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25 апреля, 02:30

Procrastinating on April 24, 2017

**Over at [Equitable Growth](http://EquitableGrowth.org): Must- and Should-Reads:** * **A Low-Pressure Economy Is Not Only Dark But Invisible in the Horserace Noah Smith is Running… | Equitable Growth** * **Bridget Ansel**: _Weekend reading: “This post is tax-ing” edition | Equitable Growth_ * **Matthew Yglesias**: _If you really respect Trump voters, tell them the truth_: "A wave of recent columns argue that what Trump superfans... * **Ezra Klein**: _The GOP’s biggest health care achievement has been making Obamacare more popular_: "It is bizarre watching House Republicans persuade themselves that the problem they face on health care... * **Fatih Guvenen and Greg Kaplan**: _Top Income Inequality in the 21st Century: Some Cautionary Notes_: "IRS and SSA data reveal diverging patterns in top income shares... * **Kevin Drum**: _We're Now In the Second Biggest Housing Boom of All Time_: "The most remarkable feature of this chart... * **Òscar Jordà, Moritz Schularick, and Alan M. Taylor**: _Monetary Policy Medicine: Large Effects from Small Doses?_: "How do we know that higher interest rates will bring prices under control?... * **Chris Hayes**: _On escaping the “doom loop” of Trump's presidency_: "I tend to think of it in terms of my own behavior... * **Hyun Song Shin**: _Accounting...

25 апреля, 01:11

Donald Trump's Pick For Agriculture Secretary Confirmed

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); WASHINGTON, April 24 (Reuters) - The U.S. Senate on Monday confirmed former Georgia Governor Sonny Perdue as secretary of agriculture, leaving all but one of President Donald Trump’s Cabinet positions filled. Lawmakers voted 87 to 11 in favor of Perdue, who takes office as the agricultural community grapples with the key issues of trade and immigration. The nomination earlier passed the Senate Agriculture Committee with only one vote in opposition, although some Midwestern senators raised concerns that Perdue was not from a major agricultural production state. Trump nominated Perdue, 70, in January but progress on his confirmation was slow, with media reports suggesting that undoing his various business entanglements caused delays in the ethics filings. Perdue did not file his disclosure forms until mid-March, and the Senate panel backed him later that month. Trade is seen as critical to reviving a moribund farm economy, where incomes have been falling with lower grain prices. Farm incomes in 2016 are expected to have hit their lowest levels since 2009. Agriculture relies heavily on seasonal and casual labor, and farmers are concerned tough immigration rules could make it harder to find workers while raising costs. Trump has raised tensions on immigration with his pledge to build a wall at the Mexican-U.S. border. Perdue, who holds a doctorate in veterinary medicine and was raised on a dairy farm, is the first agriculture secretary from a southern state since Mike Espy of Mississippi, who served from January 1993 to December 1994. Perdue’s home state of Georgia accounted for just 2 percent of total U.S. agriculture exports in 2015. Trump still has one Cabinet nominee, Alexander Acosta for labor secretary, awaiting confirmation. (Reporting by Mark Weinraub in Chicago and Eric Beech in Washington; Editing by Susan Heavey and Andrew Hay) -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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24 апреля, 00:34

Wladimir Klitschko says he and Joshua have sent out ‘great message’ for boxing

• Ukrainian heavyweight praises well-mannered buildup• Contrasts with behaviour of Tyson Fury and David Haye Wladimir Klitschko believes the manner in which he and Anthony Joshua have conducted themselves in the build-up to their heavyweight fight at Wembley on Saturday has presented a “great message” about boxing and is in contrast to the way Tyson Fury and David Haye, two of his former opponents, have behaved when promoting fights.It is a little over four months since Klitschko and Joshua announced their fight and the interim has seen very little of the usual trash talking. The ugliest it has got was arguably earlier this month when Klitschko claimed Joshua, the IBF champion, took confidence from his “big muscles” and was more suited to bodybuilding than boxing. Otherwise the two men have been respectful of each other and vowed to maintain that in the remaining days before they meet at the national stadium. Continue reading...

23 апреля, 15:51

Links for the Week of April 23, 2017

**Must-Reads:** 1. **Kevin Drum**: _We're Now In the Second Biggest Housing Boom of All Time_: "The most remarkable feature of this chart... 2. **Òscar Jordà, Moritz Schularick, and Alan M. Taylor**: _Monetary Policy Medicine: Large Effects from Small Doses?_: "How do we know that higher interest rates will bring prices under control?... 3. **Rick Perlstein**: _I Thought I Understood the American Right. Trump Proved Me Wrongs_: "Direct-mail pioneers like Richard Viguerie created hair-on-fire campaign-fund-raising letters... 4. **Financial Times**: _Donald Trump Beats a Retreat_: "Another week, another series of flip-flops by America’s president... 5. **Ezra Klein**: _The GOP’s problem on health reform is they’ve spent years hiding their real position_: "The most interesting policy argument... is the debate between conservatives’ real position on health care and their fake position... ---- ---- **Should-Reads:** * **Fatih Guvenen and Greg Kaplan**: _Top Income Inequality in the 21st Century: Some Cautionary Notes_: "IRS and SSA data reveal diverging patterns in top income shares... * **Chris Hayes**: _On escaping the “doom loop” of Trump's presidency_: "I tend to think of it in terms of my own behavior... * **Hyun Song Shin**: _Accounting for global liquidity: reloading the matrix_: "In emerging market economies especially, a weakening of...

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22 апреля, 16:22

Hibs heartache as Darren McGregor own goal puts Aberdeen into Cup final

The only disappointment was that such a freak moment determined the outcome of an epic cup tie. Jonny Hayes’s long range shot, which would have carried no danger whatsoever for the Hibernian goalkeeper Ofir Marciano, benefitted from a wicked deflection off Darren McGregor before bouncing into the net.Aberdeen thereby progressed to the Scottish Cup final by the odd goal in five but Hibs, last year’s winners and architects of a stirring recovery from 2-0 down here, emerge with great credit. The swell of support afforded to the Hibs players by those fans in green and white at full-time, and despite defeat, illustrated that much. Continue reading...

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22 апреля, 08:00

Earth Day 2017: ‘The experts are fighting back’

With a climate-change sceptic in the White House, marchers worldwide are today spreading a message of hope that protest and science can save the world‘An exuberant rite of spring” is how the New York Times described 22 April, 1970. In Manhattan, and across America, “huge, light-hearted throngs ambled down autoless streets.” Earth Day had been born, an outburst of protest – and revelry – that involved everyone from save-the-whales activists to opponents of new freeways. Denis Hayes, now 72, was the man tasked with organising it. “What we did was pull together an event that told all of those people, ‘You know you’ve really got something in common and this should be one big movement where we’re supportive of one another’.”It sparked, he tells me, the most profound change in American society since the New Deal. “We now have different kinds of buildings, different kinds of automobiles, different planes, different lighting, different land use. People are choosing to have diets for environmental reasons, choosing to have one child for environmental reasons.” And all that, he says, “didn’t come from political leadership at the top, it came from a bunch of demands down at the grassroots”. Continue reading...

22 апреля, 01:49

How Bernie Sanders Learned To Stop Worrying And Love The Democratic Party

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); OMAHA, Nebraska ― Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Rep. Keith Ellison (D-Minn.) called on an arena full of Omaha Democrats to get behind the city’s mayoral candidate Heath Mello on Thursday night, passionately appealing for unity hours after national reproductive rights advocates criticized the Democratic Party for backing an anti-choice lawmaker. “Maybe, just maybe, it’s time to change one-party rule in Nebraska. And we can start right here, by electing Heath Mello as the next mayor,” Sanders declared to loud cheers. Well before Sanders delivered his remarks, Mello had responded to the controversy by vowing that he would “never do anything to restrict access to reproductive health care” as mayor, notwithstanding his faith-rooted opposition to abortion ― and history of votes to limit abortion rights as a state lawmaker. But Sanders and Ellison’s decision to stump for Mello well before that clarification underscored a disagreement within progressive ranks about where to draw ideological boundaries, with Sanders arguing that compromising on contentious social issues is the price of building political power outside the liberal coasts. Ironically, enduring charges of progressive betrayal allowed Sanders to showcase his pragmatism and party loyalty on the fourth day of a cross-country “Come Together, Fight Back” tour with Democratic National Committee chair Tom Perez in which his own differences with the Democratic establishment have occasionally crept into the spotlight. “We can all be pure. I would love it if everybody in America held my political views,” Sanders said after Thursday’s rally, in a locker room in the Baxter Arena that had been turned into a green room for the evening. “That would be great if 320 million Americans all agreed with Bernie Sanders on every issue. Unfortunately, that’s not the case.”  This is a progressive guy. We disagree on an issue. Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), on Heath Mello Sanders, who himself has faced accusations of excessive purism from Democratic critics, argued that supporting figures like Mello is an essential part of reviving the Democratic Party in GOP strongholds like Nebraska where Republicans control all congressional seats, the governorship, the legislature and the mayoralty of the largest city. He likened his disagreement with Mello on abortion rights to divergences with other Democrats who supported the Iraq War, major international trade deals and financial industry deregulation. “This is a progressive guy. We disagree on an issue,” Sanders said. The Vermont senator’s team-player tone was a marked contrast with some of the scenes of intra-party dissonance that arose on earlier legs of his national tour with the DNC. A handful of Sanders supporters booed at mentions of Perez’s name at rallies earlier this week in Portland, Maine, and Miami. Then there were the divergent messages of Sanders and Perez themselves. In an MSNBC appearance with Perez on Tuesday evening, Sanders pointedly denied that he was a Democrat, telling host Chris Hayes, “I am an independent.” Asked in the same interview whether he shared Sanders’ ire for the “ruling class of this country, the billionaire class,” Perez avoided the question, pivoting instead to talking points about Democrats winning when they “put hope on the ballot.” Earlier that day, Sanders declared that Georgia Democratic congressional candidate Jon Ossoff is “not a progressive,” according to a report in the Washington Post. But by Thursday night, with political writers wondering whether Democrats would ever resolve their “existential crisis,” Sanders was walking back his characterization of Ossoff. “I don’t know a whole lot about Jon. I certainly hope that he wins,” Sanders told HuffPost. “It would be an asset. It would be part of the process of reclaiming the House of Representatives for the Democrats.” Sanders also offered more details about his reasons for not formally identifying as a Democrat. For practical purposes, he has caucused with Democrats since taking office in the House in 1991, and is now a member of the leadership of the Senate Democratic Caucus, Sanders noted. What’s more, given the plurality of Americans who identify with neither of the two major parties, someone like him can help Democrats recruit independents, Sanders argued. “The Democratic Party is going to have to work very very hard to bring those independents into the party, to make the case that the Democratic Party can represent their needs. So having an active independent in the Democratic Senate leadership, I think, is very positive,” he concluded. A key to understanding the kumbaya atmosphere in Omaha is Sanders’ close relationship with Nebraska Democratic Party chairwoman Jane Kleeb. Kleeb backed Sanders in the March 2016 Nebraska caucus, which Sanders won, and a few months later was elected chair of the state Democratic Party on the strength of the Sanders wave. She now sits on the board of Our Revolution, the successor organization to Sanders’ presidential campaign. But Kleeb’s considerable accomplishments as a party chair and grassroots organizer in the state were clearly what impressed Sanders most. He implied that not traveling to Omaha to speak on behalf of Mello would have been an insult to her hard work and success in a state that Donald Trump won by 25 percentage points. “She is great. She is exactly the kind of energy that we need for the Democratic Party,” Sanders said. As founder of the multistate environmental advocacy group Bold Alliance, Kleeb earned progressive accolades for forging a new coalition of traditional green activists, native American tribes, farmers and ranchers to oppose construction of the Keystone XL pipeline. The various stakeholders believe the pipeline would threaten vital water sources on its way through Nebraska and neighboring rural states. The enthusiasm and diversity on display at Thursday’s three-hour rally suggests Kleeb has brought some of that creative organizing to her leadership of the state party. The boisterous crowd of 6,000 that arrived to hear Sanders and Mello was dotted with dozens of “Bernie-Mello” signs distributed by the state party. The placards featured the already famous outline of Sanders’ white hair and glasses alongside an outline of Mello’s black hair with black sunglasses. For his part, Mello, who has a sunny disposition, combined a local pitch filled with promises to improve pothole-ridden roads and pursue a “unifying aspirational vision” for the city’s development with an appeal to concerns about the policies of President Trump. “We need leadership that’s also willing to stand up against those in Washington, D.C., who want to trample on our values … values like inclusion and having a mayor who stands with immigrants, refugees” and the LGBTQ community, Mello said, prompting roars from the crowd. Although Sanders was clearly the evening’s biggest draw, many in the crowd also expressed excitement at Mello’s candidacy and the prospect of a Democratic glimmer in an otherwise deep-red state. Myra Jo Bates, 68, a retired marketing professor and volunteer for Mello’s campaign, said that while Mello’s opposition to abortion “bothers” her, “nobody’s perfect.” “I’m excited because he’s different and he’s going to be the mayor of all of Omaha, not just West Omaha, which is what we have now,” Bates said, referring to an affluent part of the city. The Democratic Party is a broad party. We are pro-life; we are pro-choice. Jane Kleeb, chairwoman, Nebraska Democratic Party In fact, Mello’s position on abortion did not come up at all over the course of the rally. The closest any speaker came was a remark by Kleeb implying that the existence of opposing views on abortion is simply a facet of the Nebraska Democratic Party’s diversity. “The Democratic Party is a broad party. We are pro-life; we are pro-choice,” she said, before listing other factions like labor unions and “people that work in corporate America.” At a smaller rally in Grand Prairie, Texas, just outside Dallas, where Sanders spoke earlier in the day, some of the lingering internecine battles were slightly more visible. A group of Sanders supporters briefly broke into a chant of “Berniecrats, Berniecrats” during remarks by Dallas County Democratic Party chair Carol Donovan. Later someone interrupted a speech by Texas Democratic Party chair Gilberto Hinojosa to ask if he supported the Trans-Pacific Partnership, the now-defunct 12-nation trade agreement negotiated by former President Barack Obama that was deeply unpopular with the party’s progressive base. “No, I didn’t. In fact, the Texas Democratic Party, at my request, passed a resolution unanimously opposing the TPP,” Hinojosa responded, drawing cheers from the crowd. “Thank you for reminding me of that.” Sanders’ presence on the stump was also reassuring to some of the disaffected Democratic activists and independents who flocked to his candidacy. One of them was Joseph Landemeyer, a bearded 52-year-old who came with his brother from Gainesville, Texas, an hour away, to see Sanders in person. Landemeyer has never identified as a Democrat, but he voted for Obama twice and Sanders in the primary. When it came time for the general election last November, however, he opted for Green Party candidate Jill Stein. Hillary Clinton was “not of the people,” given her speeches to big banks and her other corporate ties, Landemeyer said. Enlisting Sanders as a prominent spokesman is “a good sign for the Democratic Party. They can’t be old-school values. They have to be new school,” Landemeyer said. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

22 апреля, 00:09

Another State Shows Voter Fraud Isn't A Widespread Problem

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Voting irregularities in North Carolina accounted for just 0.01 percent of nearly 4.8 million votes in last year’s general election, according to a State Board Of Elections audit released on Friday. The State Board Of Elections said that even if every irregularity was proven to be voter fraud, there wasn’t enough of it to have influenced the outcome of any race. “One ineligible vote is too many in any election; however, our analysis of irregularities does not indicate any contest was affected in November,” Kim Westbrook Strach, executive director of the State Board of Elections, said in a statement.  The audit comes as the Supreme Court is considering whether to hear North Carolina’s appeal from a lower court ruling blocking its controversial 2013 photo voter ID law, which lawmakers argued was needed to prevent voter fraud. The audit also is a slap to former Gov. Pat McCrory (R), who claimed there was voter fraud in the November election and refused to concede his defeat. Officials in other states, including Iowa, New Hampshire and Nevada, have been able to offer only scant examples of voter fraud. President Donald Trump, who won North Carolina in last year’s presidential election, has alleged that millions of illegal votes were cast for his opponent Hillary Clinton in the U.S. election. Trump has offered no evidence for the claim. North Carolina’s audit describes few instances of outright fraud. “The evidence suggests that participation by ineligible voters is neither rampant nor non-existent in North Carolina,” the audit report said. “Our audits suggest that in the 2016 general election, approximately 0.01% of ballots were cast by ineligible voters. Most incidents are isolated and uncoordinated, and detecting technical violations does not always prove purposefully unlawful conduct. Our work indicates that ineligible voters are not isolated to one political party or any geographical region of the state.” The audit found there were 441 investigations into suspected felons voting, 41 cases of non-citizens voting, and 24 substantiated cases of double voting. The audit found just two cases of voter impersonation ― the kind of fraud a photo ID voting requirement aims to prevent. North Carolina in 2013 passed a law that requires voters to show photo ID at the polls, shortened the early voting period, and eliminated same-day voter registration. Critics argued the law is unnecessary because illegal voting is rare and the the law made it disproportionately more difficult for African Americans, poor and elderly residents to vote. A federal appeals court last year blocked the state from implementing the law, ruling that it targeted African Americans with “almost surgical precision.” The audit provides a glimpse into why people vote illegally. Often, the motive is confusion about the law. In the 41 cases of non-citizens voting, for example, the Board of Elections found that all of the individuals were in the United States legally and didn’t know they were prohibited from voting. Some had been misinformed by canvassers. One woman who had registered to vote had lived in the United States for 50 years and thought she had citizenship because she had been married to a U.S. citizen. The two cases of voter impersonation involved one woman who forged her husband’s signature on a mail-in ballot, and another who voted in person on behalf of her deceased mother. The audit found the “suspects in each case indicated that they were motivated out of a desire to carry out their loved one’s voting wishes.” The Board of Elections said it is reviewing an additional 19 cases of potential voter impersonation, but some of those cases appeared to be cases of mistaken identity. The report also shows how easily someone can mistakenly be accused of illegally voting. The board found during its probe of voting by non-citizens that “even where data from the Division of Motor Vehicles, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the voter rolls matched exactly, a high proportion of flagged individuals were citizens.” Some felons suspected of illegally voting presented information to auditors showing they were actually eligible. Earlier this week, Democracy North Carolina, a voting rights group, called for a criminal investigation of McCrory’s campaign and the Republican Party of North Carolina, saying both groups brought frivolous challenges to legitimate votes. The group also released a report detailing the humiliation of legitimate voters who were nonetheless accused of fraud. The state GOP chairman said the party was “dismayed but not surprised” by the audit. “This report confirms instances of illegal voting by convicted felons, illegal immigrants, and people voting under other names, including dead voters,” party chair Robin Hayes said in statement that ignored the fact that the audit found a miniscule number of irregularities. “These people should be investigated and criminally prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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22 апреля, 00:00

The Democratic Party's Messaging Rift, in One Short Video

Jeff Stein, VoxOn Monday, Bernie Sanders and recently elected Democratic National Committee Chair Tom Perez embarked on a "Unity Tour" in several states to rebrand a party now further from power than it’s been in decades. But serious differences between the Democratic Party’s factions remain. On Wednesday, Sanders and Perez appeared with MSNBC’s Chris Hayes for their first joint interview — and it didn’t take long for Hayes to pry open the split in the politicians’ worldviews

21 апреля, 21:19

U.S. Treasury Says It Will Not Issue Drilling Waivers To Russia Sanctions

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); The United States will not make an exception for American companies, including oil major Exxon Mobil Corp, seeking to drill in areas prohibited by U.S. sanctions on Russia, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said on Friday. “In consultation with President Donald J. Trump, the Treasury Department will not be issuing waivers to U.S. companies, including Exxon, authorizing drilling prohibited by current Russian sanctions,” Mnuchin said in a statement. Exxon spokesman Alan Jeffers had no immediate comment on the statement. The company this week declined to comment on a Wall Street Journal report that it is seeking permission from the U.S. government to drill in several areas of the Black Sea banned by U.S. sanctions on Russia. The United States and European Union imposed economic sanctions on Russia over its annexation of the Crimea region in 2014 and role in the conflict in eastern Ukraine. Texas-based Exxon, the world’s largest publicly traded oil producer, wound down drilling in Russia’s Arctic in 2014 after those sanctions were imposed. Exxon was allowed to finish some drilling projects as the sanctions took effect. (Reporting by Yeganeh Torbati and Ernest Scheyder; Editing by Andrew Hay and Alistair Bell) -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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21 апреля, 21:15

Antifake: l'enquete no esta bien la explosion dans le metro de SPB

presentadora: Vera Kutafina Antifake: la investigación no está bien, la explosión en el metro de St.Petersburgo Hay los grupos de personas / que todas las catástrofes / consideran como realización. Si aparece una noticia / del accidente del avión, de repente / hacen un video / que demuestra /que todo es falso / y es un espectaculo. Es el caso de la explosión / en St.Petersburgo. Una porción nueva des revelaciones. Analysemos la logica. Si, es verdad, habían noticias / que citaron Rosbalt. Dicen / que llamaron a su celular. Y la persona que contestó, se presentó / como Dzhalilov. Pero primero, si él está vivo, lo quisieramos ver vivo. Si existe / una grabación de esta charla, porque no publicarla? En este caso / sus conosidos pueden reconocer su voz. Et porque / él no vinó / en la policía / como hizo Ilias Nikitine, / el primero sespechado? Le da igual / que está nombrado / kamikaze? Le llamaron / y nosotros les tenemos que creer / en la palabra. Imaginense que no. Los servivios especiales / desactivaron este número / para chequear las conversaciones / y encontrar complices. Acá hay nada raro. Ah, es por esto / es imposible encontrarlo vivo. La cabeza de Dzhalilov / estabá separada de su cuerpo / después de la conversación con periodistas. Bueno, / si él estuvo / todo el tiempo / en los brazos de los servicios secretos, porque no habían retirado su celular, y le habían permitido / hablas con periodistas? Y si todo este tiempo / estuvo en la libertad, porque hay que matarlo / después de la charla / con periodistas? Porque no tomar / la cabeza de otra persona / que no está conocida todavía? Los autores tratan de asegurarnos / que para los servicios secretos / es muy simple / de nombrar cualquier persona / un kamikaze. Pero elijen la persona / que ya sabemos / que está viva. Logico. Claro / que vamos a comparar / estas dos chicas / pero analizemos la logica / de los autores. Explican muy vagamente / que no es importante / si las chicas de la foto / son diferentes o es una sola. Lo importante/ es que muchos trolles / aparecieron en su pagina de facebook. Pero eso pasa / no solamente con ellos. Todos / que tienen muchos seguidores, no reciben / los commentarios de todos. Es normal tmb. Quando aparece / un material mediático, mucha gente lo comparte. Y no solo seguidores / pueden verlo. Lo mismo pasa / casi con todos los canales de youtube. Es posible comparar / la cantidad de vistas / con la cantidad de seguidores / o son mucho menos. Pero algunos videos / estan vistas / por mucha más gente / que la cantidad de seguidores. Tmb es normal. Los autores / tratan de convensernos / que no es una coincidencia, y que los trolles / tratan de convencernos / que es una sola chica en las fotos. Calcularon todo logicamente. En realidad, hay tanta logica / que en el juego de cartas. La gente / que hacen muchos commentarios, intoxican / que es la misma chica. Pero es fácil d’entender / que estas dos chicas / son diferentes / y es fácil de comprobar. Primero, ellas tienen / las orejas diferentes, / las frentes diferentes / y la edad diferente. Y si alguien pretende / que los anteojos son iguales, / urgente / tienen que visitar su oculista. Segundo, / los autores dicen / que no es importante / si son dos chicas direrentes / o una sola. Yo tmb estoy de acuerdo, / no es importante. Porque estaban mentiendo / desde el principio. Insisten / que la chica de Moscú / es una enfermera de ambulancia. Es verdad / que la chica de St.Petersburgo / tiene es vestido de ambulancia. Pero la espalda / de la chica de Moscú / está escondida / aun que exista el video / de su espalda. Hay un logo / del “Centro criminalístico / de la Dirección / del Ministerio / del Interior”. Allí está el video / donde ustedes / pueden verlo / ustedes mismos. Acá ella examina / el asfalto con su farol. Es decir / que no es una enfermeira de ambulancia / como dicen los autores, / es una experta criminalistica. Además / nadie de estos payasos / no se preguntaron / para que una enfermiera / tiene la cámara. Pero si estas dos chicas / tienen anteojos, / es decir / que son la misma persona. Logico! Y porque esta chica / no dice nada / en las redes sociales, / ni confirma, / ni desmiente. Los autores / insinuan / que no tiene nada que decir. Como explicarlo / más correcto... Estas dos chicas, / enfermera y criminalista, / son las personas ocupadas / a diferencia de los autores del video. Ellas no tienen tiempo / ara explicar cosas simples / para... Bueno, relajense. Gracias / al espectador atento / para este matarial.

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21 апреля, 20:40

Без заголовка

**Should-Read: Chris Hayes**: _On escaping the “doom loop” of Trump's presidency_: "I tend to think of it in terms of my own behavior... >...Like, what am I going to do? How am I going to avoid the doom loop? My whole approach to the Trump era is to act as if reality matters, facts matter, the basic political gravity of whether you make people's lives better or worse matters, rigorous thinking, nonconspiratorial thinking, logical skepticism — all of these things, these principles I hold as a journalist, as a thinker, as a writer, as a citizen, they all matter. Act as if that's the case, even with the knowledge they may not. >I don't know if in the end they will matter, but I can't figure out how to conduct myself in my life or in my work if they don't...

20 апреля, 02:34

After 2 Decades, Fox News Braces For Primetime Without Bill O’Reilly

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Brian Williams. Keith Olbermann. Campbell Brown. Connie Chung. Phil Donahue. Chris Hayes. Paula Zahn. Ed Schultz. Eliot Spitzer. Kathleen Parker. Those are some of the TV news stars who competed against Bill O’Reilly at 8 p.m. ― and lost. But O’Reilly’s long reign as cable news king abruptly ended Wednesday when 21st Century Fox, parent company of Fox News, announced that he would be leaving the network amid a sexual harassment scandal. His time slot goes to Tucker Carlson, whose show has aired at 9 p.m. since Megyn Kelly left Fox News in January. O’Reilly’s departure represents an “enormous change” for the industry, although Fox News’ competitors may not be able to take immediate advantage, said Jonathan Klein, who led CNN from 2004 to 2010 and is currently CEO of video subscription platform TAPP Media. “It won’t send viewers to CNN or MSNBC because O’Reilly’s viewers aren’t looking for cable news,” Klein told HuffPost. “They’re looking for O’Reilly.” O’Reilly pioneered the opinionated host-driven cable news format on Fox News. The network launched “The O’Reilly Report” in 1996, its first year on the air, before shifting format to “The O’Reilly Factor” two years later. By the early 2000s, O’Reilly was the highest-rated host, paving the way for Fox News to become the most-watched cable news network ― a title the network hasn’t relinquished since. In a Wednesday memo to Fox News staff, 21st Century Fox Executive Chairman Rupert Murdoch and his sons James and Lachlan didn’t mention the scandal that brought down O’Reilly, but noted that “by ratings standards,” he “is one of the most accomplished TV personalities in the history of cable news.” Of course it wasn’t ratings that led to O’Reilly’s downfall, an unceremonious exit unparalleled in an industry where a TV news host’s rise and fall is inextricably tied to viewership. His audience, averaging around 4 million viewers, appeared to be sticking by him even as advertisers fled in response to the New York Times revelations that the host and the network paid $13 million to five women over allegations of sexual harassment and inappropriate behavior. But the social media-driven advertiser exodus ― along with public protests, continued fallout from the sexual harassment scandal involving former Fox News chairman Roger Ailes, and the possibility of sinking a major British TV deal ― was apparently too much for the Murdochs. Fox News isn’t getting a political makeover as O’Reilly leaves the building. In fact, the new opinion line-up may be more pro-Donald Trump than before, given that O’Reilly, while largely supportive of the president, occasionally differed with him. The more staunchly pro-Trump Eric Bolling will host a new 5 p.m. show, while “The Five,” with Trump-sympathetic co-hosts Kimberly Guilfoyle and Jesse Watters, shifts to 9 p.m. (The rotating cast also includes co-hosts who have been critical of Trump, such as Bob Beckel, Juan Williams and Dana Perino.)  And the unapologetically conservative Carlson will kick off primetime in the coveted 8 p.m. slot.  Carlson’s star has risen quickly at Fox News. A former CNN and MSNBC host, Carlson was leading “Fox & Friends Weekend” before a promotion to replace Greta Van Susteren at 7 p.m. He improved ratings at that hour and created several viral moments while sparring with journalists such as Teen Vogue’s Lauren Duca and Newsweek’s Kurt Eichenwald. When Kelly left for NBC News in January, Carlson landed in her 9 p.m. slot. Although Kelly was a star, the network didn’t miss a beat with Carlson’s shift into primetime. His show averaged 3.27 million viewers during the first quarter of 2017, second only behind O’Reilly’s nearly 4 million. However, Carlson will now have to perform without the best lead-in in cable news.  It’s unlikely that O’Reilly viewers will flock to less partisan hosts (CNN) or avowedly progressive ones (MSNBC), and many who tuned in nightly will stick with Fox News as long as a right-leaning host is on air. But the question will be whether fans of O’Reilly specifically will watch someone else in his time slot ― or perhaps go see if a game’s on.  Though Fox News remains the ratings leader, the ground can shift. Liberals coping with Trump’s presidency have been increasingly tuning into MSNBC, with 9 p.m. host Rachel Maddow recently topping O’Reilly in the age 25-to-54 demographic prized by advertisers. Next week, a resurgent CNN plans to give Jake Tapper, the breakout news anchor of the Trump era, a tryout in primetime.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

20 апреля, 02:34

After 2 Decades, Fox News Braces For Primetime Without Bill O’Reilly

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Brian Williams. Keith Olbermann. Campbell Brown. Connie Chung. Phil Donahue. Chris Hayes. Paula Zahn. Ed Schultz. Eliot Spitzer. Kathleen Parker. Those are some of the TV news stars who competed against Bill O’Reilly at 8 p.m. ― and lost. But O’Reilly’s long reign as cable news king abruptly ended Wednesday when 21st Century Fox, parent company of Fox News, announced that he would be leaving the network amid a sexual harassment scandal. His time slot goes to Tucker Carlson, whose show has aired at 9 p.m. since Megyn Kelly left Fox News in January. O’Reilly’s departure represents an “enormous change” for the industry, although Fox News’ competitors may not be able to take immediate advantage, said Jonathan Klein, who led CNN from 2004 to 2010 and is currently CEO of video subscription platform TAPP Media. “It won’t send viewers to CNN or MSNBC because O’Reilly’s viewers aren’t looking for cable news,” Klein told HuffPost. “They’re looking for O’Reilly.” O’Reilly pioneered the opinionated host-driven cable news format on Fox News. The network launched “The O’Reilly Report” in 1996, its first year on the air, before shifting format to “The O’Reilly Factor” two years later. By the early 2000s, O’Reilly was the highest-rated host, paving the way for Fox News to become the most-watched cable news network ― a title the network hasn’t relinquished since. In a Wednesday memo to Fox News staff, 21st Century Fox Executive Chairman Rupert Murdoch and his sons James and Lachlan didn’t mention the scandal that brought down O’Reilly, but noted that “by ratings standards,” he “is one of the most accomplished TV personalities in the history of cable news.” Of course it wasn’t ratings that led to O’Reilly’s downfall, an unceremonious exit unparalleled in an industry where a TV news host’s rise and fall is inextricably tied to viewership. His audience, averaging around 4 million viewers, appeared to be sticking by him even as advertisers fled in response to the New York Times revelations that the host and the network paid $13 million to five women over allegations of sexual harassment and inappropriate behavior. But the social media-driven advertiser exodus ― along with public protests, continued fallout from the sexual harassment scandal involving former Fox News chairman Roger Ailes, and the possibility of sinking a major British TV deal ― was apparently too much for the Murdochs. Fox News isn’t getting a political makeover as O’Reilly leaves the building. In fact, the new opinion line-up may be more pro-Donald Trump than before, given that O’Reilly, while largely supportive of the president, occasionally differed with him. The more staunchly pro-Trump Eric Bolling will host a new 5 p.m. show, while “The Five,” with Trump-sympathetic co-hosts Kimberly Guilfoyle and Jesse Watters, shifts to 9 p.m. (The rotating cast also includes co-hosts who have been critical of Trump, such as Bob Beckel, Juan Williams and Dana Perino.)  And the unapologetically conservative Carlson will kick off primetime in the coveted 8 p.m. slot.  Carlson’s star has risen quickly at Fox News. A former CNN and MSNBC host, Carlson was leading “Fox & Friends Weekend” before a promotion to replace Greta Van Susteren at 7 p.m. He improved ratings at that hour and created several viral moments while sparring with journalists such as Teen Vogue’s Lauren Duca and Newsweek’s Kurt Eichenwald. When Kelly left for NBC News in January, Carlson landed in her 9 p.m. slot. Although Kelly was a star, the network didn’t miss a beat with Carlson’s shift into primetime. His show averaged 3.27 million viewers during the first quarter of 2017, second only behind O’Reilly’s nearly 4 million. However, Carlson will now have to perform without the best lead-in in cable news.  It’s unlikely that O’Reilly viewers will flock to less partisan hosts (CNN) or avowedly progressive ones (MSNBC), and many who tuned in nightly will stick with Fox News as long as a right-leaning host is on air. But the question will be whether fans of O’Reilly specifically will watch someone else in his time slot ― or perhaps go see if a game’s on.  Though Fox News remains the ratings leader, the ground can shift. Liberals coping with Trump’s presidency have been increasingly tuning into MSNBC, with 9 p.m. host Rachel Maddow recently topping O’Reilly in the age 25-to-54 demographic prized by advertisers. Next week, a resurgent CNN plans to give Jake Tapper, the breakout news anchor of the Trump era, a tryout in primetime.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

20 апреля, 00:50

Aaron Hernandez's Death Highlights A Serious Problem

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); WASHINGTON ― It’s a familiar story: An inmate takes his or her life inside a prison or jail, and family and loved ones are left wondering how the incident possibly could have happened. This time, the public interest is even higher ― one of the most famous prisoners in America, former NFL star Aaron Hernandez, was found dead in his cell on Wednesday morning, according to the Massachusetts Department of Correction. Hernandez, 27, was serving a life sentence for the 2013 murder of Odin Lloyd, a semi-professional football player who was dating the sister of Hernandez’s fiancee. That sentence was handed down in 2015, but last Friday, he was found not guilty of a separate 2012 double murder.  (Note: This article discusses some of the details of the means by which Hernandez killed himself.) It’s a misconception that there is nothing prisons and jails can do about suicides in custody. Although “not all inmate suicides are preventable, many of them are,” said Lindsay Hayes, a national expert on this issue who previously consulted with the Massachusetts Department of Correction. Hayes also noted that he was “confident” that the agency and its health care provider will conduct comprehensive investigations into Hernandez’s death, and that “should include a transparent determination as to whether or not his death was preventable.” As the circumstances unfold, there are a number of factors that may help answer that question: Were there any warning signs, and if so, should Hernandez have been put on suicide watch? Did he receive appropriate mental health screening and treatment, if warranted? How often was he supposed to be checked on, and when was his last contact with a correctional officer? Was his prison cell designed with suicide prevention in mind, or retrofitted to reduce ligature points an inmate could use to hang himself? In the wake of Hernandez’s death, his family is seeking a probe. His former agent said he didn’t believe that Hernandez would kill himself. (It’s not uncommon for friends and family members to be skeptical that a loved one would ever take his or her own life.) There were 47 suicides in Massachusetts prisons between 2001 and 2014, according to federal data. From 2001-2014, the suicide mortality rate in Massachusetts state prisons was 32 per 100,000 inmates, double the national average of 16 per 100,000 over that timeframe. There were six suicides in 2014, but just one suicide in 2015 and two in 2016, according to Massachusetts Department of Correction data. The suicide rate in jails is much higher than it is in prison. In state prisons throughout the country, that rate was 20 deaths per 100,000 inmates in 2014, compared to 50 deaths per 100,000 inmates in local jails, according to Bureau of Justice statistics. Still, prison suicides appear to be on the rise in recent years. The percentage of suicides in state prisons in 2014 was the highest recorded since 2001, and represented a 30 percent jump from 2013 to 2014 ― from 192 deaths in 2013 to 249 deaths in 2014. The suicide death rate in 2014 ― 20 suicides per 100,000 inmates ― was the highest rate recorded since 2001. Part of the discrepancy between prisons and jails is due to the nature of the confinement. Unlike prisons, jails hold inmates for only short periods of time, and they are dealing with people who may not be used to the shock of confinement, could be withdrawing from drugs or alcohol, and have unknown mental health histories. (A Huffington Post investigation found that nearly a third of jail deaths over a year-long period occurred in the first 72 hours after booking.) Hernandez wasn’t new to confinement: He was already serving a sentence of life without parole. But his apparent suicide occurred less than a week after he was acquitted on separate charges stemming from the murder of two other people. During the trial, he had contact with his family — including his 4-year-old daughter — in a different capacity than he would have once back in prison. That kind of event is a trigger “that could increase his risk of harming himself,” says Eric Balaban, a senior staff counsel with the National Prison Project at the American Civil Liberties Union. That raises the question of whether Hernandez’s mental health status was evaluated during or after the trial. A prison spokesman told the Boston Globe that Hernandez had not been on a suicide watch and did not suggest that he planned to harm himself, although it’s not clear on what evaluation that was based. (A Massachusetts Department of Correction spokesperson did not immediately respond to HuffPost’s list of questions about Hernandez’s death.) The Souza-Baranowski Correctional Center, where Hernandez was held, is a 500,000 square foot maximum-security facility that opened in 1998 at a cost of more than $100 million. It has more than 1,000 cells and 366 cameras. Earlier this year, it was the site of a prison riot where inmates were “getting ready for war,” in the words of one official. Leslie Walker, the executive director of Prisoners’ Legal Services of Massachusetts, told the New York Times on Wednesday that she considered the prison “troubled” and noted they were “very concerned” about it. The group sued the state on behalf of inmates in December for allegedly unlawfully segregating mentally ill inmates in solitary confinement, which can exacerbate mental health issues and make inmates more likely to commit new crimes when they’re released. The suit alleged that Department of Correction officials were downgrading the diagnoses of mentally ill inmates, making them eligible to place in segregation. The physical plan of a prison, as well as whether inmates have direct supervision from staff, can also be key factors in preventing suicides. We do not yet know how often Hernandez was supposed to be checked on by staff, or when he actually was. Hernandez was found hanging by a bedsheet tied to the cell window, and it’s unclear whether the window had been designed to prevent suicide. For the cell window to be suicide-resistant, any security bars should have been flush with the window or covered, or the gap between the bars and the window should have been eliminated, according to a guide issued by Hayes on suicide-resistant cells. Hernandez was also in a single cell in a general population unit at the time of his death, according to prison officials, which can also be a risk factor. As the investigation into Hernandez’s death is ongoing, authorities and Hernandez’s family are still searching for answers. “There were no conversations or correspondence from Aaron to his family or legal team that would have indicated anything like this was possible,” said Jose Baez, a lawyer for Hernandez. If you or someone you know needs help, call 1-800-273-8255 for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. You can also text HELLO to 741-741 for free, 24-hour support from the Crisis Text Line. Outside of the U.S., please visit the International Association for Suicide Prevention for a database of resources. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

19 апреля, 22:57

Bill O’Reilly's Fox News Career Was Rife With Years Of Offensive Comments

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Bill O’Reilly no longer has a job at Fox News after allegations of him sexually harassing female colleagues caused activists to rail against the network and its advertisers earlier this month. But O’Reilly, who has worked at Fox News since the network launched in 1996, was a source of controversy long before The New York Times published its bombshell report on the accusations against him. The anchor has a history of making racist, sexist or otherwise inflammatory remarks — none of which prompted companies to pull advertisements from his show. Here’s a look back at some of O’Reilly’s worst moments in his 20 years at Fox News. He was previously accused of sexual harassment. In 2004, Andrea Mackris, who was then a producer at Fox News, sued O’Reilly for sexual harassment. Her allegations, which can be found here, include multiple instances of O’Reilly making lewd remarks during phone conversations. O’Reilly denied the charges, but settled the lawsuit. As HuffPost’s Michael Calderone wrote earlier this week, the suit had no lasting effect on O’Reilly’s career at Fox News.  He’s also faced domestic violence allegations.  In 2015, Gawker reported on court documents that showed O’Reilly had been accused of physically abusing his former wife, Maureen McPhilmy. According to the report, O’Reilly’s daughter allegedly claimed she had seen her father “dragging McPhilmy down a staircase by her neck.”  O’Reilly said the report was “100 percent false.” An appeals court, however, awarded McPhilmy primary custody of the estranged couple’s two children. He made racist comments about a congresswoman. Last month, O’Reilly mocked Rep. Maxine Waters’ (D-Calif.) hair during a segment of “Fox & Friends.”  “I didn’t hear a word she said. I was looking at the James Brown wig,” he said. “Do we have a picture of James Brown? It’s the same wig.” O’Reilly later apologized for his comments, while Waters took him to task during an interview with MSNBC’s Chris Hayes. “I am a strong black woman, and I cannot be intimidated. I cannot be undermined,” she said.  He aired an incredibly offensive segment on Chinatown. Last year, “The O’Reilly Factor” aired a five-minute segment featuring longtime producer Jesse Watters walking around New York City’s Chinatown and asking residents offensive questions. The segment drew widespread condemnation for blatantly mocking Asian-Americans and promoting racist stereotypes. O’Reilly, however, stood by Watters and the decision to air the segment. “He’s not getting fired,” O’Reilly said. “We are a program that is not politically correct.” He’s vilified Black Lives Matter. The Black Lives Matter movement is a frequent target of Fox News scorn, and O’Reilly is no exception. He’s claimed the group is “killing Americans,” called it a “destructive movement” and declared that “very few white Americans” respect it.  He’s also labeled the movement a “hate America group” and said Martin Luther King Jr. “would not participate” in the group’s protests. And blamed Trayvon Martin’s death on how he was dressed. In a 2013 interview with former Rep. Allen West (R-Fla.), O’Reilly blamed the death of Trayvon Martin, the unarmed black teenager shot to death by neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman, on how Martin was dressed at the time. “If Trayvon Martin had been wearing a jacket like you are and a tie like you are, Mr. West, this evening, I don’t think George Zimmerman would have any problem,” O’Reilly said. “But he was wearing a hoodie and he looked a certain way. And that way is how ‘gangstas’ look. And, therefore, he got attention.”  He alleged former President Barack Obama had “deep emotional ties to Islam.” Last July, O’Reilly argued that the then-president was incapable of fighting the Islamic State group because of his “emotional attachment to the Muslim world,” ties the anchor said had “hurt the USA.”  His argument largely hinged on photos appearing to show Obama attending his Muslim half-brother’s wedding in the early 1990s, as well as information that his stepfather and father were Muslim (despite little evidence that Obama Sr. ever practiced Islam). “What we can tell you with certainty is that Barack Obama has deep emotional ties to Islam,” O’Reilly said.  He used a slur for Mexican immigrants. In 2003, O’Reilly described undocumented immigrants from Mexico as “wetbacks” while discussing security at the U.S.-Mexico border. During the segment, O’Reilly argued in favor of using military force at the border. “We’d save lives because Mexican wetbacks, whatever you want to call them, the coyotes, they’re not going to do what they’re doing now, so people aren’t going to die in the desert,” he said.  O’Reilly later said he misspoke. “I was groping for a term to describe the industry that brings people in here. It was not meant to disparage people in any way,” he told The New York Times. He claimed slaves who built the White House were “well-fed.” After first lady Michelle Obama made some emotional observations in 2016 about what it was like as a black woman to live in a house built by slaves, O’Reilly seized the opportunity to mansplain that, actually, those slaves had it pretty good. “Slaves that worked there were well-fed and had decent lodgings provided by the government, which stopped hiring slave labor in 1802,” he said. “However, the feds did not forbid subcontractors from using slave labor. So, Michelle Obama is essentially correct in citing slaves as builders of the White House, but there were others working as well.” He shamed Megyn Kelly for speaking out about harassment she faced at Fox News. After former Fox News host Gretchen Carlson sued Fox News chief Roger Ailes for sexual harassment (leading to his ouster), Fox News personality Megyn Kelly also came forward with allegations against the executive.  O’Reilly addressed the allegations on his show and criticized Kelly for her decision to speak out. “If somebody is paying you a wage, you owe that person or company allegiance. You don’t like what’s happening in the workplace, go to human resources or leave,” he said. “And then take the action you need to take afterward if you feel aggrieved. There are labor laws in this country. But don’t run down the concern that supports you by trying to undermine it.” Kelly left the network for NBC less than two months later.  He repeatedly compared gay marriage to marrying animals. While O’Reilly’s stance on same-sex marriage appears to have shifted over the years, he’s previously claimed that legalizing gay weddings would be a slippery slope toward allowing humans to marry animals, including ducks, goats, dolphins and turtles.  “Laws that you think are in stone ― they’re gonna evaporate, man,” he said in 2005. “You’ll be able to marry a goat ― you mark my words!” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

19 апреля, 12:46

Mike Pence fires fresh warning to North Korea

Mike Pence fires fresh warning to North Korea Mike Pence, the US vice president, has said that the US will counter any North Korean attack with an "overwhelming and effective American response". Pence sent the warning in a strong speech in Japan's capital of Tokyo as he continues his tour of Asia. Meanwhile, the US is backtracking on claims made last week that a naval strike group was heading to waters near North Korea as a show of strength. Al Jazeera's Wayne Hay reports from Tokyo. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/

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18 апреля, 19:12

N Korea tension dominates Pence’s Japan visit

N Korea tension dominates Pence’s Japan visit. US Vice President Mike Pence says there has to be a new approach to dealing with North Korea. He is in Tokyo where trade was supposed to be the focus of his meeting with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. But the tough talk between Pyongyang and Washington is overshadowing the tour. Al Jazeera's Wayne Hay reports from Tokyo. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/

17 апреля, 18:10

Trump offers himself as star attraction of Easter Egg Roll

President Donald Trump relied on a very different type of star power for his inaugural White House Easter Egg Roll — his own.Gone were chart-topping names from the Obama administration such as Ariana Grande, Justin Bieber and Beyoncé. Instead, thousands were treated to military bands and far less prominent acts, including a family band that arrived in an RV.“I wanna thank everybody,” Trump said, greeting onlookers from the White House balcony, where he was flanked by first lady Melania Trump, their son Barron and the Easter Bunny. “This is the 139th Easter Egg Roll. Think of it — 139. It began [a] long time ago — 1878.” Indeed, Trump’s first egg roll marks the 139th year of the White House tradition, which dates to President Rutherford B. Hayes in 1878. Like his inauguration, Trump’s Easter Egg Roll lacked the additional star power on display during Obama’s presidency. The president himself, however, was the star attraction (even the first lady felt it necessary to introduce herself to a crowd of children), drawing everyone’s attention as he walked onto the balcony with his family. “The president’s coming,” Attorney General Jeff Sessions said, pausing his reading of the picture book “It’s Not Easy Being a Bunny.” Trump, whose wife nudged him to put his hand over his heart during a rendition of the national anthem, announced that he, Melania and Barron would sign cards for soldiers and join the children on an egg roll. “I don’t know if we’re gonna be successful, but I know a lot of people down there are gonna be successful. I’ve seen those kids and they’re highly, highly competitive,” he joked. He thanked the first lady for her hard work putting the event together. “She has been working on this a long time to make it perfect, and we wanted to keep it just right,” Trump said, going on to congratulate his wife “on this wonderful, wonderful day we’re going to have.” “Lotta people. Lotta people, and they’re gonna have a great time," he added. Planning for the event didn’t begin in earnest until late February, with the White House ordering commemorative wooden eggs only after it was reminded to do so by a Maine-based manufacturer in a since-deleted tweet. And the White House had said the crowd would be significantly smaller than the estimated 37,000 Obama hosted last year. Stephanie Grisham, the first lady’s communications director, told People magazine that the smaller crowd is “by design” because, in her understanding, “past years had gotten so large that children were not able to enjoy the activities.” Melania, White House press secretary Sean Spicer and Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson read picture books to children, and the White House’s egg roll Twitter account shared images of kids posing with characters such as the Easter Bunny, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and Judy Hopps and Nick Wilde, the rabbit and fox of “Zootopia.” Unlike past years, the first lady didn’t champion a pet cause. But she did welcome everyone to the White House and thank the staff and volunteers “who worked tirelessly to ensure that you have [a] memorable experience,” as well as the military. “This is the first time that my husband and I [are] hosting this wonderful tradition,” she said. “And it's great that you are all with us today. I hope you have a great time with many activities.” Spicer, the 2008 Easter Bunny at President George W. Bush’s White House Easter Egg Roll, posted an image alongside this year’s Easter Bunny. He told NBC Washington it was an honor to be back, helping the first family create this experience for Americans.As for speculation over whether he would reprise his bunny role, Spicer said he opted to go a different route. “I stuck with just an Easter tie this year,” he said. While the event was largely a lighthearted, high-profile affair for kids, Trump made a political reference in his brief remarks. “We will be stronger and bigger and better as a nation than ever before,” he said. “We’re right on track. You see what’s happening, and we are right on track.” Trump’s declaration follows North Korea’s latest attempted provocation over the weekend, when it conducted a failed missile test. Han Song Ryol, North Korea’s vice foreign minister, told The Associated Press in an interview Friday that Trump’s tweets were adding to a “vicious cycle” of tensions on the Korean Peninsula.Despite the threat of North Korea’s nuclear capability, questions about the administration's next moves in Syria and the ongoing battle against the Islamic State in the Middle East, Trump tweeted Monday that the first months of his administration has highlighted the “total failure” of President Barack Obama’s foreign policy. The president was apparently roughly quoting conservative author Michael Knowles, who appeared on “Fox and Friends” sharing a similar sentiment.He later told a CNN reporter that North Korea has “gotta behave.”

17 апреля, 16:42

Страдания коксующегося угля: циклон Дебби нанес удар по крупнейшим компаниям

Evraz, «Мечел» и «Распадская» могут заработать на проблемах конкурентов