• Теги
    • избранные теги
    • Компании30
      • Показать ещё
      Страны / Регионы27
      • Показать ещё
      Разное22
      • Показать ещё
      Люди1
      Издания4
      Сферы1
      Международные организации1
Formosa Plastics
26 октября, 18:41

Plastics Lobby Hopes Voters Will Unban Its Bags

This story originally appeared in Capital & Main. Sign up for email alerts from Capital & Main. When the tiny, picturesque community of Bisbee, Arizona, decided to ban single-use plastic bags in 2014, leaders in the plastics industry worried Bisbee had sparked a trend. Other Arizona cities—Kingman, Flagstaff, Tempe—were considering similar restrictions; soon, the bag makers feared, the whole state would fall. So they did what corporate lobbyists do in a reliably conservative state: They persuaded legislators and the governor to declare bans like Bisbee’s illegal. Next door in deep blue California, where more than 150 local jurisdictions have already banned the bags, defending the market sector of the single-use plastic bag has proved altogether more complicated. Sixty percent of polled Californians say they support a plastic bag ban; rescinding the existing bans would be impossible. So instead the industry put its muscle into holding off a statewide ban. For a while, it succeeded. Assemblymember Julia Brownley authored a bill in 2010 that would have outlawed single-use carryout bags of any material; it failed in the Senate after the Virginia-based American Chemistry Council worked hard to defeat it. But in 2014, State Senators Alex Padilla, Kevin de León and Ricardo Lara collaborated on a less restrictive law, one that would ban most plastic bags but allow grocery stores to charge 10 cents for each paper replacement. It earned the support of the California Grocers Association, and eventually the United Food and Commercial Workers union. It allows for the continued use of thicker plastic bags that will last for 125 uses or more and directs $2 million in loans to job creation in the recycled and reusable grocery bag industry. In August of that year, the bill made it all the way to the governor’s desk. So the bag lobby pursued its last available option. Before 2014 was out, the plastics lobby had collected enough signatures to place the plastic-bag ban, Senate Bill 270, on hold and put it to a referendum on the November 8, 2016 ballot. Sacramento special-interest politics threw data and science out the window. “Our contention is that it’s a special-interest giveaway to grocers in the state,” says Jon Berrier, spokesman for the American Progressive Bag Alliance, a consortium of mostly out-of-state plastic-bag manufacturers and an offshoot of the American Chemistry Council. “It bans a 100-percent recyclable product produced in America with American labor, that according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency accounts for only 0.3 percent of the waste stream. “The idea that you’re going to reduce waste or litter banning plastic retail bags,” he says, “is simply false. Sacramento special-interest politics threw data and science out the window.” Berrier is right that plastic bags account for only a small percentage of our garbage. (The vast majority of it is paper, yard trimmings and food.) But single-use plastic retail bags are a singularly pernicious kind of trash. Easily airborne, they float away from conscientious neatnik and litterbug alike, to find their way into mountain streams, storm drain culverts, ocean gyres and, eventually, the gullets of marine animals from cetaceans to sea birds. Sea turtles mistake them for jellyfish and suffer excruciating deaths by starvation; pelicans spear through them and strangle. On a recent paddle down the Los Angeles River, I saw white plastic bags clinging to the trees; my fellow kayakers playfully dubbed them “grocery-bag flowers.” Plastic bags can be recycled at special, dedicated facilities, but you can’t just toss them into a blue bin. Sent to ordinary processing centers, they clog up sorting screens and have to be cut out with hook knives and saws. They don’t degrade, but disintegrate, turning ocean and freshwater into a diluted chemical soup. But they are also big business, earning their manufacturers $100 million to $150 million every year in California alone. The short list of generous contributors to the No on 67 campaign contains only one in-state individual or company, Durabag of Tustin, California, which contributed a mere $50,000 early on. The rest of the donors list consists of out-of-state companies whose futures depend on the persistence of their industry: Advance Polybag of Sugar Land, Texas ($946,833); Formosa Plastics of Livingston, New Jersey ($1,148,441); Hilex Plastics of Hartsville, South Carolina ($2,783,739); Superbag of Houston, Texas ($1,238,188). It has already been money well spent, and not just because a victory in the nation’s bellwether state could set a trend, while a loss could spread bag bans like a virus. As the San Francisco Chronicle reported, simply by delaying Padilla’s bill for 18 months, the industry has bagged $15 million in profit. Steve Maviglio, a spokesperson for the Yes on 67 campaign that supports the ban, says that the plastics lobby’s concern over the predicted job losses rings hollow, considering that almost no single-use plastic bags are made in California. The thicker plastic bags allowed in Padilla’s law will, on the other hand, add to the state’s manufacturing economy, adding several hundred jobs. The plastic industry’s claim of 2,000 jobs lost “is incredible and nonsense,” Maviglio says. Our contention is that it’s a special-interest giveaway to grocers in the state. The plastics lobby could, however, win this one—not least because the wording of the referendum on the ballot is confusing. “It’s not intuitive that we need to vote ‘Yes’ for the law to go into effect,” says Diz Swift, a member of the League of Women Voters in Berkeley. “People might say, ‘Oh, no, I don’t want the law vetoed, I want it to go into effect,’ and mistakenly vote ‘No.’” (To be clear, a “No” vote on Proposition 67 will overturn the bag ban; a “Yes” will uphold it.) Even more confusing is that the plastic bag alliance has put another proposition on the ballot – Proposition 65 – that would direct the 10-cent bag fee toward a special wildlife conservation fund. Berrier says the measure came out of the bag alliance’s research. “Only 25 percent of the people we asked had any idea where that 10 cent bag fee would go,” he says. “A lot of people thought it was going to the environment, or to local government.” When they find out it’s going back to the grocers, he says, “They’re outraged. They want it to go to an environmental purpose.” To Swift, however, putting Proposition 65 on the ballot above Proposition 67 is a blatant attempt to skew the vote. Only the most sophisticated and well-informed voters will understand what it all means. “The money goes into a fund that sounds really good,” she says. “It’s for drought mitigation, clean drinking water, regional parks, litter removal and habitat restoration. But it requires creating a bureaucracy that doesn’t really help.” Maviglio is more blunt. “We call 65 the Screw the Grocers Initiative,” he says flatly. “They’re trying to send a message to grocers in other states who would hop aboard a statewide ban.” Single-use bags cost grocers anywhere from six to 16 cents per bag, “and that doesn’t include delivery and stocking,” Maviglio claims. “There’s no windfall there.” If that’s not persuasive enough, he asks voters to consider the source. Prohibitions against plastic bags have been carried by the most grassroots of efforts—community organizations, moms, local environmental groups. The Arizona ban on plastic-bag bans, he says, comes straight out of the American Legislative Exchange Council, a think tank that assists corporations in state lawmaking, with an emphasis on preempting local control. “The plastics industry has no regard for the environment,” Maviglio says. “It would be hypocritical of them to put something on the ballot to help wildlife.” To be fair, Berrier doesn’t argue that helping wildlife is the point: The goal of Prop 65, he says, is only to highlight where the bag-fee money goes after grocers collect it. “The language is very plain and simple,” he insists, “and it will have its intended effect.” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

04 октября, 14:53

PPG Industries Closes Sale of European Fiber Glass Business

PPG Industries (PPG) has completed the sale of its European fiber glass operations to Japanese glass maker, Nippon Electric Glass Co. Ltd.

23 сентября, 21:00

PPG Industries to Sell Interest in PFG Fiber Glass JVs

PPG Industries Inc. (PPG) said that it has inked a deal to sell its 50% ownership interests in its two PFG Fiber Glass joint ventures (PFG) to Nan Ya Plastics Corp.

Выбор редакции
12 августа, 05:30

Vietnam's Solution To Fish Death Scandal Leaves Many Locals Unsatisfied

After 80 tons of dead fish washed up on central coast beaches in April, citizens protested that the government moved too slowly in finding the cause. After weeks of sporadic demonstrations, the Natural Resources and Environment Ministry named Taiwanese-invested Formosa Ha Tinh steel plant the culprit for releasing toxic chemicals into the ocean. That was supposed to close the case of the initially mysterious pileup of millions of fish from April 4 to 15. But now it’s August and a lot of things still smell fishy if you ask around in Vietnam.

02 июля, 23:11

Mass Fish Deaths in Vietnam Highlight the Country's Press Freedom Problem

MELBOURNE, Australia -- The stink from Vietnam's fish kill scandal -- which left some 70 tons of dead fish scattered across the beaches of four of the country's provinces and fishermen out of work -- is symptomatic of something greater than worries about food security and the environment: access to information and the ability to distribute it. On June 30, almost three months since the mass fish deaths began, Vietnam's newspapers all began printing the same story: Formosa Ha Tinh Steel Corp., a subsidiary of Taiwan's Formosa Plastics Group, blamed by many for the incident, had accepted responsibility for the industrial pollution that had caused the environmental fiasco and would pay $500 million in compensation. The government of Vietnam, which had been silent for much of this, also noted the company was responsible due to a toxic spill. Earlier in the month there was progress towards a verdict but no confirmation, as Tuoi Tre newspaper wrote: On June 2, the government held a press meeting to announce that the cause behind the deaths had been identified, but it was being challenged by experts in order to ensure it was based on scientific, legal, and objective grounds before a final conclusion was confirmed. While the public waited for answers and the tourism industry suffered, the press was also curtailed. As the New York Times mentioned in its reporting of the incident: "Officials said that it had been necessary to restrict news coverage of the disaster while the investigation was underway." This wasn't entirely unusual for the country whose journalists often face obstacles while doing their jobs, but it did highlight a situation that doesn't appear to be getting better anytime soon. Vietnam has consistently been ranked poorly for press freedom, and the fish death debacle shows recent changes in the Vietnamese press: environmental journalism is now more tightly watched as the public becomes more aware of problems -- and more likely to organize. In the wake of this scandal, the freedom to report thoroughly on environmental issues might be abating, just as it gains traction in the public commons in Vietnam. In fact the reaction Thursday to the scandal served as a coup, of sorts, and a rarity in governmental response to similar offenses in the past. Going forward, the level of follow up reporting will determine more about how much press freedom will be allowed in these large-scale environmental cases with their mix of government oversight, foreign money and public anger at pollution. But for right now this new government line, and fine of half a billion in compensation, is encouraging in comparison to the wrist-slap fines of the past. Protesters in Hanoi demand cleaner water after mass fish deaths. (Nguyen Huy Kham/ Reuters) Up to now environmental and food safety issues have been allowable investigative stalwarts of the press for a while, likely because they're much safer topics than tales of actual, detailed official corruption or government mismanagement. But once somewhat controversial issues get enough public attention, coverage often lessens or is at least more carefully managed. Such was the case with our fish kill story, which made international headlines as well as people took to the streets in protest for the lack of accountability and information for this disaster. But this is nothing new. In fact, those critical of the government can be locked up under three different sections of the criminal code: 88, 79 and 258. Vietnam's press is state-owned, but each news outlet is owned by different government organizations, rather than by the Communist Party directly. Instead, directives are issued and there is also a good measure of self-censorship; editors and journalists tend to know when a story or topic is incendiary. This 2008 paper, written as social media was just taking off, covers how Vietnam's press operates quite well. When Vietnam's fish kill protests began over two months ago, people were angry at the lack of government action, the cavalier response from a spokesman for Taiwanese company Formosa assumed responsible for the pollution and worried for both food security and the livelihoods of those affected. By early May, protesters in Ho Chi Minh City numbered in the many hundreds or more, and were not simply activists but ordinary people, too. What, for journalists, was largely apolitical investigative work now has a stronger political background thanks to a growing number of young activists and a more general unease over both pollution and food security in the population. Before the news of the chemical spill and the fine broke this week, Formosa built a 10.6 billion dollar steel mill in Ha Tinh, a small, poor province south of Hanoi where a large amount of the fish washed up. The building of the plant was a coup for the provincial government that had lobbied hard. Back then it was said that the piles of fish washed ashore were apparently the result of a one-time accidental dump of pollution in the sea via an underwater pipeline several miles offshore, according to initial press reports. Formosa spokesman's initial statement at a press conference stating that Vietnam would have to "choose" between a steel plant and catching fish and seafood set off a social media storm of people "choosing" fish. Throughout the ordeal, the government blocked much reporting on the issue, citing its "sensitive nature" and so people turned to other avenues to express their frustration and share information. As Vietnam Right Now wrote on June 11, "With demonstrations banned, and the media firmly under state control, frustration at the government's handling of the mass fish deaths in central provinces has increasingly been restricted to social media." Protester displays picture of the mass of dead fish on the shores of Vietnam. (Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty) In May, about a month after the fish stink began, I wrote on U.S. President Barack Obama's first visit to Vietnam for The WorldPost and Australia's Lowy Institute, a Sydney-based foreign policy think tank. The American leader received a rapturous welcome and the public rancor over the fish saga evaporated at a time when things could have been uncomfortable for the government -- and gave the country a boost in positive press. President Obama's dinnertime trip to eat bun cha, a pork dish with noodles, was the headline of the day. "They've taken a break from choosing fish, but even a president can't be a distraction forever," I wrote in Lowy's Interpreter blog, Sure enough, on June 5, protests and arrests began again. Pham Doan Trang, a longtime journalist-turned-activist, chronicled the events in a group email to journalists and academics. Trang was one of the activists slated to meet Obama during his Vietnam trip, but was prevented from doing so after the car she was covertly traveling in from Ho Chi Minh City to Hanoi was stopped by police. She wrote that post-Obama protests were more sparsely attended, to the point that in HCMC police outnumbered protesters. She also noted that many protesters were dragged away, beaten and interrogated by police and security forces, who used methods she likened to old Soviet techniques. This social media aspect of journalism can have the effect of distortion: untruths can be propagated in a blogosphere unrestricted by editorial standards. Even so, the reporting feels more honest than the official line printed in the papers. Environmental sagas have made for compelling reporting in Vietnam over the past years, but as discourse moves into the civil society and social media realm, and interest in environmental issues increases, the government attitude towards them is changing and what, for journalists, was largely apolitical investigative work now has a stronger political background thanks to a growing number of young activists and a more general unease over both pollution and food security in the population. Luong Nguyen An Dien, a Vietnamese journalist who recently returned after a stint at Columbia University's school of journalism, told me, "Now social media has boomed in Vietnam, and the authorities are increasingly wary of public sentiment there. To them, any environmental issue could be politicized. The fish kill is just an example." Despite the crackdown from the government, reporters still usually report on sensitive issues until the subject gets too hot via social media. This social media aspect of journalism can have the effect of distortion: untruths can be propagated in a blogosphere unrestricted by editorial standards. Even so, the reporting feels more honest than the official line printed in the papers, which often go through screening and censorship by Ministry of Information and Communications. A boy looks at a dead fish on a beach in Quang Trach district in the central coastal province of Quang Binh. (STR/AFP/Getty) Online environmental organization started to gain traction in Vietnam in 2009, when disparate groups came together to criticize the government's plans for bauxite mines in the ecologically delicate Central Highlands region. That they were Chinese-run only made people angrier. Citizens organized a campaign via Facebook that took the government by surprise and the site was intermittently blocked (though never officially "banned") for some time after. The same year, The Committee to Protect Journalists named Vietnam in the top "10 Worst Countries to Be a Blogger," following the detention of a blogger for her coverage of territorial issues between China and Vietnam. In the past few years young activists are doing more than talking but actually criticizing the government. When Hanoi's city government announced a tremendous cull of the city's beautiful old trees -- all made from valuable wood -- young people organized online, and protested. Some protests quickly turned violent. Dien, the Vietnamese journalist, remembers the last Taiwanese environmental scandal, when in 2008, MSG producer Vedan left a 10 kilometer section of the Thi Vai River in Dong Nai province ecologically "dead." There was anger -- and the story was heavily reported by Vietnamese press -- but apart from those affected, there were few protests and not much online organizing. As food safety becomes a strong preoccupation, the environmental movement is going to pick up steam. And the freedom to report on it might be waning -- for now at least. "At the time, the purpose of covering the Vedan case was to sneak through a bigger story -- why the Taiwanese MSG maker could get away with such blatant violations for such a long time.The final outcome fell short of that expectation: Instead it was all about how Vedan finally agreed to compensate Vietnamese farmers out of fear they would face a massive boycott," he said. Dien has reported on environmental issues in the country as well. Writing for Vietnam Express he questioned why Monsanto, the company responsible for Agent Orange, is receiving such a welcome back into Vietnam after the chemical deforested so much land and led to birth defects in subsequent generations of the Vietnamese population. This topic has not yet reached the proportions of the fish kill scandal, partly as there are no direct effects: no tons of dead fish. Whether people begin to organize around less immediate threats remains to be seen, but as food safety in general becomes a strong preoccupation, the environmental movement is going to pick up steam. And the freedom to report on it might be waning -- for now at least. Also on WorldPost: -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

02 июля, 23:11

Mass Fish Deaths in Vietnam Highlight the Country's Press Freedom Problem

MELBOURNE, Australia -- The stink from Vietnam's fish kill scandal -- which left some 70 tons of dead fish scattered across the beaches of four of the country's provinces and fishermen out of work -- is symptomatic of something greater than worries about food security and the environment: access to information and the ability to distribute it. On June 30, almost three months since the mass fish deaths began, Vietnam's newspapers all began printing the same story: Formosa Ha Tinh Steel Corp., a subsidiary of Taiwan's Formosa Plastics Group, blamed by many for the incident, had accepted responsibility for the industrial pollution that had caused the environmental fiasco and would pay $500 million in compensation. The government of Vietnam, which had been silent for much of this, also noted the company was responsible due to a toxic spill. Earlier in the month there was progress towards a verdict but no confirmation, as Tuoi Tre newspaper wrote: On June 2, the government held a press meeting to announce that the cause behind the deaths had been identified, but it was being challenged by experts in order to ensure it was based on scientific, legal, and objective grounds before a final conclusion was confirmed. While the public waited for answers and the tourism industry suffered, the press was also curtailed. As the New York Times mentioned in its reporting of the incident: "Officials said that it had been necessary to restrict news coverage of the disaster while the investigation was underway." This wasn't entirely unusual for the country whose journalists often face obstacles while doing their jobs, but it did highlight a situation that doesn't appear to be getting better anytime soon. Vietnam has consistently been ranked poorly for press freedom, and the fish death debacle shows recent changes in the Vietnamese press: environmental journalism is now more tightly watched as the public becomes more aware of problems -- and more likely to organize. In the wake of this scandal, the freedom to report thoroughly on environmental issues might be abating, just as it gains traction in the public commons in Vietnam. In fact the reaction Thursday to the scandal served as a coup, of sorts, and a rarity in governmental response to similar offenses in the past. Going forward, the level of follow up reporting will determine more about how much press freedom will be allowed in these large-scale environmental cases with their mix of government oversight, foreign money and public anger at pollution. But for right now this new government line, and fine of half a billion in compensation, is encouraging in comparison to the wrist-slap fines of the past. Protesters in Hanoi demand cleaner water after mass fish deaths. (Nguyen Huy Kham/ Reuters) Up to now environmental and food safety issues have been allowable investigative stalwarts of the press for a while, likely because they're much safer topics than tales of actual, detailed official corruption or government mismanagement. But once somewhat controversial issues get enough public attention, coverage often lessens or is at least more carefully managed. Such was the case with our fish kill story, which made international headlines as well as people took to the streets in protest for the lack of accountability and information for this disaster. But this is nothing new. In fact, those critical of the government can be locked up under three different sections of the criminal code: 88, 79 and 258. Vietnam's press is state-owned, but each news outlet is owned by different government organizations, rather than by the Communist Party directly. Instead, directives are issued and there is also a good measure of self-censorship; editors and journalists tend to know when a story or topic is incendiary. This 2008 paper, written as social media was just taking off, covers how Vietnam's press operates quite well. When Vietnam's fish kill protests began over two months ago, people were angry at the lack of government action, the cavalier response from a spokesman for Taiwanese company Formosa assumed responsible for the pollution and worried for both food security and the livelihoods of those affected. By early May, protesters in Ho Chi Minh City numbered in the many hundreds or more, and were not simply activists but ordinary people, too. What, for journalists, was largely apolitical investigative work now has a stronger political background thanks to a growing number of young activists and a more general unease over both pollution and food security in the population. Before the news of the chemical spill and the fine broke this week, Formosa built a 10.6 billion dollar steel mill in Ha Tinh, a small, poor province south of Hanoi where a large amount of the fish washed up. The building of the plant was a coup for the provincial government that had lobbied hard. Back then it was said that the piles of fish washed ashore were apparently the result of a one-time accidental dump of pollution in the sea via an underwater pipeline several miles offshore, according to initial press reports. Formosa spokesman's initial statement at a press conference stating that Vietnam would have to "choose" between a steel plant and catching fish and seafood set off a social media storm of people "choosing" fish. Throughout the ordeal, the government blocked much reporting on the issue, citing its "sensitive nature" and so people turned to other avenues to express their frustration and share information. As Vietnam Right Now wrote on June 11, "With demonstrations banned, and the media firmly under state control, frustration at the government's handling of the mass fish deaths in central provinces has increasingly been restricted to social media." Protester displays picture of the mass of dead fish on the shores of Vietnam. (Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty) In May, about a month after the fish stink began, I wrote on U.S. President Barack Obama's first visit to Vietnam for The WorldPost and Australia's Lowy Institute, a Sydney-based foreign policy think tank. The American leader received a rapturous welcome and the public rancor over the fish saga evaporated at a time when things could have been uncomfortable for the government -- and gave the country a boost in positive press. President Obama's dinnertime trip to eat bun cha, a pork dish with noodles, was the headline of the day. "They've taken a break from choosing fish, but even a president can't be a distraction forever," I wrote in Lowy's Interpreter blog, Sure enough, on June 5, protests and arrests began again. Pham Doan Trang, a longtime journalist-turned-activist, chronicled the events in a group email to journalists and academics. Trang was one of the activists slated to meet Obama during his Vietnam trip, but was prevented from doing so after the car she was covertly traveling in from Ho Chi Minh City to Hanoi was stopped by police. She wrote that post-Obama protests were more sparsely attended, to the point that in HCMC police outnumbered protesters. She also noted that many protesters were dragged away, beaten and interrogated by police and security forces, who used methods she likened to old Soviet techniques. This social media aspect of journalism can have the effect of distortion: untruths can be propagated in a blogosphere unrestricted by editorial standards. Even so, the reporting feels more honest than the official line printed in the papers. Environmental sagas have made for compelling reporting in Vietnam over the past years, but as discourse moves into the civil society and social media realm, and interest in environmental issues increases, the government attitude towards them is changing and what, for journalists, was largely apolitical investigative work now has a stronger political background thanks to a growing number of young activists and a more general unease over both pollution and food security in the population. Luong Nguyen An Dien, a Vietnamese journalist who recently returned after a stint at Columbia University's school of journalism, told me, "Now social media has boomed in Vietnam, and the authorities are increasingly wary of public sentiment there. To them, any environmental issue could be politicized. The fish kill is just an example." Despite the crackdown from the government, reporters still usually report on sensitive issues until the subject gets too hot via social media. This social media aspect of journalism can have the effect of distortion: untruths can be propagated in a blogosphere unrestricted by editorial standards. Even so, the reporting feels more honest than the official line printed in the papers, which often go through screening and censorship by Ministry of Information and Communications. A boy looks at a dead fish on a beach in Quang Trach district in the central coastal province of Quang Binh. (STR/AFP/Getty) Online environmental organization started to gain traction in Vietnam in 2009, when disparate groups came together to criticize the government's plans for bauxite mines in the ecologically delicate Central Highlands region. That they were Chinese-run only made people angrier. Citizens organized a campaign via Facebook that took the government by surprise and the site was intermittently blocked (though never officially "banned") for some time after. The same year, The Committee to Protect Journalists named Vietnam in the top "10 Worst Countries to Be a Blogger," following the detention of a blogger for her coverage of territorial issues between China and Vietnam. In the past few years young activists are doing more than talking but actually criticizing the government. When Hanoi's city government announced a tremendous cull of the city's beautiful old trees -- all made from valuable wood -- young people organized online, and protested. Some protests quickly turned violent. Dien, the Vietnamese journalist, remembers the last Taiwanese environmental scandal, when in 2008, MSG producer Vedan left a 10 kilometer section of the Thi Vai River in Dong Nai province ecologically "dead." There was anger -- and the story was heavily reported by Vietnamese press -- but apart from those affected, there were few protests and not much online organizing. As food safety becomes a strong preoccupation, the environmental movement is going to pick up steam. And the freedom to report on it might be waning -- for now at least. "At the time, the purpose of covering the Vedan case was to sneak through a bigger story -- why the Taiwanese MSG maker could get away with such blatant violations for such a long time.The final outcome fell short of that expectation: Instead it was all about how Vedan finally agreed to compensate Vietnamese farmers out of fear they would face a massive boycott," he said. Dien has reported on environmental issues in the country as well. Writing for Vietnam Express he questioned why Monsanto, the company responsible for Agent Orange, is receiving such a welcome back into Vietnam after the chemical deforested so much land and led to birth defects in subsequent generations of the Vietnamese population. This topic has not yet reached the proportions of the fish kill scandal, partly as there are no direct effects: no tons of dead fish. Whether people begin to organize around less immediate threats remains to be seen, but as food safety in general becomes a strong preoccupation, the environmental movement is going to pick up steam. And the freedom to report on it might be waning -- for now at least. Also on WorldPost: -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Выбор редакции
30 июня, 14:44

Taiwanese Firm Takes Blame for Vietnam's Mass Fish Deaths

Vietnam’s government said a steel plant belonging to Taiwan’s Formosa Plastics Group was responsible for discharging pollutants that killed fish along a 130-mile stretch of coast in one of the country’s worst-ever environmental disasters.

25 мая, 22:10

Obama in Vietnam: Long on Weapons, Short on Human Rights

Gary Sands Global Governance, Vietnam Vietnamese hoping he'd bring change were disappointed. United States President Barack Obama waved goodbye to Vietnam today, following meetings in Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City with Vietnam’s new leadership, young entrepreneurs, and civil rights activists. Despite waiting until now to visit Vietnam for the first time, he leaves behind an enduring legacy of goodwill, as thousands of Vietnamese flocked to line the streets throughout his three-day visit in hope of catching a glimpse of the widely-popular U.S. president. On Monday, Obama also hoped to leave behind any of the remnants of animosity between the two former enemies of the Vietnam War—by announcing a complete lifting of an embargo on lethal weapons sales to Vietnam. The Vietnamese have been clamoring for advanced weaponry from the United States since the normalization of relations in 1995, and Washington partially eased the embargo toward the end of 2014 to allow for the sale of some defensive maritime equipment to Vietnam. Last year, Vietnam was the eighth-largest purchaser of arms in the world and over the last five years arms imports are up 699 percent. Hanoi currently buys a significant amount of military equipment from Russia, including Kilo-class submarines and corvettes, although they seek to buy more advanced equipment from other nations, such as the United States, in keeping with a diversified “no military alliance” foreign policy. U.S. defense contractors are salivating over sales, most likely the P-3 surveillance planes, helicopters and missiles Hanoi needs to beef up its naval forces and coastal defenses. The full lifting of the embargo fits neatly into Obama's strategic "pivot" toward the Asia-Pacific region, and may help to boost Hanoi’s defenses against an encroaching China. Yet given Vietnam’s past record on human rights and recent domestic turmoil, at a joint press conference held on Monday, Obama felt it necessary to include a proviso, “As with all our defense partners, sales will need to still meet strict requirements, including those related to human rights.” Thousands of protesters have gathered in Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City on three successive Sundays this month to vent their anger at the government over their response to the death of one hundred tons of fish in the central provinces in April. The protesters widely believe a $10.6 billion coastal steel plant in Ha Tinh province, owned by a unit of Taiwan's Formosa Plastics, is to blame for discharging untreated waste into the ocean. Read full article

20 марта 2015, 15:33

HTC Chairwoman Cher Wang Named CEO

TAIPEI (Reuters) - HTC Corp on Friday named Cher Wang as chief executive, giving its founder and chairwoman a bigger role in leading a potential turnaround of the Taiwanese smartphone maker. The return of Wang, a scion of one of Taiwan's most prominent families, comes as HTC's phones have often struggled to translate positive early reviews into strong sales, and the former contract manufacturer has found it tough to build a strong consumer brand in a competitive market. HTC said Wang has been increasingly involved in running various aspects of the business. She replaces Peter Chou, who will lead product development as head of the HTC Future Development Lab, an executive role focusing on identifying future growth opportunities. Chou is known to be more focused on research and development, so the change is positive in that respect, said Jimmy Chen, a technology analyst with Masterlink Securities Investment Advisory in Taipei. But Chou also built a reputation as an abrasive manager whose demanding style hit morale at the company, according to executives previously interviewed by Reuters. It remains unclear if HTC can overcome its challenges, Masterlink's Chen said. "If you don't bring in fresh blood then there's probably less of a chance to improve the operations." HTC recently named a new marketing chief, filling a post that had been vacant for four months. Revenue at HTC, which once had a 10 percent share of the global smartphone market, has largely flatlined after gradually sliding over the past two years. Net income has fared worse, with the company reporting either losses or a slim profit at best since hitting a peak in the third quarter of 2011. Like other, larger mobile phone makers such as Apple Inc and Samsung Electronics, HTC is trying to diversify into other 'connected' devices to find new growth outside an increasingly commoditized space. "We are seeing rapid changes in the industry, with the smartphone as our personal hub connecting us to a growing world of smart devices," Wang said in a company statement announcing the management changes. But despite forging a partnership with Google Inc to develop a smartwatch based on its Android operating system over a year ago, HTC has yet to deliver one to the market. Wang's father, the late Wang Yung-Ching, was chairman of Taiwanese conglomerate Formosa Plastics Group. Cher Wang was considered a pioneer in Taiwan's male-dominated technology industry, founding HTC in 1997 and establishing it as a leader in a then fast-growing mobile segment. (Additional reporting by Michael Gold; Editing by Ian Geoghegan)

Выбор редакции
01 сентября 2014, 09:00

EPA finalizes GHG permits for Texas olefins complex

The US Environmental Protection Agency has issued a final permit to Formosa Plastics Corp. (FPC) to proceed with the third major expansion of its petrochemical complex in Point Comfort, Tex. (OGJ Online, June 3, 2013).

Выбор редакции
19 мая 2014, 12:19

Compensation sought after Vietnam riots

Formosa Plastics Group is demanding $3m in compensation from Hanoi in the wake of the anti-China riots, with other manufacturers set to follow suit

Выбор редакции
19 мая 2014, 12:19

Compensation sought after Vietnam riots

Formosa Plastics Group is demanding $3m in compensation from Hanoi in the wake of the anti-China riots, with other manufacturers set to follow suit

17 мая 2014, 15:49

Новый геополитический кризис набирает обороты

По меньшей мере 21 человек погиб и 100 человек пострадали во время столкновений в провинции Хатинь в северной части Центрального Вьетнама. Большинство погибших - граждане Китая. На Парасельские острова полностью или частично претендуют пять стран — Китай, Вьетнам, Малайзия, Филиппины и Бруней Тысячи демонстрантов пытались захватить сталелитейный завод Formosa Plastics Group, принадлежащий тайваньской корпорации. Столкновения были вызваны обострившимися отношениями между Китаем и Вьетнамом, после того как в районе Парасельских островов китайские власти попытались установить буровую платформу "Хайян Шию-981". Платформа прибыла в сопровождении китайских военных кораблей, но, несмотря на это, вьетнамские корабли попытались помешать ее установке, в результате чего китайский корабль протаранил два вьетнамских. Как считают эксперты, Китай разместил буровую вышку не с целью начать добычу, а скорее для того, чтобы обозначить свое физическое присутствие в данной акватории, тем самым упрочняя свое право на владение данной территорией. Об этом говорит выбор места для установки буровой вышки, так как после многих лет исследования данного региона государственная Китайская национальная офшорная нефтяная корпорация (CNOOC) выбрала наименее перспективный район для разработки. Как отмечает экономист EIA Александр Метелица, в данном районе объем запасов нефти не превышает 1 млн баррелей. CNOOC агрессивно стала реализовывать планы по развитию глубоководного бурения. Именно с этим связаны последние события. "Китай добывал нефть на суше в течение долгого времени, но эта нефть на исходе. Если вы хотите расширить свою производственную базу, вам придется выходить за границы", - отметил вице-председатель консалтинговой компании Facts Global Energy Кан Ву. По словам директора программы по Юго-Восточной Азии в Центре стратегических и международных исследований Эрнеста Бауэра, буровая установка может быть мощным "сообщением" о намерениях Китая в данном регионе. Однако в то же время он отметил, что это довольно дорогой способ сообщить о своих намерениях, так как ежедневная поддержка работы буровой установки требует сотен тысяч долларов. Представители CNOOC заявили, что компания планирует сохранить буровую установку на ее нынешнем местоположении до августа. В мае 2011 г. CNOOC завершила строительство "Хайян Шию-981", стоимость которой составила около $925 млн. В мае 2012 г. буровая установка пробурила свою первую скважину. Уже через год власти Вьетнама зафиксировали, что установка постепенно движется к Юго-Западу в сторону Парасельских островов. Необходимо отметить, что "Хайян Шию-981" уже имеет репутацию "мобильного воплощения суверенитета Китая", поскольку во время ее строительства было ясно, что Китая направил свой взор на ресурсы в Южно-Китайском море. Согласно последним оценкам запасы в Южно-Китайском море составляют 11 млрд баррелей нефти и 190 трлн куб. футов природного газа. Это больше, чем объем запасов нефти в Аляске в 1970 г., и более чем в два раза превышает объем газа на месторождении Хьюготон в Канзасе, Техасе и Оклахоме. Запасы нефти и газа в Южно-Китайском море Единственное, что остается Ханою, - это ежедневно осуждать действия Китая. Премьер-министр Вьетнама призвал другие государства-члены Ассоциации государств Юго-Восточной Азии проявить "солидарность и единство" и признать, что Китай нагнетает обстановку в регионе. Однако, по словам Бауэра, насыщение "энергетического голода" Китая в конечном итоге может быть полезным для всего региона. "Не стоит рассчитывать на стабильность в Азии, если Китай не чувствует себя комфортно в плане энергетической безопасности", - отметил Бауэр. На текущий момент более 80 кораблей защищают буровую установку, ситуация продолжает накаляться.

17 мая 2014, 09:58

Пекин подтвердил гибель двоих граждан КНР в беспорядках во Вьетнаме

Министерство иностранных дел КНР подтвердило, что двое китайских граждан погибли, почти 100 получили ранения в беспорядках во Вьетнаме на фоне территориального спора двух стран, передает агентство Синьхуа. Столкновения во вьетнамской провинции Хатинь произошли в ночь на 15 мая, когда несколько сотен демонстрантов попытались взять штурмом сталелитейный завод Formosa Plastics Group, принадлежащий тайваньской корпорации. Ранее агентство Рейтер сообщало, что жертвами беспорядков стали пятеро вьетнамцев и, предположительно, 16 граждан КНР. "Глава МИД КНР Ван И осудил (произошедшее) в срочном телефонном разговоре с вице-премьером и министром иностранных дел Вьетнама Фам Бинь Мином в четверг вечером", — сказала представительница китайского МИД Хуа Чуньин. По словам Чуньин, во Вьетнам прибыла рабочая группа из Китая, которую возглавляет замминистра иностранных дел Лю Цяньчао. "Мы будем продолжать… через различные каналы требовать, чтобы власти Вьетнама строго наказали нарушителей, незамедлительно пресекали насильственные действия и гарантировали, что они не повторятся в будущем", — добавила Чуньин. По материалам: РИА Новости

16 мая 2014, 23:18

Новый геополитический кризис набирает обороты

  По меньшей мере 21 человек погибло и 100 человек пострадали во время столкновений в провинции Хатинь в северной части центрального Вьетнама. Большинство из погибших граждане Китая. Парасельские острова полностью или частично претендуют пять стран — Китай, Вьетнам, Малайзия, Филиппины и БрунейТысячи демонстрантов пытались захватить сталелитейный завод Formosa Plastics Group, принадлежащий тайваньской корпорации. Столкновения были вызваны обострившимися отношениями между Китаем и Вьетнамом, после того как районе Парасельских островов китайские власти попытались установить буровую платформу "Хайян Шию-981". Платформа прибыла в сопровождении китайских военных кораблей, но несмотря на это, вьетнамские корабли попытались помешать ее установке, в результате чего китайский корабль протаранил два вьетнамских. Как считают эксперты, Китай разместил буровую вышку не с целью начать добычу, а скорее для того, чтобы обозначить свое физическое присутствие в данной акватории, тем самым упрочняя свое право на владение данной территорией. Как считают эксперты, Китай разместил буровую вышку не с целью начать добычу, а скорее для того, чтобы обозначить свое физическое присутствие в данной акватории, тем самым упрочняя свое право на владение данной территорией. Об этом говорит выбор места для установки буровой вышки, так как после многих лет исследования данного региона государственная компания Китайская национальная оффшорная нефтяная корпорация (CNOOC) выбрала наименее перспективный район для разработки. Как отмечает экономист EIA Александр Метелица, в данном районе объем запасов нефти не превышает 1 млн баррелей. CNOOC агрессивно стала реализовывать планы по развитию глубоководного бурения. Именно с этим связано последние события. "Китай добывал нефть долгое время на суше в течение долгого времени, но эта нефть на исходе. Если вы хотите расширить свою производственную базу, вам придется выходить за границы", - отметил вице-председатель консалтинговой компании Facts Global Energy Кан Ву. По словам директора программы по Юго-Восточной Азии в Центре стратегических и международных исследований Эрнеста Бауэра, буровая установка может быть мощным «сообщением» о намерениях Китая в данном регионе. Однако в то же время он отметил, что довольно дорогой способ сообщить о своих намерениях, так как ежедневная поддержка работы буровой установки требует сотен тысяч долларов. Представители CNOOC заявили, что компания планирует сохранить буровую установку на ее текущем местоположении до августа. В мае 2011 года CNOOC завершила строительство "Хайян Шию-981", стоимость которой составила около $925 млн. В мае 2012 года буровая установка пробурила свою первую скважину. Уже через год власти Вьетнама зафиксировали, что установка постепенно движется к Юго-Западу в сторону Парсельских островов. Необходимо отметить, что "Хайян Шию-981" уже имеет репутацию «мобильного воплощения суверенитета Китая», поскольку во время ее строительство было ясно, что Китая направил свой взор на ресурсы в Южно-Китайском море. Согласно последним оценкам, запасы в Южно-Китайском составляют 11 млрд баррелей нефти и 190 триллиона кубических футов природного газа. Это больше, чем объем запасов нефти в Аляске в 1970 году, а более чем в два раза превышает объем газа на месторождении Хьюготон в Канзасе, Техасе и Оклахоме. Запасы нефти и газа в Южно-Китайском море Единственное что остается Ханою, это ежедневно осуждать действия Китая. Премьер-министр Вьетнама призвал другие государства членов Ассоциации государств Юго-Восточной Азии проявить «солидарность и единство» а признать, что Китай нагнетает обстановку в регионе. Однако, по словам Бауэра, насыщение "энергетического голода" Китая в конечном итоге может быть полезным для всего региона. "Не стоит рассчитывать на стабильность в Азии, если Китай не чувствует себя комфортно в плане энергетической безопасности", - отметил Бауэр. На текущий момент более 80 кораблей защищают буровую установку, ситуация продолжает накаляться.

16 мая 2014, 07:57

Тихоокеанский фронт обретает очертания

На фоне вялотекущей гражданской войны на Украине и усиления противостояния между Западом и Россией, не стоит забывать и о «Тихоокеанском фронте». Последний конфликт между Китаем с одной стороны и Вьетнамом и Филиппинами – с другой, показывает, что Азиатско-Тихоокеанский регион может в любой момент заполыхать и стать одним из ведущих фронтов мирового конфликта, в который постепенно сползает нынешнее мировое сообщество. Напряжение на Корейском полуострове, конфликт Китая и Японии из-за спорных территорий, спор за архипелаг Спратли и Парасельские острова, которые располагаются в Южно-Китайском море и являются объектом территориального конфликта между КНР, Вьетнамом, Филиппинами, Малайзией и Тайванем уже значительный промежуток времени. Все говорит о том, что напряжение в АТР растёт. Сейчас на Дальнем Востоке и Юго-Восточной Азии идет война нервов. Стороны обмениваются заявлениями, встают в позу, корабли и самолеты противоборствующих сторон проходят по спорным территориям, идет освоение спорных островов и шельфов. Во Вьетнаме беспорядки, есть погибшие и раненые. Участники акция протеста штурмуют китайские и другие иностранные предприятия. Трудно предсказать, когда и где полыхнет в полную силу. Но очевидно одно, США эта ситуация выгодна. Америка готова воевать до последней капли крови корейца, японца или вьетнамца. Главная цель в АТР – это Китай. Нельзя забывать и о Русском Дальнем Востоке, который также интересует западные ТНК и ТНБ. Россия в этом конфликте не останется сторонним наблюдателем. Мы получим ещё один источник хаоса, теперь уже у дальневосточных границ. США и часть мировой «элиты» делают ставку на хаос и разрушение. Война должна списать долги, прежние обязательства, переформатировать мир, привести к созданию Нового мирового порядка. Схватка за острова Вьетнам охвачен антикитайскими настроениями. Участники акций протеста требуют вывода китайской нефтяной платформы из спорного участка Южно-Китайского моря. 15 мая пришло сообщение о гибели 21 человека (по предварительным данным, большинство погибших китайцы) и сотне раненых. Сотни человек задержаны правоохранительными органами. Демонстранты штурмовали сталелитейный завод Formosa Plastics Group, принадлежащий тайваньской корпорации, во вьетнамской провинции Хатинь. Кроме того, разгромлены 15 иностранных предприятий на юге государства. Массовые акции протеста начались 11 мая и были связаны с конфликтом в районе спорных островов в Южно-Китайском море. От погромов пострадали тайваньские, китайские и южнокорейские предприятия. Затронули акции протеста и других иностранных предпринимателей. Так, сингапурский МИД заявил, что пострадали несколько иностранных предприятий. Погромщики взломали их и подожгли. Пострадал Вьетнамо-Сингапурский промышленный парк. Правительство Сингапура попросило Ханой немедленно восстановить порядок. Китайский МИД призвал Вьетнам успокоиться и уважать суверенитет КНР. Тайвань выразил обеспокоенность, осудил насилие и призвал Ханой восстановить порядок, а также воздержаться от принятия поспешных решений, которые могут поставить под угрозу многолетние дружественные отношения между двумя странами. Надо отметить, что всплеск напряженности в регионе произошел после визита американского президента Барака Обамы, который выразил поддержку своим союзникам Японии и Филиппинам, которые имеют территориальные споры с Пекином. Президент США подписал с филиппинскими властями соглашение о военном сотрудничестве. Кроме того, в апреле помощник госсекретаря США по делам Восточной Азии и Тихоокеанского региона Дэниел Рассел заявил, что Пекину не стоит сомневаться в готовности Вашингтона защищать своих азиатских союзников в случае применения Китаем силы при решении территориальных конфликтов со своими соседями. Рассел заявил, что «следует усилить давление на Китай». Повод для роста напряженности в Южно-Китайском море дал Китай. Китайцы впервые послали глубоководную буровую установку для разведки углеводородов у Парасельских островов. Буровая установка принадлежит китайской государственной нефтегазовой компании и может вести работы на глубине до 3 км. По оценкам ученых, запасы нефти в Южно-Китайском море составляют от 23 до 30 млрд. тонн, а природного газа - около 16 трлн. кубометров. Большая часть углеводородов (около 70%) расположено на глубоководном шельфе. Во Вьетнаме считают, что Парасельские острова принадлежат им. Кроме того, в территориальный спор в Южно-Китайском море вовлечены Тайвань, Филиппины, Малайзия и Бруней. Китайская нефтяная платформа в Южно-Китайском море 7 мая Ханой потребовал у Пекина убрать буровую вышку из Южно-Китайского моря. Министр иностранных дел Вьетнама Фам Бинь Минь провел телефонные переговоры с членом Госсовета Китая Яном Цзечи и заявил, что Ханой предпримет все меры для защиты национальных интересов в Южно-Китайском море. Вьетнам обвинил КНР в нарушении международных законов и суверенитета Вьетнама. Вьетнам требует убрать нефтяную вышку и начать переговоры для решения спорного вопроса. По мнению вьетнамцев, китайская вышка расположена в пределах экономической зоны Вьетнама. Вьетнамцы завили, что буровая вышка установлена на континентальном шельфе, на котором, согласно Конвенции ООН по морскому праву, Ханой обладает исключительными правами на поиск и добычу природных ресурсов. Китайцы утверждают, что вышка находится в территориальных водах КНР и выдвигает претензии на большую часть вод Южно-Китайского моря. Вьетнам поддержали и Соединенные Штаты. Пресс-секретарь американского госдепартамента Джен Псаки назвала действия КНР провокационными и не способствующими поддержанию мира и стабильности в регионе. Вьетнамцы смогли помешать китайским кораблям установить буровую вышку, которая предназначалась для усиления уже действующей китайской буровой платформы. Силы были неравны: платформу сопровождал всего один китайский военный корабль. Вьетнам же направил на перехват около трёх десятков кораблей ВМС и береговой охраны. Однако Китай в ответ направил флотилию в 80 кораблей. Обе стороны обвинили противника в агрессивном поведении. По данным Ханоя, китайцы протаранили несколько вьетнамских кораблей и отгоняли их водометами. Китайцы же заявили, что на таран шли вьетнамцы. А применение водометов было оправдано тем, что их используют «на исконно китайской территории». Хотя огнестрельное оружие и не применялось, информационные агентства сообщили о нескольких раненых. Это столкновение вызвало резкий рост напряженности. Вьетнамская и китайская общественность обвиняют друг друга в агрессии и нарушении суверенных прав. Так, пекинская газета Global Times заявила: «Нужно преподать Вьетнаму такой урок, которого он заслуживает». По мнению профессора университета в Гонконге Джонатана Ландона ситуация в Южно Китайском море свидетельствует о серьёзном сдвиге в морской стратегии Китая: «Раньше Китай заявлял о своих притязаниях, а теперь он их реализует». Эту мысль поддерживает и ведущий научный сотрудник Института Дальнего Востока РАН Александр Ларин. Раньше Китай держался в тени, накапливал силы, теперь появилась возможность реализовать свои замыслы. Исторические предпосылки конфликта. Ресурсы спорных территорий В этом году исполнилось сорок лет с того дня, как необитаемые Парасельские острова, около которых и расположена китайская буровая платформа, перешли под контроль Китая. Сражение у Парасельских островов (или Сражение за острова Сиша) в 1974 году произошло между военно-морскими силами КНР и Южного Вьетнама. Правивший в Сайгоне режим Республики Вьетнам был на грани поражения и Китай решил использовать удачный момент. Китайцы под видом рыбаков высадились на нескольких необитаемых островах. Над островами был поднят китайский флаг как знак суверенитета КНР над ними. Вьетнамские корабли стали снимать китайские флаги. Произошла перестрелка с китайцами. Вьетнамский корабль протаранил китайское рыболовецкое судно. Руководство КНР дало приказ «освободить» острова. В район прибыли дополнительные китайские силы. Столкновение морских сил привело к победе китайцев. По вьетнамским данным, Китай бросил в бой четыре ракетных катера типа «Комар». Китайцы потопили корвет HQ-10 «Нят Тяо» (бывший американский тральщик). Ещё раньше фрегат HQ-16 «Ли Тхыонг Киет» (бывший американский корабль береговой обороны) получил тяжелые повреждения. Быстрая потеря одного из кораблей и тяжелые повреждения другого заставили вьетнамцев отступить. После ухода южновьетнамских кораблей китайцы заставили капитулировать небольшие вьетнамские сухопутные силы. В ходе этого короткого сражения вьетнамцы потеряли 52 человека погибшими и 16 ранеными, а китайцы - 18 человек убитыми и 67 ранеными. По данным китайцев, все их корабли уцелели, хотя и получили повреждения. В итоге Китай установил контроль над спорными Парасельскими островами. С тех пор один из спорных островов – Вуди, китайцы построили аэродром, спасательный центр и разместили военный гарнизон. Спор за архипелаг Спратли также имеет давнюю историю (Острова Спратли - зона возможного военного конфликта в Юго-Восточной Азии). Причем помимо КНР и Вьетнама, на него также претендуют Тайвань, Филиппины, Малайзия и Бруней. Острова не населены. Этот архипелаг в юго-западной части Южно-Китайского моря состоит из более чем 100 островков, рифов, атоллов, которые имеют суммарную площадь менее 5 кв. км. Имеется также ещё несколько сотен островков погруженных в воду. В разное время острова контролировали испанцы, американцы, филиппинцы, затем на них силой утвердились французы. Китайские претензии на острова французы отвергли. Во время Второй мировой войны острова достались японцам, затем на них вернулись французы (от них они перешли в «наследство» к вьетнамцам) и китайцы. В дальнейшем Китай, Вьетнам, Тайвань, Филиппины, Малайзия и Бруней создали на островах свои форпосты. Наибольшее число островков принадлежит Вьетнаму, за ним следуют Китай и Филиппины. Время от времени происходят конфликты. Так, 1988 году произошло боестолкновение китайских и вьетнамских ВМС. У Джонсон-рифа (Синь Коу) погибли три вьетнамских и один китайский сторожевик. Победил опять Китай, который расширил зону своего контроля. В дальнейшем стычки стали обычным явлением, но до серьёзных боев дело не доходило. По сути, Параселы и Спратли – это кучка голых скал и рифов в море. Однако они имеют военно-стратегическое значение – контроль над акваторией Южно-Китайского моря и морскими коммуникациями. Острова расположены на важнейших морских путях из Индийского океана в Тихий. Для КНР они имеют огромное значение, так как связывают страну с Ближним Востоком, Африкой и Западной Европой. По ним в Китай поступают жизненно необходимые ресурсы. Кроме того, в последние десятилетия возросла роль ресурсов, которые можно получить в море. Так, район спорных островов богат биоресурсами. Нельзя забывать и про углеводороды, которые есть на шельфе. И Параселы, и Спратли расцениваются экспертами как наиболее перспективные для разработок углеводородов в регионе. При этом объем реальных запасов углеводородов подсчитать нельзя. Китайцы в своих прогнозах наиболее оптимистичны. С учётом факторов быстрого роста населения и экономики стран АТР природные ресурсы Южно-Китайского моря – это серьёзный повод для борьбы. Кроме того, нельзя сбрасывать со счётом и обычный патриотизм. Те же Китай и Вьетнам имеют старую историю вражды, и не собираются уступать друг другу. Политическое руководство не может потерять лицо перед своим населением. В Китае и Вьетнаме значительно вырос местный средний класс, который является носителем идеологии национализма. В настоящее время Юго-Восточную Азию по настроению населения можно сравнить с Европой перед Первой мировой войной. Люди требуют «исторической справедливости» и желают реванша за прежние поражения. Территориальные споры издавна являются серьёзной предпосылкой для роста националистических настроений. Позиция Китая Политика Китая сводится к стремлению получить максимум из возможного. Поэтому Пекин объявил примерно 80% всей акватории Южно-Китайского моря своей суверенной территорией. Китайцы исходили из расположения островов, их они считают своей «исконной территорией», а раз так то и территориальные воды вокруг них также принадлежат им (отсюда и 80% акватории моря). Понятно, что ни в коем случае не устраивает соседей Китая, у которых имеются свои претензии на острова. И уступать они не собираются. Причем на острие конфликта Вьетнам и Филиппины, которые больше всех потеряют от аппетитов Пекина. Китай на ноты протеста соседних государств заявил, что препятствовать свободной торговле и передвижению судов по своим «внутренним водам» не будет и пока это слово держит. Однако это не может устраивать соседние страны. Ранее морские коммуникации были свободны, грузопоток по ним был естественны и не подлежал сомнению. Теперь всё под контролем Китая и следствие их доброй воли. В 2013 году китайская полиция получила право высаживать на иностранные суда в Южно-Китайском море досмотровые команды, досматривать их и при необходимости брать под свой контроль. Надо отметить, что китайцы последователь возражают против созыва конференции всех заинтересованных сторон по текущим проблемам Южно-Китайского моря, при участии наблюдателей от мирового сообщества. Они предпочитают двусторонние переговоры. В такой ситуации Китай застрахован от того, что на него будут давить сразу несколько государств (будет создана антикитайская коалиция) с неизбежным привлечением третьей силы, то есть США, которые имеют свои интересы в регионе и заинтересованы в роли арбитра. Решать споры с каждой стороной по отдельности для Пекина гораздо выгоднее и спокойнее. В двустороннем формате Китай идёт на компромиссы, но постепенно продавливает свои интересы. К тому же уступки Китая часто показательны. В частности, проектов по совместной разведке и добыче газа и нефти в спорных районах было уже несколько. Но постепенно Китай отсекает конкурентов и становится главным руководителем процесса. К тому же в последние годы в АТР по территориальным вопросам наметилась тенденция по ужесточению позиции соперничающих стран. Все государства, в зависимости от бюджета, ведут наращивание морских и воздушных сил, проводят демонстративные военные учения, ищут союзников. Продолжение следует…

15 мая 2014, 21:50

В мире: Василий Кашин: По всей Восточной Азии растет национализм

«По всему региону растет национализм. Восточную Азию сравнивают по настроениям с Европой накануне Первой мировой. Народы богатеют, появилось время подумать о своем месте в истории, о мировоззрении, появились идеи об исторической справедливости», – заявил газете ВЗГЛЯД политолог Василий Кашин, комментируя волну антикитайских погромов во Вьетнаме. В результате беспорядков в провинции Хатинь в северном Вьетнаме погиб 21 человек, еще около 100 получили ранения. В ночь на четверг несколько сот демонстрантов попытались взять штурмом сталелитейный завод Formosa Plastics Group, принадлежащий тайваньской корпорации. Среди погибших оказались пятеро вьетнамцев и, предположительно, 16 граждан Китая. Погромы вспыхнули днем ранее в другом уголке Вьетнама – на юге, в провинциях Бин Дуонг и Донг Най. Там тоже прокатились антикитайские демонстрации. Манифестанты были разгневаны тем, что Китай в начале мая приступил к бурению нефтяных скважин в Южно-Китайском море, в спорном районе Спратли, на который также претендует и Вьетнам. Ранее в районе нефтяной платформы между вьетнамскими и китайскими патрульными кораблями произошло вооруженное столкновение. На прошлой неделе министры иностранных дел блока АСЕАН выразили серьезную обеспокоенность ростом напряженности в отношениях между Вьетнамом и Китаем. От погромов на юге пострадали тайваньские фабрики, которые, как казалось протестующим, принадлежали китайцам. Вьетнамские власти сообщали, что были сломаны ворота фабрик и разбиты окна. Полиция начала расследование. Власти Тайваня уже заявили, что окажут помощь пострадавшим соотечественникам, а представитель Вьетнама на острове дал понять, что тайваньцы попали под горячую руку бунтовщиков по ошибке. МИД Сингапура заявил, что помещения ряда иностранных компаний были взломаны и подожжены, пострадал промышленный парк (напомним, большинство жителей Сингапура – китайцы). Гонконгская компания Yue Yuen, которая шьет обувь для Adidas, Nike и других международных брендов, заявила, что приостановила производство во Вьетнаме. Пресс-секретарь Белого Дома Джей Карни напомнил, что президент Барак Обама во время своего недавнего азиатского турне подчеркивал необходимость мирного диалога по территориальным спорам в Южно-Китайском море. В интервью газете ВЗГЛЯД эксперт Центра анализа стратегий и технологий Василий Кашин рассказал о том, не приведут ли нынешние антикитайские погромы во Вьетнаме к большой войне в Юго-Восточной Азии. ВЗГЛЯД: Вьетнам считается авторитарным государством. Могли ли погромы там вспыхнуть стихийно? Какими могут обернуться последствиями эти беспорядки? Василий Кашин (фото: с личной страницы vk.com) Василий Кашин: Вьетнамские власти изначально разрешили небольшие демонстрации, то есть дали слабину, чтобы напугать китайцев, но потом ситуация у них вышла из-под контроля... Последствия же могут быть не очень приятные. Тот факт, что во Вьетнаме били китайских менеджеров, инженеров и прочий персонал,  будет подогревать националистические чувства в Китае, создаст дополнительное давление на правительство и вынудит его вести себя к Вьетнаму более жестко. Хотя между Китаем и Вьетнамом обострялись территориальные споры, параллельно шла и другая тенденция - постепенный перенос во Вьетнам китайских производств, прежде всего текстильной промышленности, что было подспорьем в экономическом развитии Вьетнама. В целом между странами создали довольно прочные экономические связи. Этот процесс теперь нарушается. Во Вьетнаме ухудшится инвестиционный климат, но пока сложно оценить, насколько. Корейские и японские предприятия тоже приостановили свою работу, боятся. Больнее всего экономически это ударит по Вьетнаму. А политически – это неприятно для обеих сторон. ВЗГЛЯД: Насколько жестко теперь пойдет спор вокруг самой нефтеносной акватории? В. К.: Китай уже практически претендует на всю акваторию Южно-китайского моря. На волне такого роста националистических страстей обе стороны могут начать жестче себя вести, участятся столкновения, например, пограничных судов, взаимные задержания и так далее. В спор вовлечены все соседние страны, включая даже Индонезию и Малайзию. Наиболее серьезные споры у Китая с Вьетнамом и Филиппинами. При этом с последними китайцы обычно ведут себя жестче, потому что это менее влиятельная страна и связей у китайцев с ними  меньше. С Вьетнамом политика была более сложная. ВЗГЛЯД: Известно, что Вашингтон хотел бы создать по периметру Китая буферную зону из своих союзников, чтобы сдерживать его растущую мощь? Насколько правдоподобны версии о том, что это рука США подливает масла в огонь спора Ханоя и Пекина? В.К.: Здесь нет как таковой руки США, все это происходит без американских заговоров. Но, видя рост противоречий между странами АСЕАН и Китаем, США пытаются учитывать это, - созданием системы союзов и своего возвращения в Азию. Они солидаризируются со странами АСЕАН в вопросах, связанных с режимом судоходства в Южно-Китайском море, в этом плане критикуют Китай за излишнюю агрессивность. «Вопрос стратегии и национальной гордости» ВЗГЛЯД: Вашингтон ранее предостерегал Китай от повторения крымского сценария на Тайване. А есть что-то общее у островов в Южно-Китайском море и Крыма? В.К.: Здесь даже отдаленно нет ничего общего. У нас споры с Украиной в большей степени из-за людей, чем из-за территорий, и они очень тесно связаны с давней историей, психологией и так далее. Острова в Южно-китайском море никогда не были заселены, это были голые скалы. Сейчас их искусственно заселяют, строятся посты, китайцы построили на одном из островов город, чтобы закрепить за собой. Но в последнее время важность клочков суши начинает расти из-за таких явлений как энергоносители, транспортные потоки, новые виды оружия. Это вопрос стратегии и национальной гордости. На шельфе там открыты месторождения нефти и газа. Также через Южно-китайское море, Малаккский пролив идет основной поток китайского и японского импорта энергоносителей и вообще всех товаров внешней торговли, это места, контроль над которыми дает огромное значение.  Кроме того, Китай строит мощный стратегический атомный подводный флот, уже построил базу на для своих новых атомных ракетных подводных лодок на острове Хайнань. Китайцы не возражают против торгового судоходства, но пытаются максимально ограничить возможность для действий любых иностранных военных кораблей. По всей видимости, Пекин рассматривает Южно-китайское море, как будущий защищенный район, где лодки смогут патрулировать с ракетами на борту и по некоторым предположениям он стремится по советскому образцу создать там бастион – хорошо охраняемую акваторию, где субмарины могут чувствовать себя в безопасности. Поэтому для китайцы пытаются запретить доступ сюда чужим военным кораблям. Тем временем сразу по всему региону растет национализм. Недаром восточную Азию сравнивают по настроениям с Европой накануне Первой мировой. Люди начали богатеть, у них появилось время подумать о своем месте в истории, о мировоззрении, появились идеи об исторической справедливости - и это тоже влияет на правительства. То, что в Европе не придет никому в голову. - «Давайте мы что-нибудь просто захватим, потому что невозможно больше терпеть!», - у них это можно сказать. ВЗГЛЯД: Насколько нынешние США готовы вмешаться, если Китай открыто вступит в войну со своими соседями? В.К.: С Филиппинами  у них - военный союз, США обязаны защищать их. По отношению к Вьетнаму у США  нет таких обязательств, происходит их медленное движение в военно-политической сфере, но Вьетнам все-таки не является страной в орбите влияния США... Периодически даже у самих стран-союзников США – Японии, Филиппин или Тайваня - звучат вслух сомнения, готовы ли США вмешаться, прийти им на помощь в случае нападения Китая. Если вспомнить историю, то так все большие войны и начинались. У кого-то возникали сомнения в решимости противоположной стороны, кто-то решал шарахнуть как следует – авось, она стерпит, однако противоположная сторона не стерпела... Такие цепи ошибок и приводят к катастрофам. В Восточной Азии набор всех этих условий есть.  Теги:  США, Китай, Япония, Россия и Китай, Вьетнам, Филиппины Закладки: 

Выбор редакции
15 мая 2014, 09:20

Штурм завода во Вьетнаме закончился гибелью множества людей

Более 20 человек погибли в ходе штурма демонстрантами сталелитейного завода во вьетнамской провинции Хатинь, сообщает в четверг, 15 мая, Reuters. Несколько сотен протестующих пытались штурмовать сталелитейный завод Formosa Plastics Group, принадлежащий тайваньской корпорации. Демонстранты по

Выбор редакции
15 мая 2014, 08:53

Десятки человек погибли во Вьетнаме в результате столкновений

В четверг несколько сотен демонстрантов пытались взять штурмом сталелитейный завод Formosa Plastics Group тайваньской корпорации в провинции Хатинь (северная часть центрального Вьетнама).В результате столкновений погиб 21 человек: по предварительным данным, пятеро граждан Вьетнама и 16 выходцев из Китая. Сообщается также о сотне раненых (источник - «Коммерсант»).

Выбор редакции
15 мая 2014, 04:48

Taiwanese steel plant in Vietnam attacked by rioters: media

TAIPEI (Reuters) - A steel plant owned by Formosa Plastics Group, Taiwan's biggest investor in Vietnam, was attacked by rioters overnight, Taiwanese media reported on Thursday.