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Выбор редакции
26 июня, 16:30

Kraft Heinz's (KHC) Cost Savings Strong, Currency a Drag

On Jun 23, we issued an updated research report on Kraft Heinz Company (KHC) -- one of the largest consumer packaged food and beverage companies.

24 июня, 16:00

Why General Mills Stock Is Rated a "Hold" Before Earnings

General Mills stock is underperforming the market. It's beaten down, but it reports earnings next week. So is it a good time to buy?

24 июня, 00:50

Q2 Earnings Season Preview

Q2 Earnings Season Preview

Выбор редакции
23 июня, 15:58

General Mills (GIS) Q4 Earnings: Is Disappointment in Store?

General Mills Inc. (GIS) is set to report fourth-quarter fiscal 2017 results on Jun 28, before the market opens. Let's see how things are shaping up for this announcement.

20 июня, 00:06

Top Stock Reports for Chevron, Pfizer & Boeing

Top Stock Reports for Chevron, Pfizer & Boeing

19 июня, 16:19

Kellogg Company (K) Invests $2 Million in Bright Greens

Kellogg Company's (K) venture-capital fund (eighteen94 capital) invested $2 million in Bright Greens -- a maker of plant-based frozen smoothies.

Выбор редакции
15 июня, 19:15

Snacks with added fiber a part of Nutrition Facts delay

SNACK bars, cereals and brownies with added fiber may not appear as filling under a new labeling rule. A little-discussed aspect of the revamped Nutrition Facts panel, which was postponed this week,

06 июня, 10:51

Why Is The Kraft Heinz (KHC) Up 3.4% Since the Last Earnings Report?

The Kraft Heinz (KHC) reported earnings 30 days ago. What's next for the stock? We take a look at earnings estimates for some clues.

02 июня, 20:16

Top Stock Research Reports for Microsoft, UPS, Alibaba & Others

Top Stock Research Reports for Microsoft, UPS, Alibaba & Others

02 июня, 19:14

Here Are All The Winners Of Donald Trump’s Paris Agreement Decision

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); There are too many losers of President Donald Trump’s decision to pull the United States out of the landmark Paris climate agreement to name them all. But among them are innumerable species, coral reefs, Antarctica’s ice, coastal and indigenous communities, the poor, women and, really, humans in general ― and the planet at large. Trump seems to think that America will somehow benefit from his decision, but many experts disagree. After rising as a global climate leader, the U.S. is now essentially ceding that role to power houses such as China and the European Union. And it doesn’t look like the United States is going to get anything good in return, according to analysts. “With this step, the U.S. is on its own,” Niklas Höhne, founding partner of the NewClimate Institute, told HuffPost on Friday. America is joining Nicaragua and Syria as the only countries not signed on to the Paris Accord. And the winners of the president’s decision are few and far between.  One could argue that the victors include Trump himself, who was able to fulfil his campaign promise to “cancel” the Paris deal, or the 22 Republican senators who supported his choice, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky). But with seven out of 10 Americans — and almost half of Trump voters — expressing support for remaining in the international accord, it’s perhaps too early to say whether Trump and Republican lawmakers will really emerge as winners here.  Fossil fuel companies seem to be an easy answer, as they stand to gain from a rollback of climate regulations. Yet, several major oil, gas and coal companies, including American oil giants ExxonMobil and ConocoPhilips, urged Trump to stay in the Paris deal. “It gives the U.S. the ability to participate in future climate discussions to safeguard its economic and environmental best interests,” ConocoPhilips spokesman Daren Beaudo told Bloomberg this week.  Trump said the Paris Agreement would be bad for the American economy and lead to major job losses, so his supporters would argue that American businesses and workers would be the benefactors of his decision. However, the United Nations predicted this month that the U.S. would lose jobs by quitting the accord. It’s set to lose out to emerging climate leaders like China, India and the E.U. in the rapidly growing clean energy industry, which is estimated to be worth $6 trillion by 2030. American-made goods also face being slapped with carbon tariffs.  Some of America’s largest companies, including manufacturing and retail bigwigs like Walmart, General Mills and General Electric have also argued that the U.S. should not ditch the Paris deal.  General Electric Chairman and CEO Jeff Immelt issued a statement Thursday expressing his dismay at Trump’s climate announcement.  Disappointed with today’s decision on the Paris Agreement. Climate change is real. Industry must now lead and not depend on government.— Jeff Immelt (@JeffImmelt) June 1, 2017 So it seems that the only clear winners are climate conspiracy groups such as the Heartland Institute and people like Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt and White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon, both of whom have been credited with persuading Trump to ditch the Paris deal.  Many have questioned Pruitt’s close ties with the fossil fuel industry and exactly whose interests he’s serving as head of the EPA. Bannon’s intentions, however, are clearer.  A climate conspiracist and nationalist with ties to white supremacy groups, Bannon has long been fighting a war of ideology ― and withdrawing from the Paris Accord is a victory for his anti-globalist and “America-first” ideals.  “It has to be sad for someone so invested in masculinity to know that when it comes to climate, Donald Trump is clearly the beta to Steve Bannon’s alpha,” Travis Nichols, a Greenpeace spokesman, told HuffPost.  George Frampton, co-founder of the Partnership for Responsible Growth, a conservative group advocating for a carbon tax, told HuffPost this week that the positions of the key climate deniers who influenced Trump reflected “a refusal to engage in the fact that we are in a global economy and a set of global relationships.”  “Working together with other countries on climate change is actually a tremendous economic and competitiveness opportunity,” Frampton said. “But in the same way that they don’t see working with allies on a lot of other things is in our best interest and represents leadership, they don’t see applying the same lesson to climate change.”  Joseph Majkut, director of climate policy at the libertarian think tank Niskanen Center, said pulling out of the Paris accord may satisfy the America-first, nationalistic narrative, but it’s a non-binding, cooperative agreement. “There’s no real policy win that comes of this,” he told HuffPost. “It’s purely a political symbol.” So, according to Majkut, all Trump’s pledge to dump the Paris deal seems to have achieved is to appease a handful of “thought leaders on the right.” Alexander C. Kaufman contributed reporting. type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related... + articlesList=593030dae4b07572bdbf9a33,5930fa3ce4b02478cb9a21d4,59309ab8e4b02478cb99f151,59306bd5e4b0e9a77a53ba4e,5931114de4b075bff0f21cbd -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

02 июня, 19:14

Here Are All The Winners Of Donald Trump’s Paris Agreement Decision

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); There are too many losers of President Donald Trump’s decision to pull the United States out of the landmark Paris climate agreement to name them all. But among them are innumerable species, coral reefs, Antarctica’s ice, coastal and indigenous communities, the poor, women and, really, humans in general ― and the planet at large. Trump seems to think that America will somehow benefit from his decision, but many experts disagree. After rising as a global climate leader, the U.S. is now essentially ceding that role to power houses such as China and the European Union. And it doesn’t look like the United States is going to get anything good in return, according to analysts. “With this step, the U.S. is on its own,” Niklas Höhne, founding partner of the NewClimate Institute, told HuffPost on Friday. America is joining Nicaragua and Syria as the only countries not signed on to the Paris Accord. And the winners of the president’s decision are few and far between.  One could argue that the victors include Trump himself, who was able to fulfil his campaign promise to “cancel” the Paris deal, or the 22 Republican senators who supported his choice, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky). But with seven out of 10 Americans — and almost half of Trump voters — expressing support for remaining in the international accord, it’s perhaps too early to say whether Trump and Republican lawmakers will really emerge as winners here.  Fossil fuel companies seem to be an easy answer, as they stand to gain from a rollback of climate regulations. Yet, several major oil, gas and coal companies, including American oil giants ExxonMobil and ConocoPhilips, urged Trump to stay in the Paris deal. “It gives the U.S. the ability to participate in future climate discussions to safeguard its economic and environmental best interests,” ConocoPhilips spokesman Daren Beaudo told Bloomberg this week.  Trump said the Paris Agreement would be bad for the American economy and lead to major job losses, so his supporters would argue that American businesses and workers would be the benefactors of his decision. However, the United Nations predicted this month that the U.S. would lose jobs by quitting the accord. It’s set to lose out to emerging climate leaders like China, India and the E.U. in the rapidly growing clean energy industry, which is estimated to be worth $6 trillion by 2030. American-made goods also face being slapped with carbon tariffs.  Some of America’s largest companies, including manufacturing and retail bigwigs like Walmart, General Mills and General Electric have also argued that the U.S. should not ditch the Paris deal.  General Electric Chairman and CEO Jeff Immelt issued a statement Thursday expressing his dismay at Trump’s climate announcement.  Disappointed with today’s decision on the Paris Agreement. Climate change is real. Industry must now lead and not depend on government.— Jeff Immelt (@JeffImmelt) June 1, 2017 So it seems that the only clear winners are climate conspiracy groups such as the Heartland Institute and people like Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt and White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon, both of whom have been credited with persuading Trump to ditch the Paris deal.  Many have questioned Pruitt’s close ties with the fossil fuel industry and exactly whose interests he’s serving as head of the EPA. Bannon’s intentions, however, are clearer.  A climate conspiracist and nationalist with ties to white supremacy groups, Bannon has long been fighting a war of ideology ― and withdrawing from the Paris Accord is a victory for his anti-globalist and “America-first” ideals.  “It has to be sad for someone so invested in masculinity to know that when it comes to climate, Donald Trump is clearly the beta to Steve Bannon’s alpha,” Travis Nichols, a Greenpeace spokesman, told HuffPost.  George Frampton, co-founder of the Partnership for Responsible Growth, a conservative group advocating for a carbon tax, told HuffPost this week that the positions of the key climate deniers who influenced Trump reflected “a refusal to engage in the fact that we are in a global economy and a set of global relationships.”  “Working together with other countries on climate change is actually a tremendous economic and competitiveness opportunity,” Frampton said. “But in the same way that they don’t see working with allies on a lot of other things is in our best interest and represents leadership, they don’t see applying the same lesson to climate change.”  Joseph Majkut, director of climate policy at the libertarian think tank Niskanen Center, said pulling out of the Paris accord may satisfy the America-first, nationalistic narrative, but it’s a non-binding, cooperative agreement. “There’s no real policy win that comes of this,” he told HuffPost. “It’s purely a political symbol.” So, according to Majkut, all Trump’s pledge to dump the Paris deal seems to have achieved is to appease a handful of “thought leaders on the right.” Alexander C. Kaufman contributed reporting. type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related... + articlesList=593030dae4b07572bdbf9a33,5930fa3ce4b02478cb9a21d4,59309ab8e4b02478cb99f151,59306bd5e4b0e9a77a53ba4e,5931114de4b075bff0f21cbd -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

02 июня, 16:49

5 Food Stocks for Healthy Gains on Organic Food Trend

Food majors are trying to improve their products through innovations as demand for organic food continues to grow in the U.S. We have handpicked five stocks that have gained in the current scenario and have the potential to further grow.

01 июня, 23:28

Trump Recklessly Pulls U.S. Out Of The Paris Agreement

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible);   President Trump has decided to pull the U.S. out of the historic Paris Agreement on climate change. This agreement marked a critical turning point in efforts to address climate change as it included, for the first time, specific commitments from all major countries and a path to strengthen domestic climate action in the years ahead. Trump’s decision is an assault on our children’s future, American companies, and all the countries in the world. As NRDC’s President Rhea Suh put it: “This is a grave and grievous mistake that hurts our country – starting now. “Trump’s extremism has isolated us from the global coalition we helped to create – with China, Germany, India, Japan and 190 other countries – to fight the central environmental challenge of our time. He’s sidelined American workers in the clean energy boom that’s remaking the global economy. And he’s abandoned our children to climate catastrophe. “It’s on the rest of us now – state and local officials, business leaders, citizens, educators, consumers, activists and congressional members who grasp the stakes for our future - to keep the promise of Paris alive.” President Trump announced that he intends to pull the U.S. out of the Paris Agreement following the procedures outlined in the agreement. As the agreement outlines, the U.S. can formally notify the world that it intends to withdraw from the agreement on Nov. 4, 2019 and that withdrawal doesn’t take effect until one year later. So the U.S. won’t be formally out of the Agreement until November 4, 2020 — after the end of Trump’s first term. The next administration should quickly rejoin the Paris Agreement. Trump is deciding to align against the desires of the American people, American businesses, workers, and the entire world President Trump’s decision to withdraw from the Paris Agreement goes against the best interest of America as reflected by the broad swath of the U.S. that has argued for staying in the agreement. The American people overwhelmingly support the Paris Agreement. The vast majority of American — 70 percent — want the U.S. to stay in this agreement (see figure). That includes the majority of Trump voters. American business strongly support the U.S. remaining in the Agreement. Over 1,100 companies with major operations in the U.S. have urged Trump to stay in the Paris Agreement as they have signed on to letters, joined advertisements, and placed phone calls to the White House. These companies account for over $3.6 trillion in annual revenues and include many of America’s most well-known brands. They include more than one-third of the manufacturing council that Trump put together to advise him on manufacturing issues (such as 3M, Campbell, Corning, Dow, and GE), twenty of the largest and most recognizable companies in America (such as Apple, BP, DuPont, General Mills, Google, Intel, Microsoft, Unilever and Walmart), over 1,000 large and small companies with operations throughout the U.S. (such as Levi Strauss & Co, Campbell Soup Company, Kellogg Company, Johnson & Johnson, and Box Latch Products in Wisconsin), and over 360 business leaders from small and mid-sized American companies (such as representatives from Good Meets World based in Missouri and Ideal Energy from Iowa). Global business leaders support the #ParisAgreement bc they know it is good for the planet and economy. pic.twitter.com/vpW69dRJkG— NRDC (@NRDC) June 1, 2017 American workers benefit from a growing global clean energy market. There are over 3 million people working in the clean energy sector right now in America (see figure). And there’s going to be $19 trillion in global clean energy investment over the next 30 years as countries move to meet the targets of the Paris Agreement (see figure). America’s workers want the U.S. to stay in the Paris Agreement as reflected in the statements from major labor organizations opposed to this withdrawal (including from the AFL-CIO, SEIU, and United Steel Workers). Major states and cities want the U.S. to stay-in. Governors and mayors representing major portions of the U.S. population and economic output wants the U.S. to stay in the Paris Agreement. These states taken together would represent the world’s 5th largest economy, 6th largest emitter and 12th most populous country. Their continued commitment can be a major driver in the years to come. The entire world strongly supports the Paris Agreement. All key countries around the world rallied behind the Paris Agreement — which entered into force at a historic pace. Only Nicaragua and Syria have signaled that they have no intent to join the Paris Agreement. And the only major emitting countries that haven’t yet formally joined the agreement are Russia and Turkey. With this decision Trump joins Putin as the only major leaders in the world who aren’t on board with the Paris Agreement to address climate change. Trump has decided to become a global pariah while sinking chances that other countries will work with him on his priorities around security, trade, and other diplomatic issues. Climate action in the U.S. and around the world will continue As Trump tries to withdraw from the Paris Agreement it has become clear that he stands alone in his desire to pull the U.S. out of international efforts to address climate change. Companies, states, cities, and citizens want the U.S. to continue efforts both at home and abroad to address climate change. And that’s why we continue to see climate action across the country. Unfortunately, this move is a complete reversal from America’s role a couple of months ago. The U.S. played a central leadership role in helping to secure the Paris Agreement and now Trump wants to cede that leadership role to other countries. Other countries are stepping up with the leaders from China, India, Europe, Latin America, and many others reinforcing that they will continue to act aggressively at home to address climate change regardless of what Trump does. No country has signaled that they plan to withdraw from the Paris Agreement if Trump pulls the U.S. out. In fact, in recent days key countries have reinforced their commitment to the Paris Agreement. The commitment to climate action is strong around the world, as Trump will find when he meets with other leaders and sees first-hand how they are continuing to invest more in clean energy. The fight will go on It is a sad day in America and around the world. But the fight will go on to ensure that we protect our children and grandchildren from the devastating impacts of climate inaction. Trump may try to take us backwards, but America and the world won’t let him get his way. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

01 июня, 16:36

Kellogg (K) Chalks Out Cost-Cutting Plans, Lays Off 1000

Kellogg Company (K) has taken its cost-cutting plans a notch higher with the retrenchment of more than 1000 employees across several of its facilities in the U.S.

01 июня, 00:49

Trump Quitting Paris Climate Deal Is About Ideology, Not Business

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Quitting the Paris Agreement, as President Donald Trump has decided to do, will have steep political and economic costs. But for an embattled president, it does offer one benefit: It fulfills a campaign promise popular with his base and appeases the members of his administration who are ideologically opposed to anything that smacks of globalism or environmentalism. There’s been a simmering tension in Trump’s administration on this front. On one side were advisers like Steve Bannon, who believe that climate science is fiction and that a global pact to deal with rising emissions is a Trojan horse for a United Nations takeover. On the other were people like Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and National Economic Council Director Gary Cohn, who actually saw an upside for businesses in staying in the deal. The United States now joins Syria and Nicaragua as the only nations not to participate in the historic accord. The U.S. had taken a lead role in brokering the agreement, and leaving it is a deeply isolationist move that could weaken the nation’s bargaining power in other agreements. As America retreats, China is primed to become the new moral leader on this issue. In mid-May, President Xi Jinping announced a $900 billion fund to invest in infrastructure and clean energy projects abroad. The economic consequences for the U.S. could be worse. The United Nations predicts that the U.S. will lose jobs in the rapidly growing clean energy industry ― estimated to be worth $6 trillion by 2030 ― to Europe, India and China. Countries that tax emissions may put tariffs on American-made imports. And big companies that expect the U.S. will have to regulate carbon eventually are likely to see ditching the deal as only delaying the inevitable, while also sowing the sort of instability that investors don’t like. Trump’s decision also defies the desires of many major corporate and fossil fuel interests. Oil giants including Exxon Mobil Corp. and Royal Dutch Shell pleaded with the administration to stay in the deal, as did coal producers and corporate behemoths such as Walmart, General Mills and DuPont, all of which operate internationally. The deal is popular with the public. Sixty-one percent of Americans said the U.S. should stay in the deal while just 17 percent supported backing out, according to a HuffPost/YouGov poll taken in May. Even ousted Fox News pundit Bill O’Reilly urged Trump to keep the U.S. in the pact last November. But by canceling the deal, Trump makes good on a 2016 pledge, appeasing ardent supporters and a small group of donors. He also wins the approval of a handful of congressmen who made their names railing against widely accepted science. “What we’re seeing is Trump being true to what got him elected, which is playing to a particular segment of the population,” said former Rep. Bob Inglis (R-S.C.), now the executive director of the conservative environmental advocacy group RepublicEN. “He’s dancing with those who brung him. That’s the one thing that I think he understands.” Trump hyped the announcement of his decision on the Paris pact for days before the actual announcement. The U.S. cannot officially begin the process of pulling out until November 2019 under the terms of the deal. I will be announcing my decision on the Paris Accord over the next few days. MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) May 31, 2017 Taking the U.S. out of the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change would be the fastest and most drastic way to scrap the Paris Agreement, as it would completely withdraw the country from international talks on global warming. Trump earlier instructed the Environmental Protection Agency to draft plans to withdraw from the Paris Agreement, but said nothing of the UNFCCC, according to a report Wednesday from the London-based nonprofit Responding to Climate Change. Trump has already axed policies that are key to meeting the U.S. targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions under the Paris Agreement and outlined plans for an aggressive increase in fossil fuel production over the coming years. The voluntary accord obliges its signatories to come together every five years to set new, more ambitious goals in hopes of capping global warming at no more than 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit above pre-industrial temperatures. Withdrawing cements the fact that the U.S. will go it alone, come what may. “I see this as mostly an exercise in honesty,” said Josiah Neeley, director of energy policy at the conservative think tank R Street Institute. “It would have been inauthentic for the administration to stay in. It’s not true to them, it’s an honest assessment of where they want to go and what the country is going to do regardless.” Deciding whether the nation should leave the accord split the White House into two camps. In a twist, Secretary of State Tillerson reportedly acted as one of the “adults” in the Cabinet, advocating for pragmatic market incentives to reduce emissions, such as a tax on carbon. Tillerson is an authority on climate policy from his nearly four decades at Exxon Mobil, and the company is a top funder of climate science denial. Behind Tillerson was Energy Secretary Rick Perry, who had seen the success of wind energy during his time as Texas governor; Defense Secretary James Mattis, who understands the security concerns unfettered global warming pose to the military; U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley, who as South Carolina governor courted wind energy giant General Electric to build in her state; Cohn, a former Goldman Sachs executive who knows the value of hedging bets on climate science; and Ivanka Trump, the president’s older daughter whom Politico named the “climate czar” last year because of her plans to champion the science behind global warming.  The side that opposed the climate deal took a more radical, ideological approach fueled by the belief that the overwhelming consensus among climatologists that the Earth is warming due to human activity is a conspiracy. One of the foremost advocates for withdrawal appeared to be chief strategist Bannon, a doctrinaire nationalist skeptical of global alliances like the United Nations and the European Union. The withdrawal camp also included EPA chief Scott Pruitt, who in his previous post as Oklahoma’s attorney general sued the EPA more than a dozen times and cultivated such close ties to a gas company that he once allowed its lawyers to send a complaint to the EPA under his letterhead. They were joined by Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who has said it’s unfair for the U.S. to fund renewable energy development in poor countries based on a theory; a handful of House Republicans; and 22 GOP senators who said staying in the Paris Agreement made the administration vulnerable to lawsuits by environmentalists. Asked to ascribe motivations to that group, George Frampton, co-founder of the Partnership for Responsible Growth, a D.C.-based conservative group advocating for a carbon tax, chortled: “You want me to psychoanalyze Steve Bannon?” “It’s a refusal to engage in the fact that we are in a global economy and a set of global relationships,” Frampton said. “Working together with other countries on climate change is actually a tremendous economic and competitiveness opportunity. But in the same way that they don’t see working with allies on a lot of other things is in our best interest and represents leadership, they don’t see applying the same lesson to climate change.” By leaving the Paris Agreement, Trump plays to a handful of “thought leaders on the right,” said Joseph Majkut, director of climate policy at the libertarian think tank Niskanen Center. “The America-first, nationalistic narrative is satisfied by pulling out of the Paris Agreement, which is a non-binding, cooperative agreement,” Majkut said. “There’s no real policy win that comes of this. It’s purely a political symbol.” Early in any administration, the push to achieve campaign promises can be a grounding narrative, particularly for a White House faced with high-profile failures. The House bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act has paltry public support and could be difficult to pass in the Senate. And Trump’s temporary ban on travelers from several Muslim-majority countries has been struck down by every judge it has come before. “It’s easy to see him viewing this as a victory,” Majkut said. “He stumbled in achieving a lot of campaign promises, this is one that doesn’t require congressional consent, and a judge can’t get in the way.”  type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related Stories + articlesList=592dae29e4b0c0608e8bb885,5922e848e4b094cdba55ba51,592ddb6ae4b055a197cdea89,591f1134e4b03b485cb119cf,5909ee4ce4b02655f842f072,593030dae4b07572bdbf9a33 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

01 июня, 00:49

Trump Quitting Paris Climate Deal Is About Ideology, Not Business

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Quitting the Paris Agreement, as President Donald Trump is reportedly poised to do this week, will have steep political and economic costs. But for an embattled president, it does do one thing: It fulfills a campaign promise popular with his base. If Trump does indeed pull the U.S. from the deal, the country will join Syria and Nicaragua as the only nations not to ratify the historic accord. The U.S. took a lead role in brokering the agreement, and leaving it would be a deeply isolationist move that could weaken the nation’s bargaining power in other agreements. As the U.S. retreats, China is primed to become the new moral leader on this issue. Earlier this month, President Xi Jinping announced a $900 billion fund to invest in infrastructure and clean energy projects abroad. The economic consequences could be worse. The United Nations estimates that the U.S. stands to lose jobs in the rapidly growing clean energy industry ― estimated to be worth $6 trillion by 2030 ― to Europe, India and China. Countries that tax emissions may put tariffs on American-made imports. And big companies that expect the U.S. to eventually regulate carbon are likely to see ditching the deal as delaying the inevitable, while also sowing the sort of instability that investors don’t like. The decision would also defy the desires of many major corporate and fossil fuel interests. Oil giants including Exxon Mobil Corp. and Royal Dutch Shell have pleaded with the administration to stay in the deal, as have coal producers and corporate behemoths such as Walmart, General Mills and DuPont, all of which operate internationally. The deal is popular with the public. Sixty-one percent of Americans say the U.S. should stay in the deal while just 17 percent support backing out, according to a HuffPost/YouGov poll taken this month. Even ousted Fox News pundit Bill O’Reilly urged Trump to keep the U.S. in the pact last November. But by canceling the deal, Trump will make good on a 2016 pledge, appeasing ardent supporters and a small group of donors. He’d also win the approval of a handful of congressmen who made their names railing against widely accepted science. “What we’re seeing is Trump being true to what got him elected, which is playing to a particular segment of the population,” said former Rep. Bob Inglis (R-S.C.), the executive director of the conservative environmental advocate RepublicEN. “He’s dancing with those who brung him. That’s the one thing that I think he understands.” It’s unclear whether, or when, Trump will announce plans to withdraw. The country cannot officially begin the process of pulling out until November 2019 under the terms of the deal. I will be announcing my decision on the Paris Accord over the next few days. MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) May 31, 2017 Taking the U.S. out of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change would be the fastest and most drastic way to scrap the Paris Agreement, as it would completely withdraw the country from international talks on global warming. Trump instructed the Environmental Protection Agency to draft plans to withdraw from the Paris Agreement, but said nothing of the UNFCCC, according to a report Wednesday from the London-based nonprofit Responding to Climate Change. Trump has already axed policies that are key to meeting the U.S. targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions under the Paris Agreement, and outlined plans for an aggressive increase in fossil fuel production over the coming years. The voluntary accord obliges its signatories to come together every five years to set new, more ambitious goals in hopes of capping global warming at no more than 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit above pre-industrial temperatures. Withdrawing cements the fact that the U.S. will go it alone, come what may. “I see this as mostly an exercise in honesty,” said Josiah Neeley, director of energy policy at the conservative think tank R Street Institute. “It would have been inauthentic for the administration to stay in. It’s not true to them, it’s an honest assessment of where they want to go and what the country is going to do regardless.” Deciding whether the nation should leave the accord split the White House into two camps. In a twist, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson reportedly acted as one of the “adults” in the Cabinet, advocating for pragmatic market incentives to reduce emissions, such as a tax on carbon. Tillerson is an authority on climate policy from his nearly four decades at Exxon Mobil, and the company is a top funder of climate science denial. Behind Tillerson was Energy Secretary Rick Perry, who had seen the success of wind energy during his time as Texas governor; Defense Secretary James Mattis, who understood the security concerns unfettered global warming pose to the military; United Nations Ambassador Nikki Haley, who as South Carolina governor courted wind energy giant General Electric to her state; National Economic Council Director Gary Cohn, a former Goldman Sachs executive who knew the value of hedging bets on climate science; and Ivanka Trump, the president’s eldest daughter who Politico named the “climate czar” last year because of her plans to champion the science behind global warming.  The side that opposed the climate deal took a more radical, ideological approach fueled by the belief that the overwhelming consensus among climatologists that the Earth is warming due to human activity is a conspiracy. One of the foremost advocates for withdrawal appeared to be chief strategist Steve Bannon, a doctrinaire nationalist skeptical of global alliances like the United Nations and the European Union. The withdrawal camp also included EPA chief Scott Pruitt, who in his previous post as Oklahoma’s attorney general sued the agency more than a dozen times and cultivated such close ties to a gas company that he once allowed its lawyers to send a complaint to the EPA under his letterhead. They were joined by Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who has said it is unfair for the U.S. to fund renewable energy development in poor countries based on a theory; a handful of House Republicans; and 22 GOP senators who said staying in the Paris Agreement made the administration vulnerable to lawsuits by environmentalists. Asked to ascribe motivations to that group, George Frampton, co-founder of the Partnership for Responsible Growth, a D.C.-based conservative group advocating for a carbon tax, chortled: “You want me to psychoanalyze Steve Bannon?” “It’s a refusal to engage in the fact that we are in a global economy and a set of global relationships,” Frampton said. “Working together with other countries on climate change is actually a tremendous economic and competitiveness opportunity. But in the same way that they don’t see working with allies on a lot of other things is in our best interest and represents leadership, they don’t see applying the same lesson to climate change.” By leaving the Paris Agreement, Trump plays to a handful of “thought leaders on the right,” said Joseph Majkut, director of climate policy at the libertarian think tank Niskanen Center. “The America-first, nationalistic narrative is satisfied by pulling out of the Paris Agreement, which is a non-binding, cooperative agreement,” Majkut said. “There’s no real policy win that comes of this. It’s purely a political symbol.” Early in any administration, the narrative of achieving campaign promises can be a grounding force, particularly for a White House faced with the high-profile failures. The House bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act has paltry public support and could be difficult to pass in the Senate. And Trump’s temporary ban on travelers from several Muslim-majority countries has been struck down by every judge it has come before. “It’s easy to see him viewing this as a victory,” Majkut said. “He stumbled in achieving a lot of campaign promises, this is one that doesn’t require congressional consent, and a judge can’t get in the way.”  type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related... + articlesList=592dae29e4b0c0608e8bb885,5922e848e4b094cdba55ba51,592ddb6ae4b055a197cdea89,591f1134e4b03b485cb119cf,5909ee4ce4b02655f842f072 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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25 мая, 16:30

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Alphabet, Morgan Stanley, Abbott, Waste Management, General Mills and Raytheon

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Alphabet, Morgan Stanley, Abbott, Waste Management, General Mills and Raytheon

24 мая, 20:48

Analyst Reports for Alphabet, Morgan Stanley, Abbott & Others

Analyst Reports for Alphabet, Morgan Stanley, Abbott & Others

02 сентября 2014, 04:21

10 компаний контролирующих мировую пищевую индустрию

  В сельском хозяйстве и пищевой промышленности занято более одного миллиарда человек в мире или треть всей рабочей силы. И хоть данный сектор играет ключевую роль в жизни человечества, как это ни парадоксально, его контролируют крайне небольшое число транснациональных компаний. Согласно докладу компании Oxfam International, 10 компаний, специализирующихся на производстве продуктов питания и напитков, могут формировать продуктовую корзину большей части населения планеты, влиять на их условия труда, а также окружающую среду.  Associated British Foods Выручка: $21,1 млрд Расходы на рекламу: неизвестно Прибыль: $837 млн Сотрудники: 112,6 тыс. Штаб-квартира: Лондон, Великобритания  Associated British Foods – это британская компания-производитель продуктов питания, которой удалось выстроить глобальную сеть с помощью приобретений. В результате постоянного прироста за счет покупки новых компаний, Associated British Foods производит практически все виды продовольствия, начиная от сахара, заканчивая кукурузным маслом и чаем. ABF один из основных поставщиков важных пищевых ингредиентов, в том числе эмульгаторов, ферментов и лактозы.   Coca-Cola Сo. Выручка: $46,9 млрд Расходы на рекламу: $3,0 млрд Прибыль: $8,6 млрд Сотрудники: 130,6 тыс. Штаб-квартира: тланта, Джорджия, США  Coca-Cola является одним из самых дорогих брендов в мире. Совокупный объем продаж в 2013 финансовом году в стоимостном выражении превысил отметку $47 млрд. Coca-Cola Сo. крупнейший мировой производитель и поставщик концентратов, сиропов и безалкогольных напитков. Крупнейшим акционером этой компании является фонд Berkshire Hathaway Inc. (8,61%), контролируемый легендарным инвестором Уорреном Баффетом.   Groupe Danone Выручка: $29,3 млрд Расходы на рекламу: $1,2 млрд Прибыль: $2,0 млрд Сотрудники: 104,6 тыс. Штаб-квартира: Париж, Франция  Французская компания Groupe Danone имеет обладает колоссальным присутствием в во всем мире. Его крупнейшим рынком, по объемам продаж, является Россия, далее следуют Франция, США, Китай и Индонезия. Компания является крупнейшим в мире продавцом свежих молочных продуктов, больше половины от всего объема продаж данной продукции в мире в 2013 году пришлось на Groupe Danone.   General Mills Выручка: $17,9 млрд Расходы на рекламу: $1,1 млрд Прибыль: $1,8 млрд Сотрудники: 43 тыс./LI] Штаб-квартира: Голден-Вэлли, Миннесота, США  Компания General Mills владеет рядом одних из наиболее известных американских брендов, таких как Pillsbury, Colombo Yogurt, Betty Crocker, «Зеленный великан». Производственные мощности компании размещены в 15 странах, однако, продукция реализуется более чем в 100. Полоска продукции компании невероятно широкая : хлопья для завтрака, йогурт, замороженное тесто, консервированные супы, пицца, мороженое, соевые продукты, овощи, мука и др.   Kellogg Выручка: $14,8 млрд Расходы на рекламу: $1,1 млрд Прибыль: $1,8 млрд Сотрудники: 30,2 тысячи Штаб-квартира: Батл-Крик, Мичиган, США  Американская компания Kellogg зарабатывает меньше всех среди пищевых гигантов, по итогам 2013 года объем выручки составил лишь $15 млрд. Kellogg является одним из крупнейших в мире хлебообработчиков и производителей печенья. Компания специализируется на производстве сухих завтраков и продуктов питания быстрого приготовления.   Mars Выручка: $33,0 млрд Расходы на рекламу: $2,2 млрд Прибыль: нет данных Сотрудники: 75 тыс. Штаб-квартира: Маклин, Виргиния, США  Из всех компаний, представленных в данном списке, Mars –единственная, которая находится в частной собственности. Mars владеет такими "шоколадными" брендами, как M&Ms, Milky Way, Snickers и Twix. Компания владеет продовольственными брендами, такими как Uncle Ben's, а также производителем жевательных резинок и конфет Wrigley.   Mondelez Выручка: $35,3 млрд Расходы на рекламу: $1,9 млрд Прибыль: $3,9 млрд Сотрудники: 107 тысяч Штаб-квартира: Дирфилд, Иллинойс, США  Компания Mondelez появилась в результате разделения пищевого гиганта Kraft Foods. Во время разделения мировые бренды (Oreo, TUC, Cadbury, Milka, Alpen Gold, Jacobs) достались Mondelez, вто время как американские - Kraft Foods Group. По итогам прошлого года, выручка компании составила $35 млрд выручки при капитализации более чем $72 млрд.   Nestle Выручка: $103,5 млрд Расходы на рекламу: $3,0 млрд Прибыль: $11,2 млрд Сотрудники: 333 тыс. Штаб-квартира: Веве, Швейцария  Nestle по всем показателям является крупнейшей пищевой компанией в мире. Выручка компании за прошлый год составила 92 млрд швейцарских франков. Компания производит растворимый кофе, минеральную воду, шоколад, мороженое, бульоны, молочные продукты, детское питание, корм для домашних животных, фармацевтическую продукцию и косметику. Более 2000 товарных знаков на 461 фабрике в 83 странах мира.   PepsiCo Выручка: $66,4 млрд Расходы на рекламу: $2,5 млрд Прибыль: $6,7 млрд Сотрудники: 274 тыс. Штаб-квартира: Пёрчейз, Нью-Йорк, США  Помимо известных "содовых" брендов, PepsiCo владеет рядом продуктовых торговых марок, таких как Tostitos, Doritos, Quaker. Более того, компания является крупнейшим рекламодателем в мире, расходы компании в этой области в 2012 году превысили $2,5 млрд.   История вопроса Выручка: $68,5 млрд Расходы на рекламу: $7,4 млрд Прибыль: $6,7 млрд Сотрудники: 174,3 тысячи Штаб-квартира: Лондон, Великобритания и Роттердам, Голландия  Unilever трудно назвать пищевой компанией, так как большую часть ее прдуктовой линейки представляют средства личной гигиены и бытовая химия. Однако, на еду и напитки проходится более трети выручки. По итогом прошлого года выручка компании составила 50 млрд евро. Компания владеет такими брендами, как Lipton, Brooke Bond, Calve, Rama, Creme Bonjour и другие.