• Теги
    • избранные теги
    • Люди665
      • Показать ещё
      Страны / Регионы1090
      • Показать ещё
      Разное433
      • Показать ещё
      Издания88
      • Показать ещё
      Международные организации120
      • Показать ещё
      Формат27
      Компании161
      • Показать ещё
      Показатели38
      • Показать ещё
      Сферы1
Филип Хаммонд
Филип Хэммонд (англ. Philip Hammond; родился 4 декабря 1955) — британский политик от Консервативной партии, министр иностранных дел Великобритании с 15 июля 2014 года. Впервые был избран в парламент в 1997 году от округа Раннимид и Вейбридж.
Филип Хэммонд (англ. Philip Hammond; родился 4 декабря 1955) — британский политик от Консервативной партии, министр иностранных дел Великобритании с 15 июля 2014 года. Впервые был избран в парламент в 1997 году от округа Раннимид и Вейбридж.
Развернуть описание Свернуть описание
22 марта, 21:30

Why becoming a tax haven would be bad news for Britain

Theresa May and Philip Hammond have warned the EU that if they don’t like the Brexit deal, they could turn the UK into a tax haven. The truth is that being ‘offshore’ means being unfair and undemocratic – and you still pay taxMost of us take democracy for granted, but you would have to think again if you lived in a tax haven. Singapore has had the same party in power since 1959. Jersey, meanwhile, has never had a general election, the members of its parliament (the States) being subject to re-election at varying times. But at least Jersey has a political party – called Reform Jersey – even if it only holds three seats in the States. All the remaining elected politicians claim to be independents, although they seem to have a decidedly pro-finance approach in common. Neighbouring Guernsey has no parties at all. Continue reading...

Выбор редакции
22 марта, 14:20

With so much dirty money around, it’s time to make UK banks clean up their act | John McDonnell

It’s vital the chancellor steps up to ensure the financial system is fit for purpose – especially taxpayer-owned RBS – to restore the public’s confidence in itThe revelations published in the Guardian yesterday about the criminal network that is processing money through major British banks are a damning indictment of the failings of our banking system. For a period of at least four years, shortly after the financial crisis in the early 2010s, Russian criminal interests moved nearly $740m through British banks, including HSBC, RBS, Barclays, Lloyds and Coutts, with HSBC as the largest conduit by far.They could do this, despite regulations expressly designed to prevent such activity taking place. Yet, when presented with a series of urgent questions, demanding answers and action, the response from the government was astonishingly complacent. A mere week after the self-employment tax U-turn, it is following a path well-worn since 2010 – pathetically easy on the big banks and the super-rich, but tough on those just trying to earn a living. Continue reading...

Выбор редакции
20 марта, 19:43

Save London's high streets from business rate hike, says mayor

Sadiq Khan fears loss of vibrant and diverse character if family-run and independent shops are forced to closeIndependent and family-run businesses could be forced off London’s high streets by the sharp rise in business rates that will come into force from April, spoiling the character of local communities, Sadiq Khan has warned.The mayor of London said businesses in the capital faced a “clear and present risk” from the tax and accused the government of not doing enough to help. Continue reading...

19 марта, 10:00

Even the biggest scoops slide into the past

The Times’s revelations about Andrea Leadsom won an award last week. How long ago her leadership bid seems nowThe stickiest category of the lot at the Press Awards is always Scoop of the Year, demonstrating perennially that a week is a long time in daily journalism and 12 months is an eternity of forgetfulness. So the great prize for 2016 goes to Rachel Sylvester for her Times interview with Andrea Leadsom proclaiming that “being a mother” gave her the edge over Theresa May.Andrea who? Seldom in history has the woman who might have been PM vanished so completely in the dark tunnels of Whitehall. And, meanwhile, the scoops keep coming. Here’s Laura Kuenssberg, winning a BBC badge of honour for telling Philip Hammond he’d got his Nics in a twist. Here’s Michael Crick of Channel 4 rejoicing as the Electoral Commission finally pursues Tory election expense fiddles. Continue reading...

17 марта, 17:50

Theresa May's difficult week could be more than just a glitch

Election expenses scandal and Sturgeon’s ambush see PM’s reputation as a safe pair of hands questioned as never before Theresa May launched a slick new government website on Thursday, promising a “plan for Britain”, but for the first hour or so it just displayed an error message.Technical gremlins can attack at any time, but somehow the glitch felt symbolic of the prime minister’s week. Continue reading...

17 марта, 17:11

Brexit diaries: 'We are at a turning point in the UK's political history'

A second vote on Scottish independence splits opinion – as does the chancellor’s failure to mention Brexit in his budgetThe pattern has been the same among our Brexit diarists for the past 10 weeks: Theresa May is felt to be significantly outperforming Jeremy Corbyn when it comes to her approach to the EU across most leavers and remainers, Conservative and Labour supporters. This week the score was an average of 5.7 out of 10 for the prime minister and 2.9 out of 10 for the Labour leader, with both marked down by remain voters. Continue reading...

Выбор редакции
17 марта, 11:59

If big business is to thrive, it needs a strong welfare state | Phil McDuff

The entrepreneurial spirit cannot flourish if people don’t feel valued, rewarded and, above all, sheltered from severe economic turbulenceUnleash the power of markets and the private sector will deliver returns that raise everyone’s living standards: that’s the market liberalism argument. However, for a decade now we have been living in a world where the opposite is true. GDP rises but wages shrink. The financial crisis was 10 years ago but austerity looks set to continue into the middle of the next decade, as we endlessly wait for the recovery that’s always round the corner.The chancellor, Philip Hammond, berated Labour during his budget speech for wanting to “saddle our children and burden our future”, but young people who entered the jobs market in 2010 will be in their mid-to-late 30s before austerity is projected to end. It’s not “protecting our children’s future” to keep them in low-waged, precarious work from 18 to 38. The UK government is issuing 40-year bonds at 1.87% and, in a fit of perversity, we’re “protecting” our children from those interest payments by forcing them to take payday loans at 1,500%. Continue reading...

Выбор редакции
16 марта, 23:29

Tories condemn May over chancellor's national insurance humiliation

Prime minister accused of shabby treatment of Philip Hammond, while one ex-minister says there is ‘a battle for the future of our party’Moderate Conservative backbenchers have rallied behind Philip Hammond and said Theresa May should have done more to defend his plan to increase national insurance contributions for the self-employed. Related: Theresa May declares 'absolute faith' in Hammond after U-turn Continue reading...

Выбор редакции
16 марта, 19:56

Theresa May declares 'absolute faith' in Hammond after U-turn

Prime minister backs chancellor after decision to drop national insurance rates policy that sparked backbench revoltTheresa May has said she has “absolute faith” in the chancellor, Philip Hammond, a day after he dropped his key budget measure of increasing national insurance rates for the self-employed.Interviewed by ITV News, the prime minister was asked whether Hammond should have resigned following the U-turn. She said: “I have absolute faith in the chancellor. We made very clear yesterday, he and I, about the tax lock, that we recognised the spirit of the manifesto and the change has been made.” Continue reading...

16 марта, 18:55

Promises, promises: Just what is the status of the Conservative manifesto?

Print section Print Rubric:  A U-turn on tax highlights the odd status of a sacred, yet disposable, document Print Headline:  Promises, promises Print Fly Title:  The Conservative Party manifesto UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  The global economy enjoys a synchronised upswing Fly Title:  Promises, promises Main image:  Cameron? Never heard of him Cameron? Never heard of him PHILIP HAMMOND’S budget of March 8th was short and rather sensible. But it blew up spectacularly over a promise to raise taxes on the self-employed. The chancellor’s tax plan was extremely modest, representing less than 0.1% of public spending. Yet the response from Conservative backbenchers and the right-wing press—who, with Labour under inept leadership, form the main opposition to the government these days—was apoplectic. The Sun even offered its readers bumper stickers bearing ...

16 марта, 18:55

Promises, promises: Just what is the status of the Conservative manifesto?

Print section Print Rubric:  A U-turn on tax highlights the odd status of a sacred, yet disposable, document Print Headline:  Promises, promises Print Fly Title:  The Conservative Party manifesto UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  The global economy enjoys a synchronised upswing Fly Title:  Promises, promises Main image:  Cameron? Never heard of him Cameron? Never heard of him PHILIP HAMMOND’S budget of March 8th was short and rather sensible. But it blew up spectacularly over a promise to raise taxes on the self-employed. The chancellor’s tax plan was extremely modest, representing less than 0.1% of public spending. Yet the response from Conservative backbenchers and the right-wing press—who, with Labour under inept leadership, form the main opposition to the government these days—was apoplectic. The Sun even offered its readers bumper stickers bearing ...

Выбор редакции
16 марта, 16:26

We must pay more tax, or be complicit in the slow death of public services | Duncan Weldon

Philip Hammond’s retreat on national insurance bodes ill for the role of the state as British people have known it since 1945Yesterday the chancellor abruptly U-turned on a planned rise in national insurance contributions (NICs) for the self-employed. The proposed change was a sensible move. It was a progressive rise in tax – no one earning under £16,000 would have been affected, and most of the money raised came from the top 20% of earners – and was a step in the right direction of responding to changing patterns of employment. The sudden reversal does leave the budget with a £2bn hole, but in the context of the public finances this is merely a rounding error. However, it raises bigger questions for our political system and our ability to raise taxes. Related: Tax will torment the Conservatives long after the Brexit rage fades | Matthew d’Ancona Continue reading...

Выбор редакции
16 марта, 09:00

May hung Hammond out to dry over his budget U-turn | Simon Jenkins

Failing to back up a minister in trouble leaves the prime minister a pushover for backbenchers with a grievanceA screeching U-turn, a climbdown, a budgetary black hole, a humiliation. It is hard to explain the bizarre events in the Commons on Wednesday as the prime minister toppled a key pillar of her chancellor’s week-old budget. The reversal was “announced” in a letter to the Treasury committee. Related: Good riddance to the unfair NIC tax rise. Now what about that £2bn black hole? | John McDonnell Continue reading...

Выбор редакции
16 марта, 06:16

Philip Hammond: National Insurance U-turn to 'keep public's trust'

Chancellor says not going ahead with NI rises for the self-employed shows the government is listening.

Выбор редакции
15 марта, 22:55

Martin Rowson on Philip Hammond’s budget U-turn – cartoon

Chancellor scraps national insurance rise for the self-employed, admitting it broke Tory manifesto promise Continue reading...

Выбор редакции
15 марта, 21:45

The Guardian view on the budget U-turn: a climbdown that shows where power lies | Editorial

Philip Hammond was right to reopen the question of national insurance contributions by the self-employed. But the press and backbench Tory MPs would not let himEven by the standards of recent budget U-turns – and there have been quite a few of those – the one performed on Wednesday by Theresa May and Philip Hammond takes some beating. Seven days after announcing an increase in national insurance contributions for the self-employed, the prime minister and the chancellor bent the knee on Wednesday morning by scrapping it. An about-face is rarely good for a political reputation. But this was an about-face on both a fiscal measure worth £2bn that played a prominent role in last week’s budget, and on a philosophical issue about fairness that is close to the heart of Mrs May’s inclusive conservatism.The U-turn on NICs tells us where power lies in Mrs May’s party. It makes clear that power does not, after all, lie with her to the degree some have assumed. A leader who has been talked up as one of the strongest prime ministers of recent times first had to pause a relatively minor fiscal measure – £2bn is not a vast sum in the context of government spending – and then ordered an abject retreat. Continue reading...

Выбор редакции
15 марта, 20:58

Philip Hammond digs deep as he explains his NICs U-turn

It had been absolutely right to raise contributions, the chancellor said, which was why he was no longer going to do itThe phone call had come through just after eight in the morning while Phil “The Undertaker” Hammond was eating breakfast. It was the prime minister ordering him to bury Class 4 NICs. He had tried telling her that doing a U-turn on your only real budget measure less than a week after it had been announced made him and the government look hopelessly incompetent, but Theresa wasn’t having any of it. The Tory backbenchers were on her back. The Daily Mail was on her back. And now she was on his back.Six hours later The Undertaker rather sheepishly arrived in the Commons to try to explain how it was that, though he still absolutely stood by his budget because it was his budget that was his, he now wanted to fundamentally change it because although he hadn’t broken any promises in the Conservative party manifesto, as that’s not the sort of thing he would ever dream of doing, he had in fact broken the promises he had made in the Conservative party manifesto. Continue reading...

Выбор редакции
15 марта, 20:50

Good riddance to the unfair NIC tax rise. Now what about that £2bn black hole? | John McDonnell

The chancellor must tell us how extra social care will be funded, after Jeremy Corbyn, Labour and civic society forced him into a U-turnThe government’s U-turn on the unfair £2bn national insurance hike for the self-employed is a humiliation for chancellor Philip Hammond, who has shredded his reputation after only his first budget – and broke a manifesto promise to do it. Labour opposed the measure from the start: Jeremy Corbyn made our opposition loud and clear in his immediate budget response, and Labour MPs hammered the same message home over the next few days. Opposition came from all sides of the house, and from business organisations like the Federation of Small Businesses, leaving the Tory leadership completely isolated.The chancellor’s climbdown will be a huge relief to all those self-employed workers and businesspeople, earning as little as £8,000 a year, who faced a serious increase in their tax bill at a time when average pay for the self-employed has fallen dramatically – their average earnings are now just £12,480 a year. Continue reading...

Выбор редакции
15 марта, 18:53

A record breaker

Philip Hammond's National Insurance U-turn may be the quickest ever - here are the other contenders.

Выбор редакции
15 марта, 15:55

Hammond's NICs U-turn is a political disaster for the government | Larry Elliott

Chancellor’s change of heart raises the question of who’s in charge at the Treasury: Hammond, May or the Daily Mail?Not so funny now, is it chancellor? A week to the day since he peppered his debut budget speech with gags to disguise its thinness, Philip Hammond has just done a screeching U-turn.There was only one measure of note in the package – an increase in national insurance contributions for the self-employed – and from the moment it was announced the proposal caused a firestorm of criticism. Continue reading...