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28 марта, 19:19

Kansas Shooting Hero Who Tried To Stop Hate Crime Gets Incredible Reward

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); A man who intervened in a bar shooting is getting a big “thank you” for his heroic efforts. On Feb. 22, Ian Grillot, 24, was shot in the hand and chest while trying to stop a gunman who shot two Indian men in a bar in Olathe, Kansas. Alok Madasani, who was wounded, and Srinivas Kuchibhotla, who was killed, were engineers with navigation device maker Garmin Ltd. At least one bystander told the Kansas City Star in February that the gunman shouted “get out of my country” before shooting the victims he reportedly thought were Middle Eastern. Grillot hid behind a table and counted the gunshots, then pursued the gunman when he thought he was out of bullets. Unfortunately, he miscounted. On March 25, an Indian community center in Houston invited Grillot to a formal gala to honor his selfless act. But Grillot had no idea the group would also award him a $100,000 check it had raised to help him buy a home, the Kansas City Star reports. “It is not every day that one meets a genuine hero — a person who risks his life for another, and takes a bullet for a complete stranger,” Jiten Agarwal, chair of India House Houston’s annual gala said in a press release. “Ian Grillot is a man who reminds us of the promise of America and its greatness.” The idea to raise money for Grillot began when Charlie Yalamanchili, an India House trustee, proposed the group buy him a house. He then offered to match every dollar raised by India House members. “I don’t know if I could’ve lived with myself if I wouldn’t have stopped or attempted to stop the shooter, because that would’ve been completely devastating,” said Grillot in the release. “I do now have a very powerful message and if I can help empower people and spread hope and love, then why not?” He added, “I am honored to be at India House that serves so many families from so many communities in the Houston area.” Tina Fey, Alec Baldwin, Tom Hanks, Tracy Morgan, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Michael Moore, Padma Lakshmi and a whole host of other stars are teaming up for Stand for Rights: A Benefit for the ACLU. Donate now and join us at 7 p.m. ET on Friday, March 31, on Facebook Live. #standforrights2017 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

28 марта, 11:03

Why Is Fitbit (FIT) Down 11.2% Since the Last Earnings Report?

Fitbit (FIT) reported earnings 30 days ago. What's next for the stock? We take a look at earnings estimates for some clues.

28 марта, 02:09

Fitbit (FIT) Stock Jumped 5% After Alta HR Debuts Early

Fitbit Inc. (FIT) closed the day with 5.4% growth to $5.69 per share after the wearable company introduced global availability for its new product, Alta HR.

27 марта, 19:11

Медведев пришел на встречу в дешевых часах

Встречаясь с дальнобойщиками российский премьер-министр надел недорогую пластиковую модель с силиконовым ремешком. До это журналисты уже видели у него другой бюджетный аксессуар

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27 марта, 12:18

Дмитрия Медведева заметили в новых часах: цена и модель

На встрече с дальнобойщиками по тарифным вопросам премьер-министр появился с новыми часами на руке. Hi-Tech Mail.ru определил модель часов. Hi-Tech Mail.ru уже подметил симпатию Дмитрия Медведева к марке Swatch. На сей раз он появился в часаx Swatch SILVER GLAM (SUOZ147). Ранее премьер-министр носил часы Garmin. Это кварцевые швейцарские часы в пластиковом корпусе с металлической окантовкой и силиконовым ремешком. Дизайн циферблата сделан в стиле стимпанк. Часы из коллекции 2012 года выпуска, но по-прежнему есть в продаже. Как выяснил Hi-Tech Mail.ru, в официальном московском магазине Swatch эта модель сейчас стоит 4400 рублей, что в 12 раз дешевле часов Garmin, в которых ранее был замечен премьер. Популярные часы: С какими еще гаджетами премьер-министра видели ранее: Читайте также: Гаджеты Дмитрия Медведева круто подешевели

23 марта, 16:54

Fitbit Plunges to 52-Week Low: Three Reasons to Stay Away

Shares of Fitbit, Inc. (FIT) hit a 52-week low of $5.42 on Mar 22.

15 марта, 02:21

Low-Cost Brands Still Dominate Smartwatch Market

Tag Heuer introduced on Tuesday its new Connected Modular 45 smartwatch. The $1,650 technology-packed watch is the second luxury wearable the Swiss watchmaker has developed. But does it live up to the lofty price tag? More importantly, does it signal a shift in the wearable and smartwatch market as a whole?

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13 марта, 09:48

Garmin представит фитнес-трекер Vivosmart 3

Компания Garmin готовится выпустить новый фитнес-трекер Vivosmart 3, который, предположительно, придет на смену модели Vivosmart HR Plus. Изображение с сайта wareable.com Также ожидается, что новинка сможет составить конкуренцию устройству Fitbit - Fitbit

08 марта, 17:20

In Kansas City, A Mother Fears Her Children Could Be Next

KANSAS CITY, Kan. — Mahnaz Shabbir was 12 when a teacher walked into her sixth-grade classroom and asked her to come to the front of the room and explain why her cousin wasn’t eating. Mortified, Shabbir told the class that her cousin, who had recently moved to the U.S. from India, was observing the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, which requires fasting. When her friends played “cowboys and Indians,” Shabbir, whose parents came from Hyderabad, India, was always made to play an Indian. This felt different: Her teacher had singled her out in front of her overwhelmingly white, Christian classmates. That was 1971. But it was a humiliating lesson, and one that she carried with her for decades: Keep quiet about your religion. So Shabbir did just that. She didn’t wear a headscarf in public. She talked about Islam only to people she could trust. She moved across the country: First to Wisconsin, then to the University of Missouri-Kansas City for business school and finally to the Kansas City suburbs, where she settled down with her husband.  Shabbir, who has kind eyes and a disarming smile, came to love the Midwest for everything the cities to the east were not. The people were nice. The spaces were vast. The stores were clean. She got a job doing strategic planning and business development at a hospital system. Her husband, an immigrant from Hyderabad like her parents, worked as a physician. They built a spacious home outside Kansas City, with wide windows, a winding staircase and a golden chandelier in the foyer. She had children of her own — four boys. But after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, the anti-Muslim whispers turned to shouts, and Shabbir couldn’t shake something inside her. Kids called her second-oldest child, a high school student named Syed, a “terrorist.” A man told her eldest child, Ali, that Muslims should be locked up. When the man asked for Ali’s name, he said it was Al. Shabbir spoke to the principal and counselors at Syed’s school. She started to attend talks to help combat stereotypes about Muslims. Then she went again, and again, and again. Women’s groups, churches and the NAACP asked her to help dispel myths about Islam.  She published a column in the Kansas City Star. “[T]here has been so much negative information about Muslims and Islam, I knew I couldn’t be silent,” she wrote. “I had to speak out and let others know the truth. Thank God, for people who want to know the truth.” In 2003, she quit her job at the hospital and started a consulting firm focused on combating Islamophobia. She led diversity trainings at middle schools. She became the chair of an independent citizen advisory board that investigated racial profiling by police. She worked on human relations at the school district and at interfaith groups dedicated to improving understanding between religions. One time, a veteran told her he would help protect local mosques. A mother told Shabbir that her child, after attending one of her local “Meet a Muslim” programs, pushed back against one of his peers at school who said Muslims were “the problem.” In 2006, her husband returned from his pilgrimage to Mecca. He appeared exhausted. Within a day, he died, leaving Shabbir to care for their four children alone. Four years later, Shabbir made her own pilgrimage to Mecca. She wore a headscarf. Afterward, she decided not to take it off.  “Oh, isn’t it much better than [just after] 9/11?” people ask her now. “No, actually,’” she tells them. “It’s worse.” The attacks on her children haven’t stopped. Someone pushed down her youngest child, who is in high school, and told him he blended into the rug. People called her second-youngest, Abbas, a monkey and a sand nigger. Abbas got into the first fight of his life when someone told him the same thing another person had told his brother Syed: that their late father was a terrorist. Today, Islamophobia is more than a sentiment in Kansas. It’s the law. In 2012, Gov. Sam Brownback (R) signed a bill to ban state courts and agencies from using Islamic law to make decisions. It’s also a political cudgel: Last July, Shabbir opened her mailbox to find a postcard from U.S. Rep. Kevin Yoder (R-Kan.), who represents her district. On the front of it was an Arab man with a large gun against the backdrop of a smoldering city. “Terrorism,” it warned, “can strike any time, anywhere.” In 2015, the most recent year with available data, hate crimes in the U.S. jumped by 7 percent, according to FBI data. In Kansas, they jumped 35 percent, mostly due to an increase in religiously motivated attacks. Then, one day last month, a man entered Austins Bar & Grill in Olathe, Kansas, minutes from Shabbir’s home. At the bar, the man noticed Srinivas Kuchibhotla and Alok Madasani, two 32-year-old Indian men who worked at Garmin, a technology company that makes GPS-enabled gadgets. He asked them if they were in the country illegally. He asked them what type of visas they had. He told them to get out of his country. Some people say the bar kicked the man out. But he returned with a gun. He shot Madasani, Kuchibhotla and Ian Grillot, a 24-year-old who tried to stop him. Then he fled. Adam Purinton, 51, of Olathe, has been charged in the shooting.  Madasani and Grillot survived the attack. Kuchibhotla did not. He was 32 — roughly the same age as Shabbir’s oldest children. He was from Hyderabad, where her parents and late husband were born.  “It could have been any one of our boys,” she said. “It could happen while we’re here. Right now. Right at this moment it could happen.”   Shabbir wanted President Donald Trump to speak out. But for days, he said nothing. That Sunday, four days after the attack, the India Association of Kansas City organized a vigil for Kuchibhotla in Olathe. Hundreds attended. Shabbir stood up and recited a Muslim prayer. “Namaste. As-salaam alaikum. Peace be unto you,” she said.  At the vigil, Shabbir spotted Congressman Yoder. She walked up to him and looked him in the eye. There is a Pandora’s box of hate that has been opened, she told him. It’s the duty of elected officials to do what they can to close it. The next morning, back in Washington, D.C., Yoder asked for a moment of silence on the House floor and shared what he said he had learned at the vigil. “Last night, our community sent the strong message that love will overcome hate,” he said. “Thousands of concerned citizens in my district came together to support one another and our growing and vibrant Indian community in this time of great tragedy. “We show the world that our diverse political and religious views are what make our community and our country great. Mr. Speaker, in addition to this moment of silence, let us renew our commitment to treating each other with respect and embracing civility in our public discourse.” The next day, Yoder asked Trump to condemn the attack at Austins Bar & Grill. A few hours later, he did. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

28 февраля, 23:54

A Murder in Trump's America

When a gunman shot Srinivas Kuchibhotla and Alok Madasani, he acted alone—but such tragedies are abetted by politicians who fuel the resentments that produce them.

28 февраля, 00:06

Shooter In Possible Kansas Hate Crime Appears In Court

OLATHE, KANSAS ― Adam Purinton, the 51-year-old man accused of hurling racial slurs before opening fire on two Indian men in a Kansas bar last week, appeared calm and composed during a brief court appearance Monday. Appearing via a live video feed inside the Johnson County Courthouse in Olathe, Kansas, Purinton replied to several questions with a “yes sir” before acknowledging that he could not afford a lawyer.  “I am asking the court to appoint counsel,” he told the court from a room at the New Century Detention Center. Public defender Michael McCulloch was assigned to his case. Purinton is scheduled to appear in court again the morning of March 9.  Purinton is charged with first-degree murder and two counts of attempted first-degree murder in the shooting of Srinivas Kuchibhotla, Alok Madasani and Ian Grillot on Wednesday at Austin’s Bar and Grill in Olathe. Kuchibhotla, 32, died of his wounds. Madasani, 32, and Grillot, 24, survived. Although Kansas does not have a hate crime law, the FBI is investigating the shooting as a possible federal hate crime.   Dinesh Kansal, an Indian-American resident of Olathe, said he came to the courthouse Monday to get a good look at Purinton. “I want to know why this idiot did what he did,” Kansal told The Huffington Post, adding that the shooting is “giving this town a bad name all over the world.”  Kuchibotla and Madasani, both immigrants from India, were regulars at Austin’s Bar and Grill, where they often enjoyed a post-work whiskey after leaving their jobs at Garmin, a technology company that makes GPS navigation devices.  According to witnesses, Purinton was also drinking at Austin’s that night, and yelled “get out of my country” to the two men. “He asked us what visa are we currently on and whether we are staying here illegally,” Madasani recounted to The New York Times. Purinton was eventually kicked out of the bar, but returned a short time later with a gun. He opened fire, killing Kuchibotla and seriously wounding Madasani. Another customer at the bar, Ian Grillot, hid beneath a table during the shooting. After hearing nine shots, Grillot said he thought the gun’s magazine was empty and got up to apprehend Purinton. Purinton then shot him in the chest and hand. .@kctv5 interview with Ian Grillot. Thought he heard 9 shots fired, but miscounted & chased down suspect before getting shot through hand. pic.twitter.com/vVaap9IbhV— Jake Godin (@JakeGodin) February 24, 2017 Purinton fled the scene. Later that night, police received a call from an Applebee’s bartender 70 miles away in Missouri. She said a man was there drinking, and had confessed to having just shot two “Iranians,” KMBC reported. Police arrived a short time later and arrested Purinton.  Purinton served in the Navy for two years in the late 1980s and later worked for the Federal Aviation Administration. He does not have a lengthy criminal record. Johnson County court records show a DUI charge that was dismissed. Purinton’s neighbors told various media outlets that he had PTSD, was a heavy drinker, and was struggling with the recent loss of his father.  Neighbors say they believe suspect is a military veteran with PTSD. He also was recently diagnosed with serious illness, they say. @KCStar— Greg Farmer (@gregfarmerKC) February 23, 2017 Kuchibhotla’s body was scheduled to be shipped back to India Monday for a funeral. His death has received national attention in his home country, where many are wondering whether the xenophobic rhetoric of President Donald Trump has made America unsafe for immigrants.  Sunayana Dumala, Kuchibhotla’s wife, told reporters this weekend that she couldn’t sleep after Trump’s election victory in November.  “I was like, ‘Srini, will we be safe in this country?” she recounted saying to her husband. “I think hate crimes will be more open now. Will it be safe for us to go to the mall? For us to go to [the] office?” Despite calls for him to do so, Trump has yet to address last week’s shooting. White House press secretary Sean Spicer said at a press briefing Friday that it was “absurd” to link the Olathe shooting to Trump’s stance on immigration.  At another press briefing Monday, Spicer said that although he didn’t want to get ahead of law enforcement’s investigation of the shooting, early reports out of Olathe were “disturbing.” A massive vigil was held for the three shooting victims Sunday in Olathe. Madasani arrived on crutches.  “I wish it was a dream,” Madasani told the crowd of the shooting, according to The Kansas City Star. “It was rage and malice in an individual’s heart that killed my friend ... killed our friend,” he said. “It’s an isolated incident that doesn’t reflect the true spirit of Kansas, Midwest and United States.” “I want to take this opportunity to ask ... all of you for tolerance of our diversity and for respect of humanity,” he added. “I hope I’m not asking too much, because that is what my friend would have wanted.” America does not do a good job of tracking incidents of hate and bias. We need your help to create a database of such incidents across the country, so we all know what’s going on. Tell us your story. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

27 февраля, 19:54

Man Who Intervened In Shooting Of Indian Engineers Delivers Powerful Message Of Hope

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); A Kansas man wounded when he intervened in a bar room shooting that killed an Indian engineer and injured another said on Sunday he was glad he risked his life in an incident U.S. authorities are investigating as a possible hate crime. Ian Grillot, 24, was struck in the hand and chest at the bar in Olathe, Kansas, when suspect Adam Purinton opened fire on Wednesday evening. At least one bystander told the Kansas City Star he shouted “get out of my country” before shooting the Indian victims. Purinton, a 51-year-old white Navy veteran, will make an initial appearance in Johnson County District Court on Monday. He faces charges of murder and attempted murder. Grillot, a construction worker, said that he had to step in when the shooting started in the bar crowded with fans watching a University of Kansas basketball game. “I was more than happy to risk my life to save the lives of others. There was families, there was kids inside,” he said in a video released by the University of Kansas Health System, where he is recovering from his wounds. “I couldn’t stand there, I had to do something. That’s why I acted the way I did.” The hospital said Grillot was continuing to improve. “I did get my chest tube out and that feels much better, but it is hard to describe how sore I feel,” he said. Purinton is accused of killing Srinivas Kuchibhotla, 32, and wounding Alok Madasani, also 32 in the shooting in Olathe, a Kansas City suburb. Both men were engineers with navigation device maker Garmin Ltd. The Federal Bureau of Investigation is looking at whether the shooting was a hate crime, the official term for crimes motivated by bias or prejudice. Hundreds gathered in Olathe on Sunday for a prayer vigil for Kuchibhotla and the other victims. Supporters marched and held up signs decrying hate and supporting love and inclusivity. Madasani spoke at the rally, where he called the shooting “an isolated incident that doesn’t reflect the true spirit of Kansas, the Midwest and the United States,” according to the Associated Press. The shooting triggered outrage on Indian social media, where people voiced concern that U.S. President Donald Trump’s “America First” position on immigration and jobs has fueled a climate of intolerance. A White House spokesman said on Friday that any loss of life was tragic, but it would be absurd to link the killing to Trump’s rhetoric. Local media reports said Purinton often complained about his ill health and was mourning the death of his father. An online GoFundMe campaign has raised almost $1.2 million for the shooting’s victims and families. (Reporting by Ian Simpson in Washington; Editing by Michael Perry) -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

26 февраля, 23:25

Wife Of Kansas Shooting Victim Was Afraid Of Hate Crimes After The Election

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Sunayana Dumala says she spent nights lying awake after Donald Trump was elected president in November. She worried about the increasingly hostile climate toward foreigners ― people like her and her husband, who came to the U.S. from India. Dumala’s husband, Srinivas Kuchibhotla, was fatally shot on Wednesday in a bar in Olathe, Kansas. Witnesses say a man yelled racial slurs and told the victim and his friend to “get out of my country.” Dumala, who has since returned to India to be with her husband’s family, told the BBC on Saturday that she was fearful in the face of what she considered to be a growing hatred and intolerance toward foreigners.  “I was like, ‘Srini, will we be safe in this country? I’m so worried. I think hate crimes will be more open now. Will it be safe for us to go to the mall? For us to go to [the] office?’” she said.  Dumala said her husband hugged her and told her not to worry.  We’ve read many times in newspapers of some kind of shooting happening everywhere. And we always wondered, how safe are we? Are we doing the right thing? Sunayana Dumala Kuchibhotla, a 32-year-old aviation engineer for Garmin, “loved America,” Dumala said. She described her husband as optimistic, loving and encouraging. He was driven to succeed in his field, and they were planning to start a family after buying what she called their “dream home” in Olathe. Kuchibhotla had recently finished painting their living room, she said. “My husband came to the United States with a lot of dreams in his mind. We made the United States our home,” Dumala said Friday at a gathering at Garmin’s U.S. headquarters in Olathe. “We’ve read many times in newspapers of some kind of shooting happening everywhere. And we always wondered, how safe are we? Are we doing the right thing?” “He always assured me that only good things happen to good people,” she added. “Always think good. Always be good. And good will happen to you.” function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_2'),onPlayerReadyVidible); The night he was killed, Kuchibhotla was enjoying after-work drinks with his friend and co-worker, 32-year-old Alok Madasani, at Austin’s Bar and Grill. Adam W. Purinton, 51, yelled racial slurs at the two Indian men and asked if they were in the country illegally, according to witnesses. Purinton was asked to leave, but later returned with a gun. He allegedly shot both men and Ian Grillot, a 24-year-old bar patron who tried to intervene. Purinton was later charged with one count of first-degree murder and two counts of premeditated attempted murder. The FBI is investigating whether the incident was a hate crime.  Trump hasn’t addressed the shooting. White House press secretary Sean Spicer said Friday that any loss of life is tragic, but that it was “absurd” to connect Trump’s stance on immigration to Kuchibhotla’s death.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

24 февраля, 11:02

Что умеют новые часы Дмитрия Медведева

Вот у вас денег нет, а Дмитрий Медведев где-то наскреб 53.890 рублей на новенькие часы, узнал Sobesednik.ru

24 февраля, 04:45

GoFundMe Raises Over $160,000 For Family Of Man Killed In Apparent Hate Crime

A GoFundMe campaign is raising money to help the family of an Indian-American engineer killed Wednesday evening by a man who reportedly yelled “Get out of my country!” before opening fire. Srinivas Kuchibhotla, an aviation engineer originally from Hyderabad, India, was shot at an Olathe, Kansas bar Wednesday. Two other people ― including Kuchibhotla’s co-worker at technology company Garmin, Alok Madasani, and Ian Grillot, a 24-year-old bystander ― were injured in the shooting. An Olathe man, Adam Purinton, 51, has been charged in the shooting. He reportedly fled the scene and later told an employee at a bar in Clinton, Missouri, that he had killed two Middle Eastern men, according to the Kansas City Star. function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Kavipriya Muthuramalingam, a friend of Kuchibhotla’s, set up the GoFundMe campaign Thursday to raise money for his family. “Srinu was a kindhearted, gentle, very compassionate human being. He was a brilliant, budding engineer who had a bright future ahead of him,” Muthuramalingam told The Huffington Post.  “Everywhere Srinu went, he only left a positive impression with his gentle and decent behavior. We are heartbroken, and things will never be the same. His wife and family are facing incredible grief.” The campaign exceeded its fundraising goal of $150,000 in a matter of hours. The funds will go toward helping Kuchibhotla’s family pay for funeral costs and other recovery expenses, according to the GoFundMe page. “This includes the very expensive process of carrying his mortal remains back to India, so his parents can say goodbye one last time to their beloved son,” the page says. Crowd-funding pages were also set up Thursday to help cover medical expenses for Madasani and Grillot.  Police arrested Purinton early Thursday morning at an Applebee’s about 80 miles from the Olathe bar. He was charged with premeditated murder and two counts of attempted murder, according to local officials. An FBI representative said the agency was investigating whether the shooting violated federal laws that might designate it as a hate crime, the New York Daily News reported. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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23 февраля, 18:10

Company News for February 23, 2017

Companies In The News are: TOL,FSLR,GRMN,BMY

23 февраля, 17:42

Fitbit (FIT) Q4 Loss Greater than Expected, Revenues Miss

Fitbit, Inc. (FIT) reported fourth-quarter 2016 adjusted loss of 63 cents per share, which was greater than the Zacks Consensus Estimate of a loss of 61 cents.

23 февраля, 16:25

Garmin (GRMN) Shows Strength: Stock Adds 7.3% in Session

Garmin Ltd. (GRMN) moved big last session, as its shares jumped over 7% on the day.

Выбор редакции
22 февраля, 21:47

Garmin Maps a Solid Path in Wearable Tech

Garmin’s GPS-enabled wearable devices find valuable niche while larger rivals stumble.

04 июня 2015, 21:44

Рынок носимых гаджетов подрос на 200%

Аналитическая компания International Data Corporation (IDC) опубликовала очередную сводку по мировому рынку носимой электроники. В I квартале этого года устройства такого типа показывают уверенные темпы роста.