• Теги
    • избранные теги
    • Люди1895
      • Показать ещё
      Страны / Регионы933
      • Показать ещё
      Разное1175
      • Показать ещё
      Международные организации102
      • Показать ещё
      Издания183
      • Показать ещё
      Компании704
      • Показать ещё
      Формат57
      Показатели72
      • Показать ещё
      Сферы3
22 июня, 11:02

Лукавый дар Линкольна... Почему отмена рабства в США не принесла счастья... рабам?

Расовая сегрегация в Соединенных Штатах была законодательно запрещена лишь спустя 100 лет после отмены рабства.

21 июня, 08:00

80 лет беспосадочному полёту экипажа Чкалова в США

Если изучать историю 30-х годов СССР по нынешним шаблонам, то может сложится извращенное впечатление, что в СССР тогда ничего хорошего не было кроме ГУЛАГа и репрессий. Но это именно извращение, причем полное. Между тем 30-е были временем грандиозных побед и достижений советских людей. Вот один из таких многочисленных подвигов, которым восхищался весь тогдашний мир. Подвиг, сравнимый с первым полетом человека в космос.20 июня "ужасного" 1937 года экипаж Чкалова, Байдукова, Белякова на специально для этого созданном самолете АНТ-25 за 63 часа преодолел расстояние в 8,5 тыс. км и приземлился в США. По приземлении в США их принял в Белом доме президент Франклин Рузвельт, а на родине лётчики были награждены орденами Красного Знамени и стали национальными героями.Герои Советского Союза лётчики Александр Беляков, Георгий Байдуков и Валерий Чкалов. На самолете надпись "Сталинский маршрут".АНТ-25, на котором летел экипаж, имел размах крыльев, в 2,5 раза превышающий длину фюзеляжа. В них находились багажные отсеки и топливные баки. На фото — приземление в американском Ванкувере.Изначально экипаж планировал приземлиться в Сан-Франциско, однако из-за сложных погодных условий, приведших к перерасходу топлива, был вынужден сесть в городе Ванкувер, штат Вашингтон.К концу путешествия в баках оставалось всего 77 из первоначально имевшихся 3,5 тыс. литров горючего.Чкалов с женой Ольгой и сыном Игорем.Встреча лётчиков в Москве.Чкалов и "проклятый" Сталин.

21 июня, 07:55

Why Did Democrats Ossoff And Parnell Lose Their Congressional Races In Georgia And South Carolina?

Democrats around the country were hopeful that they could win two special elections Tuesday in what had long been “safe” Republican districts in Georgia and South Carolina. Instead, both Democratic candidates — Jon Ossoff and Archie Parnell — narrowly lost. Why did they lose? Pundits and politics will be debating this question for a long while, but here’s one factor that made a huge difference: Low turnout among African Americans. If this sounds familiar, it should. It explains why Hillary Clinton lost Michigan, Wisconsin, and Pennsylvania to Donald Trump last November by a total of 77,000 votes. Had she won those three states, she would have won the Electoral College and would be occupying the White House today. Democrat Jon Ossoff’s campaign in the Atlanta suburbs attracted the most attention and the most money. Last November, no political expert expected Georgia’s 6th Congressional district to be a hotly-contested swing district. For many years it was represented by right-wing Republican Congressman Newt Gingrich. When he retired, he was replaced by Tom Price, his ideological twin. But after Trump picked Price to become Secretary of Health and Human Services, Ossoff, an unknown 30-year-old documentary filmmaker, jumped into the race to replace Price in a special election. The national Democratic Party did not initially support Ossoff’s campaign. The party leaders viewed it as a long shot at best. What propelled Ossoff’s campaign were hundreds of local volunteers – many of them political neophytes – who formed new local groups like PaveItBlue, Johns Creek-Milton Progressives Network, Roswell Resistance Huddle, and Liberal Moms of Roswell and Cobb to support Ossoff. Progressive groups like MoveOn and Daily Kos, and a strong endorsement from civil rights icon Rep. John Lewis (who represents Atlanta in Congress) helped Ossoff raise millions of dollars, mostly in small-size donations. In the April primary, he came in first among 18 contenders, with 48 percent of the vote, only 3,700 shy of winning the 50 percent needed for victory. Instead, he faced a run-off with the second-place finisher, Karen Handel, a conservative Republican. At that point, in part because of the contest’s symbolic value, the national Democratic Party began helping Ossoff. In fact, Democrats and Republicans from around the country poured money into the race, making it by far the most expensive U.S. House race in the nation’s history. A week before the election, polls showed Ossoff with a narrow lead. But on Tuesday, Handel narrowly beat Ossoff by a 51.9 percent to 48.1 percent margin. In Tuesday’s special election in South Carolina, Republican Ralph Norman beat Democrat Archie Parnell by a 51.1 percent to 47.9 percent margin. Last November, Republican incumbent Mike Mulvaney beat his Democratic opponent by a 59.2 percent to 38.7 percent landslide. Mulvaney gave up his seat to become Trump’s budget director. At the time, few thought that this seat was up for grabs. Moreover, the race attracted less attention and money than the Georgia contest, but it had many of the same dynamics — an upsurge of Democratic volunteers (particularly women) inspired by anti-Trump sentiment and fears of what the Republican-led Congress might do to health care and other issues. But another dynamic was a work in both contests. A few days ago the Los Angeles Times described Ossoff’s last-minute effort to drive up the Black vote. Ossoff’s campaign, the Times reported, “are scrambling to engage with black voters, who make up 13% of the district’s electorate,” but a much smaller percentage of those who actually vote. Ossoff’s campaign probably made some inroads in increasing Black turnout since the April primary, but fell short of the number needed to prevail. The Wall Street Journal described a similar dynamic in South Carolina. On Tuesday morning, before the polls had opened, it reported, “South Carolina Democrats have spent recent weeks trying to build a machine to turn out the districts black voters.” In that district, Blacks represent 28 percent of the potential voters but a much smaller percentage of actual voters. In other words, the Democrat candidates in both races ignored the Black vote until the last minute. Then they parachuted organizers and operatives into the districts to rev up Democratic-leaning but low-propensity voters, particularly Black voters. Had Black turnout been higher, both Ossoff and Parnell probably would have won. The Democrat candidates in both races ignored the Black vote until the last minute. Clinton’s losses last November in Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania could also be attributed to low turnout by Democratic-leaning citizens, especially African Americans. In Wisconsin, Trump beat Clinton by a mere 22,748 votes out of more than 2.9 million votes cast. Statewide, Trump received about the same number of voters as Mitt Romney in 2012, but Clinton received almost 240,000 fewer votes than Obama did in 2012. The statewide decline in voter turnout was particularly devastating in Democratic strongholds. In 2011, Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker and the Republican legislature adopted tougher voter-registration laws, including a requirement that voters provide a photo ID to vote. This election law change had a chilling effect in Milwaukee, the state’s largest city, which has a large African American and low-income population. According to Neil Albrecht, the Milwaukee Election Commission’s executive director, voter turnout in that city declined by 41,000 people between 2012 and 2016, with most of the drop-off coming in high-poverty districts. But the Clinton campaign also failed to invest sufficient resources in those areas and Clinton herself barely campaign in Wisconsin, because her advisors mistakenly assumed that it would be a slam-dunk win. The Democrats’ mistake in Wisconsin last year and Georgia and South Carolina this year wasn’t simply failing to focus campaign resources on Black and other Democratic-leaning but low-propensity voters. Most Democratic leaders suffer from a kind of short-term-itis that limits their ability to think beyond the next election cycle. Everyone who has studied voter turnout knows that people are more likely to vote if they’ve developed trust and social relationships with other people through ongoing activities (including churches, sports activities, and issue-organizing campaigns), that people are more likely to vote if someone they know contacts them one-on-one, and that people are more likely to vote if they’ve been involved in some kind of activism in-between elections. You can’t build that kind of trust and organizational capacity by dropping into Congressional districts a few months before election day. The Koch brothers and their fellow Republican billionaires understand this. They’ve spent the last decade investing in building a conservative and Republican political infrastructure that turns out the vote on election day but also engages people in-between election cycles. It isn’t just about last-minute TV ads. Other factors were at work in both the Georgia and South Carolina races. Ossoff didn’t live in the district, providing Handel with an opportunity to call him a “carpetbagger.” Her allies also ran last minute ads ridiculously linking Ossoff (and Bernie Sanders, who gave him a lukewarm endorsement for not being “progressive” enough) to the shooting of Republican politicians and staffers participating in a baseball practice in Virginia last week. Plus, it rained on Tuesday in the most Democratic parts of the Congressional district, which may have dampened turnout. The South Carolina race received much less attention, and less money, than the Georgia contest. Parnell raised $763,000 compared with Norman’s $1.3 million. The national Democratic Party didn’t invest in Parnell’s campaign until a month before the election. Parnell, a tax attorney, might also have been handicapped by his brief stint with Goldman Sachs which, even in South Carolina, is not a popular brand. Also, South Carolina’s 5th district was redrawn to heavily favor Republicans after the 2010 elections. Ossoff ran on a liberal but not overly progressive platform. Parnell was even more moderate, supporting mainstream Democratic but reluctant to identify with the Democratic Party’s Sanders/Warren wing. Still, it isn’t clear how important their policy ideas mattered in determining the outcome of both races. In evaluating the lessons of these two close losses, pundits are split between those who emphasize message (policy agenda, themes, talking points, TV ads, and whether to attack Trump) and those who emphasize movement (grassroots organizing around issues in between elections, voter engagement and turnout [especially among Democratic-leaning but low-propensity voters], training volunteers, and knock-knock-knocking on every door). Both are needed, of course, but they reflect different approaches to winning elections. Both the Georgia and South Carolina races were long shots for the Democratic candidates. Ossoff’s and Parnell’s defeats in these special elections don’t necessarily portend similar results in the November 2018 House races, but they do offer some important lessons. Democrats need to win a net 24 seats to have a majority. In November, Hillary Clinton beat Trump in 23 House districts that were won by Republican candidates for the House. At the time, those 23 seats seemed the upper limit of potential Democratic shifts. But the number of “swing” districts has grown in the wake of the Trump meltdown. Between January and May, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee expanded its list from 59 to 79 GOP-held seats it intends to target, hoping to take advantage of Trump’s historically low popularity, the upsurge of activism, and the growing local protests against House Republicans. Only 18 of those contests are in the South — six in Florida, four in North Carolina, three in Virginia, two each in Texas and Georgia, and one in Alabama. Nine are in California, including three in Orange County, once a Republican bastion but one that Hillary Clinton won last November — the first Democrat to do so since Franklin Roosevelt. But If liberals, progressives and Democrats are going to win these “swing” races ― to take back the House next year and the Senate and White House in 2020 ― they have to invest in grassroots organizing in-between election cycles. That means paying for year-long, multi-year organizers to build local organizations and movements, not just occasional protest marches and last-minute get-out-the-vote drives. As Pete Seeger sang, “When will they ever learn?” Peter Dreier is professor of politics and chair of the Urban & Environmental Policy Department at Occidental College. His most recent book is The 100 Greatest Americans of the 20th Century: A Social Justice Hall of Fame (Nation Books). -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

20 июня, 17:39

The Rise and Fall of the Word 'Monopoly' in American Life

For several decades, the term was a fixture of newspaper headlines and campaign speeches. Then something changed.

20 июня, 15:52

Lady Death and the Invisible Horror: The female face of war

1. Lyudmila Pavlichenko, Lady Death Lyudmila Pavlichenko. / Archive Photo Lyudmila Pavlichenko is considered the deadliest woman sniper of the Great Patriotic War, with 309 kills to her name, all of them enemy soldiers and officers. Nicknamed “Lady Death” by foreign war reporters, she is the subject of songs and movies. In the Soviet Union, her image twice appeared on postage stamps. Pavlichenko volunteered for frontline service at the age of 25, and joined the combat army after only brief sniper training. Pavlichenko took part in the battles for Odessa and Sevastopol in Ukraine. During these battles, she met a fellow sniper with whom she decided to tie the knot. But soon after applying for permission to marry, Pavlichenko’s fiancé was seriously wounded and died in the hospital. This story forms the basis of the plot of a recent film about Pavlichenko, “Battle for Sevastopol.” Lyudmila Pavlichenko. / TASS Pavlichenko was involved in the defense of Sevastopol practically till the very end. Under the most horrendous conditions, the city stood firm for eight months. In June 1942 Pavlichenko was wounded and evacuated from the city. In less than one year, Pavlichenko eliminated 300 enemy soldiers and officers. It is said that some of Germany’s top snipers were sent to take her out, 36 of whom she neutralized. One of her adversaries, according to media reports, was a German sniper with over 400 kills. Having recovered from injury, Pavlichenko traveled to the United States and Canada as part of a Soviet youth delegation. She was received by U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt, and his wife Eleanor took her on a trip around the country. At meetings in the United States, Pavlichenko urged the Allies to expedite the opening of a second front in Europe. Speaking in Chicago, she stated: “Gentlemen, I am 25 years old. I have already annihilated 309 fascist invaders. Do you not think, gentlemen, that you have been hiding behind my back for too long?” In the United States she was presented with a Colt pistol, and in Canada with a Winchester rifle. The singer Woody Guthrie dedicated the song “Miss Pavlichenko” to her. In 1943 Pavlichenko was awarded the title Hero of the Soviet Union, but she did not return to the front and spent her time training snipers. 2. Aliya Moldagulova Aliya Moldagulova was a sniper of the 54th Rifle Brigade of the 22nd Guards Army. / TASS Born in Kazakhstan, Aliya Moldagulova was in Leningrad when war broke out. In March 1942, the 16-year-old girl was evacuated from the besieged city, along with other children from the orphanage where she lived. By December of that same year, Aliya had enrolled as a cadet at the recently established Central School of Sniper Training Instructors. There she was awarded a personalized rifle for fine marksmanship, and in July of the following year, Aliya was sent to the front. “In August 1943 sniper Aliya Moldagulova joined our brigade. A fragile, very likeable girl from Kazakhstan. Despite only being 18 years old, by October she had 32 fascist kills to her name,” recalls one of Aliya’s fellow women soldiers. The latter also recounts that Aliya was exceptionally brave. Besides being an excellent sniper, she also captured German soldiers and carried the wounded from the battlefield, administering first aid in the process. Aliya was killed during the liberation of the Pskov Region in north-west Russia in January 1944. As told by eyewitnesses, she repeatedly led her fellow fighters on the attack with the cry: “Brothers, soldiers, follow me!” During one such attack, despite being injured by shrapnel, she charged at the enemy. Wounded once more by a German officer, she nevertheless managed to kill her adversary. Aliya later died from wounds sustained during this battle. Her service record includes 78 enemy soldiers and officers killed. The title Hero of the Soviet Union was conferred on her posthumously. The ballet “Aliya” was dedicated to her memory, and the story of her life was told in the 1985 movie “Snipers.” 3. Roza Shanina, The Invisible Horror 3rd Belarus Front. Snipers Roza Shanina, Alexandra Yekimova and Lidia Vdovina (left to right). / TASS Roza Shanina was a kindergarten teacher. She saw frontline action at the age of 19 after two years of badgering the military enlistment office to send her to the front. In June 1943, like Aliya Moldagulova, she enrolled at the Central School of Sniper Training Instructors, graduating with honors. Fellow soldiers recall that on killing her first Nazi in April 1944, she exclaimed: “I killed a person, a person...” However, just a few days later she had ten enemy kills to her name, and in a month's time she was awarded the Order of Glory Third Class. Her trademark technique was the “doublet”—a double shot in one breath. Roza was soon presented with another Order of Glory, this time Second Class. As the first woman to receive this award, it brought her nationwide fame. The frontline newspaper Let’s Destroy the Enemy wrote about her, and the Moscow magazine Ogonyok put her photo on its cover. Foreign journalists dubbed her “the Invisible Horror of East Prussia,” which is where she served from the fall of 1944 onwards. Roza Shanina / Archive image / Colored by Klimbim In her wartime diary, Roza wrote that she did not deserve all this glory. She believed that she had contributed very little to the war effort. Having served for nine months, she was killed in action in January 1945, just three months before victory, while covering the wounded commander of her artillery unit. She is believed to have eliminated 59 Wehrmacht soldiers and officers. Read more: World War II heroes now in color

20 июня, 00:16

The Supreme Court's Ominous National Security Ruling

The verdict could have significant implications for the case testing the Trump administration’s “travel ban,” barring entry of persons from six majority-Muslim countries.

19 июня, 23:40

Why So Many Critics Hate the New Obama Biography

David Garrow had the temerity to depict Obama as a real, complicated human being. Too bad the former president’s mythmakers can’t accept that.

19 июня, 22:36

A Psychedelic Spin On 'National Security'

Cross-posted from TomDispatch.com It’s the 50th anniversary of the Summer of Love. What better place to celebrate than that fabled era’s epicenter, San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park, where the DeYoung Museum has mounted a dazzling exhibition, chock full of rock music, light shows, posters, and fashions from the mind-bending summer of 1967? If you tour the exhibit, you might come away thinking that the political concerns of the time were no more than parenthetical bookends to that summer’s real action, its psychedelic counterculture. Only the first and last rooms of the large show are explicitly devoted to political memorabilia. The main body of the exhibit seems devoid of them, which fits well with the story told in so many history books. The hippies of that era, so it’s often claimed, paid scant attention to political matters. Take another moment in the presence of all the artifacts of that psychedelic summer, though, and a powerful (if implicit) political message actually comes through, one that couldn’t be more unexpected. The counterculture of that era, it turns out, offered a radical challenge to a basic premise of the Washington worldview, then and now, a premise accepted ― and spoken almost ritualistically ― by every president since Franklin Delano Roosevelt: nothing is more important than our “national security.” And believe me, “national security” should go in those scare quotes as a reminder that it’s not a given of our world like Mount Whitney or the buffalo. Think of it as an invented idea, an ideological construct something like “the invisible hand of capitalism” or even “liberty and justice for all.” Those other two concepts still remain influences in our public life, but like so much else they have become secondary matters since the early days of World War II, when President Roosevelt declared “national security” the nation’s number one concern.  However unintentionally, he planted a seed that has never stopped growing.  It’s increasingly the political equivalent of the kudzu vine that overruns everything in its path. Since Roosevelt’s day, our political life, federal budget, news media, even popular culture have all become obsessively focused on the supposed safety of Americans, no matter what the actual dangers in our world, and so much else has been subordinated to that. The national security state has become a de facto fourth branch of the federal government (though it’s nowhere mentioned in the Constitution), a shadow government increasingly looming over the other three. It says much about the road we’ve traveled since World War II that such developments now appear so sensible, so necessary.  After all, our safety is at stake, right? So the politicians and the media tell us. Who wouldn’t be worried in a world where the constant “threats to our national security” are given such attention, even if at the highest levels of government no one seems quite sure just which enemies ― ISIS, Iran, Qatar, the Taliban, al-Qaeda, Russia, North Korea ― we should fear most.  Who suspected, for example, that Qatar, for so long apparently a U.S. ally in the war against ISIS, would suddenly be cast as that enemy’s ally and so a menace to us? To judge from the increasingly dire warnings of politicians and pundits, the only certainty is that, whoever may be out to get us, we need to be constantly on our guard against new threats. That’s where our taxpayer money should go. That’s why secrecy rules the day in Washington and normal Americans know ever less about what exactly their government is doing in their name to protect them.  It’s “a matter of safety,” of course.  Better safe than sorry, as the saying goes, and even in a democracy better ignorant than sorry, too.  The most frightening part of living in a national security state is that the world is transformed into little else but a vast reservoir of potential enemies, all bent on our destruction. Immersed in and engulfed by such a culture, it may be hard to remember, or even (for those under 65) to believe, that half a century ago a mass social movement arose that challenged not only our warped notion of security, but the very idea of building national life on the quest for security. Yet that’s just what the counterculture of the 1960s did. The challenge reveals itself most clearly in that culture’s psychedelic light shows with their “densely packed, fluid patterning of shapes and fragmented images... [which] literally absorbed audience members into the show,” as the DeYoung’s website explains. They were events meant to break down all boundaries, even between audience and performers.  Posters advertising rock music and light shows displayed the same features and added “distorted forms and unreadable, meandering lettering,” all meant to “create an intense visual effect similar to that experienced by the shows’ attendees.” In them, a vision of life and a message about it still shines through, one that gives us a glimpse, half a century later, into the most basic values and cultural assumptions of that moment and that movement. Tear Down the Wall Novelist Ken Kesey, impresario of the Trips Festival that presaged the Summer of Love, summed up the message in three memorable words: “Outside is inside.” When the Beatles kicked off that season with the first classic psychedelic record album, Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, George Harrison echoed Kesey’s vision in his song “Within You Without You,” a haunting meditation “About the space between us allAnd the peopleWho hide themselves behind a wall of illusionNever glimpse the truth...We’re all oneAnd life flows on within you and without you.” What could this possibly have to do with “national security”? Applied to our moment, think of it this way: if we’re all one, if outside is indeed inside and within you is without you, then it makes no sense to blame our problems on foreigners and build walls to keep “those people” out of our land and our lives. In Summer of Love terms, it would instead make perfect sense to tear down every wall enclosing our Trumpian world ― walls that are supposed to divide Americans from foreigners, Anglos from Latinos, straights from gays, men from women, elites from the working class, and so on into an endlessly “secure” future. The Jefferson Airplane, a house band of the Summer of Love, put the message of that moment in an explicitly political context. Presenting themselves as patriotic “Volunteers,” they urged Americans to “tear down the walls” so that “we can be together.” To be sure, most people remained deaf to such calls. But two summers later, at the Woodstock Festival, a new nation would take an initial step toward creating itself through the revolutionary act of tearing down its own walls and fences. “There was no security,” a photographer at Woodstock recalled. “The idea was that it wasn’t necessary.” By logical extension, today’s political borders of all sorts deserve the same treatment because they, too, are unnecessary. As the hippies came to see it, all the walls and fences we create are more than just unnecessary. They are, as George Harrison sang, illusions born of and built around the fiction of separateness. Recognize that illusion and another one immediately becomes obvious: the fears that spark the obsession with “national security” are largely illusory, too. Yet they are endless because what we are truly trying to fend off is not an external enemy but, in the famed words of President Roosevelt in his first inaugural address, “fear itself.”  At about the time Ken Kesey was hosting his Trips Festival, John Lennon of the Beatles discovered The Psychedelic Experience, a book co-authored by LSD gurus Timothy Leary and Richard Alpert.  It moved him to sing that there really was nothing to be afraid of: “Turn off your mind relax and float down stream, It is not dying, it is not dying.” The psychedelic rock shows, light shows, and posters were all meant to turn life into that single swirling stream, dissolving every imaginable boundary line, and so teaching that reality itself is just such a stream. To quote the nineteenth-century poet Walt Whitman (as so many did in the Summer of Love), let yourself be “loos’d of limits and imaginary lines” and “you are henceforth secure, whatever comes or goes.”   The most widely read San Francisco intellectual of that year, Alan Watts, caught the moment (and pushed it yet further) in the very title of his book, The Wisdom of Insecurity. He spelled out what the light shows and posters communicated in a flash: what we think of as separate places, inside and outside, are merely two intertwined parts, two different ways of describing a single reality. Ditto for self and other, friend and enemy, life and death. The pursuit of security, he suggested even then, creates an illusory separation between friend and enemy in an effort to protect the self and life against the other and feared death. It is, he insisted, always doomed to fail, since all those opposites are inseparable. And ironically, the more we fail, the more frightened we become, and so the more frantically we pursue both the walling off of others and the illusion of security. Far wiser and more life-enhancing, Watts concluded, was to accept the inevitability of insecurity, the truth that in the stream of life, the next moment is always as unpredictable as it is uncontrollable. Why worry about security at all if, as Lennon announced just as the Summer of Love was reaching full swing, “There’s nowhere you can be that isn’t whereYou’re meant to be,It’s easy.All you need is love.” The English language has no word to describe the state where love (if you’ll excuse this word) trumps both security and insecurity. The hippies had little interest in finding a new word to describe how life was truly to be experienced, but perhaps, until something better comes along, a term like non-security ― a state of being unconcerned with the whole issue of security ― will do. The gospel of non-security went forth from Haight-Ashbury (and New York City’s East Village) across the land. Hippies everywhere (even in Nebraska, my wife, who comes from there, assures me) assiduously cultivated such a state of mind.  It was perhaps the most essential byproduct of their counterculture and it helped underpin a mass movement, seldom considered in the context of national politics, that remains the most radical and powerful challenge yet to Washington’s present ruling passion for “national security” and the vast panoply of 17 intelligence outfits, tens of millions of classified documents, a surveillance apparatus that would have stunned the totalitarian states of the twentieth century, and a military into which taxpayer dollars are invested at an unparalleled rate. When the Counterculture Met the New Left Fifty years later, the counterculture’s thinking on the subject of security may sound like little more than a quaint and spacy fantasy. Even then, non-security was light-years away from the reality of most Americans in a country that would soon elect Richard Nixon president. California, always at the cutting edge, had already made former Hollywood actor Ronald Reagan governor and so began to pave the superhighway that has now led Donald Trump to the White House. President Trump and his minions are visibly eager to take money from people in need and lavish it on what is already the world’s largest military budget, larger than those of numerous other major powers combined. They are just as eager to spend money on a wall stretching from the Pacific to the Gulf of Mexico, high, wide, and forbidding (or as the president likes to say, “big, fat, [and] beautiful”) enough to keep Spanish-speaking foreigners out of the U.S.A. They would also expand the electronic eavesdropping network that can track our every word. And so ― as novelist Kurt Vonnegut would once have said ― it goes.  They justify such plans and so much more in the name of ― yes, you guessed it ― “national security” or (more tellingly yet) “homeland security.” With such people in power, the very idea of non-security seems beyond utopian, like a concept from outer space. In some ways that was true in the Summer of Love, too, and not just because, even then, it was so far removed from the reality of a dominant culture that would handily survive its challenge. There was also the brute fact that, when thousands of young people heeded the siren call and traveled to San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury neighborhood to experience that season of love in person, it essentially became another crime- and poverty-ridden inner-city slum. Look magazine journalist William Hedgepath, for instance, found the hippies there “working toward an open, loving, tension-free world,” but also found himself “spending the night in a filthy, litter-strewn dope fortress.”  Before we rush to judgment, however, it’s important to remember a reality often overlooked in the history books on hippiedom: most people whose countercultural lives were touched by the gospel of non-security were also touched by, and sometimes swept up in, the much larger political movement to end the war in Vietnam. This meant that their largely unspoken challenge to “national security” was woven together with another kind of challenge, one that came from the more overtly political New Left leadership of that antiwar movement.     Unlike the hippies, the New Left had no particular interest in experiencing the unsaid and undefined. They were eager instead to find precise words to make their anti-establishment case. And they first did so in 1962. That year, members of a group that called itself Students for a Democratic Society drafted a manifesto at a United Auto Workers retreat in Port Huron, Michigan. It, too, ran against the security thinking of that moment by proclaiming that “real security cannot be gained by propping up military defenses, but only through the hastening of political stability, economic growth, greater social welfare, improved education.” Nonetheless, the writers of the Port Huron Statement remained worried about security in a sense that any American of the time would have understood instantly.  They, too, divided the world into us and them, friends and enemies, good guys and bad guys. “Economic institutions should be in the control of national, not foreign, agencies,” they declared, critiquing America’s imperial role in the world. “The destiny of any country should be determined by its nationals, not by outsiders.” The best their manifesto could foresee in the world arena was “coexistence” between America and its foes, fueled by economic rather than military competition. In that sense, radical as it was, the statement offered no direct challenge to the bipartisan consensus that security was every American’s most important concern. Indeed, its language on security issues might easily be endorsed today by the most progressive voices in the Democratic Party, and on the issue of national sovereignty, eerily enough, by Donald Trump and his supporters. Still, the New Left was focused on using rational planning to move toward a future of more genuine security and less fear for all. In such a future, everyone would be able to develop his or her potential to the fullest, free from a major source of insecurity seldom mentioned more than half a century later: rampant technology deployed by a rabid capitalism that values profits above people.  The counterculture went further, even if rather incoherently, aiming to create a present in which the whole question of security, if it didn’t simply disappear, would at least become a distinctly secondary concern.  It would be a present in which, adapting a phrase of that moment, all you needed was love. Charles Perry, the historian of Haight-Ashbury, recalled one hippie who summed up the difference between his tribe and the more political types this way: “They talk about peace. We are peace.” Each of these sixties critiques of “national security” was, in its own way, utopian in terms of the realities of its moment, and most radicals of the time, however unconsciously, did their best to negotiate a path between the two. Non-security ― an escape from the usual Washington concerns ― remained an ideal then, and today it’s hard to even remember that anyone ever challenged the idea that “national security” should dominate our lives, our fears, and our dreams.   Half a century later, it should be clear that Washington’s present quest for “national security” can never end.  The national security state itself is a machine that constantly fuels the very fears it claims to fight.  In doing so, what it actually condemns Americans to is nothing less than a permanent state of insecurity. The quest for a more balanced (or even unbalanced) approach to security in the 1960s pointed a way toward at least the possibility of an American world of diminished fears.  Now, with a man in the Oval Office who sees enemies everywhere and declares that he alone can save us from them, and with nearly 4 in 10 Americans still approving of the way he’s trying to “save” us, if only there were a radical critique of “national security” somewhere in our world. Perhaps it’s time to take a retrospective look at that Summer of Love moment, half a century ago, and reacquaint ourselves with the two kinds of radicalism of the time, one promoting a more humane idea of security and the other aimed at building a new kind of life that transcended the question of security altogether. Perhaps between them they might spark some truly new thinking about how to respond to the power and dominance of our national security state and to a way of life that shuts us down, locks us in, ratchets up our terrors, and offers us a vision of more of the same until the end of time. Ira Chernus,a TomDispatch regular, is professor emeritus of religious studies at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and author of the online “MythicAmerica: Essays.” To read his earlier TomDispatch look at the 1960s and today, “Trump, a Symptom of What? A Radical Message From a Half-Century Ago,” click here. Follow TomDispatch on Twitter and join us on Facebook. Check out the newest Dispatch Book, John Dower’s The Violent American Century: War and Terror Since World War II, as well as John Feffer’s dystopian novel Splinterlands, Nick Turse’s Next Time They’ll Come to Count the Dead, and Tom Engelhardt’s Shadow Government: Surveillance, Secret Wars, and a Global Security State in a Single-Superpower World. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

19 июня, 09:56

Лукавый дар Линкольна. Почему отмена рабства в США не принесла счастья?

Расовая сегрегация в Соединенных Штатах была законодательно запрещена лишь спустя 100 лет после отмены рабства.

19 июня, 08:53

Безумству храбрых поём мы песню? К 80-летию первого перелёта через Северный полюс

Фраза, написанная Максимом Горьким, была довольно распространена в описываемое время. Время титанов. Хоть сегодня многие продолжают стонать о сталинском культе личности, тогда да, был культ личности, но простите, были и личности. Но безумны ли храбростью своею были те, кто совершил этот подвиг? Атака в стиле «любой ценой», как это выставляют сегодня некоторые организмы, или все-таки трезвый расчет и уверенность в своих силах?

18 июня, 16:09

America and Nazi Germany Were at War Way Before You Think

Warfare History Network History, The U.S. Navy engaged in a shooting war with the Kriegsmarine before official entry into World War II. Between September 1939 and December 1941, the United States moved from neutral to active belligerent in an undeclared naval war against Nazi Germany. During those early years the British could well have lost the Battle of the Atlantic. The undeclared war was the difference that kept Britain in the war and gave the United States time to prepare for total war. With America’s isolationism, disillusionment from its World War I experience, pacifism, and tradition of avoiding European problems, President Franklin D. Roosevelt moved cautiously to aid Britain. Historian C.L. Sulzberger wrote that the undeclared war “came about in degrees.” For Roosevelt, it was more than a policy. It was a conviction to halt an evil and a threat to civilization. As commander in chief of the U.S. armed forces, Roosevelt ordered the U.S. Navy from neutrality to undeclared war. It was a slow process as Roosevelt walked a tightrope between public opinion, the Constitution, and a declaration of war. By the fall of 1941, the U.S. Navy and the British Royal Navy were operating together as wartime naval partners. So close were their operations that as early as autumn 1939, the British Ambassador to the United States, Lord Lothian, termed it a “present unwritten and unnamed naval alliance.” The United States Navy called it an “informal arrangement.” Regardless of what America’s actions were called, the fact is the power of the United States influenced the course of the Atlantic war in 1941. The undeclared war was most intense between September and December 1941, but its origins reached back more than two years and sprang from the mind of one man and one man only—Franklin Roosevelt. Two Navies Unprepared For War When war broke out in September 1939, the Royal Navy and the German Kriegsmarine were both unprepared. Land-minded Adolf Hitler prepared his army and air force but had not given his navy time to build the necessary submarine or surface fleets for a naval war against Britain. Since Hitler planned for a war of short duration, he considered interference with the Atlantic sealanes a means to defeat Britain. However, Hitler preferred to eliminate continental powers first and then make the British “see reason.” Read full article

18 июня, 13:00

Patagonia's CEO Is Ready To Lead The Corporate Resistance To Donald Trump

NEW YORK ― On a cloudy May morning, Rose Marcario, the chief executive of outdoor retailer Patagonia, stared out a second-story window of a Manhattan restaurant, watching construction workers jackhammer the street below. The workers made her think of her grandfather, an Italian immigrant who, after making it through Ellis Island in the 1920s, got his first job digging the streets of this city. He earned 10 cents a day and had to bring his own shovel. People regularly spat at him and sneered at his broken English.  “He’d tell me, ‘I didn’t mind that, because I knew that someday in the future, you were going to have a better life,’” she recalled.   His sacrifice has been weighing on Marcario lately. She isn’t a parent herself, but she thinks of her young cousins, nieces and nephews. She wants them to inherit a planet with a stable climate and normal sea levels ― a country that still has some pristine wilderness left. Her job ― running a privately held company with roughly $800 million in annual revenue and stores in 16 states plus D.C. ― provides her a much bigger platform to influence their lives than anyone in her family had two generations ago. It’s also why she’s decided to take on the president of the United States to stop him from rolling back decades of public land protections.   “We have to fight like hell to keep every inch of public land,” Marcario, 52, told HuffPost last month. “I don’t have a lot of faith in politics and politicians right now.” Ventura, California-based Patagonia has taken on a number of national conservation efforts since environmentalist and rock climber Yvon Chouinard founded it in 1973. In 1988, the firm launched a campaign to restore the natural splendor of Yosemite Valley, which was being destroyed by cars and lodges. The company took on a more consumer-centric approach, launching an ad campaign in 2011 urging customers not to buy its jackets in an attempt to address rampant waste in the fashion industry.   The company was relatively quiet for the first two years after Marcario took the top spot in 2014. But she grew dismayed as environmental and climate issues took a backseat in the 2016 election, despite the stark difference between the two top candidates’ views. She worried the vicious mudslinging of the election would turn off voters. Instead of turning away from political discord, as many corporate giants have, Marcario ran toward it. In September, the company announced plans to spend $1 million and launch a get-out-the-vote tour of 17 states. On Election Day, the retailer completely closed down its operations in 30 stores to make sure employees and shoppers made it to the polls. Still, Donald Trump’s November victory caught Marcario by surprise. Trump had campaigned on bombastic promises to revive the coal industry, a top source of planet-warming emissions, and vowed to transform the U.S. into a major fossil fuel exporter. Then he named the CEO of Exxon Mobil Corp. as his secretary of state and picked an oil and gas ally to head the Environmental Protection Agency.  He nominated Ryan Zinke, a freshman congressman from Montana who questioned the science behind global warming, to head the Department of the Interior, which controls national parks and 500 million acres of land ― or 20 percent of the U.S. landmass.   And Trump made clear that he plans to roll back the environmental rules issued under Obama ― which he has said constrain businesses and stymie job growth. In a show of postelection defiance, Patagonia decided to donate all $10 million of its Black Friday sales to environmental causes. In a Nov. 28 blog post, the company nodded to the president-elect’s dismissal of climate science and promise to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement, though it stopped short of calling Trump out by name. But Marcario still thought public lands were safe. While Trump, born and raised in New York City, never seemed to care about outdoor excursions that didn’t include 18 holes, his eldest son, Donald Jr., is a big-game hunter who grew up camping in the forests of his mother’s native Czech Republic. During the campaign, Trump signaled plans to buck the Republican Party platform calling for federals lands to be turned over to state control, where they were more likely to be exploited for resource development or sold off. “I want to keep the lands great,” Trump told Field & Stream magazine in January 2016. That tone changed shortly after the election. One of Obama’s final actions was to set aside 1.35 million acres in southeastern Utah to create Bears Ears National Monument, named by the various Native American tribes whose sacred lands it included. The designation riled the state’s Republican leaders, who condemned the designation as a federal land grab and urged the incoming Trump administration to undo it, and mining interests that were looking to tap uranium and mineral deposits in the region. Patagonia went on the offensive against Utah’s Republican governor and Washington delegation. In January, the company threatened to pull out of Salt Lake City’s biannual Outdoor Retailer Show, a trade show that brings 45,000 visitors spending more than $40 million each year. Marcario pledged to fight the state’s leadership “with everything that we have.” A month later, she pulled out of the show and put intense pressure on its organizers to quit hosting the event in Utah’s capital until state lawmakers halted their assault on Bears Ears. In April, Trump directed Zinke to not only re-examine the Bears Ears designation but to to review all national monument designations going back 21 years, calling them an “egregious abuse of federal power.” Patagonia threatened to sue the Trump administration a day later, vowing to “take every step necessary, including legal action, to defend our most treasured public landscapes from coast to coast.” “A president does not have the authority to rescind a National Monument,” Marcario said in a terse statement that day. “An attempt to change the boundaries ignores the review process of cultural and historical characteristics and the public input.” Reversing Obama’s Bears Ears designation would be an unprecedented assault on a presidential prerogative created in the 1906 Antiquities Act. Nearly every president has wielded the act to preserve tribal lands and natural wonders. Only Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush declined to use the law, according to The Wilderness Society. But no White House has ever rescinded a monument, and a 2016 analysis from the Congressional Research Service suggests that presidents can only adjust, not outright abolish, a prior designation. Zinke completed his review this month, and on Monday submitted an interim report that recommends shrinking the boundaries of Bears Ears. There is some precedent for that: Woodrow Wilson halved Mount Olympic National Monument, which Roosevelt had designated in 1909. The monument was later restored to its full size when Franklin Roosevelt signed a congressional act redesignating the monument as Olympic National Park in 1938, providing it the expanded protections granted under national park status. Patagonia says it will make good on the threat to sue the administration if they move to alter Bears Ears.   The company has suggested it will take a novel approach to a lawsuit ― arguing that a reversal of those protections would hurt their business, which is structured to make environmental philanthropy a core function. The retailer is registered as a benefit corporation, or B corp, meaning the company has committed to adhering to rigid environmental and charitable standards, submitting detailed annual progress reports, and giving 1 percent of its pre-tax profits to green causes each year. Patagonia donated $800,000 to groups that advocated for Bears Ears to be established as part of that charitable giving. It also sent employees on retreats to the monument and tested products there. In May, the company released a virtual reality film touring Bears Ears.   We have to fight like hell to keep every inch of public land. Patagonia CEO Rose Marcario “We have such a close connection to the area,” Hilary Dessouky, Patagonia’s general counsel, told HuffPost by phone this week. “That’s part of our argument, that we are directly connected to the area though the work that we’ve done.” “We have a real economic interest in the preservation of America’s public lands,” she added. Mark Squillace, a law professor at the University of Colorado, said Patagonia’s claim could hold up in court. “Patagonia probably does have significant business interests that could be affected,” Squillace, who worked under Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt during the last year of Bill Clinton’s presidency, told HuffPost by phone. “The test for standing is not too draconian, so I think most courts would let Patagonia in.” Anticipated lawsuits from environmental groups and tribes ― whose legal standing to sue would be even stronger ― could also bolster Patagonia’s case. Trump could attempt to reduce the monument through an executive order, but he could also appeal to Congress to vote to change Bears Ears’ status, which Zinke has suggested they may do. That would face tough opposition, however. “I don’t believe Trump has the legal authority to rescind or shrink the monument,” Sen. Tom Udall (D-N.M.), who has a national monument in his own state under consideration, said on Monday. “If the administration moves forward with that plan, if he puts this plan before Congress, I will fight him every step of the way.” Patagonia said it would also consider its legal options if Congress acts, but would likely have a tougher time with that. At the very least, the company said it’s already considering putting its efforts behind pro-environment candidates in the 2018 election. Marcario said she had no interest in directly funding individual candidates, but Patagonia employees have given a total of $56,547 to the Democratic Party over the last 27 years, according to data from the Center for Responsive Politics. (Republicans, by contrast, received just one $500 donation in 1990.)  Marcario is ready for a long fight over something that could become her legacy at the company. Patagonia’s first CEO, Kris Tompkins, spent 12 years at the helm and donated more than 340,000 acres of land in Argentina’s northeastern Iberá wetlands to establish what will become the country’s largest nature preserve. Tompkins and her late husband, billionaire retail mogul Douglas Tompkins, also bought up huge swaths of wilderness in Argentina and Chile in hopes of preserving it. “She’s a pretty hard act to follow,” Marcario said with a laugh. Patagonia hasn’t been without its faults. Two years before Marcario took over, internal audits found forced labor and brutal conditions at Taiwanese mills that produced the raw materials for its apparel. Patagonia applied aggressive new standards for monitoring its suppliers in response, but it’s always difficult to monitor every supplier at all times. Marcario said she also wants to make changes at the corporate level to further their ideals ― by converting the firm’s food division, Patagonia Provisions, to purely organic ingredients and investing the employee retirement plans entirely in sustainable, eco-friendly funds and businesses. But for now, she’s focused on running a major company and keeping Trump from downsizing a national monument in southeastern Utah, a mammoth task unto itself. Progress requires effort, but it takes time, too. She learned that resolve from grandfather and from her childhood summers spent fishing the waters surrounding Staten Island with homemade rods her uncles made. She’s given to quoting Martin Luther King Jr.’s famous line about the long, justice-bent arc of the moral universe. After wrapping up the interview, Marcario grabbed her Patagonia backpack and prepared to catch her ride outside. She walked a few steps, then turned around. “Look, I grew up as a gay woman in the ‘80s, watching my friends die of AIDS and Jerry Falwell on TV saying they deserved it,” she said, referring to the far-right evangelical preacher. She paused for a moment, then smiled. “Look how far we’ve come.” type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related Coverage + articlesList=5935ea40e4b0099e7fae9975,5900eb2be4b0af6d718af532,5865619ee4b0eb5864889f98,5899ebbee4b09bd304bd9ef0,57e55c95e4b0e28b2b53a6d7 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

18 июня, 13:00

Patagonia's CEO Is Ready To Lead The Corporate Resistance To Donald Trump

NEW YORK ― On a cloudy May morning, Rose Marcario, the chief executive of outdoor retailer Patagonia, stared out a second-story window of a Manhattan restaurant, watching construction workers jackhammer the street below. The workers made her think of her grandfather, an Italian immigrant who, after making it through Ellis Island in the 1920s, got his first job digging the streets of this city. He earned 10 cents a day and had to bring his own shovel. People regularly spat at him and sneered at his broken English.  “He’d tell me, ‘I didn’t mind that, because I knew that someday in the future, you were going to have a better life,’” she recalled.   His sacrifice has been weighing on Marcario lately. She isn’t a parent herself, but she thinks of her young cousins, nieces and nephews. She wants them to inherit a planet with a stable climate and normal sea levels ― a country that still has some pristine wilderness left. Her job ― running a privately held company with roughly $800 million in annual revenue and stores in 16 states plus D.C. ― provides her a much bigger platform to influence their lives than anyone in her family had two generations ago. It’s also why she’s decided to take on the president of the United States to stop him from rolling back decades of public land protections.   “We have to fight like hell to keep every inch of public land,” Marcario, 52, told HuffPost last month. “I don’t have a lot of faith in politics and politicians right now.” Ventura, California-based Patagonia has taken on a number of national conservation efforts since environmentalist and rock climber Yvon Chouinard founded it in 1973. In 1988, the firm launched a campaign to restore the natural splendor of Yosemite Valley, which was being destroyed by cars and lodges. The company took on a more consumer-centric approach, launching an ad campaign in 2011 urging customers not to buy its jackets in an attempt to address rampant waste in the fashion industry.   The company was relatively quiet for the first two years after Marcario took the top spot in 2014. But she grew dismayed as environmental and climate issues took a backseat in the 2016 election, despite the stark difference between the two top candidates’ views. She worried the vicious mudslinging of the election would turn off voters. Instead of turning away from political discord, as many corporate giants have, Marcario ran toward it. In September, the company announced plans to spend $1 million and launch a get-out-the-vote tour of 17 states. On Election Day, the retailer completely closed down its operations in 30 stores to make sure employees and shoppers made it to the polls. Still, Donald Trump’s November victory caught Marcario by surprise. Trump had campaigned on bombastic promises to revive the coal industry, a top source of planet-warming emissions, and vowed to transform the U.S. into a major fossil fuel exporter. Then he named the CEO of Exxon Mobil Corp. as his secretary of state and picked an oil and gas ally to head the Environmental Protection Agency.  He nominated Ryan Zinke, a freshman congressman from Montana who questioned the science behind global warming, to head the Department of the Interior, which controls national parks and 500 million acres of land ― or 20 percent of the U.S. landmass.   And Trump made clear that he plans to roll back the environmental rules issued under Obama ― which he has said constrain businesses and stymie job growth. In a show of postelection defiance, Patagonia decided to donate all $10 million of its Black Friday sales to environmental causes. In a Nov. 28 blog post, the company nodded to the president-elect’s dismissal of climate science and promise to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement, though it stopped short of calling Trump out by name. But Marcario still thought public lands were safe. While Trump, born and raised in New York City, never seemed to care about outdoor excursions that didn’t include 18 holes, his eldest son, Donald Jr., is a big-game hunter who grew up camping in the forests of his mother’s native Czech Republic. During the campaign, Trump signaled plans to buck the Republican Party platform calling for federals lands to be turned over to state control, where they were more likely to be exploited for resource development or sold off. “I want to keep the lands great,” Trump told Field & Stream magazine in January 2016. That tone changed shortly after the election. One of Obama’s final actions was to set aside 1.35 million acres in southeastern Utah to create Bears Ears National Monument, named by the various Native American tribes whose sacred lands it included. The designation riled the state’s Republican leaders, who condemned the designation as a federal land grab and urged the incoming Trump administration to undo it, and mining interests that were looking to tap uranium and mineral deposits in the region. Patagonia went on the offensive against Utah’s Republican governor and Washington delegation. In January, the company threatened to pull out of Salt Lake City’s biannual Outdoor Retailer Show, a trade show that brings 45,000 visitors spending more than $40 million each year. Marcario pledged to fight the state’s leadership “with everything that we have.” A month later, she pulled out of the show and put intense pressure on its organizers to quit hosting the event in Utah’s capital until state lawmakers halted their assault on Bears Ears. In April, Trump directed Zinke to not only re-examine the Bears Ears designation but to to review all national monument designations going back 21 years, calling them an “egregious abuse of federal power.” Patagonia threatened to sue the Trump administration a day later, vowing to “take every step necessary, including legal action, to defend our most treasured public landscapes from coast to coast.” “A president does not have the authority to rescind a National Monument,” Marcario said in a terse statement that day. “An attempt to change the boundaries ignores the review process of cultural and historical characteristics and the public input.” Reversing Obama’s Bears Ears designation would be an unprecedented assault on a presidential prerogative created in the 1906 Antiquities Act. Nearly every president has wielded the act to preserve tribal lands and natural wonders. Only Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush declined to use the law, according to The Wilderness Society. But no White House has ever rescinded a monument, and a 2016 analysis from the Congressional Research Service suggests that presidents can only adjust, not outright abolish, a prior designation. Zinke completed his review this month, and on Monday submitted an interim report that recommends shrinking the boundaries of Bears Ears. There is some precedent for that: Woodrow Wilson halved Mount Olympic National Monument, which Roosevelt had designated in 1909. The monument was later restored to its full size when Franklin Roosevelt signed a congressional act redesignating the monument as Olympic National Park in 1938, providing it the expanded protections granted under national park status. Patagonia says it will make good on the threat to sue the administration if they move to alter Bears Ears.   The company has suggested it will take a novel approach to a lawsuit ― arguing that a reversal of those protections would hurt their business, which is structured to make environmental philanthropy a core function. The retailer is registered as a benefit corporation, or B corp, meaning the company has committed to adhering to rigid environmental and charitable standards, submitting detailed annual progress reports, and giving 1 percent of its pre-tax profits to green causes each year. Patagonia donated $800,000 to groups that advocated for Bears Ears to be established as part of that charitable giving. It also sent employees on retreats to the monument and tested products there. In May, the company released a virtual reality film touring Bears Ears.   We have to fight like hell to keep every inch of public land. Patagonia CEO Rose Marcario “We have such a close connection to the area,” Hilary Dessouky, Patagonia’s general counsel, told HuffPost by phone this week. “That’s part of our argument, that we are directly connected to the area though the work that we’ve done.” “We have a real economic interest in the preservation of America’s public lands,” she added. Mark Squillace, a law professor at the University of Colorado, said Patagonia’s claim could hold up in court. “Patagonia probably does have significant business interests that could be affected,” Squillace, who worked under Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt during the last year of Bill Clinton’s presidency, told HuffPost by phone. “The test for standing is not too draconian, so I think most courts would let Patagonia in.” Anticipated lawsuits from environmental groups and tribes ― whose legal standing to sue would be even stronger ― could also bolster Patagonia’s case. Trump could attempt to reduce the monument through an executive order, but he could also appeal to Congress to vote to change Bears Ears’ status, which Zinke has suggested they may do. That would face tough opposition, however. “I don’t believe Trump has the legal authority to rescind or shrink the monument,” Sen. Tom Udall (D-N.M.), who has a national monument in his own state under consideration, said on Monday. “If the administration moves forward with that plan, if he puts this plan before Congress, I will fight him every step of the way.” Patagonia said it would also consider its legal options if Congress acts, but would likely have a tougher time with that. At the very least, the company said it’s already considering putting its efforts behind pro-environment candidates in the 2018 election. Marcario said she had no interest in directly funding individual candidates, but Patagonia employees have given a total of $56,547 to the Democratic Party over the last 27 years, according to data from the Center for Responsive Politics. (Republicans, by contrast, received just one $500 donation in 1990.)  Marcario is ready for a long fight over something that could become her legacy at the company. Patagonia’s first CEO, Kris Tompkins, spent 12 years at the helm and donated more than 340,000 acres of land in Argentina’s northeastern Iberá wetlands to establish what will become the country’s largest nature preserve. Tompkins and her late husband, billionaire retail mogul Douglas Tompkins, also bought up huge swaths of wilderness in Argentina and Chile in hopes of preserving it. “She’s a pretty hard act to follow,” Marcario said with a laugh. Patagonia hasn’t been without its faults. Two years before Marcario took over, internal audits found forced labor and brutal conditions at Taiwanese mills that produced the raw materials for its apparel. Patagonia applied aggressive new standards for monitoring its suppliers in response, but it’s always difficult to monitor every supplier at all times. Marcario said she also wants to make changes at the corporate level to further their ideals ― by converting the firm’s food division, Patagonia Provisions, to purely organic ingredients and investing the employee retirement plans entirely in sustainable, eco-friendly funds and businesses. But for now, she’s focused on running a major company and keeping Trump from downsizing a national monument in southeastern Utah, a mammoth task unto itself. Progress requires effort, but it takes time, too. She learned that resolve from grandfather and from her childhood summers spent fishing the waters surrounding Staten Island with homemade rods her uncles made. She’s given to quoting Martin Luther King Jr.’s famous line about the long, justice-bent arc of the moral universe. After wrapping up the interview, Marcario grabbed her Patagonia backpack and prepared to catch her ride outside. She walked a few steps, then turned around. “Look, I grew up as a gay woman in the ‘80s, watching my friends die of AIDS and Jerry Falwell on TV saying they deserved it,” she said, referring to the far-right evangelical preacher. She paused for a moment, then smiled. “Look how far we’ve come.” type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related Coverage + articlesList=5935ea40e4b0099e7fae9975,5900eb2be4b0af6d718af532,5865619ee4b0eb5864889f98,5899ebbee4b09bd304bd9ef0,57e55c95e4b0e28b2b53a6d7 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

18 июня, 08:21

В США отмечают 80-летие первого беспосадочного перелета СССР-США экипажа Чкалова

Первый беспосадочный перелет из Советского Союза в США, совершенный 80 лет назад экипажем советских авиаторов под руководством Валерия Чкалова, стал примером человеческого подвига и важнейшим этапом отношений двух стран. Об этом в беседе с ТАСС заявил историк и официальный представитель Национального парка "Форт Ванкувер" (штат Вашингтон) Роберт Кромвель.Подвиг и пример человеческой выносливостиПо его словам, нынешний год является значимым как для истории авиации, так и для отношений двух стран. "Мы отмечаем 80-ю годовщину исторического события - невероятного перелета, совершенного Валерием Чкаловым вместе со вторым пилотом Георгием Байдуковым и штурманом Александром Беляковым, - отметил Кромвель. - Этот перелет из Москвы в Ванкувер представляет собой не только подвиг, пример человеческой выносливости и технологического прогресса того времени, но и важнейший этап отношений Америки и России до начала Второй мировой войны".Праздничная программа в честь перелетаКак рассказал представитель Форта Ванкувер, основные торжественные мероприятия в честь знаменитого полета пройдут в субботу, 24 июня, в рамках специальной программы, посвященной годовщине этого события. В частности, участники церемонии, среди которых будут официальные представители РФ, американские историки, авиаторы, сотрудники Форта Ванкувер и расположенного рядом Музея авиации Пирсона, возложат цветы к памятнику советским летчикам, совершившим легендарный полет.В честь годовщины в Форте Ванкувер откроется выставка картин российских художников, запечатлевших в своих работах Чкаловск - бывший город Василёво, где родился легендарный пилот. Выставка продлится до начала июля. В книжном магазине Национального парка, по словам Роберта Кромвеля, посетители могут приобрести книги, рассказывающие о полете 1937 года. Здесь также будут продаваться книги об авиации, модели самолетов и привезенные из России деревянные матрешки.Во время торжественных мероприятий в честь 80-летия полета с концертной программой выступит оркестр города Ванкувер (Vancouver Community Concert Band).Самолет АНТ-25 - последнее слово авиатехникиВ 1932 году бригадой конструктора Павла Сухого под руководством Андрея Туполева был создан самолет АНТ-25, предназначенный для дальних перелетов. Одномоторный низкоплан длиной 13 м с размахом крыльев 35 м был рассчитан на экипаж из трех человек, а его особенностью стало наличие топливных баков в крыльях.Средняя скорость полета АНТ-25 составляла 165 км/ч, а максимальная - 246 км/ч. На самолете было совершено сразу несколько рекордных полетов, однако главным стал первый беспосадочный перелет из Москвы в Северную Америку.Долгое путешествие с многочисленными неприятностямиИзначально это путешествие, траектория которого проходила через Северный полюс, должно было завершиться в аэропорту Сан-Франциско (штат Калифорния). 18 июня 1937 года с Щелковского аэродрома в воздух поднялся АНТ-25, которым управляли Герои Советского Союза Валерий Чкалов, Георгий Байдуков и Александр Беляков.Однако в полете экипаж столкнулся с многочисленными неожиданными трудностями, в том числе обледенением поверхности крыльев и винта, нехваткой кислорода, выбросом воды из системы охлаждения двигателя, неполадками с маслопроводом. В условиях недостаточной видимости пилоты иногда управляли вслепую, полагаясь только на данные приборов.19 июня самолет достиг побережья Канады, но долететь до Сан-Франциско оказалось невозможным из-за недостатка топлива. 20 июня самолет произвел посадку на аэродроме Пирсона в американском Ванкувере. Таким образом полет АНТ-25 продолжался 63 часа 16 минут, длина маршрута составила около 9 тыс. км, более половины которого пролегала над водной поверхностью и льдами. Перелет также стал и первым авиапутешествием через Северный полюс.Советские летчики - герои для СШАВ США советских авиаторов встречали как настоящих героев, их повсюду сопровождали толпы местных жителей, а в Вашингтоне, в Овальном кабинете Белого Дома экипаж принял американский президент Франклин Рузвельт. На родине экипаж был награжден орденами Красного Знамени.12 июля 1937 года еще один самолет АНТ-25 с другим экипажем совершил перелет через Северный Полюс по маршруту Москва-США, приземлившись на одном из пастбищ возле города Сан-Джасинто (штат Калифорния), совершив новый рекорд по дальности беспосадочного перелета (свыше 10 тыс. км). В.П.Чкалов передает спортивному комиссару ФАИ самописец параметров полета самолета АНТ-25. Схема перелета экипажа Чкалова с графиком высоты полета(http://tass.ru/obschestvo...)

18 июня, 08:21

В США отмечают 80-летие первого беспосадочного перелета СССР-США экипажа Чкалова

Первый беспосадочный перелет из Советского Союза в США, совершенный 80 лет назад экипажем советских авиаторов под руководством Валерия Чкалова, стал примером человеческого подвига и важнейшим этапом отношений двух стран. Об этом в беседе с ТАСС заявил историк и официальный представитель Национального парка "Форт Ванкувер" (штат Вашингтон) Роберт Кромвель.Подвиг и пример человеческой выносливостиПо его словам, нынешний год является значимым как для истории авиации, так и для отношений двух стран. "Мы отмечаем 80-ю годовщину исторического события - невероятного перелета, совершенного Валерием Чкаловым вместе со вторым пилотом Георгием Байдуковым и штурманом Александром Беляковым, - отметил Кромвель. - Этот перелет из Москвы в Ванкувер представляет собой не только подвиг, пример человеческой выносливости и технологического прогресса того времени, но и важнейший этап отношений Америки и России до начала Второй мировой войны".Праздничная программа в честь перелетаКак рассказал представитель Форта Ванкувер, основные торжественные мероприятия в честь знаменитого полета пройдут в субботу, 24 июня, в рамках специальной программы, посвященной годовщине этого события. В частности, участники церемонии, среди которых будут официальные представители РФ, американские историки, авиаторы, сотрудники Форта Ванкувер и расположенного рядом Музея авиации Пирсона, возложат цветы к памятнику советским летчикам, совершившим легендарный полет.В честь годовщины в Форте Ванкувер откроется выставка картин российских художников, запечатлевших в своих работах Чкаловск - бывший город Василёво, где родился легендарный пилот. Выставка продлится до начала июля. В книжном магазине Национального парка, по словам Роберта Кромвеля, посетители могут приобрести книги, рассказывающие о полете 1937 года. Здесь также будут продаваться книги об авиации, модели самолетов и привезенные из России деревянные матрешки.Во время торжественных мероприятий в честь 80-летия полета с концертной программой выступит оркестр города Ванкувер (Vancouver Community Concert Band).Самолет АНТ-25 - последнее слово авиатехникиВ 1932 году бригадой конструктора Павла Сухого под руководством Андрея Туполева был создан самолет АНТ-25, предназначенный для дальних перелетов. Одномоторный низкоплан длиной 13 м с размахом крыльев 35 м был рассчитан на экипаж из трех человек, а его особенностью стало наличие топливных баков в крыльях.Средняя скорость полета АНТ-25 составляла 165 км/ч, а максимальная - 246 км/ч. На самолете было совершено сразу несколько рекордных полетов, однако главным стал первый беспосадочный перелет из Москвы в Северную Америку.Долгое путешествие с многочисленными неприятностямиИзначально это путешествие, траектория которого проходила через Северный полюс, должно было завершиться в аэропорту Сан-Франциско (штат Калифорния). 18 июня 1937 года с Щелковского аэродрома в воздух поднялся АНТ-25, которым управляли Герои Советского Союза Валерий Чкалов, Георгий Байдуков и Александр Беляков.Однако в полете экипаж столкнулся с многочисленными неожиданными трудностями, в том числе обледенением поверхности крыльев и винта, нехваткой кислорода, выбросом воды из системы охлаждения двигателя, неполадками с маслопроводом. В условиях недостаточной видимости пилоты иногда управляли вслепую, полагаясь только на данные приборов.19 июня самолет достиг побережья Канады, но долететь до Сан-Франциско оказалось невозможным из-за недостатка топлива. 20 июня самолет произвел посадку на аэродроме Пирсона в американском Ванкувере. Таким образом полет АНТ-25 продолжался 63 часа 16 минут, длина маршрута составила около 9 тыс. км, более половины которого пролегала над водной поверхностью и льдами. Перелет также стал и первым авиапутешествием через Северный полюс.Советские летчики - герои для СШАВ США советских авиаторов встречали как настоящих героев, их повсюду сопровождали толпы местных жителей, а в Вашингтоне, в Овальном кабинете Белого Дома экипаж принял американский президент Франклин Рузвельт. На родине экипаж был награжден орденами Красного Знамени.12 июля 1937 года еще один самолет АНТ-25 с другим экипажем совершил перелет через Северный Полюс по маршруту Москва-США, приземлившись на одном из пастбищ возле города Сан-Джасинто (штат Калифорния), совершив новый рекорд по дальности беспосадочного перелета (свыше 10 тыс. км). В.П.Чкалов передает спортивному комиссару ФАИ самописец параметров полета самолета АНТ-25. Схема перелета экипажа Чкалова с графиком высоты полета(http://tass.ru/obschestvo...)

18 июня, 00:09

Трасса через полюс. Как Валерий Чкалов совершил новое открытие Америки

18 июня 1937 года экипаж Валерия Чкалова начал беспосадочный перелет из Москвы через Северный полюс в Америку.

15 июня, 15:30

The Importance of Fairness: A New Economic Vision for the Democratic Party

By James Kwak A lot has been written recently about the direction of the Democratic Party. This is what I think. I have been a Democrat my entire life. Today, the Democratic Party matters more than ever because it is … Continue reading →

15 июня, 08:56

Америке необходимо вспомнить о рейгановской политике в отношении России

По мнению известного американского публициста и общественного деятеля, "наблюдая за беспрецедентной кампании антироссийской истерии в Вашингтоне нельзя не почувствовать реальной опасности, что это может закончиться плохо для всех, поскольку ядовитая риторика американских политических деятелей и средств массовой информации в последнее время все более выходит из-под контроля»The post Америке необходимо вспомнить о рейгановской политике в отношении России appeared first on MixedNews.

15 июня, 08:56

Америке необходимо вспомнить о рейгановской политике в отношении России

По мнению известного американского публициста и общественного деятеля, "наблюдая за беспрецедентной кампании антироссийской истерии в Вашингтоне нельзя не почувствовать реальной опасности, что это может закончиться плохо для всех, поскольку ядовитая риторика американских политических деятелей и средств массовой информации в последнее время все более выходит из-под контроля»The post Америке необходимо вспомнить о рейгановской политике в отношении России appeared first on MixedNews.

15 июня, 08:56

Америке необходимо вспомнить о рейгановской политике в отношении России

По мнению известного американского публициста и общественного деятеля, "наблюдая за беспрецедентной кампании антироссийской истерии в Вашингтоне нельзя не почувствовать реальной опасности, что это может закончиться плохо для всех, поскольку ядовитая риторика американских политических деятелей и средств массовой информации в последнее время все более выходит из-под контроля»The post Америке необходимо вспомнить о рейгановской политике в отношении России appeared first on MixedNews.

23 января, 11:26

Дмитрий Перетолчин. Фёдор Лисицын. "Неизвестная история. Новый курс Рузвельта"

Дмитрий Перетолчин и Фёдор Лисицын о фигуре одного из архитекторов того мира, в котором мы сейчас живём, Франклина Делано Рузвельта. Как именно изменились Соединённые Штаты во время правления Рузвельта, правдивы ли мифы, которые о нём существуют, какие неизвестные страницы американской истории раскрываются при пристальном взгляде на 32-го президента США. #ДеньТВ #Перетолчин #Рузвельт #США #тайны #загадки #история #мифы #мировоеправительство #экономика #новыйкурс #Трамп #Сталин #великаядепрессия #обществопотребления

03 февраля 2016, 17:23

Нацистские связи семьи Буш

Прескотт Буш, дед Джорджа Буша младшего, и Джордж Герберт Уолкер, его прадед, в честь которого был назван его отец, сотрудничали с нацистами, и которых должны были судить за государственную измену. Прескотт Буш – дед Джорджа Буша младшего и отец Джорджа Буша старшего. Джордж Буш старший или Джордж Герберт Уолкер Буш получил имя своего деда Джорджа Герберта Уолкера.

25 ноября 2015, 20:25

Как США выходили из Великой депрессии.

Рыночные условия.Как США выходили из Великой депрессииВеликая депрессия остается классическим примером финансового кризиса рыночной экономики. Изучение методов выхода из неё, которые были применены разными странами, может оказаться полезным для проверки моделей кризиса на соответствие реальности. Модель финансового кризиса в виде роста денежного пузыря должна быть проверена на основе анализа имеющихся исторических материалов, показывающих, как развивались предыдущие кризисы и какие меры оказались успешными в их преодолении. Наиболее интересным является опыт ведущих экономик мира. В данной статье речь пойдет о США.ГУВЕР Распространённая легенда, будто администрация Гувера в условиях кризиса бездействовала, весьма далека от реальности. Президент Гувер не стал уповать на саморегулирование экономики и решил смягчить удары кризиса с помощью активного государственного вмешательства. Он развил бурную деятельность". Уже в ноябре 1929 года был обнародован президентский план «Направить мощь государства на спасение экономики». Предполагалась активная государственная поддержка банковской системы, промышленности и сельского хозяйства. Только Сельскохозяйственной сбытовой ассоциации, созданной в 1929-м, было выделено 600 миллионов долларов кредитов. Правительство Г. Гувера пыталось ослабить действие кризиса путем оказания финансовой помощи банкирам и промышленникам, чтобы спасти их от банкротства. Была создана «Реконструктивная финансовая корпорация», которая, кредитуя кампании, истратила миллиарды долларов, спасая от неминуемого банкротства неплатежеспособные банки, предприятия, железные дороги и фермерские хозяйства. Скачок государственных расходов при Гувере был самым большим за всю американскую историю в мирное время. 9 марта 1931 г. был принят чрезвычайный закон о банках, главным положение которого было предоставление Федерально-резервной системой США (аналог Центрального банка) займов частным банкам. Одновременно были предприняты меры по предотвращению массового изъятия вкладов из банков. Установлен запрет на экспорт золота. Проведены банковские каникулы, т.е. почти все банки были закрыты для проведения финансовой проверки (не путайте эти каникулы с банковскими каникулами Рузвельта, см. ниже). После нее к концу марта 80% банков было открыто, а 20% ликвидировано. Но это помогло мало. В последний год своего президентства Гувер отчаянно пытался реализовать другие планы по оздоровлению банковской системы. Однако не получилось, так как для принятия решения в Конгрессе было необходимо заручиться поддержкой демократического большинства. Вторым пунктом была справедливая социальная политика. Осенью 1929 года президент провел ряд встреч с крупными промышленниками и заставил их торжественно пообещать не снижать заработную плату своим работникам. Обещание честно выполнялось до лета 1931-го. В 1930-м было предпринято снижение налогов: налоги семейного американца с доходом в 4000 долларов упали на 2/3. Всячески поощрялась гуманитарная деятельность муниципальных структур и частная благотворительность. Наконец, были организованы масштабные общественные работы по строительству инфраструктурных объектов. Уже весной 1930-го на общественные работы было выделено 750 миллионов долларов — баснословная сумма. Повсеместно возводились новые административные здания. За четыре года президентства Гувера в США затеяли больше крупных строек, чем за предыдущие 30 лет. Именно при Гувере началось строительство моста «Золотые ворота» в Сан-Франциско и гигантской плотины на реке Колорадо. А теперь сравните с планом Обамы. Очень похоже. Не правда ли? Тщетно пыталось изъять с рынка излишки сельскохозяйственной продукции образованное правительством «Федеральное фермерское бюро», оказавшее практически помощь лишь крупным фермерам. Следующим элементом плана была защита национального производителя. В 1930 году был принят закон Смута-Холи о таможенных тарифах, внесенный однопартийцами президента сенаторами Смутом и Хоули и вводивший высокие таможенные пошлины на импортные товары. Новые таможенные пошлины, одобренные Гувером, были рекордно высокими, а круг охватываемых товаров — рекордно широким. В итоге объем импорта сократился в несколько раз. Между тем, сейчас этот закон, считают одним из факторов, подстегнувших наступление Великой депрессии. Высокий таможенный тариф способствовал резкому сокращению ввоза в США товаров из-за границы. Это в свою очередь снизило и без того неважную покупательную способность населения, а также вынудило другие страны применить контрмеры, навредившие американским экспортерам – иностранцы в ответ ввели тарифы против США. Все это привело к сокращению международной торговли. В результате все экономики проиграли и ещё больше усугубили кризис. Потом, как обычно, все свои внутренние беды в массовом сознании американцы свалили на происки иностранцев. Именно поэтому главным решением двадцатки в ноябре 2008 года был мораторий на протекционистские меры в течение года. По мере развития Великой депрессии в наиболее пострадавших странах стали принимать меры по недопущению Великой депрессии в будущем, поняли опасность зависимости от США. Поэтому там установили контроль за иностранным капиталом, возник государственный сектор экономики и кое-где было ограничено господство латифундистов, особенно в Бразилии, Чили, Мексике… В Мексике реформы были настолько глубоки, что были национализированы железные дороги, нефтяная промышленность. Лишь в середине 30-х годов после вступления в силу Закона о соглашениях о взаимной торговле, существенно снизившем таможенные пошлины, международная торговля начала восстанавливаться, оказывая позитивное влияние на мировую экономику.К чему же привели героические попытки мистера Гувера уменьшить масштабы кризиса? Несмотря на принятые меры, началась дефляция — общее снижение индекса цен за 1929-1932 г. составило 25%. Хотя учетная ставка последовательно снижалась с 6% в октябре 1929 г. до 1,5% в сентябре 1931 г. В 1932 году депрессия достигла апогея: 12 миллионов безработных, двукратное сокращение промышленного производства, тысячи разорившихся компаний и лопнувших банков… Компании и банки, которые президент пытался спасти с помощью государственных вливаний, вылетали в трубу после мучительной агонии. Удержать зарплаты на прежнем уровне не удалось. Беспрецедентный рост государственных расходов вынудил администрацию Гувера резко повысить налоги. Своими действиями Гувер лишь отсрочил падение американской экономики на самое дно. Герберт Гувер с треском проиграл выборы 1932 года: он был самым ненавистным человеком в стране, его имя ассоциировалось с кризисом и нищетой, на встречах с избирателями действующего президента забрасывали гнилыми овощами. В результате президентских выборов 1932 года хозяином Белого Дома стал Франклин Делано Рузвельт.ШАГИ РУЗВЕЛЬТА. БАНКОВСКАЯ РЕФОРМА Популярные аналогии между экономическим кризисом-2008 и Великой депрессией заставляют повторять имя Рузвельта. Его рецепты активно вспоминают и рекомендуют властям для спасения отечественной экономики. Между тем Рузвельту повезло: он пришел в Белый дом, когда низшая точка кризиса осталась позади. Причем, придя к власти, Рузвельт не знал, что делать. Первое время своего президентства Рузвельт атаковал менял (банкиров) как виновников депрессии. Хотите — верьте, хотите — нет, но вот слова, сказанные им 4 марта 1933 года в обращении к народу по поводу инаугурации: «Нечистоплотные действия менял заклеймены судом общественного мнения, они противны сердцу и разуму народа… Менялы подлежат смещению с пьедестала, который занимают в храме нашей цивилизации». Но далее Рузвельт действовал решительнее и тоньше. Так в качестве первого шага к преодолению Великой депрессии он сказал: «Давайте перестанем врать друг другу». Как только Рузвельт занял свой пост, были срочно предприняты чрезвычайные меры по выводу банковской системы из кризиса. 6 марта 1933 года, всего через два дня после инаугурационной речи Рузвельта, были объявлены недельные «банковские каникулы». Указом президента были закрыты ВСЕ банки США и взяты под контроль полиции с тем, чтобы провести проверку их деятельности и исключить малейшие намеки на махинации. Далее с целью «очистки» банковской системы была проведена тотальная ревизия всех банков. Разорившиеся банки попали под внешнее управление. Устойчивые банки получили право на дальнейшую работу.11 марта президент выступил сначала перед прессой, 12 марта — уже по радио, объясняя ситуацию и меры правительства по выходу из кризиса. Постепенно паника пошла на убыль, 15 марта открылись примерно 30% всех банков. В результате этих мер произошло укрупнение банковской системы, поскольку большинство банков, признанных «здоровыми», были крупными. Был резко усилен контроль Федерального Резерва над денежным обращением, увеличен контроль за выдачей кредитов, за созданием кредитных денег. Были приняты два важнейших закона, регулирующих банковскую сферу — 21 июня 1933 г. — Закон Гласса-Стигалла, а в 1935 г. — Закон Флетчера-Стигалла. Именно тогда была создана современная финансовая система США. Изменения в её характер работы стали делать только после недавней серии скандалов (Enron, WorldCom, Артур Андерсен и т.п.) Закон Гласса-Стигалла запрещал коммерческим банкам работать с ценными бумагами, это право получали специализированные финансовые организации — тем самым были снижены риски, которым подвергались средства вкладчиков банка. Были разъединены инвестиционные и коммерческие банки. Банкам, которые принимали депозиты, было запрещено вкладывать деньги в ценные бумаги, предприятия, пускаться в рисковые операции со средствами клиентов. С целью пресечения привлечения средств по повышенным ставкам, характерных для проведения высокорискованных операций, был введен запрет на выплату процентов по текущим счетам, проценты по депозитным счетам стали регулироваться Федеральным Резервом. Был принят закон о страховании депозитов и создана Федеральная корпорация страхования депозитов — банки отчисляли взносы в страховой фонд, в случае банкротства корпорация санирует банк и выплачивает вклады в пределах установленного законом лимита на вклад в одном банке. Именно эта мера во многом позволила в итоге стабилизировать ситуацию с «бегством вкладчиков». Была создана Федеральная корпорация, которая страховала вклады клиентов коммерческих банков. Президент США получил право назначать членов Совета Управляющих Федерального Резерва. Совет устанавливал не только нормы резервов для банков-членов Федерального Резерва, но и учетную ставку для федерально-резервных банков. Он полностью контролировал иностранные операции федерально-резервных банков, а также операции на открытом рынке. Одновременно был усилен контроль над биржей и рынком ценных бумаг.1. Устанавливался контроль над выпуском акций и других долговых обязательств фирм в ценных бумагах. Директора компаний-эмитентов несли персональную ответственность за выпуск ценных бумаг.2. Приняты нормативные акты, которые ограничивали использование банковских кредитов в биржевых операциях.3. Вводилась ежегодная публичная отчетность корпораций, зарегистрированных на бирже.4. Были ужесточены условия включения компаний в биржевые списки, установлены пределы колебаний котировок на торгах. Для организации контроля над рынком ценных бумаг была создана Комиссия по ценным бумагам и биржам . Все эти меры привели к усилению контроля Федеральной Резервной Системой (аналог ЦБ) над частными банками и денежным обращением. Только после этого Федеральный Резерв начал «развязывать кошелек» и подпитывать голодающий американский народ новыми деньгами.ОТМЕНА ЗОЛОТОЙ ПРИВЯЗКИ Во время Великой депрессии в США рушилось всё, кроме курса доллара — доллар стоял как стена, так как он был привязан к золоту. Федеральный Резерв продолжал упрямо сокращать денежную массу, еще более усугубляя депрессию. Вследствие чего между 1929 г. и 1933 г. объем денег в обращении сократился на 33%. Если учесть, что производство тоже сократилось, то нехватка денег стала угрожающей. В день своей инаугурации 5 марта 1933 года вновь избранный президент Рузвельт объявил о почти двукратном снижении курса доллара по отношению к золоту — или, что-то же самое, об удорожании золота в долларовом выражении. «Одновременно с золотым „ограблением века“ были объявлены недельные банковские каникулы (то есть попросту принудительные выходные в финансовых учреждениях), из-за которых ни один частный вкладчик не мог в экстренном порядке извлечь свои враз обесценившиеся сбережения». До этого момента цена золота в долларах была жестко зафиксирована, и правительство не имело права ее менять. Рузвельт не только сделал банковский выходной — отдал распоряжение о временном прекращении работы банков и запрещении дальнейшего выпуска вспомогательной валюты, но и убеждал общественность расстаться со своим золотом, говоря, что «консолидация ресурсов страны необходима, чтобы вывести Америку из депрессии». Президентским декретом население обязывалось сдавать все имевшиеся у него золотые слитки и монеты государству — причем по старой, гораздо более низкой цене золота. Население заставили сдать все золотые украшения. Разрешалось оставить только по две золотые монеты. Вопреки расхожим представлениям, первой реальной мерой президента Рузвельта был банальный дефолт. Механизм прост [8]: допустим, вы англичанин и у вас был 1 млн. фунтов стерлингов, которые вы обменяли на доллары по курсу 2 доллара за фунт. Полученные 2 млн. долларов вы вложили в американские облигации и через год получили их обратно вместе с небольшим доходом. Допустим, этот доход составил 100 тыс. долларов — таким образом, всего у вас теперь 2.1 млн. долларов. Но за это время американское правительство провело полуторакратную девальвацию своей валюты, так что теперь за 1 фунт дают уже не 2, а 3 доллара. В результате ваши 2.1 млн. долларов превращаются всего лишь в 0.7 млн. фунтов, в то время как изначально вы имели 1 млн., так что итогом всех ваших операций становится убыток в размере 30%. Тем, кто сдал свое золото, выплачивалась фиксированная цена в $20,66 за унцию. Эта конфискационная мера была столь непопулярна, что никто в правительстве не взял на себя смелость признаться в авторстве. Интересно, но на церемонии подписания постановления Рузвельт недвусмысленно объяснил всем присутствующим, что автором документа является не он и он его даже не читал. Даже Секретарь Казначейства заявил, что не был ознакомлен с документом, лишь добавив — «…это то, на чем настаивали эксперты». После банковского выходного частное владение золотыми слитками и монетами, за исключением коллекционных, было объявлено незаконным. Большая часть золота, находившаяся в то время в руках средних американцев, была в форме золотых монет. Новый закон на самом деле означал не что иное, как конфискацию. Нарушителям грозило 10-летнее тюремное заключение и штраф $10.000, эквивалент $100.000 сегодня. Некоторые люди не верили в указание Рузвельта. А многие разрывались между желанием сохранить заработанное тяжким трудом и лояльностью к правительству. В 1935 году, как только золото было собрано, официальную цену золота резко повысили до $35 за унцию. Эта цена сохранилась до 1971 г., когда был запрещен свободный обмен золота на доллары. Однако по новой, более высокой цене, продавать золото имели право только иностранцы. Менялы же, заранее получившие предупреждение о грядущем кризисе от Уорберга, скупившие золото по цене $20,66 за унцию, а затем вывезшие его в Лондон, имели возможность вернуть его обратно и продать американскому правительству по цене $35 за унцию, получив при этом почти 100% доход, в то время как среднестатистический американец голодал. С большой помпой было объявлено о строительстве национального хранилища золота Форт-Нокс, что в штате Кентукки. К 1936 году строительство нового национального хранилища в Форт-Ноксе было завершено и в январе 1937 года туда начало поступать золото. Спустя 4 года все отобранное государством золото было туда торжественно свезено. Когда 13 января 1937 года золото начало сюда поступать, были приняты беспрецедентные меры безопасности. Тысячи официально приглашенных лиц наблюдали за прибытием поезда из 9 вагонов из Филадельфии в сопровождении вооруженных солдат, почтовых инспекторов, секретных агентов и охранников с американского монетного двора. Все выглядело как огромная театральная постановка — собранное со всей Америки золото сосредотачивалось в одном месте, предположительно для пользы общества. Итак, первым делом были приняты меры к уменьшению цены денег и увеличению доверия к деньгам. Затем Рузвельт отнял у населения золото, чтобы не мешать государству самому решать, сколько выпускать денег. Второй важной мерой стало увеличение денег в обороте через государственные структуры. Деньги же, утраченные во время депрессии большинством американцев, не просто потерялись. Они перетекли в руки тех, кто заранее знал о биржевом крахе и вложил свои деньги в золото перед самой депрессией. Золото же всегда было самым надежным способом сбережения средств.УЖЕСТОЧЕНИЕ ПРАВИЛ ИГРЫ В ЭКОНОМИКЕ 16 июня 1933 г. Конгресс принял Закон НИРА о реконструкции национальной промышленности, который устанавливал государственную помощь индустрии и государственный контроль за честностью взаимоотношений в бизнесе. В условиях отмены анти-трестового законодательства бизнес получил возможность саморегулироваться, а профсоюзы право на коллективную защиту. Главной целью было прекращение конкуренции за счет рабочих, отсюда повышение покупательной способности населения и все это способствовало выходу из кризиса. Всем ассоциациям предпринимателей предписывалось вырабатывать кодексы «честной конкуренции», определявшие условия, объем производства, минимальный уровень цен. Кодекс должен был разрабатываться торговыми группами, а если их нет, то вводился без особых оговорок сверху. — право рабочих на организацию; — запрет дискриминации при найме на работу членов профсоюзов; — минимальный уровень зарплаты; — максимальная продолжительность рабочего дня; — фиксация цен; — продавать продукцию по ценам, ниже минимально установленных, нельзя.Во 2-ом и 3-ем разделах речь шла об оказании помощи нуждающимся, о создании организации общественных работ (финансируемых за счет налогоплательщиков) [4].РЕФОРМЫ СЕЛЬСКОГО ХОЗЯЙСТВА В области сельского хозяйства «новый курс» состоял в попытках остановить процесс разорения фермеров, и поднять цены на сельскохозяйственную продукцию путем сокращения производства и уменьшения посевных площадей, за что фермерам выплачивались премии. 12 мая 1933 г. был принят парадоксальный закон «О регулировании сельского хозяйства», устанавливающий субсидии за сокращение производства продукции аграрного сектора. Поскольку рынок сельскохозяйственной продукции, на который работали фермеры США, вдруг оказался для них закрытым благодаря принятым многими странами протекционистским мерам, пришлось принимать меры по сокращению поголовья скота и посевных площадей, чтобы повысить цены до уровня, при котором хотя бы окупались затраты. Фермерам предоставлялась компенсация за каждый незасеянный гектар и средства брались из налогов на компании и из 30% налога на муку и хлопчато–бумажную пряжу. До этого цены были очень низкими. 10 млн. акров под хлопок, 1/4 посевных площадей зерновых уничтожено, 6 млн. свиней ушло под нож. Сама природа способствовала успеху в борьбе с понижением цен, т.к. в 1936г. в США была жесточайшая засуха, песчаные бури, что привело к снижению урожая и повышению цен на сельскохозяйственную продукцию. Также были приняты меры по консолидации фермерской задолженности, фермерам предоставлялись кредиты и скоро прекратилась массовая продажа ферм с аукционов. Таким образом, к 1936 г. доходы фермеров были вполне нормальными, но 10% фермеров за эти смутные годы разорилось. Аграрная политика Ф. Рузвельта была на руку крупным фермам, которые могли сравнительно безболезненно сократить часть своих посевных площадей. Эти фермы, пользуясь правительственными субсидиями, в большом количестве приобретали сельскохозяйственные машины и химические удобрения, что повышало производительность труда и урожайность, и, несмотря на снижение посевных площадей, позволяло сохранить размеры производства на прежнем уровне. Благодаря этому процесс концентрации земельной собственности усилился, о чем свидетельствовало сосредоточение к 1940 г. в руках 1,6% общего числа ферм 34 % сельскохозяйственных площадей. В то же время 38% ферм использовало менее 5 % этих площадей, и эту группу ферм правительственная помощь, как правило, обходила.РЕФОРМЫ В СОЦИАЛЬНОЙ СФЕРЕ «Новый курс» предусматривал также ряд социальных мероприятий, направленных, прежде всего на сокращение безработицы. Была принята программа общественных работ (строительство автострад, аэродромов, мостов и т.д.) с привлечением безработных. Была введена система выдачи минимальных пособий бедствующим безработным. В марте 1933 г. на базе Закона НИРА был создан Гражданский корпус сохранения ресурсов. Задачей было направление безработной молодежи в лесные регионы для сохранения ресурсов. К лету для этой цели были созданы спецлагеря, где побывало 250 тыс. молодых людей (от 18 до 25 лет), которым предоставлялась бесплатная еда, жилье, форменная одежда и зарплата в 1 доллар в день. Руководили ими офицеры из резерва Вооруженных Сил. Работами по сохранению ресурсов являлись: строительство автомагистралей, очистка лесов, создание лесонасаждений, благоустройство парков, т.е. общественно-полезные работы. В январе 1934 г. на них было занято 5 млн. человек, а пособия получали 20 млн. человек. В мае 1933 г. был принят Закон о федеральной чрезвычайной административной помощи. По нему штатам предоставлялись средства для оказания помощи нуждающимся. Был принят закон о социальной обеспеченности, по которому создавались пенсионные фонды, выплачивались пособия по безработице. Государство признало права профсоюзов. К 1936 г. Кодексами честности, разработанными на основе Закона НИРА, охвачено 99% промышленных компаний и хотя консервативно настроенный Верховный суд, блюдя «священные принципы» отменяет NIRA, как антиконституционный акт, — но кодексы де-факто сохраняются: игра по правилам предпочтительнее. В 1935 г. был принят закон Вагнера-Коннэри «О трудовых отношениях», который провозглашал необходимость коллективной защиты трудящихся через профсоюзы, запрещал преследование рабочих за создание профсоюзов и участие в стачках и подтверждал право рабочих заключать с предпринимателями коллективные договора. Закон запрещал дискриминацию членов профсоюзов. Однако для урегулирования споров между рабочими и предпринимателями вводился принудительный арбитраж. Устанавливалось обязательное заключение коллективного договора. Была создана комиссия по борьбе с дискриминацией при найме на работу.В 1937 г. был принят Закон о справедливых условиях труда, согласно которому — запрещалось использование детского труда; — устанавливался минимум З./п. (25 центов в час, а в течение 6-ти лет был доведен до 40 центов в час); — устанавливалась максимальная продолжительность рабочей недели (44 часа, а затем в течение 2-х лет до 40 часов);Рузвельт также пытался реформировать Верховный Суд, опасаясь, что он отменит законы Вагнера и социального обеспечения. И хотя реформа суда не удалась, но и законы остались, так как Верховный Суд не стал их отменять. Для борьбы с безработицей американское правительство организовало общественные работы, затратив в 1933-1939 годах на их финансирование более 12 млрд. долларов. Рабочие строили дороги и мосты, которые работают до сих пор. И эта работа давала им возможность не умереть с голоду. Для сокращения молодёжной безработицы в 1933 году власти создали также полувоенную организацию Cи-Си-Си: Civilian Conservation Corps. Через трудовые лагеря ССС, размещённые по всей стране, за десятилетие прошло около двух миллионов молодых людей в возрасте от 18 до 25 лет, которые трудились там на общественных работах за 30 долларов в месяц. В 1938 г. Рузвельт объявил о начале осуществления плана «Подкачки насоса». Суть его состояла в том, что спрос должен был повыситься с помощью гос. инъекций в экономику (строительство жилья, автомагистралей и т.д.). Было увеличено количество людей, получающих пособия. Во время Великой депрессии в США для расшивки нехватки денег и недопущения их оттока в виртуальные пузыри использовались псевдо-деньги, а также сегментация денежного рынка. Так, существовали деревянные деньги в Тенино, штат Вашингтон, картонные деньги в Рэймонде, штат Вашингтон, обеспеченные кукурузой деньги в Клиар Лейк, штат Айова. Были выпущены купоны, которые обменивались на товары и услуги там, где не хватало федеральных долларов. Купонами платили учителям в Вилдвордебе штат Нью-Джерси, зарплаты в Филадельфии и многих других штатах. Купоны выпускали правительства штатов школьные округа, торговцы, ассоциации предпринимателей, различные агентства и даже частные лица. Издатель газеты «Springfield Union» в штате Массачусетс Сэмюель Боулз рассказал историю эмиссии купонов его газетой. Во время банковского кризиса 30-х годов она платила сотрудникам купонами. Их можно было потратить в магазинах, дававших объявления в газете, а магазины затем расплачивались купонами за рекламу в этой газете, замыкая круг. Как видим, никаких правительственных долларов не понадобилось. Купон был так популярен, что клиенты стали просить выдавать им сдачу купонами: они знали издателя и больше верили в его деньги, чем в федеральные доллары". Итак, были приняты все меры, чтобы успокоить население реформами в социальной сфере и не допустить в дальнейшем паники. Были точно определены границы уступок трудящимся (представители профсоюзов не входили в правительство). Хотя и возникло недовольство крупных бизнесменов, но оно было устранено. РЕЗУЛЬТАТ Все эти меры оказались весьма эффективными. За несколько месяцев 1933 г. объем промышленного производства возрос на 70%, а к июлю этого года он равнялся 90% от уровня 1928 г. Но развитие было очень медленным — после 1929-33 гг. снова небольшая депрессия на 2-3 года, и лишь затем подъем и в 1937 г. — снова кризис. Можно выделить следующие способы борьбы с кризисом. Это, прежде всего общественные работы, через которые деньги доставлялись непосредственно потребителям. Далее получив деньги, работники шли на рынок продовольствия и запускали спрос там. Сельское хозяйство, потребляя машины, запускало спрос в промышленности. Но этот путь оказался ограниченным. Экономическая политика Ф. Рузвельта не смогла спасти страну от очередного экономического кризиса, наступившего в 1937 г. и вновь поразившего экономику США сильнее других стран. За два года уровень промышленного производства в США упал на 21 %. Кризис 1937-1938 гг. вновь отбросил американскую экономику на полтора десятка лет назад. Объем промышленного производства в целом по капиталистическим странам упал на 11% (в США на 21%). Наиболее пострадавшими оказались выплавка стали (в США на 21%), судостроение (на 40%), в новых отраслях также отмечалось падение производства (в отличие от 1929-33 гг., когда авиапромышленность, радиопромышленность понесли незначительные потери). В 1937 г. производство автомобилей в США упало на 40%. Развития этот кризис не получил, т.к. был прерван подготовкой к войне. В целом, восстановление американской экономики заняло около 20 лет — окончательно США встали на ноги и вышли из депрессии только в 50-е годы. Помог американской экономике принятый 11 марта 1941 года закон о ленд-лизе, в рамках которого США впоследствии смогли осуществить колоссальные по объёмам поставки вооружений и военных материалов Британии, России, Китаю, Бразилии и многим другим странам. За один 1944 год национальный доход США составил $183 млрд., из которых $103 млрд. было потрачено на войну. Это в 30 раз превосходило темпы расходов, достигнутые во время Первой Мировой. На самом деле американский налогоплательщик оплатил 55% всех расходов Второй Мировой войны. Но, что не менее важно, практически каждая страна, вовлеченная в эту войну, многократно увеличила свой долг. Например, в США долг федерального правительства вырос с $43 млрд. в 1940 г. до $257 млрд. в 1950 г. — увеличение на 598%. За тот же период долг Японии увеличился на 1348%, Франции — на 583%, Канады — на 417%. Итак, последовательная, но интуитивно выработанная программа Рузвельта дала результат, но ничего нового в этой программе не было. Она была, по сути, продолжением реформ Гувера. Фактически рузвельтовский «Новый курс» был продолжением антикризисных мероприятий Гувера. К тому же Рузвельт был долгожданным новым лидером, обладал харизмой и умел вселять в людей оптимизм. Высокий авторитет Рузвельта позволил все эти реформы успешно осуществить. Американцы поверили Рузвельту и стойко переносили затяжной и болезненный процесс выздоровления экономики. Так Рузвельту досталась репутация спасителя Америки" . Нынешний мир и американское общество многому научились и сильно изменились за прошедшие десятилетия. Впрочем, как выразился бывший Госсекретарь США Генри Киссинджер, «человечество не повторяет своих старых ошибок, но постоянно делает новые» .

20 апреля 2015, 22:42

Франклин Рузвельт и золото. 1933

Некоторые фотографии прошлого цепляют нас за живое. Одни из них вызывают кучу ассоциаций, другие - желание "поговорить об этом". Сегодня меня впечатлило фото, на котором изображён Франклин Рузвельт в окружении золотых слитков. Вот оно: Видите, с какой любовью 32-й президент США смотрит на золото? Между тем, отношения у него с золотым запасом своего государства были сложные. Ни для кого ни секрет, что американский доллар начал свою дорогу по миру с 1914 года, когда началась Первая Мировая Война. Именно в то время появились долларовые зоны в Латинской Америке и Северной.Тогда доллар был подкреплён золотом. Существовало правило "золотого стандарта". К 1933 году США успели пережить серьёзный кризис и даже начали выходить из него, но экономика всё-равно была шаткая. Франклин Рузвельт решился на рискованный в то время шаг - отменил правило "золотого стандарта" и пустил доллар в свободное плавание. Через несколько месяцев он осознал, что свободное плавание доллара - дело хорошее, но для экономики проблемное. Тогда в январе 1934 года он решил немножко подправить экономический курс и ратифицировал "золотой резервный акт", в котором фиксировалось соотношение доллара к золоту. Тройская унция стала стоить 35 долларов.