• Теги
    • избранные теги
    • Люди728
      • Показать ещё
      Издания58
      • Показать ещё
      Страны / Регионы308
      • Показать ещё
      Разное322
      • Показать ещё
      Формат22
      Международные организации50
      • Показать ещё
      Компании113
      • Показать ещё
      Показатели9
      • Показать ещё
      Сферы1
Фрэнсис Фукуяма
29 мая, 11:28

Фрэнсис Фукуяма: "Дональд все разрушает. Но европейцы не должны сдаваться"

"К сожалению, отношения между США и Европой находятся в беспрецедентно низкой точке, и во всем виноват Дональд Трамп, как мы увидели на G7 в Таормине", - заявил американский историк и политолог, автор книги "Конец истории и последний человек".

21 мая, 08:00

Упадок западной системы ценностей

Современные философы, политологи, экономисты и социологи пытаются найти ответ на вопрос, куда мы движемся и как изменится мир в скором будущем. Даже Фрэнсис Фукуяма уже не столь категоричен, как двадцать лет назад, когда вышел в свет его бестселлер «Конец истории и последний человек». Тогда он провозгласил, что распространение либеральных демократий во всем мире может свидетельствовать […]

Выбор редакции
19 мая, 00:00

Дееспособность государства и проблемы управления

Последняя книга Френсиса Фукуямы «Угасание государственного порядка» вливается в поток философских, политологических, социологических и правовых исследований о судьбах современного мира. Если предыдущие работы этого ученого предупреждали общество об угрозах технологического прогресса, то здесь в центре внимания другая опасность ‒ ослабление государственного управления. На обширном опыте истории и современности автор исследует такие институты, как государство, главенство закона и представительство, размышляет о формировании нации, о соотношении «хорошего» и «плохого» правительства. // Иллария Бачило

13 мая, 11:00

Почему сингапурская модель неприменима

Наличие реальной оппозиции всегда является фактором, благоприятным для развития страны. При самом непримиримом отношении к власти государственнически ориентированная оппозиция исходит в своей деятельности из национальных интересов, а не обслуживает чужие. Благодаря этой фундаментальной основе даже в самой накаленной антиправительственной риторике у оппозиции всегда есть четкие ограничения, не позволяющие перейти черту, отделяющую оппозиционера от иностранного наемника. […]

05 мая, 21:57

Weekend Roundup: If You Don’t Have Solid Borders, You Get Walls

Even if U.S. President Donald Trump never ends up building an actual wall along the Mexican border, it was the compelling metaphor of shutting out a menacing world and protecting his own tribe that won the day in the election last year. That such a message would so resonate in a nation founded and sustained by immigrants is a sign of just how disruptive the fluid flows of globalization have been to any solid sense of cultural and social cohesion. Without boundaries that define who we are, any community is at a loss over how to secure its fate by navigating the constant churn and endless flux of today’s world. In the end, it is this sense of loss of control over one’s destiny ― whether as a result of technological change, globalization or the related issue of mass immigration ― that is at the root of the populist backlash. Identity politics is an effort to create a safe and familiar space for you and your kind in a world of tumult fomented by strangers. The French philosopher Régis Debray saw the backlash coming. In his 2010 Éloge des frontières (In Praise of Borders), he understood that unlike the universalizing reason behind globalization, culture is rooted in the vernacular wellspring of emotional attachment and belonging. Debray argued that if borders don’t secure cultural affinity, walls will be erected in their place by insecure identities fearing contamination. “The border,” he wrote, is “a vaccine against the epidemic of walls.” The Brexit vote, Trump’s victory and the strong showing of Marine Le Pen’s National Front in the first round of France’s election ought to impress this lesson upon progressive political leaders searching for a way to reconnect with an electorate that marginalized them. Those with a liberal outlook surely must read the writing on Trump’s wall that every country has the right to control its borders and insist upon clear criteria for obtaining citizenship ― including language, knowledge of laws and acceptance of host country values and norms.  Helen Clark writes from Perth that changes being proposed to Australia’s immigration policy would do just that — require an “Australian values” section in the test for citizenship. In 2015, Australia’s immigration authority defined those values in this way: Australian society values respect for the freedom and dignity of the individual, freedom of religion, commitment to the rule of law, Parliamentary democracy, equality of men and women and a spirit of egalitarianism that embraces mutual respect, tolerance, fair play and compassion for those in need and pursuit of the public good; Australian society values equality of opportunity for individuals, regardless of their race, religion or ethnic background; The English language, as the national language, is an important unifying element of Australian society. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is right to argue that the diversity that comes with immigration is a core strength of society — it is linked to creativity, innovation and even security. Yet, as Paul May points out, immigration policies in Canada are based primarily on the skills and economic needs of Canadian society and not mostly family based as they are in the U.S. and much of Europe. “In the U.S., about two-thirds of permanent residents are admitted to reunite with family members,” May writes. “Less than 20 percent are admitted because of their professional skills. In Canada, by contrast, it’s almost the opposite: more than 60 percent of permanent residents are admitted via the economy class, and only a quarter are admitted because of family reunification.” Bob Dane, the executive director of the Federation for American Immigration Reform, argues that the U.S. needs a more merit-based immigration policy ― perhaps like Canada’s ― as Trump has vaguely called for. “Our current immigration system fails to serve any identifiable national or public interests,” he writes. Following Canada’s example, however, is not so easy for a country like the U.S. As May points out, unlike Canada, the U.S. has plenty of demand for low-wage workers and shares a long border with a largely impoverished nation whose laborers are hungry for work. Nonetheless, moving in the direction of such a system would go some distance toward recovering a sense of lost control over the American border and weaken the impetus behind the appeal of a wall. Jerry Nickelsburg reinforces May’s point about the structural need in the American economy for lower-wage workers, particularly in agriculture. In an article titled “If You Want Strawberry Fields Forever, You Need Migrant Labor,” Nickelsburg offers an alternative to the present immigration quandary. “One option would be to normalize the status of undocumented farm workers, perhaps via a new version of the bracero program of 1942 to 1964 that permitted U.S. farmers to recruit temporary agricultural help from Mexico. ... It also would have the side benefits of reducing illegal border crossings — U.S. farms would not be providing jobs to newly arrived undocumented immigrants — and this would allow undocumented immigrants already here to come out of the shadows.” Among others, former Mexican President Ernesto Zedillo has argued for a similar course. Edward Leamer argues that, indeed, “aliens” are taking American jobs. But those aliens are legal robots, not undocumented immigrants. Harvard Historian Calder Walton warns of the dangers of paranoid and conspiracy-minded leaders, whether Joseph Stalin or Donald Trump, making decisions based on raw intelligence. Other highlights this week include: Trump’s Tough Talk About North Korea Might Actually End The Crisis Forget North Korea. The Next Nuclear Crisis Festers On The India-Pakistan Border Triangular Diplomacy At Work Again With China, India And Russia Playing One Off Against The Other Angela Merkel Chooses Not To Wear A Headscarf In Saudi Arabia WHO WE ARE     EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Rosa O’Hara is the Social Editor of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at HuffPost, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

04 мая, 21:26

Pollitt on Putnam, by Bryan Caplan

Lately, I've been intently reading the social science of trust.  Katha Pollitt's critique of Robert Putnam's Bowling Alone may not be the most insightful, but it's definitely the most entertaining:Putnam argues that declining membership in such venerable civic institutions as bowling leagues, the P.T.A., the League of Women Voters, the Boy Scouts, the Elks and the Shriners is an index of a weakened "civil society," the zone of social engagement between the family and the state. Why should you care about the leagues? Because, says Putnam, they bowl for thee: A weak civil society means less "trust" in each other, and that means a less vigorous democracy, as evidenced in declining electoral turnouts.It's the sort of thesis academics and pundits adore, a big woolly argument that's been pre-reduced to a soundbite of genius. Bowling alone--it's wistful, comical, nostalgic, sad, a tiny haiku of post-industrial loneliness. Right-wingers like Francis Fukuyama and George Will like it because it can be twisted to support their absurd contention that philanthropy has been strangled by big government. Clintonians and communitarians like it because it moralizes a middle-class, apolitical civic-mindedness that recognizes no hard class orrace inequalities shaping individual choice: We are all equally able to volunteer for the Red Cross, as we are all equally able to vote. Putnam's prime culprit in the decline of civic America--television--is similarly beyond the reach of structural change. It's as though America were all one big leafy suburb, in which the gladhanders and do-gooders had been bewitched by the evil blue light of Seinfeld and Friends.At least Putnam doesn't blame working mothers.She continues:Putnam seems to place both the burden of civic engagement and responsibility for its collapse on the non-elite classes. Tenured professors may be too busy to sing in a choir (Putnam's former avocation): The rest of us are just couch potatoes. Although Putnam is careful to disclaim nostalgia for the fifties, his picture of healthy civic life is remarkably, well, square. I've been a woman all my life, but I've never heard of the Federation of Women's Clubs. And what politically minded female, in 1996, would join the bland and matronly League of Women Voters, when she could volunteer with Planned Parenthood or NOW or Concerned Women of America, and shape the debate instead of merely keeping it polite?The academic in me notices that Pollitt doesn't really argue against Putnam so much as tease him.  But if you had to reinterpret her through an economic lens, the argument would be along the lines of: Civic associations are so boring and old-fashioned that we shouldn't join them even if they do have positive externalities.  Or maybe: You shouldn't call them "positive externalities" until you've shown that the status quo is better than my alternative, which it isn't.A fair esoteric reading?  It fits the conclusion:Putnam's theory may not explain much about the way we live now, but its warm reception speaks volumes. The bigfoot journalists and academic superstars, opinion manufacturers and wise men of both parties are worried, and it isn't about bowling or Boy Scouts. It's about that loss of "trust," a continuum that begins with one's neighbor and ends with the two parties, government, authority. It makes sense for the political and opinion elites to feel this trust--for them, the system works. It's made them rich and famous. But how much faith can a rational and disinterested person have in the set-up that's produced our current crop of leaders?Love your neighbor if you can, but forget civic trust. What we need is more civic skepticism. Especially about people who want you to do their bowling for them.P.S. Next week my homeschoolers are taking three APs, so expect light posting. (4 COMMENTS)

Выбор редакции
27 апреля, 14:15

Без заголовка

Сам Фукуяма признавался, что идею «конца истории» заимствовал у А. Кожева, который, в свою очередь, «подобрал» ее у Вл, Соловьева и его «Краткой повести об антихристе».

21 апреля, 23:44

Weekend Roundup: Amid Great Cultural Shifts, Voting Settles Little

In an era of profound cultural transformation, elections and referendums have very real consequences ― such as the repeal of environmental regulations or crackdowns on press freedom. But as much as they reveal how markedly divided societies are at this historical moment, they settle little. For those who are nostalgic for an ideal past, the challenges of a complex future wrought by globalization, digital disruption and increasing cultural diversity remain unresolved. For those looking ahead, there is no going back. The present political reaction is only the first act, not the last. It is the beginning, not the end, of the story of societies in fluid transition. The recent Turkish referendum, like Brexit and U.S. President Donald Trump’s election, fits a pattern of a territorial divide. Residents in large cities and coastal zones linked to global integration and cosmopolitan culture represented just under half of the vote; rural, small-town and Rust Belt regions linked more to the traditions and economic structures of the past were just over half. But there is also a major difference. The populist, nationalist narrative that won the day in Great Britain and the United States championed the “left behind” and splintered the unresponsive mainstream political parties. In Turkey, the day was won by a conservative, pious and upwardly mobile constituency already empowered by some 15 years of rule by President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s Justice and Development Party. The cultural duel there, backed up by neo-Islamist and nationalist statism, will thus be more intense than elsewhere. In an interview following the historic vote in her country, novelist Elif Shafak says, “The referendum has not solved anything. If anything, it deepened the existing cultural and ideological divisions.” She also laments the decline of Turkey’s long experiment as a majority-Muslim country attempting to balance culture, secularism and Western democracy. “This is the most significant turning point in Turkey’s modern political history,” she declares. “It is a shift backwards; the end of parliamentary democracy. It is also a dangerous discontinuation of decades of Westernization, secularism and modernization; the discontinuation of Atatürk’s modern Turkey.” Writing from Istanbul, Behlül Özkan explains the details of the constitutional referendum, how the playing field was tilted in Erdoğan’s favor and how it will have massive implications for Turkey’s future. He also emphasizes the historic importance of Turkey’s reverse. Özkan cites the political theorist Samuel Huntington who, in an essay decades ago on transitions from authoritarian rule, once defined Turkey as a clear example of a one-party system becoming more open and competitive under the constitution put in place by Mustafa Kemal Atatürk. It is rare in history to move in the other direction, as Erdoğan has now accomplished. Also writing from Istanbul, Alev Scott believes Turkey is in for “a decade of paranoia under a modern-day Sultan” who was unnerved by the slim margin of his victory. Noting a widely circulated photograph of the president at his moment of triumph, she saw a man not “celebrating victory” but “a man alarmed by near-defeat.” Even as critics within Turkey and others abroad expressed concern over the extinguishing of democracy, Trump again showed his affinity for strongman politics by calling to congratulate Erdoğan on his victory. Yet, as with other countries from India to Argentina, there is likely another element as well to this potentially budding bromance. Sam Stein and Igor Bobic report on ethical issues raised by Trump’s business ties with Turkey. In 2012, Erdoğan joined Trump and his family to mark the opening of Trump Towers Istanbul.  Here are a few additional highlights from The WorldPost this week: 11 Things To Know About North Korea’s Secret Nuclear Program North Korea’s Simple But Deadly Artillery Holds Seoul And U.S. Hostage Bill Clinton’s Secretary Of Defense Likes Trump’s North Korea Strategy Photo Series Show The People Of North Korea You Rarely Get To See 4 Reasons Why France’s Presidential Election Is So Important France’s Youth Are Turning To The Far-Right National Front Can American Democracy Survive The Era Of Inequality? Trump Shouldn’t Mess With The Clean Air Act, American Lung Association Warns Amazing Photos Capture How Flowers Look Under Ultraviolet Light  WHO WE ARE     EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar(First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherlandand Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

21 апреля, 23:44

Weekend Roundup: Amid Great Cultural Shifts, Voting Settles Little

In an era of profound cultural transformation, elections and referendums have very real consequences ― such as the repeal of environmental regulations or crackdowns on press freedom. But as much as they reveal how markedly divided societies are at this historical moment, they settle little. For those who are nostalgic for an ideal past, the challenges of a complex future wrought by globalization, digital disruption and increasing cultural diversity remain unresolved. For those looking ahead, there is no going back. The present political reaction is only the first act, not the last. It is the beginning, not the end, of the story of societies in fluid transition. The recent Turkish referendum, like Brexit and U.S. President Donald Trump’s election, fits a pattern of a territorial divide. Residents in large cities and coastal zones linked to global integration and cosmopolitan culture represented just under half of the vote; rural, small-town and Rust Belt regions linked more to the traditions and economic structures of the past were just over half. But there is also a major difference. The populist, nationalist narrative that won the day in Great Britain and the United States championed the “left behind” and splintered the unresponsive mainstream political parties. In Turkey, the day was won by a conservative, pious and upwardly mobile constituency already empowered by some 15 years of rule by President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s Justice and Development Party. The cultural duel there, backed up by neo-Islamist and nationalist statism, will thus be more intense than elsewhere. In an interview following the historic vote in her country, novelist Elif Shafak says, “The referendum has not solved anything. If anything, it deepened the existing cultural and ideological divisions.” She also laments the decline of Turkey’s long experiment as a majority-Muslim country attempting to balance culture, secularism and Western democracy. “This is the most significant turning point in Turkey’s modern political history,” she declares. “It is a shift backwards; the end of parliamentary democracy. It is also a dangerous discontinuation of decades of Westernization, secularism and modernization; the discontinuation of Atatürk’s modern Turkey.” Writing from Istanbul, Behlül Özkan explains the details of the constitutional referendum, how the playing field was tilted in Erdoğan’s favor and how it will have massive implications for Turkey’s future. He also emphasizes the historic importance of Turkey’s reverse. Özkan cites the political theorist Samuel Huntington who, in an essay decades ago on transitions from authoritarian rule, once defined Turkey as a clear example of a one-party system becoming more open and competitive under the constitution put in place by Mustafa Kemal Atatürk. It is rare in history to move in the other direction, as Erdoğan has now accomplished. Also writing from Istanbul, Alev Scott believes Turkey is in for “a decade of paranoia under a modern-day Sultan” who was unnerved by the slim margin of his victory. Noting a widely circulated photograph of the president at his moment of triumph, she saw a man not “celebrating victory” but “a man alarmed by near-defeat.” Even as critics within Turkey and others abroad expressed concern over the extinguishing of democracy, Trump again showed his affinity for strongman politics by calling to congratulate Erdoğan on his victory. Yet, as with other countries from India to Argentina, there is likely another element as well to this potentially budding bromance. Sam Stein and Igor Bobic report on ethical issues raised by Trump’s business ties with Turkey. In 2012, Erdoğan joined Trump and his family to mark the opening of Trump Towers Istanbul.  Here are a few additional highlights from The WorldPost this week: 11 Things To Know About North Korea’s Secret Nuclear Program North Korea’s Simple But Deadly Artillery Holds Seoul And U.S. Hostage Bill Clinton’s Secretary Of Defense Likes Trump’s North Korea Strategy Photo Series Show The People Of North Korea You Rarely Get To See 4 Reasons Why France’s Presidential Election Is So Important France’s Youth Are Turning To The Far-Right National Front Can American Democracy Survive The Era Of Inequality? Trump Shouldn’t Mess With The Clean Air Act, American Lung Association Warns Amazing Photos Capture How Flowers Look Under Ultraviolet Light  WHO WE ARE     EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar(First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherlandand Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

11 апреля, 15:44

Социотехнические последствия коммуникативных технологий

Современные протесты в России (март 2017 года) продемонстрировали, что поколение Интернета более политически активно, чем поколение телевизора. Рожденные в постсоветской реальности не имеют того типа страха, который был у их предшественников. Это результат, в том […]

08 апреля, 02:50

Weekend Roundup: For China And The U.S., The Solution Is In The Problem

Harvard’s Graham Allison worries that China and the U.S. risk falling into the “Thucydides Trap” ― named after the historian who chronicled the conflict between ancient Athens and Sparta ― in which rivalry between rising and established powers inevitably leads to war. More often than not, Allison’s research shows, similar rivalries throughout history have held to that pattern. The great question in this era is whether the world’s two largest economies can embark on a new departure, or if they are fated to replay an all too familiar past.  The first face-to-face meeting this week of Chinese President Xi Jinping and U.S. President Donald Trump is an opening indicator of which path will be taken. One summit does not make a relationship. But it does set a tone. That Donald Trump has changed his tune from charging “rape” by China on the campaign trail to inviting President Xi for a lavish repast at Mar-a-Lago is a sign that convergent interests may out of necessity forge a different future than history would suggest.  The interwoven relationship that has tightly tethered the U.S. and Chinese economies over the past three decades is the basis both of the present conflict and for resolving it. Hundreds of millions of Chinese have escaped poverty and climbed the income ladder by supplying cheap goods and produce to the likes of Walmart, Costco and Home Depot or assembling Apple iPhones and other electronics that are ubiquitous in the daily lives of Americans. This accounts for the huge trade deficit with China ― though the main reason for U.S. trade imbalances globally is simply that, since the 1970s, Americans consume more as a nation than they save and invest. As the made-for-export low-wage factory of the world, China has surely taken up jobs that might have been created in the U.S. Yet China, too, is a major importer of components for what it produces, reportedly spending more on importing microchips than oil, to take but one example. Increasingly, the fortunes of leading U.S. industries like Hollywood and Boeing depend on Chinese markets. If “the globalists gutted the American working class and created a middle class in Asia,” as White House adviser Steve Bannon has declared, then therein lies the solution. Having achieved relative prosperity built upon the American-led open trading order that President Trump says he is seeking to dismantle, China now has the income and the intent to shift to a domestic consumption-driven economy less reliant on exports to the U.S. As Shen Dingli writes from Shanghai, that means the present trade imbalance can best be addressed by China through increasing imports from the U.S. rather than cutting exports. The enormous financial resources China has accumulated from its trade surplus with the U.S., David Shambaugh suggests from Singapore, could be plowed back into the U.S. to finance the very kind of infrastructure projects Trump has promoted. If Trump can manage to restore a manufacturing base in the U.S. that is not mostly automated, it will reinforce the trajectory toward a more stable balance between the American and Chinese economies. Further, China is plotting an economic future that largely looks away from the U.S. ― through regional free trade agreements in East Asia, building out a revived Silk Road trading route that stretches across Eurasia from Beijing to Istanbul and deepening commercial ties with Africa. In short, if the U.S. and China can manage the bumps over the next few years, the root of economic conflict will resolve itself over time. But there’s a big hurdle they’ll have to get over first. For the two leaders, dealing with North Korea’s nuclear and missile program is a continuing conundrum. The likely course ahead appears to be a hybrid of harsher sanctions ― which the U.S is pushing ― followed in time by direct talks with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, which China is pressing for, according to top Chinese diplomat Fu Ying.  As Xi sat down with Trump in Florida, the American president launched his first direct military strike against Syrian President Bashar Assad’s airfield, where the planes which allegedly delivered this week’s deadly Syrian gas attack were based. Former NATO commander James Stavridis calls the move “proportional, tactically sound [and] professionally executed” and says it “sends a reasonable coherent strategic signal.” That signal, he suggests, was not only to Russia and Syria, but also to China and North Korea. The follow-up message Secretary of State Rex Tillerson should carry on his visit to Moscow next week, the former admiral adds, is that it must “restrain” its Syrian ally. China’s intertwined relationship with the U.S. is also getting entangled in the immigration debate. While most of that debate has focused on Mexicans and Muslims, a new schism has broken out between second and third generation Asian Americans and immigrants who have arrived in recent years from a bolder and more prosperous Middle Kingdom. Frank Wu, who chairs the prestigious Committee of 100 top Chinese-American entrepreneurs, scorns the new immigrants “from an ascendant Asia.”: “Some of our cousins, distant kin who have shown up here, are alarming. They are bigots who do not care about democracy. They believe themselves to be better than other people of color ― it hardly is worth pointing out since it is so obvious. They even suppose, not all that secretly, that they will surpass whites.” Responding furiously to this characterization from Shanghai, Rupert Li fires back that, “The Chinese-American elite were appalled by the watershed of support for Donald Trump among new Chinese arrivals.” If “they do not feel solidarity with disadvantaged groups,” he goes on to say, it is “not because they are bigoted, but because they do not consider themselves disadvantaged.”  Reflecting on events elsewhere in the world, Scott Malcomson reports on the latest turmoil in Hungary around the government’s effort to impose crippling restrictions on the Central European University, founded with the help of the Hungarian-born billionaire George Soros, and other institutions that receive foreign funding. As Malcomson sees it, the anti-foreigner animus of Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban is “self-destructive” because it isolates the country and will undermine what it needs to progress. Muhammad Sahimi worries that the tough stance of the Trump administration on Iran only boosts the chances of the hard-liners ousting reformist President Hassan Rouhani from power in upcoming elections and putting a conservative, Assad-supporting cleric in his place. Erin Fracolli and Elisa Epstein contend that what they call Trump’s “Muslim ban” harms women by identifying “honor killings” as an Islam problem in the same way he conflates the Muslim religion with terrorism in his rhetoric about “radical Islamic terrorism.”  Pax Technica author Phil Howard reports on his new research that shows “more than half the political news and information being shared by social media users in Michigan [a pivotal state that helped Trump triumph in the recent U.S. president election] was not from trusted sources.” He contrasts that experience with an election in Germany where, “for every four stories sourced to a professional news organization, there was one piece of junk.” He concludes: “Social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter don’t generate junk news, but they do serve it up to us. They are the mandatory point of passage for this junk, which means they could also be the choke point for it.” Finally, our Singularity series this week looks at how CRISPR gene editing for crops can feed the 9.7 billion people our planet is expecting to host by 2050. WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

08 апреля, 02:50

Weekend Roundup: For China And The U.S., The Solution Is In The Problem

Harvard’s Graham Allison worries that China and the U.S. risk falling into the “Thucydides Trap” ― named after the historian who chronicled the conflict between ancient Athens and Sparta ― in which rivalry between rising and established powers inevitably leads to war. More often than not, Allison’s research shows, similar rivalries throughout history have held to that pattern. The great question in this era is whether the world’s two largest economies can embark on a new departure, or if they are fated to replay an all too familiar past.  The first face-to-face meeting this week of Chinese President Xi Jinping and U.S. President Donald Trump is an opening indicator of which path will be taken. One summit does not make a relationship. But it does set a tone. That Donald Trump has changed his tune from charging “rape” by China on the campaign trail to inviting President Xi for a lavish repast at Mar-a-Lago is a sign that convergent interests may out of necessity forge a different future than history would suggest.  The interwoven relationship that has tightly tethered the U.S. and Chinese economies over the past three decades is the basis both of the present conflict and for resolving it. Hundreds of millions of Chinese have escaped poverty and climbed the income ladder by supplying cheap goods and produce to the likes of Walmart, Costco and Home Depot or assembling Apple iPhones and other electronics that are ubiquitous in the daily lives of Americans. This accounts for the huge trade deficit with China ― though the main reason for U.S. trade imbalances globally is simply that, since the 1970s, Americans consume more as a nation than they save and invest. As the made-for-export low-wage factory of the world, China has surely taken up jobs that might have been created in the U.S. Yet China, too, is a major importer of components for what it produces, reportedly spending more on importing microchips than oil, to take but one example. Increasingly, the fortunes of leading U.S. industries like Hollywood and Boeing depend on Chinese markets. If “the globalists gutted the American working class and created a middle class in Asia,” as White House adviser Steve Bannon has declared, then therein lies the solution. Having achieved relative prosperity built upon the American-led open trading order that President Trump says he is seeking to dismantle, China now has the income and the intent to shift to a domestic consumption-driven economy less reliant on exports to the U.S. As Shen Dingli writes from Shanghai, that means the present trade imbalance can best be addressed by China through increasing imports from the U.S. rather than cutting exports. The enormous financial resources China has accumulated from its trade surplus with the U.S., David Shambaugh suggests from Singapore, could be plowed back into the U.S. to finance the very kind of infrastructure projects Trump has promoted. If Trump can manage to restore a manufacturing base in the U.S. that is not mostly automated, it will reinforce the trajectory toward a more stable balance between the American and Chinese economies. Further, China is plotting an economic future that largely looks away from the U.S. ― through regional free trade agreements in East Asia, building out a revived Silk Road trading route that stretches across Eurasia from Beijing to Istanbul and deepening commercial ties with Africa. In short, if the U.S. and China can manage the bumps over the next few years, the root of economic conflict will resolve itself over time. But there’s a big hurdle they’ll have to get over first. For the two leaders, dealing with North Korea’s nuclear and missile program is a continuing conundrum. The likely course ahead appears to be a hybrid of harsher sanctions ― which the U.S is pushing ― followed in time by direct talks with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, which China is pressing for, according to top Chinese diplomat Fu Ying.  As Xi sat down with Trump in Florida, the American president launched his first direct military strike against Syrian President Bashar Assad’s airfield, where the planes which allegedly delivered this week’s deadly Syrian gas attack were based. Former NATO commander James Stavridis calls the move “proportional, tactically sound [and] professionally executed” and says it “sends a reasonable coherent strategic signal.” That signal, he suggests, was not only to Russia and Syria, but also to China and North Korea. The follow-up message Secretary of State Rex Tillerson should carry on his visit to Moscow next week, the former admiral adds, is that it must “restrain” its Syrian ally. China’s intertwined relationship with the U.S. is also getting entangled in the immigration debate. While most of that debate has focused on Mexicans and Muslims, a new schism has broken out between second and third generation Asian Americans and immigrants who have arrived in recent years from a bolder and more prosperous Middle Kingdom. Frank Wu, who chairs the prestigious Committee of 100 top Chinese-American entrepreneurs, scorns the new immigrants “from an ascendant Asia.”: “Some of our cousins, distant kin who have shown up here, are alarming. They are bigots who do not care about democracy. They believe themselves to be better than other people of color ― it hardly is worth pointing out since it is so obvious. They even suppose, not all that secretly, that they will surpass whites.” Responding furiously to this characterization from Shanghai, Rupert Li fires back that, “The Chinese-American elite were appalled by the watershed of support for Donald Trump among new Chinese arrivals.” If “they do not feel solidarity with disadvantaged groups,” he goes on to say, it is “not because they are bigoted, but because they do not consider themselves disadvantaged.”  Reflecting on events elsewhere in the world, Scott Malcomson reports on the latest turmoil in Hungary around the government’s effort to impose crippling restrictions on the Central European University, founded with the help of the Hungarian-born billionaire George Soros, and other institutions that receive foreign funding. As Malcomson sees it, the anti-foreigner animus of Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban is “self-destructive” because it isolates the country and will undermine what it needs to progress. Muhammad Sahimi worries that the tough stance of the Trump administration on Iran only boosts the chances of the hard-liners ousting reformist President Hassan Rouhani from power in upcoming elections and putting a conservative, Assad-supporting cleric in his place. Erin Fracolli and Elisa Epstein contend that what they call Trump’s “Muslim ban” harms women by identifying “honor killings” as an Islam problem in the same way he conflates the Muslim religion with terrorism in his rhetoric about “radical Islamic terrorism.”  Pax Technica author Phil Howard reports on his new research that shows “more than half the political news and information being shared by social media users in Michigan [a pivotal state that helped Trump triumph in the recent U.S. president election] was not from trusted sources.” He contrasts that experience with an election in Germany where, “for every four stories sourced to a professional news organization, there was one piece of junk.” He concludes: “Social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter don’t generate junk news, but they do serve it up to us. They are the mandatory point of passage for this junk, which means they could also be the choke point for it.” Finally, our Singularity series this week looks at how CRISPR gene editing for crops can feed the 9.7 billion people our planet is expecting to host by 2050. WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

03 апреля, 14:10

«Закручивание гаек» решает не проблему, а ее следствие

Подавление протеста и запугивание может быть эффективной тактикой, если власти хотят играть в короткую. Однако в долгосрочной перспективе такой подход вряд ли можно назвать действенным.

01 апреля, 08:33

Теневая экономика в СССР: с чего все началось

Вопрос о причинах развала и уничтожения СССР – далеко не праздный. Он не теряет своей актуальности и сегодня, спустя 22 года после того, как произошла гибель Советского Союза. Почему? Потому что некоторые на основе этого события делают вывод о том, что, мол, капиталистическая модель экономики более конкурентоспособна, более эффективна и не имеет альтернатив. Американский политолог Френсис Фукуяма после развала СССР даже поспешил заявить о том, что наступил «Конец истории»: человечество достигло высшей и последней стадии своего развития в виде всеобщего, глобального капитализма.

Выбор редакции
31 марта, 22:19

How Will The Rise of Automation Affect Our Workforce?

How will the rise of automation and AI affect the workforce and economy moving forward? This question was originally answered on Quora by Francis Fukuyama.

Выбор редакции
27 марта, 17:31

ALL IS PROCEEDING AS SCOTT ADAMS HAS FORESEEN: Francis Fukuyama in Politico: Trump’s a Dictator? H…

ALL IS PROCEEDING AS SCOTT ADAMS HAS FORESEEN: Francis Fukuyama in Politico: Trump’s a Dictator? He Can’t Even Repeal Obamacare.

25 марта, 10:31

Апокалиптические прогнозы про успехи популистов и "экзиты" были преждевременными – эксперт

Прогнозы 2016 года, подобно прогнозам Фрэнсиса Фукуямы о "конце истории", оказались неточными.

25 марта, 02:22

Weekend Roundup: The End Of (Human) History

Francis Fukuyama famously declared that the triumph of liberal democracy and free markets after the Cold War heralded “the end of history.” Yuval Noah Harari now predicts the end of human history as post-Promethean science grants us godlike powers to redesign our own species and create a new one in the form of artificial intelligence. Only time will tell if his vision of the future is closer to the mark than Fukuyama’s, and if humans as we know ourselves today will even be around to witness it. As the Israeli historian says in a WorldPost interview, “Human history began when men created gods. It will end when men become gods.” Harari contends that a new mythic authority ― “dataism” ― is being born and that the algorithm is its patron saint. “Authority came down from the clouds, moved to the human heart and now authority is shifting back to the Google cloud and the Microsoft cloud,” he provocatively quips. “Data and the ability to analyze data is the new source of authority. If you have a problem in life, whether it is what to study, whom to marry or whom to vote for, you don’t ask God above or your feelings inside, you ask Google or Facebook. If they have enough data on you, and enough computing power, they know what you feel already, and why you feel that way.”  The Homo Deus author has little doubt that dataism’s brave new dominance over our lives will be established willingly. “What will ram such a future through the wall is health,” he says. “People will voluntarily give up their privacy.” And while Harari acknowledges the dangers these developments could bring, he also sees the potential for a future that goes beyond the humanist literature that has historically warned us that transgressing natural limits invites catastrophe. “These are myths that try to assure humans that there is never going to be anything better than you. If you try to create something better than you, it will backfire and not succeed,” Harari says. But science is changing all that, he concludes. “Humans are now about to do something that natural selection never managed to do, which is to create inorganic life – AI. If you look at this in the cosmic terms of 4 billion years of life on Earth, not even in the short term of 50,000 years or so of human history, we are on the verge of breaking out of the organic realm.” For Fukuyama, the prime locus of history’s end was a Europe whole and free after the fall of the Berlin Wall. And as leaders mark the 60th anniversary of the founding of the European Union through the signing of the Treaty of Rome, things don’t look so rosy. Writing from Brussels, Florian Lang worries that the Eastern European nations ― Poland, Hungary, the Czech Republic and Slovakia ― that were some of the latest to join the EU in the wake of the Cold War “have not only throttled the speed of the European car but, also changed it into reverse gear” by promoting anti-Muslim and anti-immigrant sentiment and eroding civil liberties.  Writing from Paris, Natalie Nougayrède warns that it is no exaggeration to say that the French republic is in danger in the upcoming elections as Marine Le Pen’s right-wing National Front sees recent advances in the polls. “France is today a deeply fragmented country,” the former editor of Le Monde says, “with no common national narrative driving it forward, no sense of direction, and a loss of trust in the political class. Wide gaps separate those who believe in openness and those who would prefer to erect walls on national borders. France’s upcoming presidential election is not just a battle for the Élysée Palace ― it amounts to a redefinition of a collective identity and a nation’s role in the world in the 21st century.” Even if Le Pen falls short at the polls as Geert Wilders did in last week’s Dutch elections, Cas Mudde writes that the swell of authoritarianism and nativism exemplified by leaders like Le Pen and Wilders isn’t confined to anti-establishment parties. “Under the cover of fighting off the ‘populists,’” he says, “the political establishment is slowly but steadily hollowing out the liberal democratic system.” Writing from Rome, populist Five Star Movement partisan Davide Casaleggio wants to dismantle the distant EU edifice and reboot democracy at the opposite end, from the bottom up at the grassroots. “People shouldn’t settle for delegation; they should be able to choose participation,” he argues. That can be done, says Casaleggio, through interactive technologies that enable citizens themselves to propose and deliberate legislation. At around 30 percent in recent national polls in Italy, the Five Star Movement may well have a chance to demonstrate if governance through social networks can supplant representative democracy and the Brussels bureaucracy. Back in the United States where Twitter dictates much of the new administration’s actions lately, Jennifer Mercieca notes the paradox of U.S. President Donald Trump’s “conspiracy rhetoric.” What he “uses to legitimize himself as president threatens the fragile trust that legitimizes his government,” she says. Looking at one issue continually threatening Trump’s trust in the public eye ― his connection to Russia ― Matthew Rojansky writes that as America focuses on the Kremlin threat at home, Moscow is filling the power vacuum in Libya and elsewhere in the Middle East. Our Singularity series this week reports on a short film that depicts moral philosophers debating the ethics of superintelligent AI in front of superintelligent AI. The Future of Life Institute’s Ariel Conn also focuses on superintelligent AI by examining its risk with leading researchers. One of the discussants, Roman Yampolskiy, calls on the principle of “non-zero probability” when answering how we should prepare for AI threats: “Even a small probability of existential risk becomes very impactful once multiplied by all the people it will affect,” he warns. “Nothing could be more important than avoiding the extermination of humanity.” WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

24 марта, 11:50

Remapping the World and Nowruz in Iran: The Week in Global-Affairs Writing

The highlights from seven days of reading about the world

23 марта, 21:05

Предыдущий мир уже никогда не вернется

В "Форбс" вышла мрачная статья-рефлексия на тему краха текущего мироустройства и конца глобалистского проекта.Основной посыл - старое мироустройство, которое олицетворяли США и продвигали его по всему миру, неотвратимо уходит в прошлое, мир стремительно фрагментируется и крайне сложно определить контуры нового миропорядка, который будет выстраиваться вокруг ослабевшего гегемона и региональных лидеров вроде ЕС, Китая и России. Автор конечно не удержался от того, чтобы в очередной раз пнуть Фукуяму с его смешными прогнозами 90х годов про безраздельное американское доминирование. Но тут все заслуженно.В остальном же, человечество регулярно переживает смену мироустройства, которое как правило определяется лидерством одной или нескольких держав на разных этапах развития человечества. Если брать совсем глобально, то ничего необычного не происходит, просто эра безраздельного американского доминирования подошла к концу, что не означает, что США куда-то завтра возьмут и исчезнут - не стоит повторять ошибку Фукуямы наоборот. Просто меняется роль США в мире, а вместе с этим меняется и окружающий нас мир, который по прогнозам 90х годов должен был стать веком неоспоримого американского лидерства, но на практике, нас ждет совсем другой мир.Конец истории: предыдущий мир уже никогда не вернется.Идет разрушение структуры прежнего глобального монополярного мироустройства.Еще сравнительно недавно, на свежих развалинах биполярного мира, Френсис Фукуяма провозгласил в книге «Конец Истории», что безусловная победа либеральной доктрины, дальнейшему расширению которой после распада СССР и соцблока уже ничего не мешало, давала ему все основания верить в светлое завтра. «Наблюдаемое ныне — это, возможно, не просто окончание холодной войны или завершение какого-то периода всемирной истории, но конец истории как таковой…». Уверенность в этом будущем не поколебали даже тектонические разломы экономики 2007-2008 годов, списанные на издержки роста. Концепция «сияющего Града на холме» удачно завершили возведение нового миропорядка. Некоторый отказ от суверенитета, принятие либеральных ценностей, включение в цепочку глобального производства и товарообмена, а взамен — рост уровня жизни, повышение личных свобод, прямой и ясный путь в светлое будущее.Но, как известно – если хочешь насмешить Господа, расскажи ему о своих планах. Фукуяму критиковали с разных сторон и, как выяснилось, не зря – похоже, что «Конец Истории» не состоялся (недавно даже сам Ф.Ф. отчетливо выразил беспокойство, что «что-то пошло не так»). Причем основной удар был нанесен по опорному камню всей конструкции, по идеологии — и безусловному примату либеральной доктрины. Фактически, именно в ее цитадели, в США и Европе, в настоящее время наблюдается глубинный раскол общества по основным идеологическим постулатам. «Восстание правых» и проблемы мигрантов — лишь наиболее очевидные признаки процессаКроме них, отчётливо проявляются другие, причем многочисленные признаки идеологического кризиса. Национализм процветает во всех формах и регионах. Безусловной звучит религиозная составляющая, где феномен ИГИЛ (* - запрещена на территории России — Forbes), дополнительно оттеняющий противостояние шиитов и суннитов, выглядит вызовом явному кризису в христианстве, пытающемся за счёт отхода от традиционных (иногда базовых!) постулатов, соответствовать запросам изменившегося мира. На этом фоне повсеместная и резкая активизация сепаратизма (от привычных Шотландии и Каталонии до гротеска с «отделением Калифорнии»), и обострение языкового вопроса (Бельгия или Канада), выглядят куда меньшими проблемами, но добавляют штрихов к общей картине идеологического разломаКвинтэссенцией происходящего является кризис СМИ. Еще недавно «вершители судеб» и «властители мыслей», они явно теряют свои лидирующие позиции – и прежде всего в США. Выволочка, устроенная Дональдом Трампом журналистам сразу после избрания, могла бы показаться спровоцированной личной обидой на предвыборные потоки грязи. Но, фактически лишь является одним из признаний разрыва между реальностью и картиной мира, рисуемой СМИ. Поэтому же «разорванная в клочья» Россия коварно избирает Трампа, Brexit состояться не может, а ИГ является меньшей проблемой, чем кровавая тирания Асада. Современный потребитель медиа-продуктов меняется, он еще верит всему, но уже не верит никому. Социальные сети и мессенджеры вытесняют телевидение в область развлечений, подрывая статус СМИ, как трансляторов истины. Но они же окончательно размывают контуры общей картины, заменяя их мозаикой излишне подробных деталей.В итоге, даже среди экспертного сообщества пока не сформировалось адекватного восприятия кризисных явлений, что наглядно иллюстрируют череда ошибок в прогнозах. При этом фактически отсутствует консенсус по теоретическому осмыслению происходящего, а существующие попытки носят преимущественно описательный характер.Причем именно идеологический компонент уже оказывает определяющее влияние на политическую жизнь, где пресловутый Brexit и победа Дональда Трампа были, как оказалось, лишь верхушкой айсберга. «Трампизм» уверенно шагает по Европе, бывшей недавно если и не эталоном стабильности, то уж точно образцом либеральных норм. «Евроскепсисом» поражены и Нидерланды, и Франция, и даже сама Германия — не говоря уже о прочих Австриях и Венгриях. И все это наслаивается и на процессы в политически неустойчивых Италии и Греции, усугубляя общий кризис. Латинскую Америку лихорадит череда смен правительств и курсов, приближая её к состоянию устойчиво нестабильной Африки. После «арабской весны» тлеет (а местами полыхает) Ближний Восток, трясет Закавказье и Среднюю Азию, хронически больны Афганистан и Ирак, нарастает напряжение в трегольнике Пакистан-Индия-Китай. А сам Китай дополнительно будоражит соседей в Южно-Китайском море. Причём ситуация еще обострится, если Трамп, в рамках выполнения предвыборных обещаний, продолжит повышать градус конфронтации. И это все без упоминания проблем Восточной Украины.Однако, проблема не только в том, что по кругу идет разрушение прежних политических союзов и формирование новых, сохранение старых очагов с обострением — и возникновением свежих. В конце концов, мир регулярно переживал и это, перестраиваясь — но оставаясь в рамках прежней иерархической модели. Самое главное — идет разрушение самой структуры этой иерархии, прежнего глобального монополярного мироустройства. США демонстрируют желание развернуться к внутренним проблемам, отказавшись от миссионерства в пользу прагматизма – а нового лидера аналогичного масштаба не предвидится. При этом в каждом регионе формируется свои собственные локальные политические структуры. Китай, при всей широте интересов, занимается утверждением их в ЮВА, Германия в Европе, Россия – примерно в рамках прежнего СССР и т.д. Фактически, достаточно быстро формируется уже новая, мультиполярная мировая политическая структура. И скорость такова, что можно назвать эту смену структуры мировым политическим кризисом. Еще не взрыв – но уже разгорающийся пожарСтабильности в ситуацию могла бы добавить экономика, побеждая телевизор холодильником, однако и здесь не все гладко. Пока тревожные голоса приутихли настолько, что реальностью стало ожидание цикла повышения ставок ФРС. Мол, основные проблемы с финансовой системой решены, занятость и оплата труда близки к целевым значениям, и созревший к скачку рост экономики может привести к всплеску инфляции или перегреву экономики. Однако, по факту, многолетние и беспрецедентные программы стимуляции, пока привели в реальной экономике только к вялому боковому тренду, особенно если «очистить» статданные. Инфляция не достигает желательных уровней, и скорее придавливает спрос, а производство, хотя и превысило «докризисные» показатели, совсем не демонстрирует провозглашаемого оптимизма.Экономическая аналитика до недавнего времени обещала нам рост — и Китай (а потом и США) в качестве локомотива, но пока — увы. Китай отошёл в сторону, занявшись пузырями в «on shore», а американская экономика бодрилась было ожиданиями спурта биотехнологий, роботов и новой энергетики, однако их результаты всё ещё слишком скромны – темпа для прорывного развития явно не хватает. Инвесторы первых раундов часто фактически не могут выйти из вроде бы успешных проектов, вроде Uber, складываются «в ноль» фавориты ожиданий, такие как Theranos. Отдача идёт из сферы entertainment, куда и текут основные инвестиции. Не зря налоговые инициативы Трампа так всколыхнули рынок – «традиционная» экономика намного тяжелее восстанавливается, чем можно было бы заподозрить, глядя на цифры роста ВВП.Зато есть другие процессы, менее наглядные, но, достаточно существенно влияющие на ситуацию. Например, происходит ползучая экспансия новой парадигмы потребления, которая тесно связана со сменой парадигмы производства. Сейчас потребитель, хотя и меняет быстро один гаджет на другой, но не накапливает их, как раньше. В условиях жесткой конкуренции за его внимание, клиент становится все более избирательным, его пристрастия — еще более индивидуальными, а потребности — все более изощренными. Им все труднее угодить – и прежняя производственная парадигма с ее лозунгом «Качественного продукта, побольше и подешевле» явно сдает позиции. Нынешние технологии позволяют очень быстро и эффективно предлагать все новые образцы, при этом время от разработки до производства непрерывно сжимается. А быстрому продвижению новых продуктов дополнительно способствует жесткая и нарастающая конкуренция, когда новая фирма внезапно врывается на уже поделенный рынок, оттесняя существующих там монстров. Это означает преимущество небольших и гибких кампаний перед прежними неуклюжими производственными гигантамиФактически мы наблюдаем в экономике эволюционную борьбу динозавров с млекопитающими, с вполне предопределенным исходом. А современные технологии резко ускоряют этот процесс деструкции прежних (и еще совсем недавно успешных) методов производства в пользу новых и все быстрее меняющихся. Новые направления, фирмы и технологии, при всей скорости роста, локомотивами еще не становятся, но ноги прежним динозаврам уже подсекают, ещё больше усугубляя проблемы «старой» экономики. Описанный процесс, в сущности, эволюционно позитивен — но очевидно распыляет усилия между неизбежным поддержанием прежней инфраструктуры и развитием новых направлений, причем особенно - финансовые.При этом, именно в финансовой сфере продолжают накапливаться проблемы, хотя на ее нормализацию и выделялись триллионы долларов. Масштабные вливания спасли банковские балансы, но вернули все предпосылки, приведшие к кризису 2008 года. Например, для тех же США, где происходит постепенное формирование новых пузырей (фондового рынка, студенческих и авто- кредитов) и деформация старых, например в сланце. И хотя банковская система санирована — но в основном за счет перераспределения долгов на государственный уровень. Вот только решить эту проблему пирамиды государственных долгов и деривативов монетарными методами практически невозможно, тем более на фоне проблем с экономикой, назревающих (и уже реализуемых) торговых и валютных войн.Негласный и молчаливый консенсус заключается в признании невозможности возврата долга, но основывается на постулате, что их обслуживание не является проблемой для всех качественных заёмщиков. Однако, во всех развитых странах население стареет, усиливая нагрузку на пенсионную систему и социальное обеспечение, а долги зачастую существенно превышают ВВП. Не говоря уже о том, что далеко не все заемщики являются качественными – или, что зачастую, проблемы долгов усложняют геополитическую ситуацию (как в случае Китая и США).Нестабильность усугубляет и то, что раньше так помогало росту – гипермобильность капитала. Развитие IT-технологий, размытие границ и широкое распространение глобализации, привело к появлению новой формы капитала, который далеко ушёл от марксовской трактовки «фиктивный». Это стимулировало рост оборачиваемости и ликвидности, значительное облегчение доступа на рынки и вовлеченность широкого круга инвесторов, разбухание и самодостаточность рынка деривативов. Собственно, во многом именно этот капитал с новыми свойствами и сформировал ту пирамиду долга, которая замечательно обеспечивала рекордные темпы экономического развития всего мира. Но теперь, приходится нести издержки «финансового плеча». В случае повышения базовых ставок усложнение обслуживания и рефинансирования долговой нагрузки будет пропорциональным, вне зависимости от готовности экономики соответствовать этим изменениям. Это само по себе чревато серьёзным кризисом для всех рынков.Конечно, хотелось бы поддержать господствующие осторожные и оптимистичные трактовки происходящего. Но, весь этот мировой конгломерат проблем и кризисных явлений, как-то однонаправлено выстраивается в единый мультисоставляющий процесс глобального кризиса (или просто Кризиса). Причем, каждый из перечисленных кризисных компонентов развивается по своим законам и, теоретически мог бы быть преодолен эволюционным путем. Но, суммируясь и потенцируя друг друга, как в отдельных странах, так и в общемировой динамике, они скорее создают ситуацию «абсолютного шторма». И, если это так, то переоценить масштабность и важность этого комплексного процесса сложно.Пока понять значение происходящего мешает не только отсутствие исторических аналогов и его неспешность, хотя, с точки зрения самой истории, это развитие происходит весьма быстро. И не только его масштабность и многообразие составляющих – все-таки «великое видится издалека», а принцип слепых мудрецов, изучающих слона, никто не отменял. Тут, скорее, по-человечески понятное нежелание видеть всю глобальность грядущих перемен – и, тем более, их принять. Так что что пока господствуют многочисленные варианты существенно более оптимистичных ожиданий, типа, что проблема сама собой рассосется. Регуляторы (в широком смысле) пока реагируют по факту, основные усилия направлены на контрциклицеские действия поддержания status quo, а СМИ, вместо «кризис» и «депрессия», по-прежнему предпочитают писать «переходный период» и «новая экономическая реальность».Но психологический барьер неприятия уже прогибается, процесс осознания пошел, хотя пока осторожно — и как бы сквозь зубы. Лучше бы, конечно, чтобы это осознание пришло раньше, но нарастающие изменения, похоже, начнут требовать включения их в повестку дня уже не в ближайшие годы, а месяцы.Конечно, годы экономического роста воспитали поколения оптимистов, для которых любой кризис и откат – всего лишь отход для разбега и взятия новой высоты. Но не хотелось бы заблуждаться по поводу текущей «как-бы-паузы» – вполне возможно, что новой волны затяжного роста не случится. Более того, похоже, что общее положение сейчас соответствует прохождению «ока урагана». Это когда некое затишье после нескольких волн фактически является предвестником нового, и даже более разрушительного наката. Причем, следуя логике развития, можно сделать некие предположения по дальнейшим срокам его формирования. Поскольку основные составляющие кризиса сформировались в последние 5-8 лет — то далее есть основания предположить, что кризисные явления, после некоторой паузы, займут примерно столько же времени.Соотетственно, уже сейчас весьма значимо понимание дальнейшего развития процессов. Именно в этом, а не просто в признании кризисных явлений (или даже Кризиса) состоит на сегодня главная трудность. И здесь стоит вновь вернуться к теории Фукуямы, перефразируя его в соответствии к текущим реалиям. Используя его фразеологию, наблюдаемое ныне — это, «возможно, не просто завершение какого-то периода Всемирной Истории». И даже не финальная точка «идеологической либеральной демократии Запада», — но начало новой Истории как таковой. Причем не просто коррекции, некой антиФукуямы. Судя по динамике, следует ждать скорее именно глобальной смены идеологических воззрений, политических и экономических структур. Новая История знаменует их дальнейшее формирование в потенциально новом виде, мало привязанного к старым формам. При всей спорности этого положения, если судить по динамике, то ожидать его проверки долго не придется. Где точно находимся — узнаем уже скоро, существенно важнее – куда идти.Френсису Фукуяме было существенно проще сформулировать свою теорию — у него перед глазами уже был образец будущей модели. Фактически он экстраполировал на весь мир дальнейшее нарастающее доминирование США и существующей западной идеологии – и тогда оказался прав. Перед теми, кто будет заниматься этой проблемой сегодня, задача стоит куда сложнее. Исторических аналогов в столь глобальном масштабе нет ни современному кризису, ни путям его преодоления, ни будущей новой модели общества. В какой-то мере, схожей можно признать ситуацию на территории бывшего СССР — когда после распада Союза, в России одновременно наложились друг на друга идеологический, политический и экономический кризисы. И уже ее пример показывает, насколько разрушительна оказывается их внезапность, и насколько труден процесс выхода из этого состояния.Впрочем, если готовиться к вызовам меняющегося мира, можно начинать уже сегодня – и с самых очевидных мер: назвать кошку кошкой, признать всеобъемлемость нарастающих вызовов и приступить к созданию комплексной антикризисной программы. В идеале этот комплекс мероприятий должны бы быть сформированы на базе уже существующих мировых структур (ООН, МВФ и пр.), как наиболее соответствующих масштабу происходящего. Однако их забюрократизированность, слабость, ангажированность, да и сам процесс деструкции глобального мироустройства фактически сводят на нет перспективы подобного варианта (хотя его отвергать было бы серьезной ошибкой). Более реальной представляется первоначальная возможность их реализация в отдельно взятых странах – и подобный императив маячит в т.ч. для РоссииВесьма логичным с этой точки зрения может быть создание некоего условного национального антикризисного комитета, с изначально компактной и гибкой структурой. Задачей его могла бы быть не только (и не столько) оценка текущей ситуации, сколько прогнозирование и максимально оперативная разработка уже первых шагов, позволяющих стратегически адаптироваться к потенциально надвигающемуся Кризису. Причем само формирование должно происходить вне существующих бюрократических (в т.ч. научных) структур, так или иначе встроенных в существующую Систему. И не только в силу их изначального противодействия самой этой идее – таки существующие государственные структуры и без того загружены решением текущих задач. Генералы всегда готовятся к прошлой войне.Кстати, с этой позиции, Трамп и его идея построения «развитого капитализма в отдельно взятой стране» — скорее именно такая попытка. Попытка достаточно серьезной коррекции, интуитивная, м.б. и неудачная, но содержащая все основные компоненты – отчасти идеологический, политический и экономический. Причем, несмотря на достаточную ограниченность поставленных целей, в ней отражаются все грядущие трудности – начиная от сопротивления существующей системы до сложных экономических задач. Что интересно, в России, где генеральная репетиция подобного кризиса прошла в 90-е, а принятие решений часто осуществляется в рамках «ручного управления», аналогичная и лучше подготовленная попытка может принести неожиданно позитивные плоды. Ибо, как известно, предупрежден – вооружен, а удача предпочитает подготовку.http://www.forbes.ru/kompanii/341119-konec-istorii-predydushchiy-mir-uzhe-nikogda-ne-vernetsya - цинк

25 октября 2012, 23:49

Фрэнсис Фукуяма: Когда Китай взорвется…

«Я думаю, что данная система, рано или поздно, взорвется», — в глазах американского политолога, социолога и философа Фрэнсиса Фукуямы будущее Китая представляется очень неопределенным. По его мнению, костность китайской политической системы неизбежно натолкнется на свободное распространяемую в социальных сетях информацию. Он предсказывает неизбежный перелом. В интервью журналисту агентства «Франс Пресс», Мэрлоу Худу, Фрэнсис Фукуяма дает анализ текущим бурным политическим событиям. Интеллектуал, постепенно дистанцирующийся от американского неоконсерватизма и утверждающий, что 6 ноября он проголосует за Обаму, только что опубликовал переведенную на французский язык работу «Начало истории, с возникновения политики до наших дней» (Le Début de l'histoire, des origines de la politique à nos jours, издательство Saint-Simon). Данное сочинение, посвященное образованию политических институтов в мире, выходит спустя 20 лет после публикации его бестселлера «Конец истории и последний человек».   В субботу, 13 октября, Фрэнсис Фукуяма участвовал в диспутах, организованных французским философом Мишелем Серре (Michel Serres) в рамках дебатов газеты Nouvel Observateur. Фрэнсис Фукуяма, 11 октября 2012 года, Париж (Фото AFP) ВОПРОС: Вы только что опубликовали первую книгу двухтомника, прослеживающего возникновение политических систем. Согласно Вашей теории, стабильность общества базируется на трех столпах: сильном государстве, власти закона и ответственности правительства. И пока вы работаете над редактированием второго тома, мы являемся свидетелями серьезных потрясений на Ближнем Востоке и в Северной Африке, так называемой «арабской весны». Характер указанных событий подтверждает Вашу теорию или противоречит ей?   ОТВЕТ: «Арабская весна» — очень позитивное событие. Демократия невозможна без мобилизации общества. Чтобы совершить подобное, люди должны испытывать недовольство, гнев от того, как к ним относится авторитарное правительство. До января 2011 года на Западе существовало широко распространенное мнение, согласно которому арабы отличаются от остального мира, потому что, ввиду арабской культуры или мусульманской религии, населению арабских стран приходилось мириться с диктатурой, и в культурном отношении оно долго оставалось пассивным. Но если посмотреть на происходящее в Сирии, где мы уже в течение 18 месяцев наблюдаем гражданскую войну, становится ясно, что это мнение было ошибочным. Происходящее в данный момент — это точка отсчета. Народы Европы и, в первую очередь, Англии обрели демократию путем сопротивления власти короля и борьбой за свои права, в конечном итоге, победив.   Естественно, настоящая демократия для Египта, Туниса и Ливии - это отдаленная перспектива. Одной из причин написания указанной книги было показать людям на Западе, как трудно строятся институты демократии. Начальный переходный период — это самый легкий этап. Создание политических партий, юридической системы и культуры соглашений занимает намного больше времени... Но нужно с чего-то начинать. И без первичной мобилизации масс это невозможно. Площадь Тахрир, Каир, египтяне празднуют победу кандидата от Братьев-мусульман, Мохаммеда Мурси, на выборах президента. 24 июня 2012 года (Фото AFP/Халед Десуки (Khaled Desouki))   В: В большинстве арабских стран, переживших революцию, до нее существовала сильная государственная власть. Государство рассыпалось на части. Является ли это знаком того, что трех столпов, по Вашей теории, необходимых для создания стабильного и динамичного общества, в данных странах больше нет?   О: Все страны индивидуальны. Такой аргумент справедлив в случае с Ливией. Каддафи полностью лишил страну каких-либо государственных институтов, поэтому там нет государства. Исключительно государство должно монопольно и легитимно владеть правом на применение насильственных мер, ничего подобного в Ливии нет. Но Египет — это еще государство. В этом как раз и состоит часть египетских проблем: это страна с глубоко укоренившейся системой государства, нетронутой армией. Эти силы остаются значимыми, как это было и в истории Турции. Сирию также ожидают большие проблемы — если свергнут Асада, за этим последует демонтаж государства. В Йемене никогда не было сильного централизованного государства. Нет таких проблем и в Тунисе, относительно небольшой стране с сильной национальной идентификацией.   Основная трудность либеральной демократии в данном регионе состоит, без сомнения, в подъеме исламизма. Исторически, религия всегда была важным источником политической самоидентификации и мобилизации. Поэтому не стоит удивляться тому, что на Ближнем Востоке демократия приходит таким образом. Опасения всего мира вызывает тот факт, что либеральная демократия плохо совместима с салафизмом и другими радикальными проявлениями ислама. На данном этапе, никто не может дать точного прогноза действиям Братьев-мусульман в Египте. Иногда они тревожат, иногда обнадеживают. Это настоящая дилемма. Никому не хотелось бы стать свидетелем создания нового теократического государства по типу иранского или саудовского, но пока еще рано говорить об этом. Исламский суд в Дассе, Нигерия, октябрь 2004 года (Фото AFP/Пиус Этоми Экпеи (Pius Etomi Ekpei)) В: Вы полагаете, что Католическая церковь сыграла ключевую роль в становлении власти закона в Европе. Это особенность Старого континента?   О: Совсем нет. Единственная цивилизация, в которой власть закона не берет свое начало из религии, — это Китай, в котором никогда не было государственной религии. Но в мусульманском мире и Индии религия стояла у истоков правопорядка, так же как в иудаизме и христианстве на Западе. Любопытно, если посмотреть на названия исламистских партий, в них всегда присутствует слово «справедливость», как, например, Партия справедливости и развития Марокко. Справедливость понимается в шариате, как стремление к законности. Мы склонны ассоциировать шариат с крайними мерами наказания, практикуемыми в Саудовской Аравии или Талибаном в Афганистане. Но, на самом деле, во многих мусульманских странах стремление к справедливости аналогично требованию того, чтобы правители государств уважали закон. Возьмем пример Боко Харам (радикальная исламистская группировка - прим. издания) в Нигерии, одной из самых коррумпированных стран мира, где руководство без стыда разворовывает народные богатства. Конечно, их акции приняли очень жестокий характер. Но стремление к победе шариата сродни идеям западных христиан заставить своих правителей подчиняться более строгим моральным законам и не позволять им делать все, что они хотят. Конечно, эти правила значительно отличаются в том, что касается прав женщин и др. Но, по сути, ситуация та же самая: люди хотят ограничить власть вождей. В этом плане шариат мог бы играть положительную роль.   Конституция Ирана 1979 года не так плоха сама по себе, кроме главы, определяющей статус Совета Стражей революции и роль Вождя, что делает восьмую главу очень недемократичной. В ней предусматривается также деятельность религиозных судов, и если бы они существовали наряду с гражданскими судами, все было бы не так плохо. Закон играет важную роль для противостояния тирании правительств. Это так же верно для мусульманского мира, как и для стран Запада. Интернет-пользователь читает социальную сеть Weibo, кафе в Пекине, апрель 2012 года (Фото AFP/Марк Ральстон (Mark Ralston)) В: Вы утверждаете, что религия сыграла существенную роль в становлении власти закона во всем мире, кроме Китая. Почему кроме Китая?   О: На христианском Западе, в мусульманском мире и в Индии религия всегда служила противовесом государственной власти. Во всех этих трех цивилизациях право существовало под контролем не государства, а религии. Именно данный факт лежит в основе становления законовластия на Западе. Хотя история западных стран уникальна, сначала появилась власть закона, она предшествовала созданию первого сильного государства. Именно поэтому Германия смогла объединиться только в 1870 году: ранее законы Священной Римской империи служили препятствием объединению.   В Китае же никогда не было сильных религиозных элит, способных помешать императору. Там не было разделения правового механизма. В Китае государство образовалось само по себе. Оно не давало обществу сформировать группы, способные противостоять власти. Такой порядок превалировал все 2000 лет китайской истории.   Сейчас, когда Китай переживает период бурного экономического роста, ситуация очень сильно меняется. Неожиданно, на государственном ландшафте появляются новые социальные группы. Этот слой возник в результате капиталистического развития: бизнес и средний класс, образованные люди, зарегистрированные на Sina Weibo, китайском аналоге Твиттера... И они пришли в движение.   В данном отношении показателен пример с крушением скоростного поезда: правительство вложило миллиарды в проект скоростной железной дороги. Катастрофа произошла почти сразу после запуска в эксплуатацию, и первым шагом правительства было закопать вагоны потерпевшего крушение поезда, чтобы население ничего об этом не узнало. Но люди начали обсуждать указанное событие, пересылать фотографии через Weibo и, таким образом, заставили власти изменить свое решение.   Хотя в истории Китая почти не было организованных социальных протестов, модернизация способствовала созданию новой социальной группы, изменивший расклад для правительства страны. Глобализация здесь играет основную роль: Китай, в отличие от Северной Кореи, хочет быть частью этого мира. Интересный факт: 90% членов Центрального Комитета Коммунистической партии Китая держат свои семьи и сбережения за рубежом. Они видят альтернативу существующему строю. Несмотря на длительный период централизованной государственной власти в Китае, есть основания думать, что страну ждет не слишком стабильное будущее. Железнодорожная катастрофа в Шанъюй, на востоке Китая, июль 2011 года (Фото AFP)   В: Год назад Вы говорили о том, что Китай стоит на распутье. Что Вы под этим подразумеваете?   О: Дело Бо Силая (руководителя высокого ранга, исключенного из Коммунистической партии за коррупцию — прим. издания) обнажает структурную слабость китайской системы. Один из факторов, почему авторитарное правительство Китая функционирует все же лучше, чем правительство Мубарака или Каддафи, состоит в том, что оно лучше институализировано. Оно подчиняется определенным правилам: мандат выдается на 10 лет, возрастное ограничение для состава Политбюро 67 лет и т.д. Дело Бо Силая показывает ограниченность этой системы. Одной из причин, по которой власти хотели избавиться от Бо Силая, была его харизматичность, дающая новую жизнь революционным песням эпохи Мао, что создавало популистскую базу, способную однажды разрушить систему. В этом и состоит ее слабость: современные китайские руководители пережили Культурную революцию и не хотят ее возврата. Но после того, как они уйдут, у нас нет никакой гарантии, что не появится новый Мао.   Китай — огромная страна, где всегда существовала проблема доступа к информации. Император не знал о том, что происходит в провинциях. Точно такая же проблема и у Коммунистической партии Китая: при отсутствии свободных средств массовой информации, местных выборов невозможно знать, о чем думает народ. Они компенсируют это механизмами контроля, что и будет одной из причин, по которой система, рано или поздно, взорвется. Экономический рост замедляется, правительство не имеет точной информации о том, что реально происходит на местах, так как руководители регионов склонны обманывать о текущем положении дел. Люди не верят статистике.   В Китае 50000 сотрудников следят за интернетом, отчасти, с репрессивной целью, но, в основном, чтобы донести до правительства информацию, о чем думает население, чтобы оно не теряло связи с реальностью. Китайский полицейский пытается запретить съемку штаб-квартиры Коммунистической партии Китая, Пекин, апрель 2012 года (Фото AFP/Марк Ральстон (Mark Ralston)) В: Вы упомянули социальные сети. В данном контексте они играют какую-то роль?   О: Конечно. Постепенно, с ростом уровня образования люди получают доступ к технологиям, социальные сети становятся проводниками информации в национальном масштабе. Технологии облегчают появление национального сознания, которого не существует во времена подконтрольных средств массовой информации при коммунистическом режиме. История железнодорожной катастрофы тому пример. Правительство было вынуждено откопать вагоны и начать расследование. Естественно, реальные виновники катастрофы избежали наказания, для этого есть множество способов. Но факт остается интересным. Такое не могло бы произойти еще десять лет назад. В: За кого Вы будете голосовать на президентских выборах в Америке?   О: Я проголосую за Обаму. В некотором отношении, он меня разочаровал. Но республиканская партия проявляет такую узость идеологии, что я ни в коем случае не могу за нее голосовать. В: Четыре года назад Вы тоже голосовали за Обаму?   О: Да. Фрэнсис Фукуяма, автопортрет В: В своих работах Вы обращаетесь к биологии и психологии эволюции. Это необычно для специалиста в области политических наук. Что Вам это дает?   О: Многие специалисты в области социальных наук совсем не интересуются естественными науками. Они считают, что общественные институты — производная социума и биология здесь ни при чем. Я думаю, что это не так. Все мы обладаем свойствами, генетическим наследием, которые делают наше поведение, отчасти, прогнозируемым. Поэтому, в своей книге я начинаю с биологии. Постулат о том, что человек — существо общественное, принят как аксиома, но эта естественная социализация подразумевает естественное предпочтение своим биологическим родителям и знакомым. Эту модель поведения не нужно воспитывать: она естественная, врожденная и не зависит от происхождения человека.   В некоторой степени, это проблема современной политики: мы не хотим, чтобы люди следовали такой модели поведения. Мы запрещаем политикам покровительствовать своим избирателям, это называется коррупцией. Мы хотим, чтобы они относились ко всем на основе равенства. Такая проблема стоит перед каждой политической системой. Наше естественное желание — дать преимущества своей семье и друзьям. Невозможно построить современную политическую систему и государство, не преодолев эту тенденцию. Китай давно вошел в категорию современных государств, 2000 лет назад введя обязательные экзамены для назначаемых функционеров. Турки захватывали на Балканах христианских детей и воспитывали их мусульманами, обрывая семейные связи и делая их абсолютно лояльными государству, благодаря чему они покончили с влиятельной родовой системой, существовавшей ранее. История развития политики модерна как раз и состоит из проведения всех этих стратегий, направленных на преодоление нашей естественной тенденции покровительства своим ближним. В: Что Вы думаете о ситуации в Европе?   О: Очевидно, что в структуре Европейского Союза много уязвимых мест: принятие решений зависит от общего консенсуса, тогда как слишком большое число участников обладает правом вето, это затрудняет эффективное принятие решений. Европейские государства сильны сами по себе, но надгосударственная структура Европейского Союза слаба. Не представляю, каким образом Европа сможет создать бюджетный союз, которого так желает Германия. Система должна быть более гибкой.   Греции нужно было выйти из зоны евро два года назад. Тогда еще можно было избежать развала всей системы. Сейчас сделать это очень трудно. В конце концов, Германия будет вынуждена спасать все страны, испытывающие трудности. У нее не будет другого выбора.