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28 марта, 14:03

Republicans Are About To Kill Rules Banning Internet Providers From Sharing Your Web History

WASHINGTON ― The Republican-led Congress is jamming through a measure to overturn the Obama administration’s rules that would have banned telecom and cable companies from sharing customers’ personal information, including web browsing history, without their consent.   The House is expected to vote on the bill on Tuesday. Its companion passed the Senate last week on a 50-48 vote, largely on party lines. If the House passes the bill and President Donald Trump signs it into law, internet service providers will win a regulatory victory. But advocates say consumers can kiss network privacy goodbye. “ISPs will be able to sell your personal information to the highest bidder...and they won’t have any real obligation to keep your personal information secure, either,” said Gigi Sohn, who served as counselor to former Federal Communications Commission chairman Tom Wheeler from November 2013 to December 2016. The FCC adopted rules last October that required companies like Comcast and Verizon to get their customers’ explicit permission before they could share “sensitive” data like Social Security numbers, information pertaining to children, or health information. Under the rules — which are not yet in effect — companies also had to tell customers and law enforcement if a potentially harmful data breach occurred. (Verizon is the parent company of The Huffington Post.) The bill uses the Congressional Review Act, which allows lawmakers to undo any regulation within 60 days of its finalization, while also barring agencies from writing a “substantially” similar rule after the original one has been overturned. That means there’s a chance the FCC might be banned from regulating ISP privacy issues in the future, said David Segal, executive director of Demand Progress, a grassroots group. Trump ran a populist campaign, but his vision for the FCC, a government agency that is supposed to protect consumers from predatory telecom and cable companies, is shaping up to be the opposite, consumer advocates say. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai has also opposed the Obama administration’s privacy rules as commissioner. The rules drew concern from staff of the bureau of consumer protection at the Federal Trade Commission when they were proposed. They noted that the rules “would impose a number of specific requirements ... that would not generally apply to other services that collect and use significant amount of consumer data. This outcome is not optimal.” Internet service providers say it’s not fair that they have to be subject to regulations that tech giants like Facebook and Google, which the FTC oversees, don’t have to follow. Republicans have argued in favor of a privacy framework based on the FTC’s approach. But the rules by that agency moderate industry behavior after harm occurs, according to Sohn — while the FCC’s regulations have the power to protect consumers before they are harmed. Advocates, as well as Democrats, say that it doesn’t make sense to regulate an ISP ― which has access to everything a person does online ― like Google, which only sees some of a person’s internet traffic. As a consumer, “if I don’t like the practices of Google, I can go to Bing; if I don’t like the practices of Bing, I can go to Firefox,” Wheeler told The Huffington Post. “But if I don’t like the practice of my network provider, I’m out of luck,” the former FCC chairman added. He said that “consumers have entered into a business relationship with ISPs that ISPs are now seeking to change ... [but] it’s not their information, it’s the consumers’ information. Overturning the rules would be a win for the 21st Century Privacy Coalition, a group that former Federal Trade Commission chairman Jon Leibowitz leads, which has spent millions of dollars on lobbying in the past few years and is backed by telecom companies. “I can’t tell you [the bill] is not repealing privacy regulations, it’s a pretty blunt instrument of repeal, CRA” Leibowitz told the HuffPost. But he said, “in a very partisan Washington, where often the only choices are binary, the FCC passed a very flawed regulation, one that was criticized by the FTC, my former agency.”  He argued that if the bill is enacted, the FCC can still continue to protect privacy, and can write another rule, “if that rule takes a different approach.” When asked whether he thought a repeal would improve privacy for consumers, he said only that the proposed rule will “increase costs to consumers and reduce choices, and reduce competition for privacy.” But consumer advocates aren’t buying it. “It’s special interest lobbying as usual,” said Jeff Chester, executive director of the Center for Digital Democracy. Segal of Demand Progress said, “these companies are just trying to exploit consumers’ data towards ends of private profit.” The bill is expected to pass, but its critics aren’t giving up hope. As of Monday, the Congressional Progressive Caucus, said it was opposed to the measure and would be pushing for Congress members to vote against it. The office of Rep. Mark Pocan (D-Wis.), first vice chair of that caucus, also noted that they had received a fair amount of calls and emails in opposition to removing the rule. “Considering how much access providers already have to highly sensitive data, it is absolutely unacceptable for them to monetize personal information,” Pocan said. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

27 марта, 21:36

U.S. Senate Votes to Eliminate FCC's Broadband Privacy Rules

Recently, the U.S. Senate voted against a set of privacy rules for broadband service providers, previously proposed by the telecom regulator FCC under the democratic administration of President Obama.

27 марта, 19:11

FROM THE NETWORK THAT BROUGHT YOU RATHERGATE: CBS’s Ted Koppel views Sean Hannity and “all these…

FROM THE NETWORK THAT BROUGHT YOU RATHERGATE: CBS’s Ted Koppel views Sean Hannity and “all these opinion shows” as “bad for America:” “You have attracted people who are determined that ideology is more important than facts,” said Koppel to Hannity. “That’s sad, Ted,” said Hannity to Koppel. “You’re selling the American people short,” he added, describing […]

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27 марта, 15:30

10 Monday AM Reads

Deep from the Heart of Texas: Our Austin sourced morning reads: • How Sears CEO Lampert cashes in as stores cash out (USA Today) • The reason Hollywood’s studio leadership is in flux: The business model is changing (LA Times) • The Dow’s tumultuous 120-year history, in one chart (MarketWatch) • There are 2.4 billion robo-calls every month. The FCC… Read More The post 10 Monday AM Reads appeared first on The Big Picture.

24 марта, 19:08

В США провайдерам разрешили без спроса продавать данные клиентов

Ранее компании должны были запрашивать согласие клиентов на использование их конфиденциальных данных.Сенат США проголосовал за отмену правил конфиденциальности, обязывающих американских провайдеров запрашивать у клиентов разрешение на использование, обмен или продажу конфиденциальной информации рекламным и другим компаниям.Правила приватности были одобрены в октябре 2016 года Федеральной комиссией по связи США (Federal Communications Commission, FCC), при администрации Барака Обамы. Правила обязывали компании, такие как Comcast, Verizon и AT&T, заручиться согласием пользователей прежде, чем использовать или торговать их конфиденциальной информацией, такой как история просмотров в браузере, данные мобильных приложений, электронной почты, online-чатов и т.д. Данная политика вызвала сопротивление у провайдеров в связи с тем, что усложняла "монетизацию" персональной информации пользователей.Решение Сената вызвало возмущение у защитников прав потребителей, которые обвинили законодателей в том, что они ставят финансовые интересы нескольких корпоративных гигантов превыше конфиденциальности американских граждан."Данное голосование - явный знак, что интересы американцев представляются второстепенными в сравнении с интересами интернет-провайдеров. Без правил FCC американцы превратятся из интернет-пользователей в маркетинговые данные - из людей в продукт", - подчеркнул эксперт правозащитной группы Public Knowledge Даллас Хэррис (Dallas Harris).За отмену указа проголосовали 50 сенаторов-республиканцев, против - 48 демократов. Теперь резолюция должна пройти через Палату представителей и получить подпись президента США Дональда Трампа.(http://www.securitylab.ru...)

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24 марта, 14:33

HMM: Senate votes to kill FCC’s broadband privacy rules. The Senate’s 50-48 vote Thursday on a re…

HMM: Senate votes to kill FCC’s broadband privacy rules. The Senate’s 50-48 vote Thursday on a resolution of disapproval would roll back Federal Communications Commission rules requiring broadband providers to receive opt-in customer permission to share sensitive personal information, including web-browsing history, geolocation, and financial details with third parties. The FCC approved the regulations just […]

24 марта, 13:54

Американским провайдерам разрешили без спроса торговать пользовательскими данными

Сенат США проголосовал за отмену указа, обязывающего американских интернет-провайдеров запрашивать у клиентов разрешение на использование их персональных данных, таких как история посещенных веб-сайтов. Теперь постановление должно быть одобрено Палатой представителей.

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24 марта, 09:51

Планшет-трансформер Huawei MateBook второго поколения замечен на сайтах регуляторов

На сайтах Федеральной комиссии по связи США (FCC) и организации Bluetooth Special Interest Group (SIG) появилась информация сразу о нескольких модификациях портативного компьютера Huawei MateBook второго поколения. Оригинальная модель MateBook, показанная на изображениях, дебютировала на прошлогодней выставке MWC. Устройство оборудовано 12,9-дюймовым экраном с разрешением 2560 × 1400 точек, процессором Intel Core-M и твердотельным накопителем вместимостью до 512 Гбайт. Подсоединяемая клавиатура позволяет превратить гаджет в мини-ноутбук.

24 марта, 01:11

U.S. Banks Stock Outlook - March 2017

U.S. Banks Stock Outlook - March 2017

24 марта, 01:06

Senate Republicans Vote To Overturn Internet Privacy Protections

By David Shepardson WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Senate on Thursday voted narrowly to repeal regulations requiring internet service providers to do more to protect customers’ privacy than websites like Alphabet Inc’s Google or Facebook Inc . The vote was along party lines, with 50 Republicans approving the measure and 48 Democrats rejecting it. The two remaining Republicans in the Senate were absent and did not cast a vote. According to the rules approved by the Federal Communications Commission in October under then-President Barack Obama, internet providers would need to obtain consumer consent before using precise geolocation, financial information, health information, children’s information and web browsing history for advertising and internal marketing. The vote was a victory for internet providers such as AT&T Inc , Comcast Corp and Verizon Communications Inc , which had strongly opposed the rules. The bill next goes to the U.S. House of Representatives, but it was not clear when they would take up the measure. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said the Senate was overturning a regulation that “makes the internet an uneven playing field, increases complexity, discourages competition, innovation, and infrastructure investment.” But Democratic Senator Ed Markey said, “Republicans have just made it easier for American’s sensitive information about their health, finances and families to be used, shared, and sold to the highest bidder without their permission.” FCC Chairman Ajit Pai said consumers would have privacy protections even without the Obama administration internet provider rules. In a joint statement, Democratic members of the FCC and the Federal Trade Commission said the Senate vote “creates a massive gap in consumer protection law as broadband and cable companies now have no discernible privacy requirements.” Republican commissioners, including Pai, said in October that the rules would unfairly give websites like Facebook, Twitter Inc or Google the ability to harvest more data than internet service providers and thus dominate digital advertising. The FCC earlier this month delayed the data rules from taking effect. The Internet and Television Association, a trade group, in a statement praised the vote as a “critical step towards re-establishing a balanced framework that is grounded in the long-standing and successful FTC privacy framework that applies equally to all parties operating online.” Websites are governed by a less restrictive set of privacy rules overseen by the Federal Trade Commission. Jonathan Schwantes, senior policy counsel for advocacy group Consumers Union, said the vote “is a huge step in the wrong direction, and it completely ignores the needs and concerns of consumers.”   (Reporting by David Shepardson; Editing by Chris Reese and Jonathan Oatis) -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

24 марта, 01:06

Senate Republicans Vote To Overturn Internet Privacy Protections

By David Shepardson WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Senate on Thursday voted narrowly to repeal regulations requiring internet service providers to do more to protect customers’ privacy than websites like Alphabet Inc’s Google or Facebook Inc . The vote was along party lines, with 50 Republicans approving the measure and 48 Democrats rejecting it. The two remaining Republicans in the Senate were absent and did not cast a vote. According to the rules approved by the Federal Communications Commission in October under then-President Barack Obama, internet providers would need to obtain consumer consent before using precise geolocation, financial information, health information, children’s information and web browsing history for advertising and internal marketing. The vote was a victory for internet providers such as AT&T Inc , Comcast Corp and Verizon Communications Inc , which had strongly opposed the rules. The bill next goes to the U.S. House of Representatives, but it was not clear when they would take up the measure. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said the Senate was overturning a regulation that “makes the internet an uneven playing field, increases complexity, discourages competition, innovation, and infrastructure investment.” But Democratic Senator Ed Markey said, “Republicans have just made it easier for American’s sensitive information about their health, finances and families to be used, shared, and sold to the highest bidder without their permission.” FCC Chairman Ajit Pai said consumers would have privacy protections even without the Obama administration internet provider rules. In a joint statement, Democratic members of the FCC and the Federal Trade Commission said the Senate vote “creates a massive gap in consumer protection law as broadband and cable companies now have no discernible privacy requirements.” Republican commissioners, including Pai, said in October that the rules would unfairly give websites like Facebook, Twitter Inc or Google the ability to harvest more data than internet service providers and thus dominate digital advertising. The FCC earlier this month delayed the data rules from taking effect. The Internet and Television Association, a trade group, in a statement praised the vote as a “critical step towards re-establishing a balanced framework that is grounded in the long-standing and successful FTC privacy framework that applies equally to all parties operating online.” Websites are governed by a less restrictive set of privacy rules overseen by the Federal Trade Commission. Jonathan Schwantes, senior policy counsel for advocacy group Consumers Union, said the vote “is a huge step in the wrong direction, and it completely ignores the needs and concerns of consumers.”   (Reporting by David Shepardson; Editing by Chris Reese and Jonathan Oatis) -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

23 марта, 22:52

Perdue had a long wait for a short confirmation hearing — and nailed it

There’s at least one thing on Capitol Hill that President Donald Trump doesn’t have to worry about right now: his nominee for agriculture secretary.Former Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue, Trump’s pick to lead the Department of Agriculture, sailed through his confirmation hearing before the Senate Agriculture Committee on Thursday with a mix of folksy charm and forthright answers — and few, if any, hardball questions hurled his way.Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle expressed concern that Trump has not made rural or agricultural issues a priority since taking office, despite the downturn in the farm economy, but Perdue assured them repeatedly and firmly that he would be a strong advocate for the industry, if confirmed.“Agriculture is in my heart, and I look forward to fighting for the producers of America,” Perdue told the committee. “I will absolutely be an advocate and a fighter, where necessary.”Perdue, who wore a tie with tractors on it and often drew on his experience of being raised on a farm in Georgia, pledged that he would stand shoulder-to-shoulder with the Trump administration’s top trade negotiators to ensure that U.S. agriculture, which is extremely reliant on exports, doesn’t get shortchanged by trade shakeups or any of the new bilateral deals the president wants to pursue. He committed to fighting to protect key rural and farm programs from the administration’s proposed budget cuts and to working to make sure farmers have an adequate supply of foreign workers to harvest their crops despite the administration’s crackdown on undocumented immigrants.Committee Chairman Pat Roberts (R-Kan.) said he intends to hold a business meeting to vote on Perdue’s nomination as soon as possible, with the aim of getting the full Senate to take quick action. “I think we will have a good vote, and we have told the leadership we would like to move him as soon as possible, and the leadership has agreed,” Roberts told reporters after the hearing. “This has been a very good hearing.”As for whether a final vote would happen before the Easter recess, Roberts would only say that “hope springs eternal.”In the lead-up to the hearing, which came weeks later than the agriculture industry would have liked, Perdue knew he had at least one Democrat on his side. Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (D-N.D.), a Senate Agriculture member, announced in early February that she would back Perdue, a Republican who served two terms as Georgia governor.Other Democrats are now saying they will do the same — a sign that his confirmation is a lock.“We have a nominee who understands agriculture, grew up on a dairy farm, and after multiple discussions with him, I feel that he can do a good job of running the department,” Sen. Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.), the committee’s ranking member, said after the hearing. “Barring anything that comes up in questions for the record and so on, I’m planning on supporting him.”Perdue’s confirmation hearing could not have been more different than those experienced by most of Trump’s other Cabinet nominees, who weathered Democratic boycotts, sustained protests and marathon sessions. The hearing may have been late in coming but it was over quickly, lasting roughly two hours. It went so smoothly that Perdue got far more invitations from farm state senators to go hunting and nods to his 14 grandchildren than he did controversial questions. The only exception to the orderly process came during Perdue’s opening statement, when an animal-rights protester in the audience held up a sign featuring pigs on it that said: “We Want to Live.” Roberts halted Perdue’s speech, but it lasted but a minute. Lawmakers wrapped up the session just before 1 p.m. in order to make it to a vote on an initiative to roll back the Obama-era FCC’s broadband privacy rules.Perdue did not face a single question about a string of ethics concerns dating to his time as governor. Nor did Democrats ask him whether he believes in climate change.“If we had not shortly had a vote that will be called on the floor … I’d intend to raise those,” Stabenow said, referring to the FCC measure. “But given the situation with the votes on the floor, I will raise those for the record, and have raised those with him privately. … My feeling is that he answered the questions.”As POLITICO reported recently, Perdue has a record of appointing donors and business associates to various positions in state government. Democrats’ failure to question him on climate change was puzzling, since many scientists and agricultural experts believe it could make it more difficult for farmers to grow their crops. Perdue has criticized liberals for connecting severe weather events to climate change, contending that “they’ve lost all credibility” because their arguments are “ridiculous and so disconnected from reality.”The committee also did not question Perdue thoroughly about the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, commonly known as food stamps, a program that serves more than 40 million Americans and makes up roughly 75 percent of USDA spending. Many Republicans see it as a place where cuts could be made. Perdue was briefly asked if he supports delivering more food to families in need.“We can do that even more efficiently and effectively than we have,” he responded. “It’s certainly important to the children and families of America.” To be sure, Agriculture secretaries have a history of being relatively uncontroversial. President Barack Obama’s pick, Tom Vilsack, was approved by unanimous consent, and the last time any “nay” votes were cast for an Agriculture secretary was during the Reagan administration: Two senators cast votes against Richard Lyng when he was up for approval in 1986.This time around, the White House’s weeks-long delay in providing Senate Agriculture with Perdue’s supporting paperwork meant that he had an unusually long time to meet with lawmakers and make his case ahead of the hearing. He was the last Cabinet nominee Trump named, an announcement that came on the eve of Inauguration Day, and is on track to become the last of the lot to be confirmed.The long delay has been a constant concern for both farming and rural advocates, who worry that Trump’s rhetoric and policies on trade and immigration, in particular, and his proposal to cut USDA’s budget, could do enormous damage to their communities.Nearly every senator at the hearing brought up trade’s importance to the farming sector, which currently exports more than 20 percent of its products.“I intend to be on site as USDA’s chief salesman around the world, to sell these products, to negotiate these deals side by side with USTR, side by side with [Commerce] Secretary [Wilbur] Ross and our whole team,” Perdue said, in response to questions from Sen. John Hoeven (R-N.D.).Perdue said he would work "tirelessly" to promote U.S. agricultural products in foreign markets and that he has already been in touch with Robert Lighthizer, Trump's pick for U.S. Trade Representative. He told the committee that during their meeting, Lighthizer told him that 80 percent of what he has heard so far about trade has involved agriculture.“If confirmed, my first stop’s going to be Mr. Lighthizer’s office door,” Perdue said.Perdue fielded several questions from Democrats and Republicans on Trump’s recent “skinny budget,” which called for USDA’s discretionary spending to be reduced by 21 percent — a cut that nearly put the department on par with the trims proposed for EPA, an agency that Republicans loathe."I had no input into the budget," Perdue said, noting he was not permitted to have involvement in the process because he hasn't been confirmed.He said he viewed the budget proposal much like he considered a revenue estimate he didn't like during his time calling the shots in Georgia’s government: "I didn't like it, but we manage to it."“I think the president understands that many of his votes came from many of the areas that you are mentioning,” Perdue said, referring to rural America, which overwhelmingly backed Trump at the polls.“These are important programs," he added. "I recognize that.”Aside from trade and the budget, a running theme throughout the hearing was the plight of American dairy farmers, who are dealing with historically low prices. Sens. Stabenow, Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.), Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) and Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) all sought assurances that Perdue would work on new programs to help dairy producers, both before the 2018 farm bill and within the law itself, when Congress reauthorizes it.Stabenow asked Perdue specifically about a letter sent to USDA this week from the American Farm Bureau Federation, National Farmers Union and National Milk Producers Federation, which requested that the department create a separate category of crop insurance for animal products, like milk, in order to avoid a $20 million cap on insurance policies for the livestock sector.Perdue said the suggestion “intrigued” him, adding that he is “absolutely committed to looking for a way to give immediate and temporary relief ahead of the 2018 farm bill.” He also said any response would have to be “mindful” of budgetary constraints.Perdue promised to work with the White House to ensure access to migrant farm labor year-round, an important issue for agriculture and one that is seemingly at odds with a key point of Trump’s agenda. Farmers face a labor shortage, and a seasonal visa program has proven insufficient.“I think virtually every state in the nation is affected by [the farm labor shortage] to some degree,” Perdue said. “I think there are things we can do with [existing programs], and if I am confirmed, I can commit to you that [farm labor] and trade are things we would work posthaste on.”

23 марта, 21:07

U.S. Senate Votes To Overturn Obama Broadband Privacy Rules

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); The U.S. Senate on Thursday voted narrowly to repeal regulations requiring internet service providers to do more to protect customers’ privacy than websites like Alphabet Inc’s Google (GOOGL.O) or Facebook Inc (FB.O). The vote was along party lines, with 50 Republicans approving the measure and 48 Democrats rejecting it. The two remaining Republicans in the Senate were absent and did not cast a vote. According to the rules approved by the Federal Communications Commission in October under then-President Barack Obama, internet providers would need to obtain consumer consent before using precise geolocation, financial information, health information, children’s information and web browsing history for advertising and internal marketing. The vote was a victory for internet providers such as AT&T Inc (T.N), Comcast Corp (CMCSA.O) and Verizon Communications Inc (VZ.N), which had strongly opposed the rules. The bill next goes to the U.S. House of Representatives, but it was not clear when they would take up the measure. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said the Senate was overturning a regulation that “makes the internet an uneven playing field, increases complexity, discourages competition, innovation, and infrastructure investment.” But Democratic Senator Ed Markey said, “Republicans have just made it easier for American’s sensitive information about their health, finances and families to be used, shared, and sold to the highest bidder without their permission.” FCC Chairman Ajit Pai said consumers would have privacy protections even without the Obama administration internet provider rules. In a joint statement, Democratic members of the FCC and the Federal Trade Commission said the Senate vote “creates a massive gap in consumer protection law as broadband and cable companies now have no discernible privacy requirements.” Republican commissioners, including Pai, said in October that the rules would unfairly give websites like Facebook, Twitter Inc (TWTR.N) or Google the ability to harvest more data than internet service providers and thus dominate digital advertising. The FCC earlier this month delayed the data rules from taking effect. The Internet and Television Association, a trade group, in a statement praised the vote as a “critical step towards re-establishing a balanced framework that is grounded in the long-standing and successful FTC privacy framework that applies equally to all parties operating online.” Websites are governed by a less restrictive set of privacy rules overseen by the Federal Trade Commission. Jonathan Schwantes, senior policy counsel for advocacy group Consumers Union, said the vote “is a huge step in the wrong direction, and it completely ignores the needs and concerns of consumers.” (Reporting by David Shepardson; Editing by Chris Reese and Jonathan Oatis) -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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23 марта, 21:00

FCC moves to crack down on scam robocalls

If there's one thing Americans can still agree on, it's that robocalls are a nuisance. Now a government agency is taking action.

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23 марта, 20:08

There are 2.4 billion robo-calls every month. The FCC wants to help block them.

A new proposal would make it easier to block fraudulent calls.

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23 марта, 20:05

There are 2.4 billion robo-calls every month. The FCC wants to help block them.

A new proposal would make it easier to block fraudulent calls.

22 марта, 17:48

CenturyLink (CTL) and NetApp Team Up on Storage Program

CenturyLink (CTL) has teamed up with NetApp's (NTAP) Unified Partner Program to re-sell storage solutions designed by the latter for enterprises and small-to-midsized businesses.

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22 марта, 17:00

Net Neutrality Rules Are Doomed But The Internet Will Remain Neutral

The end of FCC's net neutrality rules is in the horizon, but the internet will likely remain neutral and fair for the most part, as it has been since its inception.

21 марта, 21:35

Sprint (S) Discontinues Direct 2 You Phone Delivery Service

U.S. national wireless carrier, Sprint Corp. (S) has abandoned its Direct 2 You phone delivery service.

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21 марта, 03:00

Неизвестное устройство Nokia прошло сертификацию в FCC

Неизвестное устройство Nokia прошло сертификацию в FCC. Предполагается, что под идентификационным номером 2AJOTTA-1038 скрывается Nokia 8 - неанонсированный флагман от HMD Global.