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27 февраля, 22:04

Remarks by President Trump in Meeting with the National Governors Association

State Dining Room 9:45 A.M. EST THE PRESIDENT:  Thank you very much.  (Applause.)  That is pretty good, I'll tell you.  Coming from governors, I can't really -- I can't even believe it.  That's so impressive.  And I very much appreciate you being here.  And thank you to Vice President Pence.  He has been so wonderful to work with.  He's a real talent, a real guy.  And he is central casting, do we agree?  Central casting.  He's been great.  (Applause.)   Good morning, everybody, and welcome back to the White House.  The First Lady and I were very, very happy last night to host you.  We saw some real talent, military talent, musicians who were fantastic.  And everybody enjoyed it.  (Applause.)   I’m very proud to have so many former governors in my Cabinet.  Vice President Pence, as you know, big governor from a very great state -- I state I like very much -- Indiana.  Nikki Haley at the U.N. -- is Nikki here someplace?  I think so -- yes.  We have Rick Perry -- is going before.  We're trying to get people approved, we can't get them out.  But Rick is going to do a fantastic job.  Sonny Purdue will be joining the Cabinet very soon.  Terry Branstad will be our ambassador to China.  And an interesting story on Terry -- every time I spoke in Iowa, he'd say, please don’t say anything bad about China. (Laughter.)  I said, what do you mean?  What do you mean?  He said, I like China and we do a lot of business with China.  "And really, just don’t" -- and I said, "hmm."  So when it came down to picking an ambassador, I called him up, I said, you like China.  And I can tell you, China is very, very happy with our choice.  So we made everybody happy.  (Applause.)  Right?  These governors -- thank you.  And thank you, Terry. These governors have been bold reformers, and their success shows why we need to make states the laboratories of democracy once again.  Many of you have shared past frustrations with waiting for permission from the federal government and agencies -- and I understand that, and I've had many people tell me about it, and it's been catastrophic for some of your states.  You know your citizens and you know they want things done.  But they don’t get things done and it's not your fault.  Sometimes it's your fault, but they understand that.  But sometimes it's not your fault.  We're going to speed it up.   Because that's not how a partnership is supposed to work.  The government should not stand in your way in delivering needed reforms and services -- and it won't.  We're going to move very, very quickly, environmentally, with Scott and so many others that are involved in the process of regulation.  We are going to be cutting -- we're going to be doing the right thing.  We're going to be protecting people environmentally and safety-wise, but we're going to be moving it quickly, very quickly.  (Applause.)    And speaking of that, I know many of you -- and I've spoken to some of you last night about it -- have many projects that are -- I mean, just literally tied up because of environmental concerns, and it's been in for years and years and years the project your state wants, great for employment -- everybody wants them -- and they couldn’t get them out of environmental protection.  And we will get them out.  Now, that doesn’t mean they’re going to be approved, but they'll be rejected quickly one way or the other.  They'll be either rejected quickly or they're going to get approved.  I would say most will be approved, but you're going to know you're not going to wait nine years or eleven years -- some of the horror stories that I've heard. Under my administration, we're going to have a true partnership of collaboration and cooperation.  We will get to the answers and we will get them quickly, and the flexibility you need to implement the reforms that you are going to have in order to make decision-making proper and decision-making fast.  So we're going to do both those things -- proper and fast.   One of the most important responsibilities for the federal government is the budget of the United States.  My first budget will be submitted to the Congress next month.  This budget will be a public safety and national security budget, very much based on those two with plenty of other things, but very strong.  And it will include a historic increase in defense spending to rebuild the depleted military of the United States of America at a time we most need it.  (Applause.)     And you'll be hearing about that tomorrow night in great detail.  This is a landmark event, a message to the world, in these dangerous times, of American strength, security and resolve.  We must ensure that our courageous servicemen and women have the tools they need to deter war, and when called upon to fight in our name only do one thing:  Win.  We have to win.  We have to start winning wars again.   I have to say, when I was young, in high school and college, everybody used to say "we haven’t lost a war" -- we never lost a war -- you remember.  Some of you were right there with me, and you remember we never lost a war.  America never lost.  And now we never win a war.  We never win.  And we don’t fight to win.  We don’t fight to win.  So we either got to win, or don’t fight it at all.  But where we are -- 17 years -- almost 17 years of fighting in the Middle East.  I saw a chart the other day -- as of about a month ago, $6 trillion we've spent in the Middle East -- $6 trillion.  And I want to tell you, that's just unacceptable.  And we're nowhere.  Actually, if you think about it, we're less than nowhere.  The Middle East is far worse than it was 16, 17 years ago.  There's not even a contest.  So we've spent $6 trillion.  We have a hornet's nest.  It's a mess like you've never seen before.  We're nowhere.  So we're going to straighten it out.    This defense spending increase will be offset and paid for by finding greater savings and efficiencies across the federal government.  We’re going to do more with less.  I got involved in an airplane contract, I got involved in some other contracts, and we cut the hell out of the prices.  I mean, we saved a lot of money, tremendous amount of money, beyond anything that the generals that were involved -- they said they’d never seen anything like this before. On one plane, on a small order of one plane, I saved $725 million.  And I would say I devoted about, if I added it up, all those calls, probably about an hour.  So I think that might be my highest and best use.  (Laughter.)  Because if we can do that, our budget will be -- might be my highest and best.  (Applause.)   And there are many other places; it’s all the same.  And in one way, that's a good thing because we have an answer.  And David is going to do a fantastic job at the VA.  I see David is sitting there, shaking his head.  Stand up, David.  (Applause.)  So we can't get our people through Cabinet, but he went through -- was it 95 to nothing? SECRETARY SHULKIN:  A hundred to zero.   THE PRESIDENT:  How the hell did you do that?  (Laughter.)  Boy, oh boy.  He must be good.  You were the one.  One hundred to zero, wow.  Chose you -- hey, we can do it.  But we do -- we have still quite a few Cabinet members, and they're just in limbo waiting and waiting.  It’s like obstruction.  It’s obstruction.  But eventually we'll get them, and they'll put their people in, and we’ll get those agencies, et cetera, to work. We’re going to do more with less and make the government lean and accountable to the people.  We can do so much more with the money we spend.  With $20 trillion in debt -- can you imagine that -- the government must learn to tighten its belt, something families all across the country have had to learn to do, unfortunately.  But they've had to learn to do it, and they’ve done it well.   My budget increases spending, and the increase in all spending, for federal law enforcement also.  And activities having to do with law enforcement will be substantially increased.  And we will fight violent crime.  If you look at what’s happening in our cities, you look at what’s happening in Chicago, what’s going on in Chicago -- we will fight violent crime, and we will win.  And we’ll win that one fairly quickly.  Once we give the local police, the local law enforcement the right to go in and fight it, and we back them monetarily and also otherwise, we’re going to win that one.  We're going to win it fairly quickly, I believe. My budget also puts America first by keeping tax dollars in America to help veterans and first responders.  So important.  This budget follows through on my promise to focus on keeping Americans safe, keeping out terrorists, keeping out criminals, and putting violent offenders behind bars, or removing them from our country altogether.  And I must say that we’ve been treated very well -- very, very well -- on the job that General Kelly has done at the border.  It’s tough, it’s strong.   I was talking last night to Terry McAuliffe, and he said, you have to mention this -- because he met with -- where is Terry?  He’s around here someplace.  Terry -- he met with General Kelly, and I think I can say you were impressed with General Kelly.  And he said, you have to get the point out that they’re removing the bad ones.  And that’s where our focus is -- it’s the bad ones.  We’re getting some very, very bad players out of this country -- drug lords, gang members, heads of gangs, killers, murderers -- we’re getting them out.  That’s what we’re focused on.   The press isn’t covering that, unfortunately, but it’s something that is very important.  We’re getting the bad ones out.  And that’s always where I said I was going to start.  I was going to start with these bad players.  And they are bad.  They are rough and tough, and we’re getting them the hell out of our country, and we’re bringing them to where they started out.  Let their country do what they have to do with them. So the budget, which is going to be a very big part of tomorrow night’s speech, it’s going to be I think a budget of great rationality.  But it’s going to have to do with military, safety, economic development, and things such as that.  Great detail tomorrow night. We’re also going to do whatever we can to restore the authority of the states when that is the appropriate thing to do.  We’re going to give you back a lot of the powers that have been taken away from states and great people and great governors.  And you can control it better than the federal government because you’re right on top of it.  You have something that’s controllable.  So I think that’s going to be very important.  You see that already taking effect.   We have to let the states compete and to see who has the best solutions.  They know the best how to spend their dollars and how to take care of the people within each state.  And the states are different, and people are different.  So the governors are going to have a lot more decision-making ability than they have right now. All states will benefit from our economic agenda.  We will reduce taxes very, very substantially, and simplify the tax code.  We’re also going to make taxes between countries much more fair.  We’re one of the only countries in the world that people can sell their product into us and have no tax, no nothing, and they get rich.  And yet if you want to do business with them, you’ll have taxes, I’ve seen, as high as 100 percent.  So they sell into us, no problem; we sell into them -- because we don’t sell them because the tax is so high that they don’t want us to sell into them.   So I know that’s always been a point of contention, but to me it’s just fair.  It’s just fair.  It’s reciprocal.  It’s fair.  And so we’re going to be doing a lot of work on that, and that’s becoming a very, very important factor -- fairness.  Because I believe in free trade.  I want so much trade -- somebody said, oh, maybe he’s a total nationalist -- which I am, in a true sense -- but I want trade.  I want great trade between countries.   But the word “free” is very deceiving, because it’s good for them, it’s not good for us.  I want fair trade.  And if we’re going to be taxed, they should be taxed at the same amount, the other countries.  And one of two things is going to happen:  We’re going to make a lot of money or the other country is going to get rid of its tax.  And that’s good, too, because now the product, like Harley-Davidson -- I was talking to them -- the product will now flow into other countries where right now they can’t do it. So we’re going to make it easier for states to invest in infrastructure, and I'm going to have a big statement tomorrow night on infrastructure.  We spent $6 trillion in the Middle East, and we have potholes all over our highways and our roads.  I have a friend who is in the trucking business.  He said, my trucks are destroyed going from New York to Los Angeles.  They’re destroyed.  He said, I’m not going to get the good trucks.  He always prided himself on buying the best equipment.  He said, the roads are so bad that, by the time we make the journey from New York to Los Angeles or back, he said the equipment is just beat to hell.  I said, when has it been like that before?  He said, it’s never -- he’s been in the business for 40 years -- he said it’s never been like that.  Forty years -- never been like that.  So we’re going to take care of that.   Infrastructure -- we’re going to start spending on infrastructure big.  And it's not like we have a choice.  It’s not like, oh, gee, let’s hold it off.  Our highways, our bridges are unsafe.  Our tunnels -- I mean, we have tunnels in New York where the tiles are on the ceiling, and you see many tiles missing.  And you wonder, you know, you’re driving at 40 miles an hour, 50 miles an hour through a tunnel.  Take a look at the Lincoln Tunnel and the Queens-Midtown Tunnel, and you’re driving, and you see all this loose material that’s heavy.  And it was made many years ago, so it’s heavy.  Today, it’s light.  It used to be better.  The problem is, you got to hold it up.  And I say to myself -- every time I drive through, I say, I wonder how many people are hurt or injured when they are driving at 40, 50 miles an hour through a tunnel, and the tile falls off.  And there are so many missing tiles and such loose concrete.  So we have to fix our infrastructure.  It’s not like we have a choice.  We have no choice, and we’re going to do it, and it also happens to mean jobs, which is a good thing.   We’re going to repeal and replace Obamacare, and get states the flexibility that they need to make the end result really, really good for them.  A very complicated issue.  We have Tom Price, just got confirmed -- sitting here.  (Applause.)  Stand up, Tom.  And I spent a lot of time with Governor Walker and Governor Rick Scott the other day -- we were talking about it.  They’re really very expert on the subject, and I want to thank them.  They spent a lot of time with me.  Governor Christie who's here someplace.  Where's Chris?  Governor Christie, thank you.  And so we have a lot of talent and a lot of expertise here, I will tell you.  And we have come up with a solution that’s really, really, I think, very good.   Now, I have to tell you, it’s an unbelievably complex subject.  Nobody knew that healthcare could be so complicated.  And statutorily and for budget purposes, as you know, we have to do healthcare before we do the tax cut.  The tax cut is going to be major, it’s going to be simple, and the whole tax plan is wonderful.  But I can’t do it until we do healthcare because we have to know what the healthcare is going to cost.  And, statutorily, that’s the way it is.  So for those people that say, oh, gee, I wish we could do the tax first -- it just doesn’t work that way.  I would like to do that first.  It’s actually -- tax cutting has never been that easy, but it’s a tiny, little ant compared to what we’re talking about with Obamacare.   And you have to remember -- and I say this to Democrats in the room -- of which we have many -- Obamacare has failed.  If you go to Minnesota, where they had a 66-percent increase, and the governor of Minnesota, who is with us today, said, Obamacare -- the Affordable Care Act -- is no longer affordable -- something to that effect.  I think that might be it exactly.  But the Affordable Care Act is no longer affordable.  Obamacare has failed.   I say to the Republicans, if you really want to do politically something good, don’t do anything.  Sit back for a period of two years, because ’17 is going to be a disaster -- a disaster -- for Obamacare if we don’t do something.  Let it be a disaster because we can blame that on the Dems that are in our room, and we can blame that on the Democrats and President Obama.  Let it implode, and then let it implode in ’18 even worse.  Don’t do anything, and they will come begging for us to do something.  But that’s not the fair thing to do for the people.  It’s not the fair thing.   Politically, I think it would be a great solution, because as soon as we touch it, if we do the most minute thing -- just a tiny, little change -- what’s going to happen?  They’re going to say, it’s the Republicans’ problem.  That’s the way it is.  But we have to do what’s right because Obamacare is a failed disaster.   And it’s interesting, it’s sort of like, when you see -- you see it with politicians, you see it with President Obama -- when you know he's getting out of office and the clock is ticking, and he's not going to be there, his approval rating goes way up, even though, you know, not that active in the last period of time.  The approval rating goes up.  That’s not him; that's like almost everybody.  I see it happening with Obamacare.  People hate it, but now they see that the end is coming, and they're saying, oh, maybe we love it.  There’s nothing to love.  It’s a disaster, folks, okay?  So you have to remember that. And, very importantly, we are going to work to restore local control to our nation’s education system.  Betsy is here someplace, and she is going to be, I think, fantastic.  (Applause.)  I think she's going to be fantastic.  Stand up, Betsy.  Betsy feels so strongly, and she has had such support from so many people.  You know, you don’t see that too much because you see the anti, you never see the positive.  But I can tell you, I’ve had so many calls while she was going through that horrible process.  That was a tough, tough, nasty process.  And she hung in, she was as strong as you get.  But so many people were calling Betsy, saying you will do such a fantastic job once you get it. It’s like sometimes I'd say, it’s much tougher to get into Harvard than it is to stay there.  Does that make sense?  It’s tougher to get into the Wharton School of Finance -- you can’t get in.  But if you get in, it’s fine, you get through, right?  I think you’re going to do a fantastic job, and we’re very proud of you.  And you took a lot of heat, but you’re going to do great.  So she wants to bring decision-making powers back to parents, back to the families and back to the states, where they can really control education.   And just finally, I’m looking forward to working with you on these projects and so much more.  We’re going to do these projects and so many more.  And I thank you all again for being here.  It’s going to be a really productive discussion -- so productive that I’m going to ask the press to start leaving because I wouldn’t want them to see any great, productive session.  (Laughter.)  But they'll be seeing it and hearing about it.   Again, thank you very much all for being at the White House.  We’ll do this many times.  I want the opinions of the governors of the states of the United States.  So I want to just thank you all for being here, and let’s take some questions, okay?  (Applause.)  Thank you. END  10:05 A.M. EST

23 февраля, 02:24

Primitive Minds

(Don Boudreaux) TweetHere’s a letter to a new and intrepid correspondent: Mr. Nolan McKinney Mr. McKinney: You point to Harley-Davidson’s resurgence, after Ronald Reagan drastically raised tariffs on imported large motorcycles, as “evidence of protectionism strengthening our economy.” Harley’s resurgence is evidence of no such thing.  The argument against protectionism is not that it doesn’t help the […]

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23 февраля, 00:50

Baja On Two Wheels With EagleRider

Riding a motorcycle in Mexico is an adventure. Riding a Harley-Davidson through Baja with EagleRider is an experience.

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21 февраля, 12:09

Офис Plarium Kharkiv: здесь мы разрабатываем игры

Вертолетная площадка, солнечные панели, 800-килограммовый робот, Harley-Davidson, батут, студия Motion Capture, кинотеатр, допросная, штатный повар, инструктор по йоге и ручной барнакл. Что из этого действительно есть в студии Plarium Kharkiv — смотрите под катом. Читать дальше →

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20 февраля, 00:28

Harley-Davidson Road King Special: The Milwaukee Vibrator Goes On Tour

Harleys offer a uniquely American and spiritual experience.

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11 февраля, 11:52

Harley-Davidson Road King Special 2017: на дорогах появился новый король

В базовое оснащение Harley-Davidson Road King Special входит ABS, противоугонная система, круиз-контроль. Цены в России стартуют с отметки в 2 123 000 рублей за байк в черном цветовом исполнении.

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08 февраля, 02:18

Trump's foreign travel is causing headaches abroad

Less than a month into his presidency, Donald Trump is forcing foreign leaders to grapple with an extraordinary question: Is it worth the political risk to invite him for a visit?In Britain, Prime Minister Theresa May is already dealing with a popular backlash over her country's invitation for a state visit to the combustible new U.S. president. Irish leaders, meanwhile, are debating whether to invite Trump — and whether their prime minister should follow tradition and visit the White House on St. Patrick’s Day. Elsewhere in the world, staffers involved in arranging summits and bilateral meetings face the possibility of public relations and security headaches wherever the U.S. president sets foot, not least because he’s likely to draw protests.“It’s really risky territory for these foreign leaders who are trying to host Trump,” said Thomas Wright, director of the Project on International Order and Strategy at the Brookings Institution. “He’s a guy who takes everything personally. He’s looking at a huge protest wherever he goes. He may blame the leaders, and he may just blame the country.”The White House did not immediately respond to requests for comment about how it was crafting its Trump travel strategy. But a Trump administration official said it’s hard for other government heads to resist the possibility of spending time with the leader of the world’s most powerful country. “For better or for worse, people understand that he’s the president, and they want to meet him,” he said.Already, wherever Trump travels inside the United States, he draws demonstrators, many of whom were spurred to hit the streets after his executive order barring refugees and visitors from seven Muslim-majority countries. The White House canceled a Trump trip to Milwaukee recently because the president’s host, the Harley-Davidson motorcycle company, was said to be worried about protests.Trump’s foreign travel plans are slowly taking shape, with Europe as a primary focus. In phone calls with international leaders, Trump has committed to attending the G-7 summit in May in Taormina, Italy; a NATO summit that same month in Brussels; and July’s G-20 summit in Hamburg. Trump’s appearance at the NATO meeting is especially sensitive given that he’s called the military alliance “obsolete” and questioned its funding structure.Two major Asian summits — APEC, hosted by Vietnam, and ASEAN, hosted by the Philippines — are set for the fall, with Trump likely to attend at least one of them. Like other such gatherings, they can be grueling affairs, requiring attendees to attend hours-long meetings, something Trump, who has a famously short attention span, may struggle with. Several modern U.S. presidents have made Canada, a neighbor and top trade partner, their first stop abroad, sometimes in the bitter cold of February. It’s unclear if Trump will follow that tradition, although Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has invited him. White House spokesman Sean Spicer has said Trump and Trudeau will meet “soon.” But at this rate, Trump appears likely to make his first overseas presidential debut later than his two recent predecessors, Barack Obama and George W. Bush, who both were traveling abroad within a month of their first inaugurations.Perhaps nowhere has the Trump visit dilemma been clearer than in Britain. U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May is determined to forge strong ties with the Trump as her country negotiates its exit from the European Union. But nearly 2 million people have signed a petition demanding that the British government not honor Trump with a state visit because “it would cause embarrassment to her majesty, the Queen.” On Monday, the debate hit a new level when the speaker of the British House of Commons, John Bercow, said Trump should not be allowed to address Parliament during his trip.“I feel very strongly that our opposition to racism and to sexism and our support for equality before the law and an independent judiciary are hugely important considerations," Bercow said, to applause, when explaining his stance.Wright said that Bercow may have done the British prime minister, a member of the Conservative Party, a favor by undercutting the notion of a Trump appearance before Parliament.“Imagine if he spoke at the House Commons and the entire Labour Party turned their backs on him — the chances of something going seriously wrong are very, very high,” Wright said.And Trump, who takes great pride in his brand, revels in adulation, and is highly sensitive to criticism, may not react well, Wright added. If he feels disrespected, say, in Britain or at the NATO summit, Trump may try to take it out on his hosts through policy decisions or, at the least, via Twitter-bashing. Even the latter poses a domestic political risk for foreign leaders who probably don’t wish to be embarrassed by the U.S. president.“The fact that he views it so personally makes it incredibly high risk,” Wright said.Irish Prime Minister Enda Kenny has accepted Trump’s invitation to stop by the White House on St. Patrick’s Day, following a custom of past prime ministers. Tens of thousands of people have signed a petition, titled “Shamrock for Trump: Not in My Name” pressuring Kenny to scrap the trip. Kenny isn’t backing down, however, and has pledged to tell Trump that he disagrees with the U.S. president’s immigration policy.Meanwhile, some Irish politicians are questioning whether Kenny should invite Trump to visit their country in return. Ireland’s finance minister, Michael Noonan, said Kenny should wait for a while before asking Trump to stop by.“I think he should invite him at some stage, but I think an early visit might be controversial,” Noonan told the Limerick Leader. “In all these things, the only reason he would invite him would be for the economic benefit of the country, and if it was too controversial it probably wouldn't be of economic benefit. So it's a matter of timing, but he certainly shouldn't rule it out.”Some foreign officials downplayed the risks involved with a Trump visit. In Poland, where the government is relatively conservative, leaders have indicated they are enthusiastic about Trump, except for one area of concern: his apparent fondness for Russia. There’s even an online petition urging Trump to make Poland his first stop in Europe; more than 116,000 people have signed on.Poland has already invited Trump for a multi-lateral meeting in July, said Piotr Wilczek, the country’s ambassador to the United States. “In Poland, I think the attitude is quite different than in some countries, like France or Germany,” Wilczek said. “I don’t think it’s a risk. I would love for him to visit.”

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07 февраля, 16:38

Harley-Davidson Works To Reverse The Declining Sales Trend In The Home Market

The iconic heavyweight motorcycle maker Harley-Davidson invokes a sense of nostalgia. The noisy guzzling Harleys were highly popular with the Baby Boomer generation, which formed its biggest customer base. Yet this segment is now aging, and Harley is struggling to replace its core customer base.

06 февраля, 15:38

Make American Jobs

President Donald Trump had Harley-Davidson executives and employees over to lunch at the White House last week and reiterated his promise to end wrong-headed trade policies that enable foreign countries to eat American workers’ lunch. The president reassured the Harley workers from the United Steelworkers (USW) union and the International Association of Machinists (IAM) that he would renegotiate NAFTA and other trade deals. “A lot of people [have been] taking advantage of us, a lot of countries [have been] taking advantage of us, really terribly taking advantage of us,” he said as news cameras clicked, “We have to be treated fairly.” No promise could be more heartening to workers as corporations like Carrier and Rexnord continue to move jobs to Mexico. No news could be better in the same week that the Economic Policy Institute (EPI) released research showing that since 2001, the United States’ massive trade deficit with China cost 3.4 million Americans their jobs. Workers, families and communities have suffered as trade and tax policy over the past quarter century encouraged corporations to off-shore factories and jobs. Flipping that philosophy to favor American workers and domestic manufacturing is exactly what labor organizations like the USW have long fought for. If President Trump actually achieves that, all Americans will benefit. In the meantime, Rexnord Corp. has finalized plans to uproot its bearings manufacturing machines in Indianapolis, transport the equipment to Mexico and throw 300 skilled and dedicated workers, members of my union, the USW, into the street. Terminations begin Feb. 13. Automation did not take these workers’ jobs. The lure of dirt-cheap wages in Mexico and tax breaks awarded for the costs of moving jobs and machinery stole them. President Trump talked Thursday to the Harley workers and executives about changing tax policy. Ending all special tax deals and loopholes that corporations like Rexnord and Carrier use for shuttering American factories and shipping them to other countries would be a good first step. U.S. policy shouldn’t reward corporations like Rexford and Carrier that profit from exploiting the international wage race to the bottom and the wretched environmental regulation of emerging nations. The next logical step would be establishing consequences for those corporations – like requiring them to pay substantial economic penalties if they want access to the U.S. market for their once-domestic and now foreign-made products. In addition, American policy must be – just as President Trump promised in his campaign – to stop trade law violators who are trampling all over American workers. The EPI study detailed the devastation caused by the worst violator – China. American workers and companies can compete on a level playing field with any counterpart in the world. But the EPI study shows just how much American workers and their employers suffer when the United States fails to strictly enforce international trade law. Of the 3.4 million jobs lost between 2001 and 2015 because of the U.S. trade deficit with China, EPI found that nearly three-quarters of them, 2.6 million, were manufacturing jobs. Every state and every Congressional district was hit. These are jobs fabricating computer and electronic parts, textiles, apparel and furniture. Manufacturing jobs such as these provide family-supporting wages and benefits such as health insurance and pensions. As these jobs went overseas, American workers’ income stagnated while those at the top – executives, 1 percenters and corporate stock holders – benefitted. As the rich got richer, the EPI researchers found that all non-college educated workers lost a total of $180 billion a year in income. When the United States agreed to allow China into the World Trade Organization (WTO) in 2001, former President Bill Clinton said the access that the deal provided American companies to the gigantic Chinese market would create jobs. Promises, promises. It’s possible no one guessed just how massively China would violate the trade rules it agreed to abide by under the WTO pact. Numerous investigations by the U.S. Department of Commerce have found China improperly subsidizes its exports by providing artificially cheap loans, free land, and discounted raw materials and utilities. To keep its workers employed, China helps finance overproduction in industries like steel and aluminum, then dumps the excess at below-market prices in the United States, bankrupting mills and factories here. China pirates innovation, software and technology from foreign producers. To steal trade secrets, its military hacked into the computers of American corporations and the USW. In addition, China has manipulated the value of its currency so that its exports are artificially cheap and imports from the United States are artificially expensive. Even if the scale of violation was underestimated, when it occurred, the American government had a responsibility to take action, to file trade cases, to take issues before the WTO, to negotiate to bring China in line with international standards and protect American jobs and preserve domestic manufacturing, which is crucial to national defense. Precious little of that occurred. The trade deficit with China exploded, obliterating American jobs, a quarter million on average every year since China joined the WTO in 2001. China exports to the United States its overproduced aluminum, steel, and other commodities, but also its unemployment. After lunch on Thursday, President Trump thanked Harley-Davidson for assembling its iconic motorcycles in America. He extended his hand in aid, saying, “We are going to help you, too. We are going to make it really great for business, not just for you, but for everybody. We are going to be competitive with anybody in the world.”American workers and domestic manufacturers already are competitive. What they need is a government that doesn’t require them to compete with a handicap so huge that it’s like asking Evel Knievel to jump his Harley-Davidson XR 750 over 19 cars without a ramp. What they need is tough action against corporations that renounce their birthplace for profit and against flagrant, job-stealing trade violators like China. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

06 февраля, 15:38

Make American Jobs

President Donald Trump had Harley-Davidson executives and employees over to lunch at the White House last week and reiterated his promise to end wrong-headed trade policies that enable foreign countries to eat American workers’ lunch. The president reassured the Harley workers from the United Steelworkers (USW) union and the International Association of Machinists (IAM) that he would renegotiate NAFTA and other trade deals. “A lot of people [have been] taking advantage of us, a lot of countries [have been] taking advantage of us, really terribly taking advantage of us,” he said as news cameras clicked, “We have to be treated fairly.” No promise could be more heartening to workers as corporations like Carrier and Rexnord continue to move jobs to Mexico. No news could be better in the same week that the Economic Policy Institute (EPI) released research showing that since 2001, the United States’ massive trade deficit with China cost 3.4 million Americans their jobs. Workers, families and communities have suffered as trade and tax policy over the past quarter century encouraged corporations to off-shore factories and jobs. Flipping that philosophy to favor American workers and domestic manufacturing is exactly what labor organizations like the USW have long fought for. If President Trump actually achieves that, all Americans will benefit. In the meantime, Rexnord Corp. has finalized plans to uproot its bearings manufacturing machines in Indianapolis, transport the equipment to Mexico and throw 300 skilled and dedicated workers, members of my union, the USW, into the street. Terminations begin Feb. 13. Automation did not take these workers’ jobs. The lure of dirt-cheap wages in Mexico and tax breaks awarded for the costs of moving jobs and machinery stole them. President Trump talked Thursday to the Harley workers and executives about changing tax policy. Ending all special tax deals and loopholes that corporations like Rexnord and Carrier use for shuttering American factories and shipping them to other countries would be a good first step. U.S. policy shouldn’t reward corporations like Rexnord and Carrier that profit from exploiting the international wage race to the bottom and the wretched environmental regulation of emerging nations. The next logical step would be establishing consequences for those corporations – like requiring them to pay substantial economic penalties if they want access to the U.S. market for their once-domestic and now foreign-made products. In addition, American policy must be – just as President Trump promised in his campaign – to stop trade law violators who are trampling all over American workers. The EPI study detailed the devastation caused by the worst violator – China. American workers and companies can compete on a level playing field with any counterpart in the world. But the EPI study shows just how much American workers and their employers suffer when the United States fails to strictly enforce international trade law. Of the 3.4 million jobs lost between 2001 and 2015 because of the U.S. trade deficit with China, EPI found that nearly three-quarters of them, 2.6 million, were manufacturing jobs. Every state and every Congressional district was hit. These are jobs fabricating computer and electronic parts, textiles, apparel and furniture. Manufacturing jobs such as these provide family-supporting wages and benefits such as health insurance and pensions. As these jobs went overseas, American workers’ income stagnated while those at the top – executives, 1 percenters and corporate stock holders – benefitted. As the rich got richer, the EPI researchers found that all non-college educated workers lost a total of $180 billion a year in income. When the United States agreed to allow China into the World Trade Organization (WTO) in 2001, former President Bill Clinton said the access that the deal provided American companies to the gigantic Chinese market would create jobs. Promises, promises. It’s possible no one guessed just how massively China would violate the trade rules it agreed to abide by under the WTO pact. Numerous investigations by the U.S. Department of Commerce have found China improperly subsidizes its exports by providing artificially cheap loans, free land, and discounted raw materials and utilities. To keep its workers employed, China helps finance overproduction in industries like steel and aluminum, then dumps the excess at below-market prices in the United States, bankrupting mills and factories here. China pirates innovation, software and technology from foreign producers. To steal trade secrets, its military hacked into the computers of American corporations and the USW. In addition, China has manipulated the value of its currency so that its exports are artificially cheap and imports from the United States are artificially expensive. Even if the scale of violation was underestimated, when it occurred, the American government had a responsibility to take action, to file trade cases, to take issues before the WTO, to negotiate to bring China in line with international standards and protect American jobs and preserve domestic manufacturing, which is crucial to national defense. Precious little of that occurred. The trade deficit with China exploded, obliterating American jobs, a quarter million on average every year since China joined the WTO in 2001. China exports to the United States its overproduced aluminum, steel, and other commodities, but also its unemployment. After lunch on Thursday, President Trump thanked Harley-Davidson for assembling its iconic motorcycles in America. He extended his hand in aid, saying, “We are going to help you, too. We are going to make it really great for business, not just for you, but for everybody. We are going to be competitive with anybody in the world.”American workers and domestic manufacturers already are competitive. What they need is a government that doesn’t require them to compete with a handicap so huge that it’s like asking Evel Knievel to jump his Harley-Davidson XR 750 over 19 cars without a ramp. What they need is tough action against corporations that renounce their birthplace for profit and against flagrant, job-stealing trade violators like China. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

04 февраля, 08:05

President Trump's Second Week of Action

PRESIDENT TRUMP’S SECOND WEEK OF ACTION 7: Presidential Actions to Make America Great Again 4: Diplomatic conversations with foreign leaders to promote an America First foreign policy. 4: Meetings to get input from workers and business leaders on jumpstarting job creation. 2: Events for the nomination of Judge Gorsuch to the Supreme Court 2: Events to commemorate African American History Month 2: Members of President Trump’s Cabinet sworn in. 1: Bill signed into law 1: Meeting with cyber security experts 1: Commemoration of American Heart Month 1: Speech at the National Prayer Breakfast 1: Letter of Recognition for National Catholic Schools Week Following Through On His Promise To The American People, President Trump Nominated Judge Neil Gorsuch To The Supreme Court On Tuesday, President Trump nominated Judge Neil Gorsuch to become Associate Justice on the Supreme Court, filling the seat left behind by the late Justice Antonin Scalia. The next day, President Trump met with various stakeholders to thank them for their input in making such an important decision. President Trump Continued To Drain The Washington Swamp And Further Protect All Americans PROTECTING AMERICANS: President Trump signed two executive memoranda to protect Americans and sanctioned the world’s largest state sponsor of terrorism in Iran. On Friday, the Trump administration sanctioned twenty-five individuals and entities that provide support to Iran’s ballistic missile program and to the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps’ Quds Force. Last Saturday, President Trump ordered a 30-day review and development of a new plan to defeat ISIS. Last Saturday, to better get advice and information needed to ensure the safety and security of the American people, President Trump signed an executive order that modernized the National Security Council and the Homeland Security Council. DRAINING THE SWAMP: President Trump used the power of his office to promote government transparency, preventing lobbying influence, and limiting regulatory overreach. Last Saturday, President Trump signed an executive order establishing new ethics commitments for all Executive branch appointees to limit the influence of lobbyists and Washington insiders. On Monday, President Trump signed an executive order to reduce government regulations by requiring two existing regulations to be ended if a new one is approved. On Tuesday, President Trump signed into law the “GAO Access And Oversight Act Of 2017” (H.R.72) allowing the Government Accountability Office to gather records from all federal agencies so it can be more responsive to civil action. President Trump Continued To Put Jobs Front And Center Through Two Executive Actions And Holding Four Stakeholder Meetings With Labor And Business Leaders FREEING UP THE FINANCIAL SYSTEM: President Trump made two Presidential actions to better enable the financial system to promote job creation and serve all Americans On Friday, President Trump signed an executive order to regulate the financial system in a way that protects consumers while promoting economic growth and job creation. On Friday, President Trump issued a memorandum to prevent the unintended consequences of financial fiduciary rules from limiting economic opportunity and American’s investments. HEARING FROM STAKEHOLDERS: Throughout the week, President Trump met with labor and business leaders to get input on how best to jumpstart job creation for all Americans. On Monday, President Trump met with small business owners to get input on how to spur job creation and help businesses like theirs succeed. On Tuesday, President Trump met with leaders in the pharmaceutical industry to discuss how jobs can be brought back to America and reduce prices so all Americans can afford quality healthcare. On Thursday, President Trump met with the executives of Harley-Davidson and union representatives to encourage American manufacturing. On Friday, President Trump met with his economic advisory council to discuss ways to deliver jobs to all Americans. To Start African American History Month, President Trump Honored The History Of The African American Community And Their Vast Contribution To American Society On Wednesday, President Trump met with African American community leaders to honor their contribution and listen to their input on what can be done to improve the lives of all Americans. The same day, President Trump signed a proclamation honoring February 2017 as Black History Month. Despite Historic Democratic Obstructionism, President Trump Continued To Get His Cabinet Nominees Confirmed By Congress On Tuesday, Elaine Chao was sworn in as President Trump’s Secretary of Transportation. On Wednesday, Rex Tillerson was sworn in as President Trump’s Secretary of State. President Trump Held Three Conversations With Foreign Leaders To Promote American Interests Around The Globe On Sunday, President Trump spoke with King Salman bin Abd Al-Aziz Al Saud of Saudi Arabia on creating safe zones in Syria and Yemen to help refugees and strict enforcement of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action on Iran. On Sunday, President Trump spoke with the Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Sheikh Muhammad bin Zayid Al Nuhayyan of the United Arab Emirates to reaffirm the strong partnership between both countries and combating radical Islamic terrorism. On Sunday, President Trump spoke with Acting President Hwang Kyo-ahn of the Republic of Korea on the important of the their mutual alliance and defending against North Korea. On Thursday, President Trump met with King Abdullah II of Jordan where he conveyed the U.S.’s commitment to Jordan’s stability and defeating ISIS. To Further Protect America’s Cyber Security, President Trump Met With Experts On Tuesday, President Trump held a listening session with cyber security experts to help fulfill his campaign promise of securing America against cyber threats. President Trump Spoke At The National Prayer Breakfast On Thursday, President Trump continued to champion repealing the Johnson Amendment to allow representatives of faith to speak freely and without retribution. President Trump Commemorated American Heart Month On Friday, President Trump proclaimed February 2017 as American Heart Month. President Trump Recognized National Catholic Schools Week On Friday, President Trump issued a letter recognizing National Catholic Schools week. In Two Weeks Of Action, The President Has Been Relentless In This Effort To Make America Great Again 21 Presidential Actions 16 Meetings With Foreign Leaders 10 Stakeholder Meetings 6 Cabinet Members Sworn-In 4 National Proclamations 3 Agency Visits 2 Speeches 1 Legislation signed into law 1 Supreme Court Nomination 1 Manufacturing Initiative Launch 1 Thank-You Reception 1 Letter Of Recognition  

04 февраля, 08:03

President Trump: Getting Americans Back To Work

STICKING TO HIS WORD: PRESIDENT TRUMP’S FIRST TWO WEEKS PRIORITIZED PUTTING AMERICANS BACK TO WORK TAKING ACTION TO STIMULATE JOB CREATION: President Trump is using the power of the Presidency to ensure that actions are taken to rebuild the nation, renegotiate U.S. trade deals, and most importantly, take action to ensure U.S. job creation. On January 23rd, The President signed an executive memorandum ordering the U.S withdrawal from the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement and related negotiations. On January 24th, The President signed an executive memorandum initiating the process to begin construction of the Keystone XL Pipeline. On January 24th, The President signed an executive memorandum declaring the Dakota Access Pipeline serves the national interest and initiating the process to complete construction. On January 24th, The President signed an executive memorandum ordering that all new pipeline construction and repair work use U.S. materials and equipment produced in the U.S. REDUCING GOVERNMENT BARRIERS TO JOB CREATION: President Trump has been working to remove burdensome government regulations and streamline government processes that for too long have stifled job creation and deterred business growth. On January 24th, The President signed an executive memorandum ordering his Commerce Secretary to find ways to streamline federal permitting processes for domestic manufacturing and to reduce regulatory burdens affecting domestic manufacturers. On January 24th, The President signed an executive order expediting the environmental review and approval process for infrastructure projects. On January 30th, The President signed an executive order to reduce regulations and control regulatory costs with the goal of revoking two regulations for every new regulation put forward. On February 3rd, The President signed an executive order setting the guiding principles for regulating the U.S. financial system to ensure economic growth, job creation, and vibrant financial markets. ENGAGING THE PRIVATE SECTOR ON JOB CREATION: President Trump continues to meet with our nation’s business leaders, union leaders, and other influential stakeholders to discuss removing government barriers to job creation and how to reverse the trend of companies shifting U.S. jobs overseas. On January 23rd, The President met with key manufacturing business leaders to discuss ways to stimulate the American manufacturing sector and bring overseas jobs back to the U.S. On January 23rd, The President met with union leaders and American workers to discuss plans to renegotiate trade deals to help stimulate U.S. job growth and wages. On January 24th, The President met with key automobile industry leaders to discuss ideas about how to bring jobs back to the U.S. automobile industry. On January 27th, The President announced the launch of a manufacturing jobs initiative featuring some of the world’s most successful and creative business leaders to share their experiences and gain their insights. On January 30th, The President met with small business leaders to discuss the removal of burdensome government regulations and how to revitalize small business growth. On January 31st, The President met with pharmaceutical industry leaders to discuss how the industry could create U.S. jobs and lower the price of drugs for the American worker. On February 2nd, The President hosted a meeting with Harley-Davidson executives and union representatives to discuss plans to spur U.S. job creation through renegotiation of trade deals, reforming the tax code and reducing government regulation.  

03 февраля, 17:30

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Ford Motor, Harley-Davidson, Lear, General and Honda Motor

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Ford Motor, Harley-Davidson, Lear, General and Honda Motor

Выбор редакции
03 февраля, 00:58

Trump meets with executives from Harley-Davidson in Washington

After a scheduled meeting in Wisconsin was cancelled, President Trump met with executives from Harley-Davidson in Washington, D.C on Feb. 2.

02 февраля, 23:56

Auto Stock Roundup: US Sales Down; Ford, Harley-Davidson Miss on Earnings

The auto sector entered the fourth-quarter reporting cycle with Ford (F) and Harley-Davidson (HOG) missing the earnings estimates.

02 февраля, 23:01

Трамп не исключил никаких вариантов ответа США на действия Ирана

Президент США Дональд Трамп заявил, что в отношении Ирана нельзя исключать никаких вариантов ответа на проведение Тегераном испытания баллистической ракеты. Трампа в ходе встречи с представителями компании Harley-Davidson попросили прокомментировать недавние действия Ирана и варианты ответа на них со стороны США, передает ТАСС. «Никакие варианты нельзя исключать», - сказал Трамп. В четверг СМИ сообщили, что после испытаний баллистической ракеты Иран провел успешный тестовый запуск крылатой ракеты под названием «Сумар» В Белом доме США заявили, что президент Дональд Трамп считает недопустимым испытания баллистических ракет в Иране, равно как и действия Тегерана в регионе Конгрессмены США внесли в Палату представителей законопроект о новых санкциях против Ирана.

02 февраля, 22:29

Remarks by President Trump Before Meeting with Harley-Davidson Executives and Union Representatives

Roosevelt Room 1:11 P.M. EST THE PRESIDENT:  So it's great to have Harley-Davidson.  What a great, great group of people and what a fantastic job you do.  And thank you for all of the votes you gave me in Wisconsin.  Some people thought that was an upset; I thought we were going to win it.  From the beginning, we thought we were going to win it. Harley-Davidson is a true American icon, one of the greats.  Your motorcycles have carried American servicemembers in the war -- in the wars.  They take care of our police officers.  And I see it so often -- whenever I go -- whenever there's a motorcycle group, oftentimes it's a Harley.  And the sound of that Harley is a little different, I have to tell you.  It's really good.   So thank you, Harley-Davidson, for building things in America.  And I think you're going to even expand -- I know your business is now doing very well and there's a lot of spirit right now in the country that you weren't having so much in the last number of months that you have right now.  You see what's happening. I'm especially honored to welcome the steelworkers and the machinists to the White House. Who is a steelworker here?  Well, you're all steelworkers, essentially, right?   But you folks have been terrific to me.  Sometimes your top people didn't support me but the steelworkers supported me, right?  A lot of your top people are going to be losing their jobs pretty soon I guess but they're all coming around -- we're getting them.  But the workers supported us big league.  We want to make it easier for businesses to create more jobs and more factories in the United States, and you're a great example of it.  That means we have to make America the best country on Earth to do business, and that's what we're in the process of doing -- we're redoing NAFTA, redoing a lot of our trade deals, and we're negotiating properly with countries -- even countries that are allies -- a lot of people taking advantage of us, a lot of countries taking advantage of us, really terribly taking advantage of us. We had one instance in Australia -- I have a lot of respect for Australia, I love Australia as a country -- but we had a problem where, for whatever reason, President Obama said that they were going to take probably well over a thousand illegal immigrants who were in prisons and they were going to bring them and take them into this country.  And I just said why?  I just wanted to ask a question -- I could ask that question of you -- why?  One thousand-two-hundred-fifty -- it could be 2,000, it could be more than that, and I said, why?  Why are we doing this?  What's the purpose?  So we'll see what happens.  But a previous administration does something, you have to respect that, but you can also say, why are we doing this?  That's why we're in the jams that we're in.   And you guys especially, the steelworkers, understand what I'm saying, right?  So I just -- we have some wonderful allies and we're going to keep it that way, but we have to be treated fairly also.  We have to be treated fairly.  In this administration, our allegiance will be to the American workers and to American businesses, like Harley-Davidson, that were very strong in the 1980s and I remember this -- you were victims of trading abuse -- big trading abuse, where they were dumping all sorts of competitors all over the place.  And Ronald Reagan stepped in and he put on large tariffs and you wouldn't be talking about Harley-Davidson probably right now if he didn't do that.   But we're going to help you, too, and we're going to make it really great for business -- not just you, but for everybody.  We're going to be competitive with anybody in the world.  We're going to be doing taxing policies very soon it's going to be coming out.  And I know health care is a big problem for every country -- every company as you know has suffered from Obamacare because of the tremendous cost and that's one of the things that we're working on hardest -- that and tax policy, and tariffs and trade. So I think you will be very happy.  It's an honor to have you at lunch.  I really appreciate your support.  You've given me tremendous support, your workers in particular have given tremendous support.  I want to thank the people of Wisconsin in particular.  It's been amazing what happened up there.  It was a big shocker that evening when they showed -- wow -- I'll never forget, wow, Wisconsin just went for Trump.  Then all of these people, especially that guy right there -- (laughter) -- not but then they said, what's going on?  Wisconsin just went for Trump.  And then Michigan went for Trump and Pennsylvania.  So they were great.   You're just great people.  These are amazing people and they get it.  So, again, to all of you at the table today, thank you very much.  We appreciate it.  We really appreciate it greatly. Q    Mr. President, is military action off the table in Iran? THE PRESIDENT:  Nothing is off the table. Q    Mr. President, the Russians are thanking you for easing sanctions. THE PRESIDENT:  I haven't eased anything.   Q    That's what they said. THE PRESIDENT:  Well, I haven't eased anything. END 1:16 P.M. EST

02 февраля, 22:06

Press Briefing by Press Secretary Sean Spicer, 2/2/2017, #7

James S. Brady Press Briefing Room  12:32 P.M. EST MR. SPICER:  Good afternoon.  Happy Groundhog Day.  We've got six more weeks of winter, apparently.  Luckily, for those of you who are going to be joining the President down to Florida this weekend, you'll get some time to get a glimpse of summer at the "Winter White House" in Mar-a-Lago. The President is going to start his meeting at 1:00 sharp.  You probably just saw the b-roll of folks from Harley rolling on in, literally.  So I’m going to try to keep this a little quick. The President signed a proclamation yesterday ushering in Black History Month.  He looks forward to an engaging and informative month of events honoring the enormous contributions that African Americans have made throughout our history. Last night, the President was honored to host the swearing-in of the next Secretary of State, Rex Tillerson, in the Oval Office.  As the President said last night, Secretary Tillerson is a man who’s already respected all over the world for the tremendous life that he’s led, and now will bring his years of experience to the critical task of making our nation safer, more prosperous, and more secure.  It’s time to bring a clear-eyed focus to our foreign affairs, and now with Secretary Tillerson at the helm of the State Department, we’ll do just that.  We'll strengthen our alliances, form new ones, and enhance America’s interests throughout the world.  Speaking of the President’s excellent nominees, praise is pouring in from around the country for his pick for Supreme Court.  The Detroit News said Judge Gorsuch is a “legal superstar"; “an outstanding choice,” says the New Hampshire Union Leader.  The Richmond Times-Dispatch says the “initial reaction” was “to cheer.”  The South Florida Sun Sentinel touted his “excellent qualifications.” Yesterday, Judge Gorsuch had his first round of meetings on the Hill.  Unfortunately, Senate offices aren’t in the habit of releasing editorials, but from everything we heard, the Judge knocked it out of the park on the Senate as well.  The President looks forward to a fair and speedy confirmation process for this exceedingly qualified nominee and jurist.    In my last briefing, I read out a list of the senators Judge Gorsuch met with.  In addition to the meeting with Majority Leader McConnell, Majority Whip Cornyn, Judiciary Chairman Grassley, and Senators Hatch and Gardner, the Judge also met with Democratic Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia.  Recently, Senator Manchin expressed his belief that Judge Gorsuch could win enough Democrats to hit 60 votes.  I’ll agree with the Senator there on that one.  I mean, we have to have a few Trump-state Democrats who want to win re-election.  But, as I pointed out yesterday, this so-called 60 vote “standard” is simply not accurate.  Democrats are grasping at straws to block the confirmation of an unquestionably qualified nominee.  I’ll repeat, neither of the two Supreme Court justices that President Obama put forward were subject to the 60-vote threshold.  So although I agree with Senator Manchin that Judge Gorsuch will probably get enough Democrats to get to 60, it’s just simply not ever been a requirement. Now, on to the events of today.  The President started his day by attending the National Prayer Breakfast.  It's a tradition that continued over six decades, going back to President Eisenhower.  The President thanked the American people for their faith and prayers that have sustained and inspired him, noting that the five words that he has heard more than any others as he’s traveled throughout the country are, “I'm praying for you.”  He spoke at length about the ISIS genocide against Christians and the oppression of peace-loving Muslims, as well as the threats of extermination against the Jewish people, and made it clear that he believes the United States has a moral obligation to speak out against such violence.  He encouraged Americans to remain a tolerant society where all faiths are respected and where all of our citizens can feel safe and secure.  With that goal in mind, the President remarked that he's taken action to ensure that the United States will not allow a beachhead of intolerance to spread throughout our nation.  In the coming days, we will develop a system to help ensure that those admitted into our country fully embrace our values of religious and personal liberty and reject any form of oppression or discrimination.  The President also committed to get rid of the Johnson Amendment and allowing our representatives of faith to speak freely and without retribution. In a particularly poignant moment during his remarks, the President recalled yesterday his visit to Dover Air Force Base to join the family of Chief Ryan Owens as America’s fallen hero was returned home.  After honoring Chief Owens for giving his life in defense of the American people, the President quoted John 15:13:  “Greater love hath no man than this: that a man lay down his life for his friends.” After returning to the White House this morning, the President held a legislative affairs staff meeting in the Oval Office with his team.  The team continues to work closely with Congress to enact the President’s agenda.  With the nomination of Judge Gorsuch to the Supreme Court, extensive outreach is underway on Capitol Hill and we look forward to the Judge receiving a swift and fair hearing. Between his meetings, the President was pleased to see that EPA Administrator-designee Pruitt was voted out of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee.  As has unfortunately become the practice, Democrats again boycotted the hearing, requiring a suspension of the rules in order to advance his nomination. Following the strategy session, the President met with Senators Hatch, Wyden and Congressmen Brady and Neal.  This meeting was an opportunity for the President to meet with the chairmen and ranking members of the Senate Finance Committee and House Ways and Means Committee to help chart the future of U.S. trade policy.  The President has put together an all-star trade team that will work closely with the U.S. Trade Representative and the committees led by these members to craft new trade deals.   The President has expressed his concern time and again with NAFTA, which he believes is an out-of-date agreement.  The ultimate goal is to ensure the best and fairest treatment of U.S. workers and businesses, and the President believes that those interests are best secured by bilateral, rather than multilateral trade deals.  He looks forward to working closely with the USTR and Congress when it comes to issues of trade. For those of you who weren’t outside and just saw the Harleys roll up, it’s no surprise that this afternoon the President will host a meeting and listening session with Harley-Davidson executives and union representatives.  For a list of those individuals, please contact our office.  Harley-Davidson has been an American success story since 1901, when William S. Harley, at age 21, completed the blueprint drawing of an engine designed to fit into a bicycle.  In 1903, Harley-Davidson began building motorcycles in the United States. And today, the company has approximately 6,000 employees and $6 billion in annual revenue.  The company’s global headquarters is located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin -- which may have had something to do with them getting in so quickly.  And there's a certain staffer. Today, the President will welcome to the White House the latest generation of Harley-Davidson executives to discuss how to make it easier for businesses to create more jobs and factories in the United States.  Beyond the company executives, representatives from the machinists and steel workers unions were also be in attendance. Their motorcycles have carried our American servicemembers in war.  They carry our police officers that keep us safe.  They carry the Secret Service as they protect our presidents.  And they bring joy to millions of Americans and throughout the world -- and others throughout the world, rather.  The President is looking forward to hosting these leaders from one of America’s truly great entrepreneurial success stories.  The American worker built this country, and the President is focused on restoring a government that puts their interests first.  A few administrative notes.  The National Security Advisor, Mike Flynn, today announced additions to the NSC senior staff.  David Cattler will be a Deputy Assistant to the President for Regional Affairs.  John Eisenberg, Deputy Assistant to the President, NSC Legal Advisor, and Department [Deputy] Counsel to the President for National Security Affairs.  Kevin Harrington, Deputy Assistant to the President for Strategic Planning.  And Kenneth Juster, Deputy Assistant to the President for International Economic Affairs. Lastly, we had a great reaction to our Skype introduction seats yesterday.  I know we've had a tremendous amount of requests pouring in from around the country.  Please contact the press office if you know of any that has an interest in joining us in the future.   In terms of the schedule for tomorrow, the President will host a Strategic and Policy Forum.  Then, in the afternoon, the President will have lunch with General Flynn before departing down to Mar-a-Lago later in the day. With that, I’ll take some questions. Katie Pavlich. Q    Hi, Sean.  Thanks for the question.  Today, President Trump talked about Christian genocide at the National Prayer Breakfast, and last year the Obama State Department officially declared a genocide by ISIS against Christians and other minority and religious groups in the Middle East and North Africa.  Now that Rex Tillerson has been sworn in as the Secretary, what specifically is the administration planning to do to comply with the legal obligations of protecting these groups under the U.N. 1948 Treaty? MR. SPICER:  That's a great question.  I think Secretary Tillerson is learning his way around the building so far this morning.  He gave a great speech talking about his vision and goal for the State Department.  I think there will be further guidance coming out on that, Katie.  Right now, his job is to get in, get settled, talk to the employees, make sure they understood.   But back to the issue, obviously it’s important to President.  It was during -- throughout the campaign.  It’s something that he addressed this morning, and is something that he is committed to.  He talked about it in terms of the executive orders, and allowing Christian minorities in key countries seek asylum in the United States.  He recognizes that, in so many nations, these are the oppressed groups in accordance with how the U.N. defines refugees.  So I think you’ll see further guidance with that. Jennifer. Q    Thanks, Sean.  I have two questions, actually.  Today, the President renewed his promise to protect religious liberty, which he says is under threat.  Some Americans see religious liberty as code for discrimination.  Can you kind of give us a sense of how the President views this tension? MR. SPICER:  It’s an interesting question, because I do -- you know, this is something that comes up quite a bit.  I think there is a line.  We have freedom of religion in this country, and I think people should be able to practice their religion, express their religion, express areas of their faith without reprisal.  And I think that pendulum sometimes swings the other way in the name of political correctness.   And I think the President and the Vice President both understand that one of the things that makes our country and this democracy so great is our ability to express our religion, to believe in faith, to express it, and to live by it.  And that’s where I think the important part is -- whether it’s a small business owner or employee, he wants to have some degree of expression of faith at the company.  And too often those voices get pushed out in the name of political correctness.   So he’s going to continue to make sure that we not only speak up for it, but find ways in which we can keep that line a little less blurred and make sure that the pendulum doesn’t swing against people.  We shouldn’t impose a religion on anybody.  We’re free to express our religion or be -- you know, not have one.  That’s obviously, in our country, an equally valid way of living your life.  But at the same time, I think people who want to express their faith shouldn’t be ostracized because they want to live that.  Major. Q    If you could give us an example, if you could, of the pendulum swinging in the direction of political correctness.  And how is that going to inform the President with this executive order?  And as you may know, a draft is circulating around town and many have wondered if that is going to be a way to either silence those on the left or be a threat to the LGBTQ community.  Talk us through both of those. MR. SPICER:  Well, I think if you look back to the Little Sisters case, if you look back to other businesses that were, under Obamacare -- Q    Would you put Hobby Lobby in that category? MR. SPICER:  I would, yeah.  Absolutely.  I think there’s several businesses and several institutions -- Catholic institutions and others -- that have been mandated or attempted to mandate certain things that they may or may not do or how they have to treat their employees.  Those are instances where clearly the pendulum is swinging a different way, where you are not carving out institutions or the ability for privately held businesses to conduct themselves to live according to their faith or their moral compass.   And so there’s clearly a lot of evidence in the last couple years of the government coming in with regulations and policies that have, frankly, denied people the ability to live according to their faith. Q    From the President’s point of view, that’s discriminatory in itself. MR. SPICER:  Well, I think there’s -- like I said, I think it’s a pendulum.  And where the President is, is that he wants to make sure that you don’t penalize someone for wanting to express their faith, and that to the extent that we can keep that line a little less blurred and allow people who don’t believe in a faith or have an opposing faith, make sure that they are equally comfortable in the workplace.  But we shouldn’t penalize people or mandate them to abide by certain policies or regulations which are in direct contradiction to their faith. Q    And what about the executive order, Sean?   MR. SPICER:  There’s right now no executive orders that are official or able to read out.  We maintain that there’s nothing new on that front.   Q    (Inaudible) drafted along -- MR. SPICER:  It's not a question of -- there are a lot of ideas that are being floated out -- I mentioned this the last couple days.  But that doesn’t mean -- part of it is, as the President does all the time, he asks for input, he asks for ideas, and on a variety of subjects there are staffing procedures that go on where people have a thought or an idea and it goes through the process.  But until the President makes up his mind and gives feedback and decides that that’s final, there’s nothing to announce.  Q    Thank you.  In light of the tragedy that happened in Quebec City last week, which Prime Minister Trudeau is actually calling an act of terrorism, what is the President doing, what initiatives is he taking to make sure that that kind of homegrown -- because he was a Canadian citizen -- homegrown terrorism, homegrown violence doesn’t happen within our country? MR. SPICER:  Well, there’s a lot of things.  Number one, he’s talked cyber -- I mean, he’s looking at it from every angle.  I think the first thing is to make sure that we look at our borders.  You’ve got to protect your own people first, then you’ve got to look at the cyber threats.  I mean, so there is a holistic approach to both immigration and there’s a direct nexus between immigration and national security and personal security that he has to look at.   But then it’s a multi-tiered step.  You look at the borders, you look at who we’re letting in, and you also look at what we’re doing internally with our intelligence agencies and the FBI that make sure that we’re looking at -- whether it’s the cyber threats that we face or other terrorist activities -- but making sure that we’re working with the NSA and the FBI to be ahead of the curve, if you will. Q    If I may, these are homegrown -- Oklahoma City was an American kid. MR. SPICER:  Sure. Q    Okay.  That’s all.  That’s what I’m asking. MR. SPICER:  That’s what I’m saying.  But I think that, part of it is, looking at using the assets that we have here -- the NSA, the FBI -- looking at using the different agencies to see if we can get ahead of the curve and see things.  And a lot of times, that’s been a very big issue, is getting ahead of the curve for when there are telltale signs, having the reporting systems up, working with the various agencies.  But it’s a multi-effort process, if you will. Kristen. Q    Sean, thank you.  Why is the administration easing sanctions against Russia? MR. SPICER:  We’re not easing sanctions.  The Treasury Department -- it is, from what I understand, it’s a fairly common practice for the Treasury Department, after sanctions are put in place, to go back and to look at whether or not there needs to be specific carve-outs for either industries or products and services that need to be going back and forth.  But I would refer you back to the Treasury Department on that one. Q    Hold on, Sean.  The language on the Treasury Department website suggests that you are, in fact, easing sanctions that authorizes certain transactions with the Federal Security Service.  Does that not suggest a shift from what was put in place --  MR. SPICER:  No, it doesn’t.   Q    So explain --  MR. SPICER:  It is, from what I understand, a regular course of action.  The Treasury does, quite often, when there are sanction imposed, but I would refer you back to the Treasury Department. Q    Thank you.  Could I ask you to describe the tone of the call on the weekend between the Australian Prime Minister and the President, and also outline the President’s concerns about the refugee deal in question?  And I asked you this earlier this week, but could you clarify whether the deal is on or not?  Because the President tweeted last night “I will study this dumb deal," implying that he's still considering it.   MR. SPICER:  Right.  The President had a very cordial conversation with Prime Minister Turnbull, where they went through an extensive discussion of this deal.  The President is unbelievably disappointed in the previous administration’s deal that was made and how poorly it was crafted, and the threat to national security it put the United States on. He has tremendous respect for the Prime Minister and for the Australian people, and has agreed to continue to review that deal and to ensure that as part of the deal, which was always part of it, that we would go through a very, very extreme vetting process to ensure that every single person that is being offered up is coming here with peaceful intentions and poses no threat to the United States.  So he has ensured that while he has respect for the Australian people and respect for Prime Minister Turnbull, that we do not pose a threat to the United States of America, that the deal that was cut by the last administration is something that he is extremely, extremely upset with.  He does not like it, but out of respect for him, he’s going to allow that process -- continue to study it and allow it to move forward under the conditions that have been set -- that there will be extreme vetting on every single one of those individuals. Q    Just for clarity, the deal itself is still under review, so it’s not certain to proceed?  Or it will proceed as --  MR. SPICER:  Part of the deal was that -- the deal allows for the United States to vet the individuals that are being offered up to be processed.  The President’s goal is to make sure that every single one of those people, in accordance with the deal and as discussed in the telephone conversation with the Prime Minister, is subject to extreme vetting to ensure that no one puts it.  But I cannot underscore how disappointed he was in the deal that was made and how he thought it was just a horrible deal that was offered up by the United States by the previous administration. Sarah. Q    The President and his national security advisor have been clear the administration wants to put Iran “on notice,” but they haven’t specified what that is.  What options are on the table?  And are there any options, like military action, that might be off the table at this point? MR. SPICER:  So I think General Flynn was really clear yesterday that Iran has violated the Joint Resolution, that Iran’s additional hostile actions that it took against our Navy vessel are ones that we are very clear are not going to sit by and take.  I think that we will have further updates for you on those additional actions, but clearly we wanted to make sure that Iran understood that they are on notice, this is not going un-responded to. John. Q    Thank you very much, Sean.   Q    It was a Saudi vessel.   MR. SPICER:  Thank you.  Yes. Q    They thought it was an American, but it's a Saudi vessel. MR. SPICER:  Right, that’s right.  John. Q    Thank you, Sean.  On January 27th, at the Republican retreat in Philadelphia, Vice President Pence had a closed-door meeting with House Republicans where several of them brought up the case of IRS Commissioner John Koskinen.  There was an attempt to impeach him last year, which some of the leadership in the House felt was unfair to the commissioner, and they urged him to tell the President that given his entire record, he should fire him or ask for his resignation soon.  My sources said the Vice President said “I can hear you.”  Is there any pending action on the fate of Commissioner Koskinen? MR. SPICER:  I have nothing to update you on.   Hallie. Q    On Yemen, it was initially described, the raid over the weekend, as a successful raid by the administration.  There are now some questions and comments raised about the possibility of additional civilian casualties.  So I’ve got a couple of questions for you on this one.  Would you still stand by your characterization of the raid as “successful”?  Was the President given multiple options about this raid, or just one?  And were there consultations with the prior administration’s national security officials, military officials about the raid moving forward? MR. SPICER:  Thank you.  Actually, I’d like to just walk through that.  I appreciate you bringing this up. There is -- let’s go through the tick-tock on that raid.  On November 7th, CENTCOM submitted the plan to DOD.  Clearly, that was under the last administration.  Legal teams were involved immediately when it was submitted to DOD.  On December 19th, the plan was approved by the Department of Defense and recommended that it be moved ahead.  It was sent then to the National Security Council staff here in the White House.  Again, this all happened under the previous administration. On January 6th, there was an interagency deputies meeting.  The deputies recommended at that time that they go ahead.  It was so easily approved it was sent straight up.  The conclusion to hold was, at that time, to hold for what they called a “moonless night,” which, by calendar, wouldn’t occur until then-President-elect Trump was President Trump. On January 24th, shortly after taking office, Secretary of Defense-then Mattis read the memo, resent it back up to the White House conveying his support.  On the 25th of January, the President was briefed by General Flynn on Secretary Mattis’s recommendation and the status of the operation, or potential operation. The President asked to see Secretary Mattis and Joint Chiefs of Staff Dunford.  He then, on that evening, had a dinner meeting, which included the President, the Vice President, Secretary Mattis, Chairman Dunford, Chief of Staff Priebus, Jared Kushner, Chief Strategist Bannon, General Kellogg, General Flynn, and CIA Director Pompeo where the operation was laid out in great extent.  The indication at that time was to go ahead on Friday the 26th.   In the morning, the deputies committee met again.  It was not a necessary step because they had previously recommended and also reaffirmed their support for that.  On January 26th, the President signed the memo authorizing the action.   So it was a very -- not only was it a very, very though-out process by this administration, it had started back on November 7th in terms of -- clearly well before that, but it was a move forward by CENTCOM on November 7th.  This was a very, very well thought-out and executed effort. Q    Where was the President the night of the raid?  How did he learn about Chief Owens’s death?  And do you still stand by your characterization that it was successful?   MR. SPICER:  The President was here in the residence.  He was kept in touch with his national security staff.  Secretary Mattis and others had kept him updated on both the raid and the death of Chief Owens, as well as the four other individuals that were injured.  So he was kept apprised of the situation throughout the evening.   And again, I think -- I would go back to what I said yesterday:  It’s hard to ever call something a complete success when you have the loss of life, or people injured.  But I think when you look at the totality of what was gained to prevent the future loss of life here in America and against our people and our institutions, and probably throughout the world in terms of what some of these individuals could have done, I think it is a successful operation by all standards. And again, I want to reiterate, it is tough to ever use the word "success" when you know that somebody has lost their life.  But when you go back and look at an individual that dedicated their life to serving this country, and went over and over and over again knowing that this not only the risk that he took but wanted to do it because he knew the threat that these kind of individuals pose to our country and to our people, that's -- while not a success that you lost to him, you know that he died in sacrifice for someone else here in this nation. Hunter Walker.   Q    Thank you, Sean.  I’ve seen some criticism of the President’s remarks at the prayer breakfast this morning.  Can you shed any light on why he thought that was a good venue to mock “The Apprentice” for its ratings? MR. SPICER:  Look, Mark Burnett, the creator of “The Apprentice,” who is a long-time supporter of the prayer breakfast but also has a personal relationship, was there.  He meant it as a light-hearted moment.  And I think if you look at the totality of his remarks, they were absolutely beautiful.  And I think to hone in on that, it was a light-hearted moment he was trying to have with a big supporter of the National Prayer Breakfast and a personal friend. Guys, I’ll be out tomorrow.  I want to make sure we all get to see the President now.  Thank you, guys. END   12:57 P.M. EST  #7-02/02/2017

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 Харлей Дэвидсон сделал первый электромотоцикл. В одном загадочном ролике компании почти ничего не видно, зато слышно что вместо привычного звука "potato-potato-potato" звук как у мотопилы маленького реактивного самолёта.  В другом ролике можно разглядеть модель LiveWire.  Характеристики: 75 л.с., максимальная скорость 148 км/ч, разгон от 0 до 100 за 4 секунды. Батареи хватает в среднем на 85 км, полная зарядка за 3,5 часа.