told, ‘Calm down. You’ve got to be more cool. Be careful with your voice, be careful with your hands.’” Hispanic men echo her observations. One ruefully told of moving from a Hispanic-dominated company, where he could gesture eloquently and speak passionately, to a Caucasian workplace where he had to “scale back” his expressiveness. Another Latina executive recalls the countless times that she’s been asked to anglicize her name. “My father, who died when I was young, chose my name,” she says. “It’s one of the few links I have to him, and I’m not willing to let it go. I am twisting myself into a pretzel to adapt to my company culture, and they can’t budge an inch to call me by my given name?” More than half (53%) of Latinas and 44% of Latinos say that EP at their company is defined by conforming to traditionally white, male standards. Furthermore, 43% of Latinas and 33% of Latinos say they need to compromise their authenticity to adhere to the EP standards at their company. The sad reality is that Latinos who decide to change who they are and modify certain aspects of their personas are achieving real results. Those who expend a great deal of energy repressing themselves are also more likely to say that they are being promoted quickly. Despite their success, this is problem — rewarding self-repression is not a good talent strategy. Previous CTI research found repression not only impacts employee engagement and morale, but can have serious ramifications for a company’s brand and bottom line. Teams with one or more members who represent the culture of the team’s target end users are 158% more likely to understand that end user, boosting the likelihood of that team innovating for that audience. Yet, even smart companies are often clueless about how to leverage their employees’ insights that would enable them to tap into this huge and exploding Latino market — a market that is projected to reach $1.7 trillion within the next four years. As repression resonates throughout an organization, it undermines its ability to attract and retain Latino talent. Among the enormous wave of Millennials flooding into the workplace, as one talent specialist observed, “authenticity and self-expression are of the utmost importance.” When Latinos repress who they are in order to rise into management, incoming or up-and-coming Latino talent is motivated to look elsewhere for employment. As one Latino focus group participant said, “I look up, see no one like myself, and have to wonder if there is a future here for me.” Multinational companies based in the US are desperate to unlock this growth market. The key? More insight from those who represent it. Yet 63% of Latinos that we surveyed do not feel welcomed and included, do not feel invited to share their ideas, and/or do not feel confident their ideas are heard and valued in the workplace. CTI research on diversity and innovation found that 56% of employees say that leaders at their companies fail to see value in ideas for which they don’t personally see a need. So if leaders lack inclusive leadership skills, they’re not likely to get behind ideas from Latinos that identify unmet needs or solve for critical business problems. What can companies do to leverage and support Latino talent in a way that lets Latinos know it’s okay to be their authentic selves? One fundamental step is to incent senior leaders to sponsor across race and ethnicity. Latinos with sponsors — senior-level advocates — are 42% more likely to be satisfied with their career progression than Latinos without sponsors. At the same time, sponsorship helps senior leaders better understand and tap into the diverse perspectives and skills Latino talent can bring to the workplace. But a mere 5% of full-time, high-earning Latino professionals in large companies have a sponsor in their corner. Companies can also help Latinos feel valued and included by cultivating culture-smart leaders. Among the steps these leaders can take: act as staunch allies when Latinos are diminished or snubbed, even in a conversation where they’re not present; and support employee resource group (ERG) efforts to celebrate Latino heritage and show support by attending ERG events and sharing efforts company-wide. Smart companies understand diverse perspectives have impact on the bottom-line and are working to better leverage these insights. Bank of America’s Hispanic-Latino Leadership Council (HLLC), for example, was formed in 2012 to connect Hispanic and Latino leaders to grow the pipeline of Hispanic-Latino employees across the company, and develop strategies to better serve and attract Hispanic-Latino customers and clients. The HLLC, however, first had to confront a challenge — identifying Hispanic and Latino leaders. This was difficult because many of the bank’s Hispanic and Latino leaders at the time had not self-identified when they first joined the bank. “We’re focused every day on being inclusive, and creating an environment where all employees have the opportunity to achieve their goals,” said Denise Harris, Senior Audit Director, member of the HLLC’s advisory council and one of the Bank’s Global Diversity and Inclusion Council members. “Yet, we found leaders reluctant or unaware that they should share their heritage. We encouraged our leaders to be proud of their heritage. By doing so, they realize how it fosters that inclusive work environment and gets them more involved in programs and initiatives, like our HLLC.” Through a concerted effort to encourage employees to be their authentic selves, attendance at the HLLC Annual Summit has grown from 50% to 80% over the past three years and the Summit received an impressive feedback score of 95% from participants for content and networking. “We have worked hard over the last few years to increase participation and provide participants with robust content and strong internal and external speakers, including members of our management team,” says Harris. “In turn, those leaders pay it forward by creating opportunities for other Hispanic-Latino employees at the firm. Our HLLC members are in key roles throughout the bank to make that happen.” Employers need to create a workplace where Latino professionals feel they can be true to themselves, contribute their insights and opinions, and lead in an authentic way. When Latino talent thrives, organizations are much more likely to meet their goals of diversifying leadership, attracting and retaining top talent, and tapping into the enormous market opportunities.

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07 октября, 16:40

Von den Fünfzigern bis heute - die Kunstsammlung der Deutschen Bundesbank

Die Deutsche Bundesbank begann bereits mit ihrer Gründung 1957 zeitgenössische Kunst zu sammeln. Über sechs Jahrzehnte entstand eine umfangreiche Sammlung aus Gemälden, Papierarbeiten, Plastiken und raumbezogenen Installationen. Im Rahmen der Europa-Kulturtage 2016 zeigt die Deutsche Bundesbank in der historischen Großmarkthalle im EZB-Hauptgebäude einen Ausschnitt aus ihrer Sammlung. Als Ergänzung zur Ausstellung finden auch in der Zentrale der Bundesbank Kunstführungen statt (www.bundesbank.de/kunstsammlung). Bildnachweis / Copyright © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2016: Andrea Büttner, K. O. Götz, HAP Grieshaber, Katharina Grosse, Margret Hoppe, Konrad Klapheck, Thomas Scheibitz, Bernhard Schultze © bei den Künstlern und ihren Rechtsnachfolgern / by the artists and their legal successors Matthias Bitzer: Matthias Bitzer, Frauke Dannert: Courtesy Galerie Rupert Pfab, Düsseldorf, Bruno Goller: Bruno Goller Archiv e.V., Anette Kelm: Anette Kelm, Ernst Wilhelm Nay: Elisabeth Nay-Scheibler, Köln/VG Bild-Kunst, Cornelia Schleime: Courtesy Galerie Michael Schultz, Berlin, Tobias Zielony: Courtesy Galerie KOW, Berlin

31 августа, 14:09

В Аксу прошло масштабное событие этого года – первая Спартакиада ERG

В городе спортсменов Аксу с 23 по 26 августа прошло масштабное событие этого года – первая Спартакиада ERG. Благодаря профессиональным режиссерам грандиозное  открытие Спартакиады  ничем не уступало Олимпийским играм! Помимо фейерверков, выступления звезд казахстанской эстрады и огненного шоу, настоящее зрелище, покорившее, жителей и гостей города показали мотоциклисты. Представители местных байкер-клубов «Гараж» и «Ермак» устроили настоящее экстрим-шоу, показав высший пилотаж вождения! На следующий день после открытия, начались соревнования, разыгралась нешуточная борьба за право стать победителями! – Символично, что это беспрецедентное мероприятие проходит в юбилейный год 25-летия Независимости Республики Казахстан и год 55-летия города Аксу, – сказал в своем выступлении на церемонии открытия аким Павлодарской области Булат Бакауов. – Внушительный вклад Евразийской Группы в развитие нашего промышленного региона  невозможно переоценить. Социальная ответственность, с которой компания ERG подходит к сотрудничеству с акиматом Павлодарской области, по праву заслуживает высокой оценки. Евразийская Группа давно поддерживает развитие массового спорта в области, финансируя не только футбольный клуб «Иртыш» и различные спортивные мероприятия, но и строительство спортивных объектов. Так, например, скоро в городе Аксу откроется крытый хоккейный корт. Одновременно во всех спорткомплексах и площадках города прошли соревнования по мини-футболу, волейболу, баскетболу, настольному теннису, легкой атлетике, гиревому спорту и шахматам. При этом, на всем протяжении соревнования спортсмены ERG демонстрировали истинно товарищеский дух, поддерживая не только лидеров, но и аутсайдеров состязаний. Победу одержала команда АО «ТНК «Казхром», которая зарекомендовала себя,как сплоченная команда. Второе место досталось работникам АО «ССГПО», замыкает тройку лидеров АО «Евроазиатская энергетическая корпорация», добившаяся победы в последний день состязаний. Всем победителям достались кубки и денежные призы. Аксусцы передали факел эстафеты в Рудный, где и пройдет следующая Спартакиада среди работников Евразийской Группы. *На правах рекламы

31 августа, 12:05

Research: Millennials Can’t Afford to Job Hop

Millennials are probably the most maligned generation yet to enter the workforce. The demographic cohort born between 1982 and 1994 is often portrayed as disloyal job hoppers —  self-involved idealists demanding a steady diet of recognition and raises. In short, a human resources nightmare, right? Wrong. A new study on Misunderstood Millennial Talent: The Other 91 Percent by the Center for Talent Innovation shatters the stereotype that all Millennials are entitled whiners just waiting to jump ship. Far fewer Millennials are a flight risk than you think, and the reason is stunningly simple: money. Forty percent of Millennials with a financial safety net — those who have families that could support them indefinitely if they were to quit or lose their job or who receive financial gifts from family members totaling at least $5,000 a year — say they plan to leave their jobs within a year. But these financially privileged folks represent fewer than one in ten Millennials CTI surveyed born between 1982 and 1994 who are working full-time in white-collar professions in the U.S. Further Reading Millennials Are Actually Workaholics, According to Research Stress Digital Article Sarah Green Carmichael And it's changing the way Americans take vacation. Save Share Only 10% of the financially unprivileged majority — the other 91% of Millennials — are planning on leaving their jobs within a year.  Many of them are staggering under heavy college debt, and they can’t rely on their family for financial help. Fifty-one percent took out loans to fund their undergraduate education, compared to 40% of their financially privileged counterparts; of those less-privileged Millennials burdened by student debt, 43% had loans totaling $40,000 or more. This means that the vast majority of Millennials are ready to commit to their current employer and invest prodigious amounts of time and energy in their work in the hope that their employers will invest in them in return. And yet most companies act as if their Millennials have one foot out the door. “Can you get these kids to stay?” challenged the global talent head of a multinational consultancy. “We cross-train our Millennials to keep it interesting for them. But we hesitate to send them off to far-flung places for two years, because they won’t stay with us. We’re not going to see the payback. Their next employer will.” In short, even as HR professionals recognize Millennials as their next workforce, they see no reason to groom them for leadership until they start acting, sounding, and looking like previous generations. That’s a mistake with profound implications. Since exposure to other countries, cultures, and consumers helps give young professionals the knowledge they need to grow those markets and crack open new ones, denying them exposure or field experience jeopardizes both corporate revenues and future expansion prospects. And if leadership development (typically reserved for high-potential talent) and cross-generational interaction are withheld from Millennials, then the imminent exodus of Boomers threatens to pull decades of institutional knowledge and market expertise out the door with them. A more nuanced understanding of what Millennials really need and want would suggest that companies are better off doing the following to attract, retain and develop their Millennials: Create a forum for cross-generational communication. CTI research finds that Millennials seek to contribute value for their employer and achieve their team’s goals. Novo Nordisk, Inc. encourages Millennials to share their ideas and development needs by sponsoring a Millennial Employee Resource Group (ERG). The grassroots ERG formed less than a year ago and already boasts a membership of nearly 500 employees. Open to all employees, including older members who are “Millennials at Heart,” the ERG is working to bridge Novo Nordisk, Inc.’s diverse, multigenerational workforce. “We are deliberately creating an environment where Millennials and all generations have the opportunity to work side-by-side with senior executives,” says Jackie Scanlan, CVP of human resources. “We know it is working because leaders are now coming to us and asking how they might engage this ERG in innovative discussions and brainstorming sessions.” Show them how to create value. If there’s one stereotype that talent specialists are loath to abandon, it is that Millennials cannot get through a day without someone affirming their worth. CTI research finds that 45% of the financially unprivileged Millennials say that recognition is very important in their career. “But it’s more because they want to understand how they contribute to the business strategy,” explains Diana Cruz Solash, EY Americas Ethnicity Leader. “Millennials want ‘just-in-time’ feedback, so we give it to them right away” — by expecting EY partners and executives to help all associates see their impact. EY has also stepped up efforts to reward employees with recognition: “Applause Awards,” for example, can be sent by anyone to anyone, with copies sent to the recipient’s manager. Likewise, EY has a central online feedback system to enable employees to recognize managers for on-the-job coaching. Help them craft their ideal work environment. Millennials have a bad reputation of jumping jobs at the hint of a higher paycheck. CTI data shows that while compensation needs to be high enough for Millennials to provide for themselves and their loved ones — 82% of financially unprivileged Millennials say that an important aspect of high compensation is the financial security it affords them — money alone isn’t enough of a magnet to draw Millennials away from a company that offers opportunity to learn new skills, build rewarding relationships, and progress in their careers. Companies that dismiss Millennials until they “grow up” are ignoring demographic reality. They already have grown up. According to a recent Pew Research Center study, Millennials now represent 34% of the U.S. workforce, outnumbering both Gen Xers and Baby Boomers. And the numbers will only increase. The smartest thing forward-thinking companies can do is to stop treating Millennials as if they are an alien species and at least listen to, if not embrace, their ideas and professional desires. “The perception that we need to turn the workplace on its head to satisfy Millennials just isn’t accurate,” observes Nancy Testa, chief diversity officer at American Express, a sponsor of this study. “Millennials are looking for career growth, competitive pay, and purposeful careers – things every generation wants. It’s the delivery that’s changing, and frankly, it’s changing in a way that improves the workplace for everyone.”

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15 августа, 00:28

ERG's: Are You Taking Advantage Of This Powerful Career Advancement Tool

If your company currently has ERG’s but you haven’t joined yet, don’t delay so you too can develop new skills, connect with senior management, take on a leadership role, and grow your network. If your company doesn’t have ERG’s, start one!

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29 июля, 10:55

"ВТБ Капитал" собрался закупить в Казахстане алюминий на 300 млн евро

"ВТБ Капитал" закупит у АО "Казахстанский электролизный завод" (КЭЗ) (входит в Eurasian Resources Group, ERG) 660 тыс.

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19 июля, 00:14

Госбанки продлили кредиты ERG

Казахстанская Eurasian Resources Group (ERG) договорилась с ВТБ и Сбербанком о рефинансировании кредитов до 2020 г., сообщила горно-металлургическая компания. Таким образом, передвинуты сроки погашения большей части общего долга в $5,8 млрд, отмечается в релизе. Представители Сбербанка и ВТБ подтвердили пролонгацию. ВТБ уточняет, что залог по его кредиту при этом увеличен.

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19 июля, 00:14

Казахская ERG договорилась со Сбербанком и ВТБ о пролонгации кредитов

Казахстанская Eurasian Resources Group (ERG) договорилась с ВТБ и Сбербанком о рефинансировании кредитов до 2020 г., сообщила горно-металлургическая компания. Таким образом, передвинуты сроки погашения большей части общего долга в $5,8 млрд, отмечается в релизе. Представители Сбербанка и ВТБ подтвердили пролонгацию. ВТБ уточняет, что залог по его кредиту при этом увеличен.

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18 июля, 12:29

ERG договорилась со Сбербанком и ВТБ о реструктуризации долга

Eurasian Resources Group (ERG) завершила сделки по реструктуризации долга с двумя основными кредиторами - ВТБ и Сбербанком, говорится в сообщении ERG.

13 июля, 00:34

What Happened When My White Boss Talked To Me About Race In America

I have never felt so Black at work... ...as the day Eric Garner was killed on July 17, 2014, the day Michael Brown Jr. was killed on August 9, 2014, the day Tamir Rice was killed on November 22, 2014, the day Walter Scott was killed on April 4, 2015, the day Freddie Gray was killed on April 19, 2015. No one at my job said anything. Through all those senseless and horrific deaths of Black men and children at the hands of White police officers, not one person at my job said anything about it. Not one person at my job was Black either. A few years have passed since I've been at that company, but I have never forgotten that feeling; the feeling of being utterly distraught, yet so completely alone in my sadness. Last night, I couldn't sleep. I stayed up writing a piece about the first time a White person at work actually acknowledged our long-standing American tragedy of racism, bigotry, and injustice. That first time was this week. *** I am a Black woman. Not only that, I am a Black woman working in tech, one of the most homogeneous industries ever birthed. As a woman in tech, I account for 30 percent of the tech workforce. As a Black person in tech, I account for 5 percent of the tech workforce. But as a Black woman in tech, I account for only 2 percent of the tech workforce. I currently work at a venture capital firm that invests in tech startups. Our VC firm is arguably the most diverse in the country with 5 Blacks, 2 Latinx, 2 Whites and 4 women. Just to put that in perspective, venture capital firms are 97 percent White and Asian and 89 percent men, so yeah, we're really really diverse in comparison. When I went into work yesterday, the first thing my boss, who is a White woman, mentioned to me was the anger and pain she was feeling about the fatal shootings of two more Black men by White police officers. She talked about the articles she read and the videos she watched and how she wanted to say something about it to the crowd of Silicon Valley founders and investors we'd be gathering for an event later that evening. She took the time to ask me how I was doing and if I wanted to talk or take some time off. She was in all ways very supportive and proactively so. I don't think I realized it at the time. It wasn't until I actually sat down to write this piece, in fact, that the significance of that short interaction really sunk in for me. A White person. Better yet, my boss. At work. Initiated a conversation with me about racial injustice in America. She expressed disgust and outrage. She asked if I was OK. She offered to speak out. She planned to take action. How many of my Black brothers and sisters -- especially in tech -- can say that their White colleagues acknowledge the current state of racial injustice in America? Seriously, I want to know. In fact, leave a comment on this post, so we can all know. I haven't been in tech that long -- five years now -- but I'll tell you one thing for sure: Tech does not talk about Black people being killed by police. And why? Well because... Tech does not work with Black people. Image source: The Verge Tech does not socialize with Black people. Data source: Public Religion Research Institute (PRRI) Image source: Kapor Capital And because tech does not interact with Black people at work or at home... Tech is less likely to empathize with Black people. Definition source: Psychology Today So yesterday, when my boss -- a White woman in tech -- empathized with me, a Black woman, that was A.VERY.BIG.DEAL. In fact, it was the first time a White colleague (and I've had many) has ever said anything to me about the killing of a Black person in America by a White police officer --  and there's unfortunately been several opportunities for them to speak up. The fact that a White colleague in a work setting made it a point to make a point about racial injustice in America and acknowledge the Black community's pain, hurt, and anger over it... the fact that she didn't just act like today was "business as usual"  --  that meant more to me than any free lunches, office perks, or holiday bonuses ever could. She saw me, she saw my people, she acknowledged our pain, and she offered to help. That means something. So I'm going to say this to all my White brothers and sisters working alongside my Black brothers and sisters: Today you have a chance to be a better colleague. Here's how... 1. Educate yourself Don't wait for a/the Black person at your company to say something. Don't wait for your HR or ERG rep to send you an email. Take it upon yourself to get educated about the Do's and Don'ts of being a good ally. Full Resource: A Guide for White Allies Confronting Racial Injustice 2. Talk about it You don't have to have all the right words or all the perfect answers, but just saying something to the Black and White people you work with -- acknowledging that this atrocity happened and that you're hurt by it -- that really is a start to making a difference. Speak about the humanity of those innocent Black men, speak about the mourning of the Black community and our entire country. Just whatever you do, speak from the heart. Image source: Natasha Howell 3. Give people space What's happening to Black people under police patrol is a national tragedy, and it is having a traumatizing effect on many people. Don't expect your Black colleagues to be able to jump right back into work as if nothing's happened -- especially if they're in a workplace that doesn't even acknowledge these horrific events are taking place. Full article: "Processing" 4. Take action Tech is smart -- like really freakin' smart. Tech wouldn't be taking over the world if it wasn't so damn smart. So I don't buy the "I don't know what to do" spiel. You have a growth mindset when it comes to everything else. Why do your critical thinking skills suddenly vanish when it comes to figuring out how you can contribute to this whole racial equality thing? Whether it be investing in a more diverse workforce, lobbying for judicial system reform, refusing to do business with cities and individuals that perpetrate racism... there are countless things you can take action on. I wholeheartedly believe that if you put your minds, hearts, and resource$ together, you can devise solutions in collaboration with the grassroots movements already on the ground and help write a new, more promising chapter of race relations in America. Full article: Silicon Valley Doesn't Care About Black People 5. *Keep* looking in the mirror Each of us has a part to play in creating the workplace and world that sees the humanity and value in all people. Each of us has a part to play in creating an environment where all people can *live* with dignity and respect. To accomplish this, it's vital that you do some retrospection and reflection and ask yourself: What am I doing today to be a part of the solution? What will I do tomorrow to be a part of the solution? What will I do next week? Next month? Next year?... We must never stop looking in the mirror, for it's the only way we can truly ensure we bring about the change we wish to see. A version of this post originally appeared on Medium. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

13 июля, 00:34

What Happened When My White Boss Talked To Me About Race In America

I have never felt so Black at work... ...as the day Eric Garner was killed on July 17, 2014, the day Michael Brown Jr. was killed on August 9, 2014, the day Tamir Rice was killed on November 22, 2014, the day Walter Scott was killed on April 4, 2015, the day Freddie Gray was killed on April 19, 2015. No one at my job said anything. Through all those senseless and horrific deaths of Black men and children at the hands of White police officers, not one person at my job said anything about it. Not one person at my job was Black either. A few years have passed since I've been at that company, but I have never forgotten that feeling; the feeling of being utterly distraught, yet so completely alone in my sadness. Last night, I couldn't sleep. I stayed up writing a piece about the first time a White person at work actually acknowledged our long-standing American tragedy of racism, bigotry, and injustice. That first time was this week. *** I am a Black woman. Not only that, I am a Black woman working in tech, one of the most homogeneous industries ever birthed. As a woman in tech, I account for 30 percent of the tech workforce. As a Black person in tech, I account for 5 percent of the tech workforce. But as a Black woman in tech, I account for only 2 percent of the tech workforce. I currently work at a venture capital firm that invests in tech startups. Our VC firm is arguably the most diverse in the country with 5 Blacks, 2 Latinx, 2 Whites and 4 women. Just to put that in perspective, venture capital firms are 97 percent White and Asian and 89 percent men, so yeah, we're really really diverse in comparison. When I went into work yesterday, the first thing my boss, who is a White woman, mentioned to me was the anger and pain she was feeling about the fatal shootings of two more Black men by White police officers. She talked about the articles she read and the videos she watched and how she wanted to say something about it to the crowd of Silicon Valley founders and investors we'd be gathering for an event later that evening. She took the time to ask me how I was doing and if I wanted to talk or take some time off. She was in all ways very supportive and proactively so. I don't think I realized it at the time. It wasn't until I actually sat down to write this piece, in fact, that the significance of that short interaction really sunk in for me. A White person. Better yet, my boss. At work. Initiated a conversation with me about racial injustice in America. She expressed disgust and outrage. She asked if I was OK. She offered to speak out. She planned to take action. How many of my Black brothers and sisters -- especially in tech -- can say that their White colleagues acknowledge the current state of racial injustice in America? Seriously, I want to know. In fact, leave a comment on this post, so we can all know. I haven't been in tech that long -- five years now -- but I'll tell you one thing for sure: Tech does not talk about Black people being killed by police. And why? Well because... Tech does not work with Black people. Image source: The Verge Tech does not socialize with Black people. Data source: Public Religion Research Institute (PRRI) Image source: Kapor Capital And because tech does not interact with Black people at work or at home... Tech is less likely to empathize with Black people. Definition source: Psychology Today So yesterday, when my boss -- a White woman in tech -- empathized with me, a Black woman, that was A.VERY.BIG.DEAL. In fact, it was the first time a White colleague (and I've had many) has ever said anything to me about the killing of a Black person in America by a White police officer --  and there's unfortunately been several opportunities for them to speak up. The fact that a White colleague in a work setting made it a point to make a point about racial injustice in America and acknowledge the Black community's pain, hurt, and anger over it... the fact that she didn't just act like today was "business as usual"  --  that meant more to me than any free lunches, office perks, or holiday bonuses ever could. She saw me, she saw my people, she acknowledged our pain, and she offered to help. That means something. So I'm going to say this to all my White brothers and sisters working alongside my Black brothers and sisters: Today you have a chance to be a better colleague. Here's how... 1. Educate yourself Don't wait for a/the Black person at your company to say something. Don't wait for your HR or ERG rep to send you an email. Take it upon yourself to get educated about the Do's and Don'ts of being a good ally. Full Resource: A Guide for White Allies Confronting Racial Injustice 2. Talk about it You don't have to have all the right words or all the perfect answers, but just saying something to the Black and White people you work with -- acknowledging that this atrocity happened and that you're hurt by it -- that really is a start to making a difference. Speak about the humanity of those innocent Black men, speak about the mourning of the Black community and our entire country. Just whatever you do, speak from the heart. Image source: Natasha Howell 3. Give people space What's happening to Black people under police patrol is a national tragedy, and it is having a traumatizing effect on many people. Don't expect your Black colleagues to be able to jump right back into work as if nothing's happened -- especially if they're in a workplace that doesn't even acknowledge these horrific events are taking place. Full article: "Processing" 4. Take action Tech is smart -- like really freakin' smart. Tech wouldn't be taking over the world if it wasn't so damn smart. So I don't buy the "I don't know what to do" spiel. You have a growth mindset when it comes to everything else. Why do your critical thinking skills suddenly vanish when it comes to figuring out how you can contribute to this whole racial equality thing? Whether it be investing in a more diverse workforce, lobbying for judicial system reform, refusing to do business with cities and individuals that perpetrate racism... there are countless things you can take action on. I wholeheartedly believe that if you put your minds, hearts, and resource$ together, you can devise solutions in collaboration with the grassroots movements already on the ground and help write a new, more promising chapter of race relations in America. Full article: Silicon Valley Doesn't Care About Black People 5. *Keep* looking in the mirror Each of us has a part to play in creating the workplace and world that sees the humanity and value in all people. Each of us has a part to play in creating an environment where all people can *live* with dignity and respect. To accomplish this, it's vital that you do some retrospection and reflection and ask yourself: What am I doing today to be a part of the solution? What will I do tomorrow to be a part of the solution? What will I do next week? Next month? Next year?... We must never stop looking in the mirror, for it's the only way we can truly ensure we bring about the change we wish to see. A version of this post originally appeared on Medium. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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11 июля, 20:04

UNESCO names Turkish musician Kudsi Ergüner as agency’s Artist for Peace

The United Nations cultural agency, has appointed musician Kudsi Ergüner, as an Artist for Peace in recognition of his efforts to promote the universal values of music, his contribution to the protection of musical heritage support for the International Decade of the Rapprochement of Cultures (2013-2022), and his unwavering commitment to the ideals of the Organization.

01 июля, 14:40

Getting More Black Women into the C-Suite

In late 2014, poised to publish a report on women’s ambition, we stumbled on a startling fact: black women are nearly three times more likely than white to aspire to a position of power with a prestigious title. And yet white women are about twice as likely as black women to attain one. Roughly twenty women helm a Fortune 500 company. After the departure of Ursula Burns at Xerox, none of those women will be black. The problem may lie in the constraints endemic to identity politics. Since the beginning, the Women’s Movement has treated all women, black and white, as having similar goals and suffering similar inequities; the Civil Rights has likewise treated black Americans as a monolithic group. Enlisted by both movements, black women fought on both fronts. But fifty years later, they would appear to have benefitted from neither, relative to women and black men, in terms of their empowerment and advancement. As we explore in our book, Ambition in Black and White: The Feminist Narrative Revised, neither movement recognizes their particular challenges in the workplace, nor their singularly fraught path toward equality. At the intersections of race and gender, both then and now, black women have labored unseen, even to those lobbying for their advancement. We talked to black women who were among the first out of the gate when barriers fell to white-collar occupations. One of these was Charlene Drew Jarvis, longtime District of Columbia Councilwoman, who started out in 1965 as a neuroscientist at the National Institute of Health. Another was Geri Thomas, former Chief Diversity Officer at Bank of America, started at the bank when she was a sophomore at Georgia State (and the bank was still Citizens and Southern National). Both women came from educated parents (Drew Jarvis’s father was a physician and researcher who pioneered blood banks). But neither came from families that could help them fulfill their ambition in a predominantly white workplace—and be seen as leaders. Thomas describes working literally in the back offices of the bank for white supervisors, encountering not one person of color until she reached the sidewalk on her lunch break, because management didn’t want black people interacting with customers and didn’t trust women with anything but admin or support roles. Drew Jarvis, with a Ph.D in neuropsychology from the University of Maryland, wanted to be recognized for her performance and work ethic, not her gender or color—so tried “never to present as a threat.” In a white bookstore, she took pains to impress the salesclerk with her diction and erudition, lest her color make him think she was ignorant. Both women, that is, suffered from invisibility even as they stood out like unicorns, either because others insisted they not be seen or because, eager to be seen as equal, they elected to downplay what made them different. Fifty years later, invisibility continues to cloak ambitious black women—as our interviews make clear — for much the same reasons. Capable and credentialed, a black lawyer at a DC firm explained how she took on an extra-heavy caseload and kept her head down, lest she be seen as “an affirmative-action choice.” A leader at a global investment bank explained how her role came “with training wheels,” with a limited remit and extensive oversight, because senior management wasn’t confident she could be trusted with strategic decisions and couldn’t allow her in such a visible role to fail (thereby exaggerating the likelihood that she would). Employee resource groups (ERGs), sometimes known as affinity groups, are the corporation’s answer to this sort of struggle: at most multinational firms, there are ERGs for women, African Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans, LGBT professionals, veterans, and employees with disabilities. Yet as with the Women’s and Civil Rights Movements, affinity groups leave those at the intersections of more than one identity–black women, or gay Latinos, or disabled Asians, or female vets—unseen and unsupported. Their goals may be the same: meaningful work that grows their skills, recognizes their effort, and rewards their performance. But their unique challenges in gaining the attention, and earning the advocacy, of senior leaders who differ from them in more than one way go unacknowledged and unaddressed. Lacking the pull of someone powerful, they languish in middle management. Or they leave. Black women, our research shows, are a case in point: they have mentors and strong support networks but lack sponsors—leaders who will talk them up behind closed doors, steer plum assignments their way, and defend them against detractors. Affinity group membership might expose them to such leaders, but as members of the women’s network they are eclipsed by white women and as members of the African-American ERG they are eclipsed by black men. The solution? ERGs needn’t go away, but they do need to acknowledge identities at the intersections, and address how the challenges of, say, women might differ in important ways depending on generation, ethnicity, sexual orientation, or veteran status. When ERGs organize events to solidify member bonds, they might consider content with wider appeal and open the event to other ERGs—to bridge, as well as bond. Better yet, ERGs might morph into BRGs, business resource groups that enlist leaders in solving issues critical to the business. That alliance allows for sponsorship to arise more organically, as leaders get to know and trust group members by working side by side toward a common goal. Finally, leaders themselves need to acknowledge that invisibility for talent at the intersections is due to blinders they wear, and resist putting aside. The Old Boys’ Network persists not necessarily because white men are racist and sexist, but rather, because aligning yourself as the champion and protector of some rising star carries considerable reputational risk, and it’s just easier to trust someone who reminds you of yourself. It’s a reflex, especially in environments that are short on cross-silo or cross-ERG occasions that allow people to get to know one another in ways that bridge difference, solidify commonality, and build trust. Leaders must create a culture in which people at the intersections of functional or affinity identities have equal access to their attention or equal opportunity to earn it. That ambitious black women feel stuck and stalled speaks to this larger problem of identity siloes within the workplace, which is often the one place in America where we consistently rub shoulders with people unlike ourselves. To tap the talent of leaders whose identities lie at the intersections (surely a majority of the men and women working in corporate America today) we need leaders who create constant opportunities for cultural intersections where commonality can emerge; and who incentivize sponsorship of diverse talent by rewarding those who resist the reflex to advocate for “mini me’s.” In that inclusive workplace, sponsorship can arise organically across difference, and no one worthy of consideration for leadership falls off the radar. In that workplace, history may no longer haunt us—or hobble the talent that’s ready to lead.

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24 июня, 15:02

Alexander Machkevitch

Alexander Machkevitch, Chairman of the Board of Directors, Eurasian Resources Group S.a.r.l. (ERG)

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24 июня, 14:59

Александр Машкевич

Александр Машкевич, председатель совета директоров, Eurasian Resources Group S.a.r.l. (ERG)

23 июня, 10:00

Уникальную книгу о героях-казахстанцах передали екатеринбургской библиотеке

     В Свердловскую областную библиотеку им. В.Г. Белинского (г. Екатеринбург) передана двухтомная книга "Герои Великой Победы – казахстанцы", подареннаясотрудникам Экспертного клуба "Урал-Евразия" в городе Кокшетау, Республика Казахстан (РК) накануне 9 мая. Теперь жители одного из крупнейших городов России получили возможность ближе познакомиться с вкладом казахстанцев в Победу в Великой Отечественной войне. ЭК "Урал-Евразия" и Свердловская областная библиотека им. В.Г. Белинского выражают благодарность партии "Нур Отан" и лично первому заместителю Акмолинского областного филиала партии Галыму Бекмагамбетову за такой ценный подарок городу Екатеринбургу и за тот огромный труд, который был вложен в создание энциклопедии.  Передача уникального издания Свердловской библиотеке состоялась в памятный для всех жителей бывшего Советского Союза день – 22 июня, в 75-ую годовщину начала Великой Отечественной войны. В эти же дни презентация энциклопедии, которая содержит биографические справки о 615 Героях Советского Союза выходцев из Казахстана, а также данные о героях, награжденных знаком "Халык Кахарманы" ("Народный Герой", 9 человек) уже после обретения Казахстаном независимости, проходит и в ряде городов соседней с Россией республики.  Издание в 2-х томах является результатом совместной работы Института общественной политики партии «Нұр Отан» и Международного института интеграции социогуманитарных исследований «Интеллект Орда». Спонсором проекта выступила казахстанская компания Евразийская Группа (ERG). В Редакционную коллегию книги «Герои Великой Победы — казахстанцы» были приглашены крупные и авторитетные специалисты по истории Великой Отечественной войны из России и Беларуси. Успешной реализации проекта способствовали депутаты Парламента РК, Министерства обороны РК, областные, городские, районные и сельские акиматы, Республиканский Совет генералов, Республиканский Совет ветеранов, архивы, библиотеки и многие другие. Особо отмечается помощь со стороны зарубежных официальных организаций, государственных и общественных учреждений и граждан из России, Узбекистана, Кыргызстана и США. На сегодняшний день живы шестеро Героев Советского Союза — казахстанцев — это уроженцы Акмолинской (Киселёв Яков Митрофанович), Восточно-Казахстанской (Борозенец Степан Николаевич, Косенков Иван Васильевич), бывших Семипалатинской (Зарудин Юрий Федорович) и Тургайской (Суриков Эмиль Иванович), Карагандинской областей (Григорьев Николай Михайлович). Совсем недавно 8 февраля 2016 года скончался Рой Алексей Хрисанфович (бывшая Кокчетавская область). В рамках создания двухтомной книги были проведены работы и по другим вопросам, среди которых:     создание общего списка героев-казахстанцев, а также сводного по регионам; составление и уточнение Списка Халық каhарманы из числа участников ВОВ; сравнительный анализ документальных и библиографических данных; уточнение базы информации о подвигах, отраженных в наградных листах; унификация информации по дискуссионным вопросам темы; проведение сравнительного анализа уже изданных материалов и базы данных, собранных партией «Нұр Отан»; уточнение написания фамилий, имен, отчеств героев; уточнение дат жизни и смерти,    и многое другое.Пресс-служба ЭК "Урал-Евразия"

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22 июня, 18:15

Alexander Mashkevic

Alexander Mashkevich, Chairman of the Board of Directors, Eurasian Resources Group S.a.r.l. (ERG)

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20 июня, 09:24

Gefährden ETFs die Effizienz der Märkte?

Sind börsennotierte Indexfonds (ETFs) eine Gefahr für die Effizienz der Kapitalmärkte? Dies ist nicht nur in der Wissenschaft ein viel diskutiertes Thema. Auf den ersten Blick ist die These relativ