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17 января, 19:36

Top Research Reports for Microsoft, Biogen & Home Depot

Top Research Reports for Microsoft, Biogen & Home Depot

17 января, 14:58

General Mills: Will the Strategic Initiatives Boost Sales?

General Mills (GIS) is currently pursuing many multi-year restructuring initiatives focused at improving operational efficiency. Will it support growth?

11 января, 15:00

An Inside View of How LVMH Makes Luxury More Sustainable

The companies that are most vocal about environmental and social issues tend to be big, mass-market brands — well-known retailers, consumer products giants, and tech firms that are telling a new story to consumers who increasingly care about sustainability. It might seem that luxury goods companies would not feel the same pressure, but the high-end brands face important questions about the way their businesses impact the world. These companies can’t ignore sustainability. One luxury leader, LVMH, provides a great example of how to build a robust sustainability program. The company is a €36 billion decentralized collection of valuable brands — which they call houses (or maisons) — covering fashion, wine and spirits, cosmetics, and jewelry. To understand its sustainability journey better, I spoke with the company’s head of environment, Sylvie Benard, and the CEOs of two of its wine and spirits brands. The center of the corporate program is a framework it calls LIFE (LVMH Initiatives for the Environment), a “strategic backbone” for programs that address nine environmental challenges. LIFE focuses attention on the full life cycle of products, from supply chain to production excellence to designing longer-lasting and repairable products. Each brand’s strategic business plans now include a LIFE plan, with actions and targets laid out for the next five years. Looking at LVMH’s efforts, I’ll highlight three areas where I see great impact and innovation: managing carbon and energy, building a connection with customers around brand purpose, and working closely with suppliers. I’ll then discuss some of LVMH’s challenges. Managing Carbon and Energy Since 2001 LVMH has studied its life cycle carbon footprint, focusing on both the obvious energy hogs — its stores and distribution — and brand-specific issues, such as packaging in spirits and personal care. The company has aggressively reduced its own energy demand and ramped up the use of clean energy. By the end of this year, 100% of the electricity for LVMH facilities in France will be renewable. Belvedere Vodka, a brand with sales in 120 countries, has pursued many large-scale projects to reduce its CO2 footprint. Belvedere’s distillery in Poland shifted from oil to gas for energy generation and added heat recovery systems to capture wasted energy. Charles Gibb, Belvedere’s CEO, says it made a strategic choice to invest in this project, even though it had a longer payback period than normal. It was part of a larger overhaul that included automating some distillery operations, which gave it better data and helped slash energy and water use. As a result, Belvedere’s greenhouse gas emissions have dropped by 40%. The most innovative part of LVMH’s carbon strategy is the use of an internal carbon fund. Dozens of the world’s largest companies use “shadow prices” to model how a carbon tax would affect their investment decisions. But only a few big companies actually collect real money from their divisions or brands (Disney and Microsoft were early leaders). LVMH’s approach is somewhat unique. Where others have collected funds internally to create a central pool of money for carbon-reducing projects, LVMH instead requires every maison to spend €15 for every ton of carbon emissions (either on-site or from grid-based electricity) on efficiency and energy reduction, clean energy, or research to understand that brand’s greenhouse gas emissions better. Like its carbon-taxing peers, LVMH has created a powerful virtuous circle of emissions reductions. In total, LVMH has invested about €6 million in the first year of the program. Brand-Building and Customer Connection The LVMH leaders I spoke with believe strongly that Millennials, more so than previous generations, care about sustainability. As Gibb puts it, “Until recently, marketing would focus mainly on product and brand image. But now people look for whether you’re both socially and environmentally responsible. People look at brands and ask what they do for the world. If you don’t do this stuff, you’re not a modern brand.” One of the ways the company is telling a more sustainable story to customers is through the use of the “Butterfly Mark,” a symbol — a first in the luxury industry — that “at a glance helps people identify brands committed to social and environmental sustainability.” (Disclosure: I’m an unpaid advisor to Positive Luxury, the company behind the mark.) The Butterfly Mark will soon appear on Krug’s Champagne. Krug also uses a fun, innovative tracking system to share information with consumers. Every bottle has a unique six-digit number, which you can input on its website to get that bottle’s story. Supply Chain Partnerships Maggie Henriquez, CEO of Krug Champagne, says that its focus on environmental and social impacts, and the story the company tells about it, stems from looking inward at its own history. Like many luxury brands, Krug was struggling after the 2008 financial crisis. Henriquez says there was a deeper problem than just economic conditions: It had lost its connection to the founder’s 19th-century ideals about craftsmanship, humility, and quality. A critical part of going back to its roots, Henriquez says, required connecting in a deeper way to growers. The quality of the crops, and the care of the growers, are key to the success of the business. Henriquez started a program to work with growers on sustainability and quality, going plot by plot to review harvest times and implement modern best practices. Together they reduce waste and agricultural inputs (such as fertilizer and water) to get better yields, which reduces the overall footprint. Some of LVMH’s other businesses, such as jewelry brand Bulgari, have also implemented supply chain tracing programs for critical inputs with potentially troubled histories (like some metals and diamonds). In one sense, none of this is surprising or cutting edge. Most large companies with agricultural supply chains, like Kellogg and General Mills, have developed elaborate, robust supplier programs to improve yields and cut water use and greenhouse gas emissions. And on the jewelry side, companies like Tiffany employ extensive tracking programs to avoid conflict minerals and blood diamonds. But LVMH does some unusual things. Henriquez decided that growers were so important to the Krug story that she wanted them engaged in a deeper way. Hernandez, growers, and the winemaking team enjoy product tastings together, allowing growers to enjoy the end results of their work and their crops. It sounds so simple, but Henriquez says, “It’s not normal in our business, and it’s such a moment of connection.” The Challenges The sustainability and operating execs at LVMH talk openly about some of the challenges they face. As usual, short-term pressures on financial performance are a concern, and change takes time. Environmental exec Sylvie Benard comments that changing behavior can take a few years, and you have to keep hammering home the message and “find the right moment” to act. However, it’s a bit easier for the brand CEOs to stay focused on the long term when some of the maisons are three centuries old. They have to plant trees today, for example, to have the right wood for casks 150 years from now. As Gibb puts it, “If you’re not thinking about the brand over a 10-year period, you’re not doing your job.” Perhaps the biggest hurdle is more existential: Can luxury goods ever be sustainable? On one level, probably not, since these products almost by definition are not an inherent human need. But while it would be easy for sustainability people to assert that “none of these products should exist,” that’s more than just unrealistic — it’s probably counterproductive. Everyone has different definitions of what makes for a thriving life; for many, it can easily include some wants, or things that provide fun and beauty. The challenge, then, is to make sure sustainability and beauty are inseparable. LVMH is on the right track, talking about sustainability as core to excellence, quality, and brand image — and central to how the company operates. As Sylvie Benard says, when “the marketing director, financial director, logistics director, and so on take the environment into account when making a decision, then life will be beautiful.”

10 января, 23:11

Medical Malpractice And The Mind-Blowing Hypocrisy Of Obamacare Repeal

A few years ago, General Mills tricked its customers into forfeiting their legal rights to go to court if, for example, a child were poisoned by a tainted bowl of cereal. The public outcry was immediate. "How can they do that? "Why would they do that?" "What are they hiding?" Within days, the company made a smart business decision and reversed itself, restoring everyone's rights again. Most people will never file a lawsuit in their life. But as the public's reaction to this incident showed, it is a bad mistake to underestimate just how strongly Americans feel about having that right - should they ever need it. It may not surprise anyone that a big corporation like General Mills would try to pull a fast one like that. But what should shock everyone is that some elected officials - including ones just sent to Washington to "fix things" - are pursuing policies that are far more drastic. Take some of our new national leaders, who have promised to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. One of those people is Rep. Tom Price (R-GA), picked to be the new Secretary of Health and Human Services. As the New York Times wrote upon his selection, "In debate on the Affordable Care Act in 2009, Mr. Price railed against "a stifling and oppressive federal government," a theme that pervades his politics. His most frequent objection to the law is that it interferes with the ability of patients and doctors to make medical decisions -- a concern he will surely take with him if he wins Senate confirmation." While ACA repeal/replace plans currently remain "a vague list of not-always-coherent ideas" (as Dean Clancy, former senior budget official in the George W. Bush administration, recently wrote), they all share one big idea. Each ACA replacement bill would deprive every patient in America of legal rights guaranteed by their state and local governments. Under these plans, anti-patient federal law would kick in if a doctor, hospital or nursing home negligently harmed or killed someone. The bills vary as to how Congress would rewrite state laws to rob these patients of their rights. One common feature, advocated by Mr. Price (H.R. 2300 in the last Congress), would empower the federal government to select and issue "one size fits all" guidelines for the treatment of every patient. You read that right. The "stifling and oppressive federal government" would become the sole authority for how to treat every medical condition. Doctors would be pressured to use a guideline even if, based on their clinical judgment, it is wrong for the patient. And then, if the patient is seriously harmed, the patient would have little or no recourse. Medical industry tribunals or panels would get to decide disputes without meaningful input from patients. Families wanting to have their case heard in court would face nearly impossible obstacles. Other common provisions in ACA replacement proposals include severe "caps" on compensation for patients injured by negligent hospitals or physicians. Laws that impose caps essentially allow politicians, who have never heard a word about a case or have any idea about the depth of someone's loss, to substitute their judgment for that of a local jury. "How can they do that?" "Why would they do that?" "What are they hiding?" Well, they think they can do it because, while professing to care about the U.S. Constitution, they really don't. At least not all of it. For example, these laws would undermine the 7th Amendment, which preserves the right to civil jury trial. U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice William Rehnquist once wrote about this right, noting, "[T]hose who oppose the use of juries in civil trials seem to ignore [that] the founders of our Nation considered the right of trial by jury in civil cases an important bulwark against tyranny and corruption, a safeguard too precious to be left to the whim of the sovereign, or, it might be added, to that of the judiciary." (I guess tyranny, corruption and the "whim of the sovereign" are all the rage again.) Why are they doing it? Dean Clancy explains, "This is one of the half-baked ideas, and unconstitutional to boot (Congress has no authority to regulate local civil justice rules). But that won't stop Republicans from pushing it, because they firmly believe damage caps reduce health care costs and thus generate budget savings." Indeed, check out Rep. Darrell Issa (R-CA)'s recent TV appearance. This whole discussion stems from an outdated Congressional Budget Office report, now almost a decade old, suggesting that an extreme set of tort limits would lower health care costs exactly $54 billion between 2010 and 2019. That's $11 billion a year, or just 0.5 percent of health care costs. I personally met with CBO about their numbers because, low as they were, they still seemed quite exaggerated. I was shocked both by wrong assumptions CBO made and by troubling facts to which they seemed indifferent (such as studies showing that more people would die). But they assured me that they were open to learning about any new studies showing their estimate to be off. Turns out, they weren't. Since that time, study after study has shown CBO to be completely wrong, and that limiting patients' legal rights would actually increase health care costs. Dean Clancy's article describes some of these studies, too. This Kaiser Health News/Washington Post piece talks about the views of other experts. And our 2016 studies, which examine insurance industry's own data, found that state limits on patients' legal rights have no impact whatsoever on insurance rates for doctors, and that in any event, medical malpractice premiums and claims per doctor are now the lowest level in four decades. Where exactly is the crisis? And what are they hiding? Maybe that fact that they have no idea what they're doing. Or maybe they don't want to address an actual medical malpractice crisis - that medical errors are now the third leading cause of death in America. Taking way patients' rights and reducing the accountability of bad doctors and negligent hospitals seems like the last thing policymakers should be doing. Of all the reasons voters may have sent these new politicians to Washington, eliminating constitutional rights, which have been around since our nation's founding, isn't one of them. Clearly, our newly elected leaders haven't yet suffered the wrath of the people on this point. You saw what happened by when the House tried to abolish its ethics office. Wait until the public hears about this. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

10 января, 18:00

More Than 600 Companies Urge Trump Not To Renege On Climate

More than 600 businesses are demanding that President-elect Donald Trump’s administration uphold U.S. commitments to low-carbon policies and the Paris Climate Agreement.  Over 630 companies signed a letter released Tuesday urging Trump, members of Congress and outgoing President Barack Obama to continue low-carbon policies, increase investments in renewable energy and keep commitments to the Paris Climate Agreement ― which Trump has threatened to quit. The U.S. ratified the accord last year.   The companies, which range from large corporations to family-owned businesses, wrote:  We, the undersigned members in the business and investor community of the United States, re-affirm our deep commitment to addressing climate change through the implementation of the historic Paris Climate Agreement. We want the US economy to be energy efficient and powered by low-carbon energy. Cost-effective and innovative solutions can help us achieve these objectives. Failure to build a low-carbon economy puts American prosperity at risk. But the right action now will create jobs and boost US competitiveness. We pledge to do our part, in our own operations and beyond, to realize the Paris Agreement’s commitment of a global economy that limits global temperature rise to well below 2 degrees Celsius. The companies that signed the letter together have more than $1 trillion in annual sales and nearly 2 million employees, organizers said.   IKEA’s North American division, one of the signatories, emphasized the importance of businesses banding together against climate change.  “All parts of society have a role to play in tackling climate change, but policy and business leadership is crucial,” IKEA spokeswoman Mona Astra Liss told The Huffington Post. “The Paris Agreement was a bold step towards a cleaner, brighter future, and must be protected. IKEA will continue to work together with other businesses and policymakers to build a low-carbon economy, because we know that together, we can build a better future.” The signatories include those known for environmental activism, such as outdoor gear retailer Patagonia, paper and cleaning supplier Seventh Generation, and disposable products retailer Eco-Products. They also include California utilities provider Pacific Gas and Electric, and solar energy companies Sungevity and SolarCity.  Other large companies that signed the letter include DuPont, General Mills, HP, Johnson & Johnson, VF Corp. and Unilever. Trump’s cabinet appointees generally oppose the type of environmental progress outlined in the letter. His picks include Exxon Mobil CEO Rex Tillerson, whose company is under investigation for climate denial, as secretary of state; Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt to lead the Environmental Protection Agency, which he is suing to stop power plant regulations; former Texas Gov. Rick Perry to lead the Department of Energy, which he once pledged to eliminate; and Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions to lead the Department of Justice. All four of those Trump cabinet picks have either downplayed the effects of climate change or denied its existence.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

10 января, 18:00

More Than 600 Companies Urge Trump Not To Renege On Climate

More than 600 businesses are demanding that President-elect Donald Trump’s administration uphold U.S. commitments to low-carbon policies and the Paris Climate Agreement.  Over 630 companies signed a letter released Tuesday urging Trump, members of Congress and outgoing President Barack Obama to continue low-carbon policies, increase investments in renewable energy and keep commitments to the Paris Climate Agreement ― which Trump has threatened to quit. The U.S. ratified the accord last year.   The companies, which range from large corporations to family-owned businesses, wrote:  We, the undersigned members in the business and investor community of the United States, re-affirm our deep commitment to addressing climate change through the implementation of the historic Paris Climate Agreement. We want the US economy to be energy efficient and powered by low-carbon energy. Cost-effective and innovative solutions can help us achieve these objectives. Failure to build a low-carbon economy puts American prosperity at risk. But the right action now will create jobs and boost US competitiveness. We pledge to do our part, in our own operations and beyond, to realize the Paris Agreement’s commitment of a global economy that limits global temperature rise to well below 2 degrees Celsius. The companies that signed the letter together have more than $1 trillion in annual sales and nearly 2 million employees, organizers said.   IKEA’s North American division, one of the signatories, emphasized the importance of businesses banding together against climate change.  “All parts of society have a role to play in tackling climate change, but policy and business leadership is crucial,” IKEA spokeswoman Mona Astra Liss told The Huffington Post. “The Paris Agreement was a bold step towards a cleaner, brighter future, and must be protected. IKEA will continue to work together with other businesses and policymakers to build a low-carbon economy, because we know that together, we can build a better future.” The signatories include those known for environmental activism, such as outdoor gear retailer Patagonia, paper and cleaning supplier Seventh Generation, and disposable products retailer Eco-Products. They also include California utilities provider Pacific Gas and Electric, and solar energy companies Sungevity and SolarCity.  Other large companies that signed the letter include DuPont, General Mills, HP, Johnson & Johnson, VF Corp. and Unilever. Trump’s cabinet appointees generally oppose the type of environmental progress outlined in the letter. His picks include Exxon Mobil CEO Rex Tillerson, whose company is under investigation for climate denial, as secretary of state; Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt to lead the Environmental Protection Agency, which he is suing to stop power plant regulations; former Texas Gov. Rick Perry to lead the Department of Energy, which he once pledged to eliminate; and Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions to lead the Department of Justice. All four of those Trump cabinet picks have either downplayed the effects of climate change or denied its existence.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

05 января, 17:30

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Comcast, Amgen, General Mills, Target and Ford

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Comcast, Amgen, General Mills, Target and Ford

04 января, 20:20

Stock Research Reports for Comcast, Amgen & General Mills

Stock Research Reports for Comcast, Amgen & General Mills

28 декабря 2016, 02:24

Cinnabon Decided To Use Carrie Fisher’s Death To Hawk Its Cinnamon Rolls

A tweeted tribute to Carrie Fisher by the Cinnabon chain is leaving a bad taste in the mouths of some “Star Wars” fans. The tweet, which has since been deleted, read, “RIP Carrie Fisher, you’ll always have the best buns in the galaxy.” The accompanying photo showed a portrait of Princess Leia done in cinnamon and sugar with the company’s cinnamon buns in place of the character’s trademark hairstyle. Fisher herself had dubbed the look “cinnamon buns,” but that didn’t make the day of the actress’ death a good time to bring it up. In fact, considering that no good ever comes of using a celebrity’s death to promote a product, the reaction from Twitter users was unsurprisingly quick and harsh. off, you must log @Cinnabon pic.twitter.com/gJxpGBtscs— Adrian Crawford (@Crawf33) December 27, 2016 @Cinnabon wtf pic.twitter.com/jQ1nQQ4Ror— Victoria (@nicholaswlde) December 27, 2016 .@Cinnabon pic.twitter.com/KJUjhRD0PJ— Jamie (@jlew8) December 27, 2016 @Cinnabon pic.twitter.com/cwCFFPIdld— Philip Lewis (@Phil_Lewis_) December 27, 2016 I bet that social media intern at Cinnabon feels pretty good about him/herself right about now— Slegr (@slegrbombs71) December 27, 2016 You could say that tweet got Cinnabon into a…sticky situation pic.twitter.com/a9hBvDMKbW— David Rudin (@DavidSRudin) December 27, 2016 *Cinnabon HQ upon hearing the news of Carrie Fisher's heart attack*"GET STARTED ON THE PRINCESS LEIA CINNABON MURAL... PRONTO!" https://t.co/ChlCoi8eDh— Dick Prescock (@DadSelfie) December 27, 2016 .@cinnabon what the hell pic.twitter.com/uhgDPg2Agc— dan mentos (@DanMentos) December 27, 2016 rip @Cinnabon social media intern, you were too beautiful to live pic.twitter.com/1xz9ZzSknF— Ian Miller (@teen_archer) December 27, 2016 Cinnabon has not responded to The Huffington Post about the now-deleted tweet, but posted an apology a few hours later. Our deleted tweet was genuinely meant as a tribute, but we shouldn't have posted it. We are truly sorry.— Cinnabon (@Cinnabon) December 28, 2016 The brewing storm is similar to the one that blew up in General Mills’ corporate face after Prince died in April. The cereal company put out a tweet featuring the words “Rest in Peace” against a purple backdrop. In place of the dot over the “i” was a single Cheerio.  New York-based crisis management expert Jessa Moore told HuffPost at the time that there is really no good way for a corporate brand to honor a celebrity’s death. “It’s insensitive,” Moore said. “It’s like they’re saying, ‘We’re going to capitalize on [a celebrity] death so we show up in a search algorithm.’” UPDATE: This version of the story has been updated to include Cinnabon’s apology tweet. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

21 декабря 2016, 22:41

13 Biggest Brand Mascot Stories of 2016

By Heather Taylor 2016 was a definitive year for brand mascots doing very big things. From debuting in Rio de Janeiro to driving a NUTmobile cross country, these icons launched major comebacks, hit the election campaign trail, and even dropped mixtapes. It’s a brand mascot’s world and we’re just living in it. Here’s a refresher on our favorite stories from 2016 starring these familiar faces (with a couple of fresh ones in between!). Comebacks Thumping his way into 2016 bigger, better, and bunnier than ever before is everyone’s favorite pink hare, the Energizer Bunny. With a reloaded comeback courtesy of San Francisco ad agency Camp + King, the 27-year-old mascot has a new tagline (Still Going™) and multimedia campaign where today’s media landscape serves as a playground for his disruptive nature. He’s got his own Spotify playlist and rocked the runway at New York Fashion Week at designer Angela Simmons’ fashion show. He even shared what he looks like without his infamous sunglasses! All across the United States, reports of sightings of another brand mascot keep popping up. Witnesses have revealed that he’s tall, covered in leaves, and wearing a green toga. Why, it’s none other than the Green Giant! #TheGiantAwakens teaser, created by Deutsch New York, shares shadowy glimpses of the big guy’s return to the Valley with the promise that he has big things in store. Debuts As the original Most Interesting Man in the World departed for a mission to Mars, his new counterpart made his debut for Dos Equis. Created by the team at Havas Worldwide New York and played by French actor Augustin Legrand, the latest Most Interesting Man in the World is just as adventurous as his predecessor. His tagline has been modified to “Stay thirsty, mis amigos,” he’s joined by an audacious female companion, and his legendary status includes sparring in Samurai armor and racing airboats down sand dunes. It’s never easy for a spokescharacter to retire, but Norm Shearer, CCO and partner at Cactus, thinks the transition was exceptionally done, “When Dos Equis had to replace the retiring actor, the core idea was so strong (and the agency handled the transition so well as part of the narrative) that switching the actor out took a great mascot and great idea and refreshed it." How about some fried chicken to go with your beer? 2016 saw the debut of many, many new Colonels for KFC with actors including Mad Men’s Vincent Kartheiser and comedian Rob Riggle getting into character. Chris Walker, Creative Director at HZDG, is a big fan of the ever-rotating faces for the chicken ‘n biscuits chain. “This is a great way to ‘freshen’ up a mascot that's been around for a long time. Each new KFC campaign stands out even more because it has a different actor playing the part, like George Hamilton as the Extra Crispy Colonel Sanders.” Major Events + Awards As the world spent the summer glued to the Rio 2016 Olympics, they also met Vinicius and Tom, the official mascots for the Olympic and Paralympic games. A pair “born out of excitement” for the sporting event, the two were instantly beloved by audiences universally. But the Olympic mascot fun isn’t over yet! Kelsey Nelson, Director of Social Influence at Ferebee Lane + Co., loved the under-the-radar announcement of Soohorang and Bandabi, mascots for the PyeongChang 2018 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games. Speaking of gold medals and awards, this year we celebrated our 13th Annual Madison Avenue Walk of Fame. More than 60,000 voted online and the results are in: the winning mascots are the FOX Robot and Woodsy Owl! Political Campaigns Election season dominated 2016 media coverage with one candidate running for office with an alTUNAtive political platform: StarKist’s Charlie® the Tuna. Throwing his red hat into the ring, Charlie joined us for a fireside chat where we discussed his “pro-good taste” stance and ambitions for making mundane meals full of flavor and fun. What has Charlie been up to since his campaign ended? Andy Mecs, Director of Marketing and Innovation at StarKist and Charlie’s campaign manager, has the scoop. “Charlie brought levity and fun to the election. He engaged his beloved fans to select his VP swimming-mate, Sallie the Salmon, and his fans were behind him 100 percent throughout the entire presidential race. Although he didn’t win the election, Charlie accepted an even bigger job as President of Charlie's® World — a 360-degree digital oasis filled with videos, activities for kids, recipes and more!” Birthdays + Anniversaries General Mills kicked off 2016 turning 150-years-old, as the home to icons like the Pillsbury Doughboy, Betty Crocker, and Green Giant. Shortly afterward, another icon hit a major milestone: Mr. Peanut’s 100th birthday. For Jeff Siegel, VP and Creative Director at CP+B Miami, Mr. Peanut turning 100 is hands-down the best brand mascot story of the year. “Not just because he’s been single-handedly keeping the monocle alive for decades, but because he was invented by a 14-year-old, proving you don’t need a fully formed brain to make great advertising.” The dapper gent was honored with festive events held throughout the year including travelling across the country in a 27-foot-long NUTmobile with his Peanutter pals, an appearance on Good Morning America, and a birthday party sweepstakes for fans. As Mr. Peanut enters his 101st year, the Planters team shares that he will continue to share Planters’ nut varieties with consumers everywhere, all while touting the irresistibility of his favorite snack.  There ain’t no party like an M&M’S 75th anniversary party! Amanda Kloos, Associate Creative Director at HZDG, loved seeing the whole squad’s commercial spots represented in the “Candyman” remix by Zedd and Aloe Blacc. “M&M’S 75th anniversary spot, which featured past and present M&M’S mascots, was one of my favorites of the year. Great way to celebrate a candy brand that has been one of America's (and one of mine!) favorites for generations.”   In Memoriam In April 2016, actor Arthur Anderson passed away at 93. He provided the vocal talent for Lucky the Leprechaun at Lucky Charms, spanning the generations from 1963 to 1992. In 2005, he told ABC News that he always thought Lucky was a fun character to play. “Hardly a day goes by when somebody doesn’t ask me to sing the Lucky Charms jingle, and I’m proud of that.” Jingle Notes It’s time for a remix, Mr. Clean! This year, Leo Burnett Toronto remixed Mr. Clean’s jingle for a millennial audience. The newly revamped ditty features electric and acoustic guitars mixed in with its familiar chorus. Finally, we leave you with some fire tracks courtesy of Hamburger Helper’s Lefty. In April, he quietly dropped the mixtape “Watch the Stove” on Soundcloud. The mix became an overnight sensation online and proved to fans that this oven mitt knows when it’s lit on and off the stove. (And ICYMI, Lefty even gave us a little insight into his creative process and dream collab too.) -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

21 декабря 2016, 18:10

Company News for December 21, 2016

CNAT,GIS,BBRY,FRED

21 декабря 2016, 01:15

5 Reasons 2016 Was A Great Year For Women. No, Really.

Sadly, for many women I’ve spoken to, it feels like the lesson of 2016 is that the glass ceiling is lower than we all thought. That lesson may or may not hold true in the political realm. But I’ve spent the year paying close attention to the issue of gender diversity in the corporate sector, and I’d argue that 2016 was actually a great year for gender equality in Corporate America. The groundwork has been laid for even more good progress in 2017, and I’m optimistic that the private sector can set a new standard through which greater gender equality will come to women in our country, and even maybe one day to the government itself.Here are five highlights of the year in corporate gender diversity that I hope will not be forgotten or obscured by the political climate:1) Mary BarraThe coolest, most ambitious, most dynamic CEO of a public company these days is a woman: Mary Barra, CEO of General Motors. Barra is an engineer by training who has driven GM to record profits, and is working to rebuild a decades-old corporate culture to compete with Silicon Valley innovation. 2016 marked her most ambitious year yet ― with her announcement of a major investment in ride-sharing app Lyft. Since Barra never stops, this working mother also makes time to advocate for STEM education for young girls. No wonder, Fortune Magazine labeled her its Most Powerful Woman 2016 for the second year running.Barra is living proof that a woman can successfully take the helm of a hard-core industrial manufacturing company - and do so gracefully, impressively and without scandal or fanfare. Although women still hold only only 23 of the 500 CEO roles in the S&P 500 (4.6%), Barra’s high profile position should easy the way for more women to take on the top role.2) The Parental Leave Arms RaceMaternity and/or parental leave is a clear-cut area in which the actions of Corporate America far outshine those of the U.S. Government in terms of support for working women and families. The U.S. continues to rank dead last among developed countries in terms of paid maternity leave, yet more and more companies are improving their leave policies to go well beyond the bare bones protection of FMLA.Following up on a trend that began in 2015, companies from all different sectors announced enhanced parental leave policies in 2016 that take into account the needs of working mothers, fathers and the changing constitution and dynamic of the American family. Some of the highlights: Fidelity announced it would provide 26 weeks to any employee when they become a parent ― regardless of gender or family circumstance Similarly, American Express and Twitter each announced 20 weeks for women or men who become parents, and Bank of America and EY offer 16. And just this month, Ikea placed a strong stake in the ground by offering 16 weeks paid leave to all new parents ― even hourly employees. Note: since this competition is one we at Fairygodboss can really get behind, we’ve created a scorecard. Check back with us to see who is leading the way in this happy fight.While parental leave is only one of many components that leads to greater gender equality in the workplace, these companies’ support and generosity around this issue sets a new bar for other companies and elevates the discussion in a resounding way.3) Flexibility is so 2016Data collected by Fairygodboss shows that, after compensation, flexibility is the most important factor for women in selecting a job. Flexibility is highly important not only to women with families, but to women without families as well. As noted by McKinsey in their report this year about Millennials in the workplace, flexibility is a core expectation of that younger demographic. Fortunately, companies like GE, Google and American Express are re-thinking expectations of the 9-5 (or 9-7) at work workday. Dell aims to have 50% of its workforce on flexible schedules by 2020. Tech companies including Dropbox and Square have implemented unlimited PTO policies that allow all employees to have greater control of their schedules. Dallas-based professional services company Ryan LLC has been praised for its progressive policy that focuses entirely on billable - rather than in-office - hours. The competition for top talent - particularly people with technical skills - is high. In order to compete, companies everywhere will have to think about ways to offer greater flexibility -- and it’s likely they’ll see commensurate benefits in terms of increased productivity and satisfaction among employees.4) Loud VoicesWorkplace gender diversity may best be accomplished by the companies that plant stakes in the ground, experiment, and boldly share their vision and accomplishments. For example, this year three major companies - HP, Verizon and General Mills - took the initiative to make public announcements that they would demand greater gender diversity from their advertising agencies or take their business elsewhere. With more and more stakeholders loudly and publicly insisting on diversity from suppliers, gender diversity goes from hazy vision to concrete priority.Rose Macario, CEO of Patagonia, published a detailed analysis of the cost - and benefits - of its progressive on-site day care. Childcare costs more than college in most US states, and is another area in which the US lags many other developed countries. Should other companies follow Macario’s well-argued approach to on-site daycare, this could become a similar arena for competition in the private sector that leads to action in the public. Again, General Motors led the way this year by announcing that its board became the first major industrial corporation with a 50/50 gender split on its board. Board diversity has been a hot topic for many years, but the more companies that truly achieve it, the higher the expectation becomes for those that don’t. Last month, Microsoft announced it would tie executive bonuses to company diversity -- honing in on the manager-level behavior that is so critical to effect in order to make real change.And it would be hard to recap the year in corporate gender diversity without mentioning Marc Benioff’s compensation audit at Salesforce. As a CEO, he heeded concerns from his top lieutenants, and invested $3 million to correct discrepancies he found in compensation. Equal pay is clearly a top issue for women, and many employers insist that it is simply too difficult to determine inequity when employees have different roles, levels of experience, education, etc. Salesforce’s initiative dispels that assumption and offers a roadmap to companies who are interested or willing to participate in a similar assessment.5) Public Diversity MetricsTransparency and goal-setting are clearly some of the most expedient paths to real change. Over the past few years, several Silicon Valley companies have boldly announced diversity targets. Just this week, Pinterest followed up on their 2015 goal to increase diversity - both ethnic and gender - within its engineering ranks. And although it fell short of its diversity target, the sheer willingness to focus on this priority and be transparent about it is essential to the advancement of gender diversity in the workplace. Accenture became the first major consulting company to follow the tech sector by publishing its U.S. workplace demographics and pledging to make diversity a top priority.With all of this investment and innovation, I’m excited to see what’s ahead in 2017. I’m a firm believer that the private sector is best positioned to lead the way on gender diversity. I’m already excited to write an even more rose-colored recap of the year next December. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

21 декабря 2016, 01:15

5 Reasons 2016 Was A Great Year For Women. No, Really.

Sadly, for many women I’ve spoken to, it feels like the lesson of 2016 is that the glass ceiling is lower than we all thought. That lesson may or may not hold true in the political realm. But I’ve spent the year paying close attention to the issue of gender diversity in the corporate sector, and I’d argue that 2016 was actually a great year for gender equality in Corporate America. The groundwork has been laid for even more good progress in 2017, and I’m optimistic that the private sector can set a new standard through which greater gender equality will come to women in our country, and even maybe one day to the government itself.Here are five highlights of the year in corporate gender diversity that I hope will not be forgotten or obscured by the political climate:1) Mary BarraThe coolest, most ambitious, most dynamic CEO of a public company these days is a woman: Mary Barra, CEO of General Motors. Barra is an engineer by training who has driven GM to record profits, and is working to rebuild a decades-old corporate culture to compete with Silicon Valley innovation. 2016 marked her most ambitious year yet ― with her announcement of a major investment in ride-sharing app Lyft. Since Barra never stops, this working mother also makes time to advocate for STEM education for young girls. No wonder, Fortune Magazine labeled her its Most Powerful Woman 2016 for the second year running.Barra is living proof that a woman can successfully take the helm of a hard-core industrial manufacturing company - and do so gracefully, impressively and without scandal or fanfare. Although women still hold only only 23 of the 500 CEO roles in the S&P 500 (4.6%), Barra’s high profile position should easy the way for more women to take on the top role.2) The Parental Leave Arms RaceMaternity and/or parental leave is a clear-cut area in which the actions of Corporate America far outshine those of the U.S. Government in terms of support for working women and families. The U.S. continues to rank dead last among developed countries in terms of paid maternity leave, yet more and more companies are improving their leave policies to go well beyond the bare bones protection of FMLA.Following up on a trend that began in 2015, companies from all different sectors announced enhanced parental leave policies in 2016 that take into account the needs of working mothers, fathers and the changing constitution and dynamic of the American family. Some of the highlights: Fidelity announced it would provide 26 weeks to any employee when they become a parent ― regardless of gender or family circumstance Similarly, American Express and Twitter each announced 20 weeks for women or men who become parents, and Bank of America and EY offer 16. And just this month, Ikea placed a strong stake in the ground by offering 16 weeks paid leave to all new parents ― even hourly employees. Note: since this competition is one we at Fairygodboss can really get behind, we’ve created a scorecard. Check back with us to see who is leading the way in this happy fight.While parental leave is only one of many components that leads to greater gender equality in the workplace, these companies’ support and generosity around this issue sets a new bar for other companies and elevates the discussion in a resounding way.3) Flexibility is so 2016Data collected by Fairygodboss shows that, after compensation, flexibility is the most important factor for women in selecting a job. Flexibility is highly important not only to women with families, but to women without families as well. As noted by McKinsey in their report this year about Millennials in the workplace, flexibility is a core expectation of that younger demographic. Fortunately, companies like GE, Google and American Express are re-thinking expectations of the 9-5 (or 9-7) at work workday. Dell aims to have 50% of its workforce on flexible schedules by 2020. Tech companies including Dropbox and Square have implemented unlimited PTO policies that allow all employees to have greater control of their schedules. Dallas-based professional services company Ryan LLC has been praised for its progressive policy that focuses entirely on billable - rather than in-office - hours. The competition for top talent - particularly people with technical skills - is high. In order to compete, companies everywhere will have to think about ways to offer greater flexibility -- and it’s likely they’ll see commensurate benefits in terms of increased productivity and satisfaction among employees.4) Loud VoicesWorkplace gender diversity may best be accomplished by the companies that plant stakes in the ground, experiment, and boldly share their vision and accomplishments. For example, this year three major companies - HP, Verizon and General Mills - took the initiative to make public announcements that they would demand greater gender diversity from their advertising agencies or take their business elsewhere. With more and more stakeholders loudly and publicly insisting on diversity from suppliers, gender diversity goes from hazy vision to concrete priority.Rose Macario, CEO of Patagonia, published a detailed analysis of the cost - and benefits - of its progressive on-site day care. Childcare costs more than college in most US states, and is another area in which the US lags many other developed countries. Should other companies follow Macario’s well-argued approach to on-site daycare, this could become a similar arena for competition in the private sector that leads to action in the public. Again, General Motors led the way this year by announcing that its board became the first major industrial corporation with a 50/50 gender split on its board. Board diversity has been a hot topic for many years, but the more companies that truly achieve it, the higher the expectation becomes for those that don’t. Last month, Microsoft announced it would tie executive bonuses to company diversity -- honing in on the manager-level behavior that is so critical to effect in order to make real change.And it would be hard to recap the year in corporate gender diversity without mentioning Marc Benioff’s compensation audit at Salesforce. As a CEO, he heeded concerns from his top lieutenants, and invested $3 million to correct discrepancies he found in compensation. Equal pay is clearly a top issue for women, and many employers insist that it is simply too difficult to determine inequity when employees have different roles, levels of experience, education, etc. Salesforce’s initiative dispels that assumption and offers a roadmap to companies who are interested or willing to participate in a similar assessment.5) Public Diversity MetricsTransparency and goal-setting are clearly some of the most expedient paths to real change. Over the past few years, several Silicon Valley companies have boldly announced diversity targets. Just this week, Pinterest followed up on their 2015 goal to increase diversity - both ethnic and gender - within its engineering ranks. And although it fell short of its diversity target, the sheer willingness to focus on this priority and be transparent about it is essential to the advancement of gender diversity in the workplace. Accenture became the first major consulting company to follow the tech sector by publishing its U.S. workplace demographics and pledging to make diversity a top priority.With all of this investment and innovation, I’m excited to see what’s ahead in 2017. I’m a firm believer that the private sector is best positioned to lead the way on gender diversity. I’m already excited to write an even more rose-colored recap of the year next December. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Выбор редакции
21 декабря 2016, 00:00

Why Yogurt Is Giving General Mills A Sour Taste In Its Mouth

Why Yogurt Is Giving General Mills A Sour Taste In Its Mouth General Mills posted lower than expected Q2 earnings results Tuesday -- partly due to continued declines in Yoplait yogurt sales. Q2 revenue was $4.1 billion, down 7% from last year;

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20 декабря 2016, 20:49

Why Yogurt Is Giving General Mills A Sour Taste In Its Mouth

General Mills has a case of yogurt-induced indigestion: The company reported lower than expected second quarter earnings results Tuesday -- in part because of continued declines from its line of Yoplait yogurts.

20 декабря 2016, 19:00

General Mills (GIS) Misses Q2 Earnings, Updates View

General Mills, Inc. (GIS) reported second-quarter fiscal 2017 adjusted earnings per share of 85 cents that missed the Zacks Consensus Estimate of 88 cents by 3.4%.

20 декабря 2016, 18:49

All Eye On Earnings

All Eye On Earnings

20 декабря 2016, 18:07

Escape to Earnings Island

We find ourselves on an island of important companies reporting earnings independent of the large group of S&P 500 firms.

Выбор редакции
20 декабря 2016, 17:21

Квартальная прибыль General Mills не дотянула до прогнозов аналитиков

Американская компания General Mills, являющаяся производителем хлопьев Cheerios, супа Progresso и других полуфабрикатов, отчиталась о не дотянувших до среднерыночных прогнозов квартальных финансовых результатах. Так, за три месяца с окончанием 27 ноября чистая прибыль компании упала с $529,5 млн или 87 центов на акцию годом ранее до $481,8 млн или 80 центов на акцию. Без учета некоторых статей прибыль составила 85 центов на одну бумагу при средних прогнозах аналитиков на уровне 86 центов на бумагу. Выручка за рассматриваемый период уменьшилась на 7% до $4,11 млрд, в то время как аналитики в среднем ожидали $4,22 млрд. Компания также ухудшила прогноз по продажам за 2017 г., заявив, что ожидает снижения показателя на 3-4% по сравнению с ранее прогнозировавшимся сокращением на 2%.

20 декабря 2016, 17:00

9 Sustainable Business Stories That Shaped 2016

In 2015, the world pivoted in a historic way toward sustainability. Debates about climate change melted away. Every country committed to action in the form of the Paris Agreement. Even the Pope spoke to the issue, reminding us that we’re all connected. It was a productive 12 months, to say the least. Then came 2016. Every year, I find big themes or specific company stories that I feel are impressive, important, or indicative of where the world is going. In 2016, two dwarf the rest: the election of Donald Trump and significant action on climate change. The context for sustainable business in 2017 may center on the competition between these two stories; that is, how will Trump and his team impact or impede progress on climate and other sustainability issues? So let’s focus on these two first, and then run quickly through seven other interesting stories. 1. Trump Shocked the World It’s not yet clear what Trump’s election means for issues that impact companies’ efforts to manage environmental and social issues. Climate change, building a clean economy, reducing inequality and raising wages, providing health care to support general wellbeing — all are big unknowns now. The early signs from the Trump team are not promising, in my view. He wants to appoint as head of the EPA a man who denies climate change and led legal battles against the EPA. His pick for Labor Secretary is staunchly opposed to covering overtime pay or increasing minimum wages (something many leading companies have been doing on their own since 2014. His choice for Secretary of State is the CEO of ExxonMobil, a company that has, for decades, attacked climate science when it knew better. A leaked memo from the Trump transition team shows an intention to move away from the Paris agreement and almost all climate and clean economy action. In response to Trump’s election and his statements doubting climate change, many countries that signed the Paris climate accords in 2015 made it clear they would power on (China in particular — see story number three, below). Former French president Nicolas Sarkozy even proposed taxing U.S. goods if the country pulled out the Paris agreement. And throwing his weight in, former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg publicly declared that cities would fight on, with or without Trump. Finally, hundreds of companies signed the latest declaration from Ceres showing their support for Paris. This is all promising. For this and many other reasons, the sustainability journey in business will continue. But given Trump’s likely stance, any global progress on climate will happen in spite of headwinds from the U.S. federal government. In the U.S., the action will have to move to states, cities, and the private sector. Businesses in particular will need to lead in a way they never have before — and they will. 2. Public and Private Sector Action on Climate Change Increased For most of 2016, the world moved quickly on climate. I’ve already mentioned the historic Paris agreement, but there are more positive steps worth noting. With the support of chemical companies, more than 170 countries also agreed to phase out HFCs, the high global-warming-potential chemicals used in air-conditioners and refrigerators everywhere. The UN also agreed to slash emissions from the airline industry. Norway banned deforestation and both Norway and Germany moved toward banning fossil-fuel-powered cars. This week, Canada announced it would tax carbon nationally by 2018. In the U.S., the Obama administration started to incorporate the “social cost of carbon” in decision-making and the Pentagon made climate change a military priority. President Obama, with his counterparts in Canada and Mexico, agreed to some aggressive regional targets on renewable energy and efficiency. At the state level, New Jersey passed a big new gas tax, and Oregon, Illinois, and California developed robust energy and climate policies. All of this will affect companies of all stripes. Business itself wasn’t quiet on the climate front either. Many invested heavily in renewable energy (see number five on this list), and some big companies dove into policy debates this year. More than 100 companies called for action on the Clean Power Plan (Obama’s big move to reduce power sector emissions), with tech giants Apple, Google, Amazon, and Microsoft even filing a legal brief in support of the policy. Nine big brands with operations in Ohio publicly pressed the state to reinstate energy efficiency and renewable energy portfolio standards. Many previously quiet companies, like food giant General Mills, spoke out about how important it was to their business to tackle climate change. Why all this progress? First, evidence of a radically altered climate system has become crystal clear. After 2015 shattered climate records, 2016 got even hotter and more extreme, creating weather events that brought physical destruction, massive economic costs, and loss of life. Second, the financial world is getting better at evaluating what’s at stake. The World Bank estimates that $158 trillion worth of assets are at risk from increased natural disasters. The London School of Economics tells us trillions of financial assets are also vulnerable. And in the U.S. alone, floods in Louisiana and North Carolina caused $10 to $20 billion in damage.  3. China Stepped Up While many countries accelerated their climate and clean economy work this year, China is a special case. Early in the year, China said it would halt new coal mine approvals, close 1,000 mines, increase wind and solar by 21% in 2016, and even eat less meat to control carbon emissions. But last month the country also indicated coal use would rise until 2020 (albeit at a slower rate than the growth of renewables). So it’s not totally clear where China’s emissions will head. But the country clearly wants to lead the world in the clean economy transition. Speaking from this year’s UN global climate meeting – which happened to coincide with the U.S. election — Chinese ministers sent a message to Trump that climate change is no hoax. Then China’s President Xi said he’ll be attending the annual bigwig gathering in Davos for the first time, with reports of China’s interest in filling trade gaps left by Brexit and possible leadership gaps on climate left by Trump. 4. Renewables Kept Growing and Getting Cheaper Renewables have been trouncing fossil fuels for a few years as the costs of the newer technologies have dropped remarkably fast. The world record for cheapest solar plant was set in Mexico… and then broken within weeks in Dubai with a bid of 2.99 cents per kilowatt-hour. Countries with big investments in renewables are reaping the rewards. For four days in May, Portugal was 100% powered by renewables, and on a single windy day Denmark’s windfarms gave the country 140% of what it needed. The U.S. finally got into offshore wind near Rhode Island. In a subtle tipping point, the total global generating capacity from renewables passed coal this year. As prices dropped, companies noticed, and corporate purchases and commitments to clean energy grew. Walmart set a 50% renewable target for 2025. In the last few weeks, Microsoft and Avery Dennison announced big purchases of clean power, and GM and Google said they’d target 100% renewable energy within a year. A growing number of companies signed the RE100 commitment to go for 100%. And in Nevada, both MGM and Caesars filed papers to stop purchasing power from their utility, NV Energy, because it doesn’t support renewables. New capital is still flowing to the clean tech — Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos, and some other business leaders just announced a $1 billion fund to invest in “next generation energy technologies.” All of this activity convinces me that Trump can’t stop the clean economy.  5. Investors Focused on Climate, Sustainability, and Short-Termism Larry Fink, the CEO of Blackrock — the world’s largest asset owner — followed up his 2015 letter to S&P 500 CEOs with another treatise against short-term focus. He disparaged the “quarterly earnings hysteria” and asked companies to submit long-term strategy plans and address environmental, social, and governance (ESG) issues. BlackRock also issued a “climate change warning,” telling investors to adapt their portfolios to fight global warming. Many banks heeded the advice, pulling funding from coal. The London School of Economics also estimated that climate change could slash trillions from financial asset values. Because of this economic and systemic risk, a high-powered task force from the G20’s Financial Stability Board issued important guidelines for companies to make climate-related disclosures. To help investors evaluate their holdings, Morningstar launched sustainability ratings for 20,000 funds, and 21 stock exchanges introduced sustainability reporting standards. Finally, to educate the next generation of analysts, the CFA exam will now include a focus on ESG issues. 6. Business Defended Employees’ and Customers’ Human Rights Companies are getting more vocal on human rights issues for many reasons. For some, it’s about the commercial opportunity to appeal to a new or growing market of rights-focused consumers. Others want to attract and retain diverse talent. But in general, society is expecting companies to broaden their mission. In one survey, 78% of Americans agreed that “companies should take action to address important issues facing society.” Millennials feel even stronger. A global survey this year showed that 87% of Millennials around the world believe that “the success of business should be measured in terms of more than just its financial performance.” This generation — which will be 50% of the workforce by 2020 — seeks employers that share their values. And so, after a divisive U.S. election, many CEOs felt the need to email employees, restating their commitment to diversity and inclusion. Earlier in the year, when Gov. Pat McCrory of North Carolina passed a bizarre law to control which bathroom transgender people use, many companies spoke up. The CEOs of dozens of big brands — including Alcoa, Apple, Bank of America, Citibank, IBM, Kellogg, Marriott, PwC, and Starbucks — signed an open letter to defend “protections for LGBT people.” Paypal and Deutsche Bank canceled plans to expand and hire in the state, and the NCAA actually relocated some championship events. (In an important side note, after costing the state $600 million in business, the law is widely credited for losing McCrory his reelection bid.)  7. More Evidence Emerged That Economies Can Grow Without Increasing Carbon Emissions So far this century, more than 20 large countries, as well as 33 U.S. states, have “decoupled” GDP growth from GHGs. One energy hog, the IT sector, has managed to level off energy use in data centers. There’s serious talk again about “peak oil” — not of supply, but of demand. We’re seeing a fundamental shift in our relationship with energy for many reasons, including the improving economics of efficiency and clean tech (see #5). But companies are also getting more systematic, strategic, and fun — yes fun — in slashing energy. More organizations are using some old tools like “treasure hunts” and reimagining them as “energy marathons” (26.2 days of innovation). Others are competing to slash energy use — see Hilton and Whole Foods energy teams go head-to-head in a streaming reality show. 8. Levi’s Shared What It Knows about Water Big themes are great, but periodically a specific example of leadership seems worthy of extra attention. In this case, Levi’s had spent a decade identifying great ways to cut water use in the apparel value chain. Realizing that water issues are too big to tackle alone, Levi’s celebrated World Water Day this year by open sourcing its best practices in water management. In essence, the company decided to promote system change and even invited competitors to its innovation lab for the first time in its history. 9. The Circular Economy Inched Closer With a growing population and ever-rising demand for resources, it’s becoming necessary to find ways to eliminate waste and reuse valuable materials endlessly. We’re seeing some interesting innovation in policy and business practice. Sweden is planning to offer tax breaks for fixing things instead of throwing them away, and six EU countries started a four-year project to help small and medium-size enterprises move to circular models. A number of companies also made moves into this space. A supermarket opened in the UK filled with only food that would’ve been thrown out. IKEA is expanding its circular offerings like reselling used furniture and creating new products from leftover textiles. More than 25 companies in Minnesota, including 3M, Aveda, and Target, launched a circular initiative to share expertise. The Ellen MacArthur Foundation and Kering both created curricula in circular thinking for fashion and design students. And finally, the Closed Loop Fund, which invests in recycling infrastructure (using funds from some large retail and CPG brands), reported on substantial progress, including launching single stream recycling across Memphis. What’s in Store for 2017? Given how far off pundits and prognosticators were this year, I have to proceed with caution. Who really knows what a Trump presidency will bring to the U.S. and the world, or what the corporate sustainability agenda will look like with so much uncertainty? I do believe companies will expand their horizons, looking more at systems, not just their operations and value chains. They will increasingly partner to tackle big global targets like the UN’s Sustainable Development goals. Demands for more transparency about how everything is made — from consumers, employees, investors, and other stakeholders — are unlikely to slow down. The food and agriculture sectors in particular will feel even more pressure to cut carbon and food waste and simplify ingredients. And no matter who’s in charge politically, macro trends are hard to stop — a changing climate; increasing challenges around water and other resources; higher expectations of companies; rising concern about inequality and wages; and technological disruption from AI, machine learning, and autonomous everything. These trends will continue and companies will need to adapt — fast.

02 сентября 2014, 04:21

10 компаний контролирующих мировую пищевую индустрию

  В сельском хозяйстве и пищевой промышленности занято более одного миллиарда человек в мире или треть всей рабочей силы. И хоть данный сектор играет ключевую роль в жизни человечества, как это ни парадоксально, его контролируют крайне небольшое число транснациональных компаний. Согласно докладу компании Oxfam International, 10 компаний, специализирующихся на производстве продуктов питания и напитков, могут формировать продуктовую корзину большей части населения планеты, влиять на их условия труда, а также окружающую среду.  Associated British Foods Выручка: $21,1 млрд Расходы на рекламу: неизвестно Прибыль: $837 млн Сотрудники: 112,6 тыс. Штаб-квартира: Лондон, Великобритания  Associated British Foods – это британская компания-производитель продуктов питания, которой удалось выстроить глобальную сеть с помощью приобретений. В результате постоянного прироста за счет покупки новых компаний, Associated British Foods производит практически все виды продовольствия, начиная от сахара, заканчивая кукурузным маслом и чаем. ABF один из основных поставщиков важных пищевых ингредиентов, в том числе эмульгаторов, ферментов и лактозы.   Coca-Cola Сo. Выручка: $46,9 млрд Расходы на рекламу: $3,0 млрд Прибыль: $8,6 млрд Сотрудники: 130,6 тыс. Штаб-квартира: тланта, Джорджия, США  Coca-Cola является одним из самых дорогих брендов в мире. Совокупный объем продаж в 2013 финансовом году в стоимостном выражении превысил отметку $47 млрд. Coca-Cola Сo. крупнейший мировой производитель и поставщик концентратов, сиропов и безалкогольных напитков. Крупнейшим акционером этой компании является фонд Berkshire Hathaway Inc. (8,61%), контролируемый легендарным инвестором Уорреном Баффетом.   Groupe Danone Выручка: $29,3 млрд Расходы на рекламу: $1,2 млрд Прибыль: $2,0 млрд Сотрудники: 104,6 тыс. Штаб-квартира: Париж, Франция  Французская компания Groupe Danone имеет обладает колоссальным присутствием в во всем мире. Его крупнейшим рынком, по объемам продаж, является Россия, далее следуют Франция, США, Китай и Индонезия. Компания является крупнейшим в мире продавцом свежих молочных продуктов, больше половины от всего объема продаж данной продукции в мире в 2013 году пришлось на Groupe Danone.   General Mills Выручка: $17,9 млрд Расходы на рекламу: $1,1 млрд Прибыль: $1,8 млрд Сотрудники: 43 тыс./LI] Штаб-квартира: Голден-Вэлли, Миннесота, США  Компания General Mills владеет рядом одних из наиболее известных американских брендов, таких как Pillsbury, Colombo Yogurt, Betty Crocker, «Зеленный великан». Производственные мощности компании размещены в 15 странах, однако, продукция реализуется более чем в 100. Полоска продукции компании невероятно широкая : хлопья для завтрака, йогурт, замороженное тесто, консервированные супы, пицца, мороженое, соевые продукты, овощи, мука и др.   Kellogg Выручка: $14,8 млрд Расходы на рекламу: $1,1 млрд Прибыль: $1,8 млрд Сотрудники: 30,2 тысячи Штаб-квартира: Батл-Крик, Мичиган, США  Американская компания Kellogg зарабатывает меньше всех среди пищевых гигантов, по итогам 2013 года объем выручки составил лишь $15 млрд. Kellogg является одним из крупнейших в мире хлебообработчиков и производителей печенья. Компания специализируется на производстве сухих завтраков и продуктов питания быстрого приготовления.   Mars Выручка: $33,0 млрд Расходы на рекламу: $2,2 млрд Прибыль: нет данных Сотрудники: 75 тыс. Штаб-квартира: Маклин, Виргиния, США  Из всех компаний, представленных в данном списке, Mars –единственная, которая находится в частной собственности. Mars владеет такими "шоколадными" брендами, как M&Ms, Milky Way, Snickers и Twix. Компания владеет продовольственными брендами, такими как Uncle Ben's, а также производителем жевательных резинок и конфет Wrigley.   Mondelez Выручка: $35,3 млрд Расходы на рекламу: $1,9 млрд Прибыль: $3,9 млрд Сотрудники: 107 тысяч Штаб-квартира: Дирфилд, Иллинойс, США  Компания Mondelez появилась в результате разделения пищевого гиганта Kraft Foods. Во время разделения мировые бренды (Oreo, TUC, Cadbury, Milka, Alpen Gold, Jacobs) достались Mondelez, вто время как американские - Kraft Foods Group. По итогам прошлого года, выручка компании составила $35 млрд выручки при капитализации более чем $72 млрд.   Nestle Выручка: $103,5 млрд Расходы на рекламу: $3,0 млрд Прибыль: $11,2 млрд Сотрудники: 333 тыс. Штаб-квартира: Веве, Швейцария  Nestle по всем показателям является крупнейшей пищевой компанией в мире. Выручка компании за прошлый год составила 92 млрд швейцарских франков. Компания производит растворимый кофе, минеральную воду, шоколад, мороженое, бульоны, молочные продукты, детское питание, корм для домашних животных, фармацевтическую продукцию и косметику. Более 2000 товарных знаков на 461 фабрике в 83 странах мира.   PepsiCo Выручка: $66,4 млрд Расходы на рекламу: $2,5 млрд Прибыль: $6,7 млрд Сотрудники: 274 тыс. Штаб-квартира: Пёрчейз, Нью-Йорк, США  Помимо известных "содовых" брендов, PepsiCo владеет рядом продуктовых торговых марок, таких как Tostitos, Doritos, Quaker. Более того, компания является крупнейшим рекламодателем в мире, расходы компании в этой области в 2012 году превысили $2,5 млрд.   История вопроса Выручка: $68,5 млрд Расходы на рекламу: $7,4 млрд Прибыль: $6,7 млрд Сотрудники: 174,3 тысячи Штаб-квартира: Лондон, Великобритания и Роттердам, Голландия  Unilever трудно назвать пищевой компанией, так как большую часть ее прдуктовой линейки представляют средства личной гигиены и бытовая химия. Однако, на еду и напитки проходится более трети выручки. По итогом прошлого года выручка компании составила 50 млрд евро. Компания владеет такими брендами, как Lipton, Brooke Bond, Calve, Rama, Creme Bonjour и другие.