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Generali Group
20 июня, 00:49

Insurers Talk A Lot About Climate Change, But Most Still Do Business In Coal

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); The insurance industry’s annual confab last week was supposed to be a dry, stoic affair. Instead, anti-coal protesters stormed the 44th Geneva Association conference at a ritzy hotel in San Francisco, plastered the bathrooms with slogan stickers and slipped fliers under the doors to executives’ rooms. A plane toting a banner reading “unfriend coal” circled the high-rise where the executives held their closing dinner and cocktail party.   The activists’ demands were twofold: Insurance companies should divest from coal projects and stop underwriting the fossil fuel. Insurers have raised the alarm on the risk posed by climate change in recent years, forming international coalitions aimed at preparing for the increased floods, storms and heatwaves that come with a warming planet. But of the 16 companies on the board of the Geneva Association ― the insurance industry’s think tank ― just one told HuffPost it cut off both funding and insurance for coal companies. AXA Group, France’s largest insurer, in 2015 announced plans to divest from companies most exposed to coal activities. This April, the firm said it would no longer offer property or casualty insurance to mining companies or utilities deriving 50 percent of their sales from coal. “Coal is often a low-cost form of energy, and is widely available to a large proportion of the world’s population,” the company said at its annual shareholder meeting on April 26. “However, coal is also the most carbon-intensive energy source. AXA, like many investors, believes coal both poses the biggest threat to the climate and its business is the most likely to be constrained.” On the opposite end of the spectrum is XL Group, whose chief executive, Mike McGavick, is the Geneva Association’s current chairman. His Ireland-based firm has refused to divest from coal companies and continues to cover them with casualty and property insurance, calling such moves “nonsense.” Other firms have followed his lead, including Japan’s Tokio Marine, the United Kingdom’s Lloyd’s, Brazil’s SulAmérica Seguros, Canada’s Intact, Switzerland’s Zurich Insurance Group and the People’s Insurance Company of China, known as PICC. (Berkshire Hathaway, the U.S. insurance behemoth led by billionaire Warren Buffett, underwrites and invests in coal, though the firm is not on the Geneva Association’s board.) Italy’s biggest insurance company, Assicurazioni Generali Group, has yet to divest or curtail coverage for coal, but a spokesman told HuffPost it was completing an internal audit to determine the scope of its exposure to the fuel. “Generali is currently performing an in-depth analysis of its exposure to coal infrastructure both from an investment and underwriting perspective,” Matthew Newton said by email. He did not respond to questions about when the audit would be complete, but suggested it could be a first step toward the company divesting and ending insurance policies for coal. Coal divestment campaigns have gained steam in recent years as hundreds of cities and universities pull their pension funds and endowments out of the industry. The fuel faces fierce competition from natural gas and renewable energy, and its use is on pace to peak in the next decade. But scientists warn that a business-as-usual approach to the industry that’s disproportionately responsible for planet-heating emissions rapidly causing Earth’s climate to change jeopardizes any hope of averting the worst effects of global warming.  Peter Bosshard, who coordinated last week’s protest for the activist group Unfriend Coal, said convincing insurers to abandon coal would hasten the industry’s demise. “It’s the one critical fact that’s been left off the hook,” Bosshard, who works for the global warming advocacy group the Sunrise Project, told HuffPost on Monday. “Insurance is a precondition for any major project to go ahead. It’s one thing to divest, but more important is to stop insuring coal.” Some companies don’t offer any insurance for coal projects. These include New Jersey-based giant Prudential, Canada’s Manulife Financial, the United Kingdom’s Aviva and the Netherlands’ Aegon. Aviva and Aegon also have moved to pull money they manage out of coal companies. Germany’s Allianz, France’s SCOR and Switzerland’s Swiss Re similarly have committed to divest, but have stopped short of cutting off insurance coverage for coal-heavy clients. None of these firms responded to HuffPost’s request for comment on Friday. “Given the clean energy transition underway, all insurers should assess their risk exposure to carbon-intensive fossil fuel industries ― including oil, gas and coal ―- and disclose this information, along with their plans to reduce their fossil-fuel risk exposures, to industry regulators and other stakeholders,” Cynthia McHale, insurance director at the sustainability shareholder advocate Ceres, told HuffPost. “Coal rapidly is being replaced and eclipsed by clean, renewable energy. The market growth opportunities are with renewables, not coal.” type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related... + articlesList=56d36cade4b03260bf773563,59441b0ae4b01eab7a2d6f48,58da777ae4b018c4606b99f9,58c993d9e4b0be71dcf104b1,59089118e4b05c397682ce92,58dad105e4b054637062e61d -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

20 июня, 00:49

Insurers Talk A Lot About Climate Change, But Most Still Do Business In Coal

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); The insurance industry’s annual confab last week was supposed to be a dry, stoic affair. Instead, anti-coal protesters stormed the 44th Geneva Association conference at a ritzy hotel in San Francisco, plastered the bathrooms with slogan stickers and slipped fliers under the doors to executives’ rooms. A plane toting a banner reading “unfriend coal” circled the high-rise where the executives held their closing dinner and cocktail party.   The activists’ demands were twofold: Insurance companies should divest from coal projects and stop underwriting the fossil fuel. Insurers have raised the alarm on the risk posed by climate change in recent years, forming international coalitions aimed at preparing for the increased floods, storms and heatwaves that come with a warming planet. But of the 16 companies on the board of the Geneva Association ― the insurance industry’s think tank ― just one told HuffPost it cut off both funding and insurance for coal companies. AXA Group, France’s largest insurer, in 2015 announced plans to divest from companies most exposed to coal activities. This April, the firm said it would no longer offer property or casualty insurance to mining companies or utilities deriving 50 percent of their sales from coal. “Coal is often a low-cost form of energy, and is widely available to a large proportion of the world’s population,” the company said at its annual shareholder meeting on April 26. “However, coal is also the most carbon-intensive energy source. AXA, like many investors, believes coal both poses the biggest threat to the climate and its business is the most likely to be constrained.” On the opposite end of the spectrum is XL Group, whose chief executive, Mike McGavick, is the Geneva Association’s current chairman. His Ireland-based firm has refused to divest from coal companies and continues to cover them with casualty and property insurance, calling such moves “nonsense.” “It’s too large a part of the economy,” he said two years ago at an insurance industry forum. “It’s too many of the investible opportunities out there and the reality is that we would be failing our shareholders if we weren’t investing in a prudent way.” Other firms have followed McGavick’s lead, including Japan’s Tokio Marine, the United Kingdom’s Lloyd’s, Brazil’s SulAmérica Seguros, Canada’s Intact, Switzerland’s Zurich Insurance Group and the People’s Insurance Company of China, known as PICC. (Berkshire Hathaway, the U.S. insurance behemoth led by billionaire Warren Buffett, underwrites and invests in coal, though the firm is not on the Geneva Association’s board.) Italy’s biggest insurance company, Assicurazioni Generali Group, has yet to divest or curtail coverage for coal, but a spokesman told HuffPost it was completing an internal audit to determine the scope of its exposure to the fuel. “Generali is currently performing an in-depth analysis of its exposure to coal infrastructure both from an investment and underwriting perspective,” Matthew Newton said by email. He did not respond to questions about when the audit would be complete, but suggested it could be a first step toward the company divesting and ending insurance policies for coal. Coal divestment campaigns have gained steam in recent years as hundreds of cities and universities pull their pension funds and endowments out of the industry. The fuel faces fierce competition from natural gas and renewable energy, and its use is on pace to peak in the next decade. But scientists warn that a business-as-usual approach to the industry that’s disproportionately responsible for planet-heating emissions rapidly causing Earth’s climate to change jeopardizes any hope of averting the worst effects of global warming.  Peter Bosshard, who coordinated last week’s protest for the activist group Unfriend Coal, said convincing insurers to abandon coal would hasten the industry’s demise. “It’s the one critical fact that’s been left off the hook,” Bosshard, who works for the global warming advocacy group the Sunrise Project, told HuffPost on Monday. “Insurance is a precondition for any major project to go ahead. It’s one thing to divest, but more important is to stop insuring coal.” Some companies don’t offer any insurance for coal projects. These include New Jersey-based giant Prudential, Canada’s Manulife Financial, the United Kingdom’s Aviva and the Netherlands’ Aegon. Aviva and Aegon also have moved to pull money they manage out of coal companies. “We decided last year to strike coal mining off our investment list,” Dick Schiethart, an Aegon spokesman, told HuffPost by email. “We have added companies that derive more than 30% of their revenues from thermal coal mining to our exclusion list.”  Germany’s Allianz, France’s SCOR and Switzerland’s Swiss Re similarly have committed to divest, but have stopped short of cutting off insurance coverage for coal-heavy clients. In 2015, Munich-based Allianz imposed stricter environmental standards on insurance for industrial firms. “Allianz sees itself as a partner supporting our customers on a journey to a low-carbon economy, for example by providing them with our technical expertise,” Anja Rechenberg, an Allianz spokeswoman, told HuffPost by email. “That’s why we will continue to insure utilities and mining companies when they show an adequate sustainability performance or suitable risk mitigation strategies.” None of the other firms responded to HuffPost’s request for comment on Friday. “Given the clean energy transition underway, all insurers should assess their risk exposure to carbon-intensive fossil fuel industries ― including oil, gas and coal ― and disclose this information, along with their plans to reduce their fossil-fuel risk exposures, to industry regulators and other stakeholders,” Cynthia McHale, insurance director at the sustainability shareholder advocate Ceres, told HuffPost. “Coal rapidly is being replaced and eclipsed by clean, renewable energy. The market growth opportunities are with renewables, not coal.” This article has been updated with comments from McGavick, Aegon, Allianz and XL Group. type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related Coverage + articlesList=56d36cade4b03260bf773563,59441b0ae4b01eab7a2d6f48,58da777ae4b018c4606b99f9,58c993d9e4b0be71dcf104b1,59089118e4b05c397682ce92,58dad105e4b054637062e61d -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

02 февраля 2015, 15:36

Структура Нацкомфинуслуг будет изменена – глава комиссии

Структура Национальной комиссии по регулированию рынков финансовых услуг будет однозначно изменена, заверил глава комиссии Игорь Пашко на пресс-конференции в понедельник.

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28 марта 2013, 21:38

PPF Group закрыла сделку по приобретению страховых компании Generali PPF в РФ и СНГ

PPF Group закрыла сделку по приобретению страховых компании Generali PPF в РФ и СНГ

14 марта 2013, 13:30

Убыток Assicurazioni Generali достиг 1,04 млрд евро

Assicurazioni Generali SpA, крупнейшая страховая компания Италии, сообщила об убытках в IV квартале прошлого года в связи со списаниями в объеме 1,3 млрд евро.Несмотря на убыток в IV квартале, Assicurazioni Generali не изменила размер дивидендов Списания связаны с обесценением инвестиций в акции, в частности в бумаги Telecom Italia SpA.Чистый убыток составил в прошлом квартале 1,04 млрд евро по сравнению с прибылью в 31 млн евро в IV квартале 2011 г. Средняя оценка аналитиков, опрошенных Bloomberg, предполагала убыток на уровне 203 млн евро. При этом страховая компания выплатит дивиденды в размере 20 евроцентов на акцию.Компания приняла решение списать стоимость инвестиций в акции Telecom Italia в размере 148 млн евро, а также в другие активы в размере 792 млн евро.Главный исполнительный директор Assicurazioni Generali Марио Греко стремится убедить инвесторов, что он может восстановить прибыль и увеличить капитал за счет сокращения издержек, продажи нестратегических активов и развития на развивающихся рынках. В рамках плана, утвержденного в январе, компания продают свою долю в U.S. life и в швейцарском блоке управления активами BSI Group.В IV квартале операционная прибыль выросла на 12% в годовом выражении и составила 928 млн евро. В сегменте страхования жизни показатель снизился до 462 млн евро, а в других видах страхования он вырос на 41% и составил 505 млн евро.Коэффициент платежеспособности Generali вырос до 150% по сравнению с показателем в 140% в конце сентября.

04 марта 2013, 18:51

Jane White: If Your Retirement Money Isn't Invested Globally, You're Toast

The only thing more maddening than the media's refusal to cover the retirement crisis -- with the exception of the Washington Post -- is the fact that most of us don't realize that our eggs aren't in the right baskets. Despite the fact that two-thirds of the largest publicly held companies are based overseas -- and have been since Fortune magazine launched its Global 500 series 23 years ago -- only one-third of Vanguard's 401(k) participants invest in international funds. Only 28 percent of Fidelity Investment's participants invest internationally and the assets make up only 7 percent of their overall portfolios. Why do we care? One of the untold stories of globalization in the 21st century is that international stocks have outperformed domestic ones. For example, while Vanguard's S&P 500 fund's 10-year return in 2010 was a measly 1.4 percent, its global equity returned a healthy 7.19 percent over that same decade. Here's some more mind-boggling statistics: • Not only is Toyota higher on the list than GM, which has descended from number one in 1990 to number 19, but Volkswagen is number 12. • The world's biggest insurance company, Axa, is based in France; number 2, Allianz, is in Germany; and number 3, Assicurazioni Generali, is in Italy. • While 18 of the "Global 50" are oil companies, only five are U.S- based. • Of the four banks on the "Global 50," only one, Bank of America, is U.S.-based and ranks lower on the list than ING of the Netherlands, Banco Santander of Spain and EXOR Group of Italy. Citigroup fell from Number 16 in 2005 to 69 in 2011. • There are only 14 U.S. companies in the top 50 -- and that's only three less than there were 23 years ago. What's even more mind-boggling is that while our media may cover China's hacking into our computers, the most astounding inroad Chinas has made is hacking into our status as the world's power. It's no surprise that China passed Japan in 2010 to become the world's second-largest economy after the U.S, marking the end of Japan's 43-year reign. China has 73 companies on the Global 500 -- compared to 26 for Britain and more than France and Germany combined -- and that's up from only 16 seven years earlier. Don't be surprised if a Chinese car maker winds up high on the list in a decade or so. China is not only going to be the biggest market for cars but it has the will and the money to make their auto industry world class, says Max Warburton of Sanford C. Bernstein & Co. in a recent interview with Bloomberg Businessweek. Of the more than one hundred Chinese automakers -- yes, you read it right -- SAIC Motor Corp. stands the best chance of becoming a world-class manufacturer as it has learned a "huge amount" from its joint venture with General Motors, Warburton said. Bottom line: we may not be able to turn back the clock to 1950 when everything that was consumed in the USA was made here but at least we should reap the rewards of investing our retirement money where the future is.

08 января 2013, 14:57

Итальянцы удвоят свою долю в "Ингосстрахе"

Итальянская группа Generali увеличит принадлежащую ей долю в "Ингосстрахе", одном из крупнейших российских страховщиков, в два раза - до 38,5 процента. Свой пакет Generali нарастит в рамках сделки с чешской PPF Group, у которой купит 49 процентов акций страхового холдинга Generali - PPF Holding за 2,5 миллиарда евро.

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08 января 2013, 14:16

Generali вдвое нарастит долю в «Ингосстрахе»

Увеличение доли итальянской компании в российском страховщике произойдет в рамках сделки по покупке 49% GPH у PPF Group за 2,5 млрд евро

08 января 2013, 13:57

Итальянская Generali увеличит свою долю в "Ингосстрахе" до 38,5%

Крупнейшая страховая компания Италии Generali увеличит свою долю в "Ингосстрахе" до 38,46% путем приобретения всех акций PPF Beta, которая косвенно владеет долей в российской страховой компании. В свою очередь, управляющая компания PPF Group получит полный контроль над бизнесом private equity компании PPF Partners. Об этом говорится в пресс-релизе Generali. Покупка доли "Ингосстраха" является частью более крупной сделки. Согласно релизу, Generali намерена выкупить у чешской группы PPF 49% уставного капитала в совместном с PPF предприятии - Generali PPF Holding (GPH) - за 2,5 млрд евро, чтобы получить полный контроль над совместным предприятием. При этом Generali уже владеет 51% GPH. Сделка будет заключена в два этапа: до 28 марта 2013 года итальянская компания выкупит 25% акций GPH по цене 1,286 млрд евро, а оставшиеся 24% по цене 1,235 млрд евро - в конце 2014 года. Ранее чешс

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22 ноября 2012, 21:52

Generali намерена продать свой швейцарский банк стоимостью 2,3 млрд евро - агентство

Итальянская страховая группа Assicurazioni Generali SpA ищет покупателей для своего швейцарского банка BSI Group, балансовая стоимость которого оценивается в 2,3 миллиарда евро, сообщается агентство Bloomberg со ссылкой на источники, знакомые с ситуацией