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05 декабря, 15:42

Ku Klux Klan Members Drive Through North Carolina Town To Hail Trump Victory

Police in Roxboro, North Carolina, will hold a press conference Monday to address community concerns after a band of KKK members drove through the small town Saturday celebrating President-elect Donald Trump’s victory in the recent election. The parade was originally going to take place in Pelham, 40 minutes away from Roxboro. But organizers moved the event after protesters gathered in Pelham Saturday morning to confront the Klansmen, according to the Charlotte News Observer. Two men were also arrested on Friday night after a stabbing at a KKK meeting in Caswell County, where Pelham is located. Close up photo of one of approximately 30 cars in KKK's "victory parade" this afternoon in Roxboro. pic.twitter.com/ElnU3KTgoI— Natalie A. Janicello (@natalie_allison) December 3, 2016 Local police and state troopers blocked several intersections in a bid to keep the peace as the parade of vehicles waving American, Confederate and KKK flags zipped through the town of some 8,000 people. Men and women shouted “White power!” and “Hail victory!” Only a handful of bystanders watched. The parade was over in minutes, officials said.  IT'S HAPPENING. KKK just came through Roxboro. Battle flags & shouting "WHITE POWER!" pic.twitter.com/rcjHbmUUiR— Natalie A. Janicello (@natalie_allison) December 3, 2016 Roxboro Police Chief David Hess explained that there was nothing officials could do to stop the car parade. But he acknowledged that the presence of the KKK provoked furious emotions that could erupt into violence. “I and the City of Roxboro do not condone the beliefs of the KKK,” Hess said, according to WNCN, a local CBS affiliate. “My heart is heavy that our community was chosen by the KKK to spread their message,” the chief, who is white, said in a statement posted to Twitter. “We owe it to the community to make sure limited exposure and potential acts of violence are minimized. I, nor you, want anyone regardless of color being physically hurt,” he said. Statement about the KKK visit to @CityofRoxboro @WRAL @ABC11_WTVD @WNCN @WXII @roxborocourier @WKRX pic.twitter.com/52pCIiE5mr— David Hess (@ChiefDavidHess) December 3, 2016 Amanda Barker, an “imperial kommander” of the Loyal White Knights who is married to the founder of the group, told the Times-News that the car parade was a celebration of Trump’s victory. “Actually we have the same views,” she said, referring to the president-elect. “A lot of white Americans felt the same way, especially about the wall, immigration and the terrorism coming here. I think Donald Trump is going to do some really good things and turn this country around.” A group spokesman told the newspaper later that members were going to spend the rest of the day “fellowshipping.” Plans for the traditional Klansmen cross burning were still up in the air, according to Barker, and it was not known if members actually set fire to a cross Saturday.  Hundreds of people, meanwhile, demonstrated against the KKK in North Carolina’s capital of Raleigh. The state’s Democratic Party issued a statement calling the Klan car parade “horrifying,” WRAL-TV reported. The demonstration comes after “months of toxic and divisive rhetoric that belittled many in our state,” party chairwoman Patsy Keever said. “We must all stand together in rejecting these hateful actions, which includes listening to and valuing those in our communities who feel targeted.” Klansmen distributed recruitment flyers in the Roxboro area in May, a campaign inspired by then-candidate Trump to crack down on undocumented immigrants. The local group, which claims to have 50 active members, is opposed to LGBT rights, interracial relationships and immigration, a spokesman told local TV station WTVD. When David Duke, former KKK grand wizard, first expressed support for Trump earlier this year, Trump said he didn’t know the man. “Just so you understand, I don’t know anything about David Duke, OK?” Trump said on CNN, then later blamed a faulty earpiece for his bizarre response to the question about Duke. Trump later disavowed support from Klansmen.  type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related Coverage + articlesList=56d8f801e4b0ffe6f8e8d051,56d20f95e4b03260bf770ffe -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

28 ноября, 16:23

Noble Corp Fleet Status: Contract Extension in Gulf of Mexico

Noble Corporation (NE) recently released its latest fleet status update.

24 ноября, 20:50

Monday Smackdown: Hoisted from Two Years Ago: Cliff Asness Department

I see that on November 18--7 days before the fifth anniversary of his appearing as lead signatory of the right-wing Republican "Open Letter to Ben Bernnke--Cliff Asness spent 82 minutes talking to Tyler Cowen. The phrase "Federal Reserve" does not appear in the transcript. The phrase "quantitative easing" does not...

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24 ноября, 16:02

Megan Hess' New York Must-Dos

Megan Hess shot to fame following her cover illustrations for the Sex in the City book, and now works with some of the most coveted luxury fashion brands in the world, as well as being artist in residence for the Oetker Collection.

23 ноября, 20:48

Trump selects DeVos as education secretary

President-elect Donald Trump announced on Wednesday that he plans to nominate school-choice activist, philanthropist and Republican mega-donor Betsy DeVos to lead the Education Department.DeVos, 58, chairs the American Federation for Children, an advocacy group that has aggressively pushed to expand charter schools and school voucher programs that provide families with public money to spend on private school tuition.“Betsy DeVos is a brilliant and passionate education advocate,” Trump said in a statement. “Under her leadership we will reform the U.S. education system and break the bureaucracy that is holding our children back so that we can deliver world-class education and school choice to all families."In the same statement, DeVos said she’s honored to work with Trump. “The status quo in education is not acceptable. Together, we can work to make transformational change that ensures every student in America has the opportunity to fulfill his or her highest potential,” she said.The pick is a sign that Trump plans to pursue his campaign pledge to push for sweeping school choice, including spending $20 billion on block grants to expand charter and private school options for low-income children — almost as much as the country now spends on funding for schools serving poor kids and special education programs combined. The idea has long been championed by conservatives but has fizzled in Congress. DeVos' advocacy group helped craft that proposal.“We know that millions of children, mostly low-income and minority children, remain trapped in K-12 schools that are not meeting their needs,” DeVos said in September when Trump released his plan. “We applaud the Trump campaign’s focus on school choice and laying out common-sense proposals to help all children access a quality education.”Trump’s selection of a second woman to a Cabinet post is also regarded as a nod to establishment Republicans -- in this case, from a critical battleground state.DeVos is part of a wealthy and influential family of Republican donors who held back their donations for much of Trump’s campaign. She is married to Dick DeVos, an unsuccessful GOP candidate for governor of Michigan, former president of Amway and former president of the Orlando Magic NBA franchise. His father co-founded the Amway Corporation.Betsy DeVos told The Washington Examiner in March that she didn’t think Trump “represents the Republican Party” and she again declined to support Trump during the Republican National Convention, casting her vote for Gov. John Kasich.However, she did celebrate Trump’s pick of Indiana Gov. Mike Pence for a running mate, noting his work expanding school choice in Indiana.“Our country needs leaders who will challenge the status quo of K-12 education,” she said in July. “Governor Pence has a proven record of accomplishment when it comes to advancing educational choice and innovation, which are critically important to improving educational outcomes for all students in America.”DeVos’ selection is sure to rankle teachers unions but it also drew mixed reviews from education conservatives.Frederick Hess of the right-leaning American Enterprise Institute called DeVos a “smart and unapologetic champion for choice, which is what Trump has spoken a lot about. She’s a small government, state and local conservative.”Others lambasted the choice, citing her involvement in Jeb Bush’s group, Foundation for Excellence in Education, which has championed the Common Core standards.“President-elect Trump rightly slammed Governor Jeb Bush for his support of Common Core on the campaign trail,” said Frank Cannon, president of American Principles Project, which opposes Common Core.“Betsy DeVos would be a very Jeb-like pick. It is puzzling, then, to see reports that the Trump transition team is considering an establishment, pro-Common Core Secretary of Education – this would not qualify as ‘draining the swamp’ – and it seems to fly in the face of what Trump has stated on education policy up to this point,” Cannon said.John Bailey, a strategic education adviser who left the Foundation for Excellence in Education earlier this year, said DeVos would be good partner to governors as they roll out changes under the Every Student Succeeds Act, the education law that sets K-12 policy and that passed last year.States next year must submit plans to the Education Department for holding schools accountable. In approving those plans, DeVos would likely grant states and school districts the flexibility they’ve been hoping for under the new law.DeVos has been the driving force between voucher expansion in Michigan. She split with former Republican Gov. John Engler, who’s now president of the Business Roundtable, over the issue in 2000. She stepped down as chair of Michigan’s GOP following disagreements with Engler and was soon appointed finance chairwoman for the National Republican Senatorial Committee.When it comes to charter school oversight, DeVos has fought for fewer regulations in Michigan. DeVos and her husband helped pass Michigan’s charter school law in 1993. They also established the school choice group, the Great Lakes Education Project. Michigan’s charter schools are some of the least regulated in the country, with about 80 percent run by private companies. Chalkbeat reported this week.Kimberly Hefling and Benjamin Wermund contributed reporting.

22 ноября, 02:22

Libya Continues To Boost Production As OPEC Nears Freeze Deal

  • 0

Libya-based Waha Oil Co reached a production rate of 75,000 barrels per day and expects output to increase in the coming weeks, according to recent reporting by Reuters. The oil company plans to bring the Jalu oilfield online soon, which will be the firm’s third revived field after Waha and Samah. The National Oil Corporation owns Waha as a joint venture subsidiary with ConocoPhillips, Marathon and Hess Corp. Output from Waha resumed last month when several previously blockaded ports opened for business. The field contributes to the Es Sider…

22 ноября, 02:22

Libya Continues To Boost Production As OPEC Nears Freeze Deal

  • 0

Libya-based Waha Oil Co reached a production rate of 75,000 barrels per day and expects output to increase in the coming weeks, according to recent reporting by Reuters. The oil company plans to bring the Jalu oilfield online soon, which will be the firm’s third revived field after Waha and Samah. The National Oil Corporation owns Waha as a joint venture subsidiary with ConocoPhillips, Marathon and Hess Corp. Output from Waha resumed last month when several previously blockaded ports opened for business. The field contributes to the Es Sider…

22 ноября, 01:00

ExxonMobil's (XOM) Oil Discovery in Guyana Now Commercial

Oil major ExxonMobil Corporation (XOM) recently declared that its Liza oil discovery, in Stabroek block offshore Guyana, is now commercial.

21 ноября, 17:53

2016 presidential advertising focused on character attacks, not policy

By Shawn Parry-Giles, Lauren Hunter, Morgan Hess, and Prashanth Bhat, University of Maryland The general election ads from the 2016 presidential campaign represented a referendum on each candidate's character. And in this ad race, there were no winners. Both the Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump campaigns featured the takeaway message that their opponent is not fit to lead. Even though Trump won the election, he will face significant obstacles in reestablishing the credibility he needs to lead a very divided electorate. Fear and anger were the key emotions of TV ads from both campaigns and two Super PACS. Trump must now find a way to mitigate national anxieties in the wake of a polarizing election. Ad research Our research team with the Political Advertising Research Center at the University of Maryland studied the political advertisements produced during the general election - from July through the end of October. Our team studied ads produced by the Clinton campaign and the Trump campaign. We also studied ads from two Super PACs: one Clinton-leaning (Priorities USA Action) and the other pro-Trump (Rebuilding America Now). In order to gain a comprehensive picture of the ads, our team examined the ad spending and ad strategies of the general election and produced A Report on Presidential Advertising and the 2016 General Election. Our team coded the content of each ad using four tenets: 1) whether content was positive, negative or comparative, 2) whether ads focused on issues, character or a combination of character and issue, 3) the emotional appeals used based on six primary emotions: anger, fear, sadness, joy, love and surprise, and 4) the subject matter. Together, these tenets helped reveal the broader strategy of each campaign - a strategy that focused more on the weaknesses of the opponent rather than the strengths of the candidate. We also studied where the money was spent during the ad cycle of the general election. Ad spending The Clinton campaign vastly outspent the Trump campaign in terms of TV ad buys. As of Oct. 25, 2016, Clinton's campaign had spent between US$142 and $172 million on TV and radio during the general election. In addition to Hillary for America's spending, Super PACs and other outside support groups spent $103 million. Although the Trump campaign increased its ad spending in the final weeks of the campaign, it didn't top the Clinton budget in terms of overall spending. As of Nov. 2, 2016, Clinton had spent $211.4 million in TV ads, while Trump had spent only $74 million. The Clinton campaign spent three times more money on TV and radio advertising than the Trump campaign, yet Clinton's final total was still far less than we have seen in the last two elections. Clinton's spending seems almost modest when compared to Obama's $404 million budget in 2012. One reason for the general drop in spending is that the 2016 candidates focused more energy on electronic ads and social media than television spot ads. According to Borrell Associates, a market research firm, digital spending for 2016 was estimated at $1.6 billion - a 576 percent increase since 2012. Despite an increase in ad spending on social media, which caters to younger voters, TV remains the most dominant platform for political ads with a 70 percent share of ad revenue. The target audience for political ads is not clear-cut. TV ads often target older voters, yet most TV ads are also uploaded to YouTube and other social networks that are predominantly used by younger audiences. While Clinton launched her first general election ad in July 2016, Trump's first general election ad came out in the third week of August. Both campaigns heavily targeted battleground states: Florida, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Ohio. The Clinton campaign also focused on Arizona, Nevada, Nebraska and Texas while Trump invested much of his resources in Nevada, Arizona, Wisconsin, California and Colorado. Clinton's ad strategies Clinton's campaign organization, Hillary for America, produced 38 televised ads between July 7 and Oct. 25. Over half of Clinton's ads overtly attacked Trump, frequently using the words and images of Trump as ammunition. An additional 24 percent of the ads represented an implicit attack on Trump, juxtaposing him as the negative counterpart to Clinton's positive character. Ads such as "Myself," "Families First" and "General Allen" serve as part of a series of comparative attack ads questioning Trump's fitness. In another ad, titled "America's Bully," Clinton tells a young girl, "We shouldn't let anybody bully his way into the presidency." The ads addressed Trump's temperament and intelligence, contrasting him with Clinton's moral character, government experience and steady nature. In attacking Trump, the ads primarily appealed to emotions of fear, sadness and anger. Trump's ad strategy Trump relied on character attacks as the subject matter for approximately 35 percent of the TV ads he released. Of the 17 ads released by his campaign from August through late October, six were categorized as character attacks. In "Immigration," "Economy," "Dangerous" and "Change," the Trump campaign contrasted the character of the candidates. But by the end of October, Trump released three positive character ads in a row that featured more "campaign biographies" of the candidate. In these commercials, Trump showboated his success and promised to bring the same leadership of success to the presidency. These ads were aimed at both overcoming his negative image among American voters and demonstrating his ability to govern successfully. Overall, Trump's campaign strategy focused on building a more positive image of himself while denigrating Clinton's character. For instance, in his ad "Deplorable," the narrator queried: "You know what's deplorable?" The answer: "Hillary Clinton viciously demonizing hard-working people like you." The incendiary language that Clinton used ("deplorable") and Trump applied to Clinton ("demonizing") exacerbated the anger and fear animating the campaign ads of 2016. Super PAC ad strategy The Super PACs echoed the strategies of the candidates' official campaigns. In fact, for most of the ads produced by Priorities USA Action, the message was that Trump is "dangerous" and "unfit" to be the president. Many of the ads featured the mothers of children who have been hurt, killed or emotionally affected by the types of "hate," "bullying" or "disrespect" that Trump exhibited during this campaign. The audience was invited to empathize with the grieving mothers and to consider the futures of their own children. Trump-leaning ads from Rebuilding America Now predominately traded on voter anger and contempt for Clinton. Nine of the 11 "negative" ads attacked Clinton's character in some way, frequently using Bill Clinton's indiscretions as an index of her own immorality. The 2016 takeaway While character attacks have always been a feature of campaign advertising, during the 2016 election, these formed the mainstay strategy for both the campaigns. Between 1952 and 2008, 31 percent of the general election ads were character-based. In 2016, character ads made up 76 percent of the television campaign ads from the general election. The Clinton and Trump campaigns, as well as the Super PACs, attacked the opposition through appeals to fear and anger over positive emotions like joy and love. Our analysis suggests these negative appeals helped deepen the anxiety and cynicism that dominated the campaign climate in ways unmatched in recent memory. The consequence is an electorate openly expressing fear of the other side. As the Pew Center reports, "[m]ore than half of Democrats (55 percent) say the Republican Party makes them 'afraid,' while 49 percent of Republicans say the same about the Democratic Party." If the campaign of 2008 was known as one of "hope" and "change," the campaign of 2016 may well go down in history as one of "fear" and "anger." Shawn Parry-Giles, Professor of Communication, University of Maryland; Lauren Hunter, Ph.D. Student of Communication, University of Maryland; Morgan Hess, Ph.D. Student in Rhetoric and Political Communication, University of Maryland, and Prashanth Bhat, Ph.D. Student, University of Maryland Additional UMD PARC Research Team Members: Alyson Farzad-Phillips, Nora Murphy, Claudia Serrano Rico, Kyle Stephan and Gareth Williams. This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

20 ноября, 22:45

2016 Presidential Advertising Focused On Character Attacks

Shawn Parry-Giles, University of Maryland; Lauren Hunter, University of Maryland; Morgan Hess, University of Maryland, and Prashanth Bhat, University of Maryland The general election ads from the 2016 presidential campaign represented a referendum on each candidate's character. And in this ad race, there were no winners. Both the Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump campaigns featured the takeaway message that their opponent is not fit to lead. Even though Trump won the election, he will face significant obstacles in reestablishing the credibility he needs to lead a very divided electorate. Fear and anger were the key emotions of TV ads from both campaigns and two Super PACS. Trump must now find a way to mitigate national anxieties in the wake of a polarizing election. Ad research Our research team with the Political Advertising Research Center at the University of Maryland studied the political advertisements produced during the general election - from July through the end of October. Our team studied ads produced by the Clinton campaign and the Trump campaign. We also studied ads from two Super PACs: one Clinton-leaning (Priorities USA Action) and the other pro-Trump (Rebuilding America Now). In order to gain a comprehensive picture of the ads, our team examined the ad spending and ad strategies of the general election and produced A Report on Presidential Advertising and the 2016 General Election. Our team coded the content of each ad using four tenets: 1) whether content was positive, negative or comparative, 2) whether ads focused on issues, character or a combination of character and issue, 3) the emotional appeals used based on six primary emotions: anger, fear, sadness, joy, love and surprise, and 4) the subject matter. Together, these tenets helped reveal the broader strategy of each campaign - a strategy that focused more on the weaknesses of the opponent rather than the strengths of the candidate. We also studied where the money was spent during the ad cycle of the general election. Ad spending The Clinton campaign vastly outspent the Trump campaign in terms of TV ad buys. As of Oct. 25, 2016, Clinton's campaign had spent between US$142 and $172 million on TV and radio during the general election. In addition to Hillary for America's spending, Super PACs and other outside support groups spent $103 million. Although the Trump campaign increased its ad spending in the final weeks of the campaign, it didn't top the Clinton budget in terms of overall spending. As of Nov. 2, 2016, Clinton had spent $211.4 million in TV ads, while Trump had spent only $74 million. The Clinton campaign spent three times more money on TV and radio advertising than the Trump campaign, yet Clinton's final total was still far less than we have seen in the last two elections. Clinton's spending seems almost modest when compared to Obama's $404 million budget in 2012. One reason for the general drop in spending is that the 2016 candidates focused more energy on electronic ads and social media than television spot ads. According to Borrell Associates, a market research firm, digital spending for 2016 was estimated at $1.6 billion - a 576 percent increase since 2012. Despite an increase in ad spending on social media, which caters to younger voters, TV remains the most dominant platform for political ads with a 70 percent share of ad revenue. The target audience for political ads is not clear-cut. TV ads often target older voters, yet most TV ads are also uploaded to YouTube and other social networks that are predominantly used by younger audiences. While Clinton launched her first general election ad in July 2016, Trump's first general election ad came out in the third week of August. Both campaigns heavily targeted battleground states: Florida, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Ohio. The Clinton campaign also focused on Arizona, Nevada, Nebraska and Texas while Trump invested much of his resources in Nevada, Arizona, Wisconsin, California and Colorado. Clinton's ad strategies Clinton's campaign organization, Hillary for America, produced 38 televised ads between July 7 and Oct. 25. Over half of Clinton's ads overtly attacked Trump, frequently using the words and images of Trump as ammunition. An additional 24 percent of the ads represented an implicit attack on Trump, juxtaposing him as the negative counterpart to Clinton's positive character. Ads such as "Myself," "Families First" and "General Allen" serve as part of a series of comparative attack ads questioning Trump's fitness. In another ad, titled "America's Bully," Clinton tells a young girl, "We shouldn't let anybody bully his way into the presidency." The ads addressed Trump's temperament and intelligence, contrasting him with Clinton's moral character, government experience and steady nature. In attacking Trump, the ads primarily appealed to emotions of fear, sadness and anger. Trump's ad strategy Trump relied on character attacks as the subject matter for approximately 35 percent of the TV ads he released. Of the 17 ads released by his campaign from August through late October, six were categorized as character attacks. In "Immigration," "Economy," "Dangerous" and "Change," the Trump campaign contrasted the character of the candidates. But by the end of October, Trump released three positive character ads in a row that featured more "campaign biographies" of the candidate. In these commercials, Trump showboated his success and promised to bring the same leadership of success to the presidency. These ads were aimed at both overcoming his negative image among American voters and demonstrating his ability to govern successfully. Overall, Trump's campaign strategy focused on building a more positive image of himself while denigrating Clinton's character. For instance, in his ad "Deplorable," the narrator queried: "You know what's deplorable?" The answer: "Hillary Clinton viciously demonizing hard-working people like you." The incendiary language that Clinton used ("deplorable") and Trump applied to Clinton ("demonizing") exacerbated the anger and fear animating the campaign ads of 2016. Super PAC ad strategy The Super PACs echoed the strategies of the candidates' official campaigns. In fact, for most of the ads produced by Priorities USA Action, the message was that Trump is "dangerous" and "unfit" to be the president. Many of the ads featured the mothers of children who have been hurt, killed or emotionally affected by the types of "hate," "bullying" or "disrespect" that Trump exhibited during this campaign. The audience was invited to empathize with the grieving mothers and to consider the futures of their own children. Trump-leaning ads from Rebuilding America Now predominately traded on voter anger and contempt for Clinton. Nine of the 11 "negative" ads attacked Clinton's character in some way, frequently using Bill Clinton's indiscretions as an index of her own immorality. The 2016 takeaway While character attacks have always been a feature of campaign advertising, during the 2016 election, these formed the mainstay strategy for both the campaigns. Between 1952 and 2008, 31 percent of the general election ads were character-based. In 2016, character ads made up 76 percent of the television campaign ads from the general election. The Clinton and Trump campaigns, as well as the Super PACs, attacked the opposition through appeals to fear and anger over positive emotions like joy and love. Our analysis suggests these negative appeals helped deepen the anxiety and cynicism that dominated the campaign climate in ways unmatched in recent memory. The consequence is an electorate openly expressing fear of the other side. As the Pew Center reports, "[m]ore than half of Democrats (55 percent) say the Republican Party makes them 'afraid,' while 49 percent of Republicans say the same about the Democratic Party." If the campaign of 2008 was known as one of "hope" and "change," the campaign of 2016 may well go down in history as one of "fear" and "anger." Additional UMD PARC Research Team Members: Alyson Farzad-Phillips, Nora Murphy, Claudia Serrano Rico, Kyle Stephan and Gareth Williams. Shawn Parry-Giles, Professor of Communication, University of Maryland; Lauren Hunter, Ph.D. Student of Communication, University of Maryland; Morgan Hess, Ph.D. Student in Rhetoric and Political Communication, University of Maryland, and Prashanth Bhat, Ph.D. Student, University of Maryland This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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19 ноября, 01:06

ExxonMobil set to develop Liza discovery offshore Guyana

ExxonMobil Corp. has informed the Guyanese government that it intends to fast-track development of the Liza discovery on the 6.6 million-acre Stabroek block. The company’s partners, Nexen Energy ULC and Hess Corp., gave Minister of Natural Resources Raphael Trotman notice of the discovery’s commercial quantities early last week.

15 ноября, 17:16

BP plc (BP) Expands Footprint in Offshore Newfoundland

BP plc (BP) emerged as a big winner in the latest call for bids by the Canada-Newfoundland & Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board ("C-NLOPB") for deep-water zones off Eastern Newfoundland and the Jeanne d'Arc basin.

14 ноября, 16:44

Hess Cuts Workforce by Over 11% to Cope with Price Volatility

Hess Corporation (HES) has reportedly cut a number of jobs to combat the persistent oil price volatility.

11 ноября, 17:33

Here are the people who will cast the formal vote for president next month

On Dec. 19, the 538 members of the Electoral College (or their alternates) will meet in their state capitals to ratify the results of the presidential election.Here are the people who will cast the formal votes for president in each state. POLITICO examined several dozen electors last month, many of whom are on this final roster:ALABAMA (GOP)1. Frank Burt, Jr.2. Will Sellers3. Jim Wilson4. Tim Wadsworth5. Elbert Peters6. Mary Sue McClurkin7. Bob Cusanelli8. Perry Hooper Jr.9. Grady ThorntonALASKA (GOP)10. Sean Parnell, Palmer AK11. Jacqueline Tupou, Juneau AK12. Carolyn LemanARIZONA (GOP)13. Bruce Ash14. Walter Begay15. Sharon Giese16. Robert Graham17. Alberto Gutier18. Jerry Hayden19. Carole Joyce20. Jane Lynch21. Foster Morgan22. James O'Connor23. Edward RobsonARKANSAS (GOP)24. Jonelle Fulmer25. Jonathan Barnett26. Keith Gibson27. Sharon Wright28. Tommy Land29. John NabholzCALIFORNIA (DEM)30. Dustin Reed31. John Ryan32. Faith Garamendi33. Kathleen Scott34. Timothy Farley35. Analea Patterson36. Janine Bera37. Denise Wells38. Mark Headley39. Susan Eggman40. James Donahue41. Christine Pelosi42. Saundra Andrews43. Mark Olbert44. Donna Ireland45. Steven Diebert46. Steve Spinner47. Celine Purcell48. Javier Gonzalez49. Vinzenz Koller50. Ana Huerta51. Stephen Natoli52. Andres Ramos53. Gail Teton-Landis54. Natalie Fortman55. Shawn Terris56. David Warmuth57. Laurence Zakson58. Nury Martinez59. Sheldon Malchicoff60. Cathy Morris61. Benjamin Cardenas62. Edward Buck63. Olivia Reyes-Becerra64. Robert Torres65. Priscilla Richardson66. Gwen Moore67. Jacki Cisneros68. John MacMurray69. Marie Torres70. Jane Block71. Andrew Krakoff72. Karen Waters73. Dorothy Vann74. Sandra Aduna75. Gregory Willenborg76. Carmen Perez77. Raymond Cordova78. Francine Busby79. Patrick Drinan80. Christine Kehoe81. Katherine Lyon82. Shirley Weber83. Eileen Feinstein Mariano84. Laphonza ButlerCOLORADO (DEM)85. Terry Phillips86. Mary Beth Corsentino87. Jerad Sutton88. Robert Nemanich89. Amy Drayer90. Ann Knollman91. Sen. Rollie Heath92. Hon. Polly Baca93. Micheal BacaCONNECTICUT (DEM)94. Barbara Gordon95. Ellen Nurse96. Edward Piazza97. Tyisha Walker98. Christopher Rosario99. Robert Godfrey100. Steven JonesDELAWARE101. Lynn Fuller102. Lydia York103. Linda CavanaughDISTRICT OF COLUMBIA (DEM)104. Anita Bonds105. Jack Evans106. Franklin GarciaFLORIDA (GOP)107. Ade Aderibigbe108. Larry Ahern109. Brian Ballard110. Kristy Banks111. Michael Barnett112. LizBeth Benacquisto113. Robin Bernstein114. Pam Bondi115. John Browning116. Sharon Day117. Dena DeCamp118. Nick D119. Jeremy Evans120. John Falconetti121. Peter Feaman122. Kat Gates-Skipper123. Joe Gruters124. Debbie Hannifan125. Blaise Ingoglia126. Tony Ledbetter127. Mike Moberley128. Susan Moore129. Joe Negron130. Clint Pate131. Ray Rodrigues132. Carlos Trujillo133. Robert Watkins134. Susie Wiles135. Christian ZieglerGEORGIA136. Bruce Allen Azevedo137. Brian K Burdette138. Lott Harris Dill139. John David Elliott140. James Randolph Evans141. Bobbie D. Frantz142. Linda D. Herren143. Rachel Blackstone Little144. Deborah M. McCord145. Michael Neil McNeely146. Mary L. Padgett147. Neil L. Pruitt148. Joshua Kirk Shook149. Frank B. Strickland150. Baoky Nguyen Vu (resigned, will be replaced by alternate)151. John B. WhiteHAWAII (DEM)152. John Bickel153. Janice Bond154. Marie (Dolly) Strazar155. David MulinixIDAHO (GOP)156. Jennifer Locke157. Melinda Smyser158. Layne Bangerter159. Caleb LakeyILLINOIS (DEM)*160. Toni Preckwinkle161. Carrie Austin162. Silvana Tabares163. Jesus "Chuy" Garcia164. Pam Cullerton165. Nancy Shepardson166. Vera Davis167. William Marovitz168. Barbara Flynn Currie169. John R. Daley170. Michelle Mussman171. Lauren Beth Gash172. Kevin Duffy Blackburn173. Jerry Costello174. Carol Ammons175. Mark Guethle176. Flint Taylor177. John Nelson178. Don Johnston179. **POLITICO was only able to identify 19 of the 20 Democratic electors in Illinois. Party officials did not respond to requests for comment. We will update with the final name as soon as possible.INDIANA (GOP)180. Stephanie Beckley181. Kevin Steen182. Kelly Mitchell183. Daniel Bortner184. Laura Campbell185. Jeff Cardwell186. Donald Hayes187. Randall Kirkpatrick188. Edwin Simcox189. Ethan Manning190. Chuck WilliamsIOWA (GOP)191. James Whitmer192. Don Kass193. Dylan Keller194. Alan Braun195. Kurt Brown196. Polly GranzowKANSAS (GOP)197. Ashley J. McMillan198. Helen Van Etten199. Mark Kahrs200. Ron Estes201. Clayton L. Barker202. Kelly ArnoldKENTUCKY (GOP)203. Jim Skaggs204. David Disponett205. Robert Duncan206. Michael Carter207. Scott Lasley208. Walter Reichert209. Mary Singleton210. Troy SheldonLOUISIANA (GOP)211. Chris D. Trahan212. Lloyd A. Harsch213. Charles L “Charlie” Buckels214. Louis R. Avallone215. Kay Kellogg Katz216. Lennie H. Rhys217. Garrett C. Monti218. Steven “Scott “ WilfongMAINE (3 D, 1 R)219. Diane Denk220. David Bright221. Sam Shapiro222. Richard Bennett (R)MARYLAND*223. Lesley Israel224. Robert Leonard225. Lillian Holmes226. Salome Peters227. Hagner Mister228. Claudia Martin229. Courtney Watson230. Karen Britto231. Susan Ness232. Wayne RogersMASSACHUSETTS (DEM)233. Nazda Alam234. Mary Gail Cokkinias235. Marie Turley236. Dori Dean237. Donna Smith238. Cheryl Cumings239. Marc Pacheco240. Curtis Lemay241. Jason Palitsch242. Paul Yorkis243. Parwez WahidMICHIGAN244. John Haggard245. Jack Holmes246. Kelly Mitchell247. Judy Rapanos248. Henry Hatter249. Robert Weitt250. Wyckham Seelig251. Ross Ensign252. Michael Banerian253. Brian Fairbrother254. Ken Crider255. Mary Vaughn256. Jim Rhoades257. William Rauwerdink258. Hank Fuhs259. Joseph GuzmanMINNESOTA (Dem)260. Fred Knudson261. Roger Gehrke262. Marge Hoffa263. Raymond Hess264. Muhammed Abdurrahman265. Betsy O’Berry266. Mike Wammer267. Mary Murphy268. Jules Goldstein269. Sherrie PughMISSISSIPPI (GOP)270. Ann Hebert271. Joe F. Sanderson Jr.272. Bradley R. White273. J. Kelley Williams274. William G. Yates Jr.275. Wirt A. Yerger, Jr.MISSOURI (GOP)276. Tim Dreste277. Janice DeWeese278. Hector Maldonado279. Sherry Kuttenkuler280. Casey Crawford281. Tom Brown282. Cherry Warren283. Scott Clark284. Al Rotskoff285. Susie JohnsonMONTANA (GOP)286. Thelma Baker287. Nancy Ballance288. Dennis ScrantonNEBRASKA (GOP)289. Phil Berlin290. John Dinkel291. Chuck Conrad292. Craig Safranek293. Paul BurgerNEVADA (Dem)294. Dayananda Prabhu Rachakonda295. Larry Jackson296. Joetta Brown297. Paul Catha II298. Greg Gardella299. Teresa Benitez-ThompsonNEW HAMPSHIRE (Dem)300. Bev Hollingworth301. Terie Norelli302. Carol Shea Porter303. Dudley DudleyNEW JERSEY (Dem)304. Alaa R Abdelaziz305. Tahsina Ahmed306. Anthony Cureton307. Lizette Delgado-Polanco308. Edward Farmer309. Christopher D. James310. Leroy J Jones Jr311. Retha R Onitiri312. Marlene Prieto313. Ronald G Rios314. Hetty M Rosenstein315. Kelly Stewart Maer316. Mary Ann Wardlow317. Heriberta Loretta WintersNEW MEXICO318. Lorraine Spradling319. Edward Torres320. Noyola Archibeque321. John Padilla322. Roxanne AllenNEW YORK (Dem)323. William J. Clinton324. Andrew M. Cuomo325. Kathy C. Hochul326. Thomas P. DiNapoli327. Eric T. Schneiderman328. Carl E. Heastie329. Andrea Stewart-Cousins330. Bill de Blasio331. Letitia A. James332. Scott M. Stringer333. Melissa Mark-Viverito334. Byron W. Brown335. Christine C. Quinn336. Basil A. Smikle, Jr.337. Melissa Sklarz338. Mario F. Cilento339. Rhonda Weingarten340. George K. Gresham341. Daniel F. Donohue342. Stuart H. Appelbaum343. Gary S. LaBarbera344. Lovely A. Warren345. Stephanie A. Miner346. Katherine M. Sheehan347. Anastasia M. Somoza348. Sandra Ung349. Ruben Diaz, Jr.350. Hazel L. Ingram351. Rachel D. GoldNORTH CAROLINA (GOP)352. Linda Harper353. Charles Staley354. Karen Kozel355. Martha Jenkins356. Celeste Stanley357. Donald Webb358. Robert Muller359. Jennifer Dunbar360. Andrea Arterburn361. Glenn Pinckney Sr.362. Mark Delk363. David Speight364. Ann Sullivan365. Lee Green366. David SmuskiNORTH DAKOTA (GOP)367. Duane Mutch368. John Olson369. Ronald CarlisleOHIO (GOP)370. Alex Triantafilou371. Mary Anne Christie372. Cory Schottenstein373. Jim Dicke II374. Cheryl Blakely375. Marilyn Ashcraft376. Christina Hagan377. Richard Jones378. Tom Coyne379. Judy Westbrock380. Ralph King381. Leonard Hubert382. Tracey Winbush383. James Wert384. Brian Schottenstein385. Curt Braden386. LeeAnn Johnson387. Ed CrawfordOKLAHOMA (GOP)388. David Oldham389. Teresa Turner390. Mark Thomas391. Bobby Cleveland392. Laurie Beth393. Charlie Potts394. George WilandOREGON (DEM)395. Frank James Dixon396. Karen A. Packer397. Austin Folnagy398. Leon H. Coleman399. Harry W. "Sam" Sappington III400. Timothy Norman Powers Rowan401. Laura GillpatrickPENNSYLVANIA (GOP)402. Robert Asher403. Mary Barket404. Robert Bozzuto405. Theodore Christian406. Michael Downing407. Margaret Ferraro408. Robert Gleason409. Christopher Gleason410. Joyce Haas411. Ash Khare412. James McErlane413. Elstina Pickett414. Patricia Poprik415. Andrew Reilly416. Carol Sides417. Glora “Lee” Snover418. Richard Stewart419. Lawrence Tabas420. Christine Toretti421. Carolyn “Bunny” WelshRHODE ISLAND (DEM)422. Clay Pell423. Grace Diaz424. L. Susan Weiner425. Frank J. MontanaroSOUTH CAROLINA (GOP)426. Glenn McCall427. Matt Moore428. Terry Hardesty429. Jim Ulmer430. Brenda Bedenbaugh431. Bill Conley432. Shery Smith433. Moye Graham434. Jerry RovnerSOUTH DAKOTA (GOP)435. Dennis Daugaard436. Matt Michels437. Marty JackleyTENNESSEE (GOP)438. Joey Jacobs439. Beth Scott Clayton Amos440. Jason Mumpower441. Susan Mills442. Liz Holiway443. Lynne Davis444. Tom Lawless445. Mike Callahan446. Pat Allen447. Shannon Hanes448. Drew DanielTEXAS (GOP)449. Marty Rhymes450. Thomas Moon451. Carol Sewell452. John Harper453. Sherrill Lenz454. Nicholas Ciggelakis455. William Hickman456. Landon Estay457. Rex Lamb458. Rosemary Edwards459. Matt Stringer460. Shellie Surles461. Melissa Juett Kalka462. Kenneth Clark463. Sandara Cararas464. David Thackston465. Robert Bruce466. Marjorie Forster467. Scott Mann468. Marian Stanko469. Curtis Nelson470. Tina Gibson471. Kendell Muenzler472. Alexander Kim473. Virginia Able474. John Dillard475. Thomas Knight476. Marian Knowlton477. Rex Teter478. Stephen (Chris) Suprun Jr.479. Jon Jewett480. Susan Fischer481. Loren Byers482. William Lawrence Greene483. Mary Lou Erben484. Art Sisneros485. Candace Noble486. Fred FariasUTAH (GOP)487. Peter Greathouse488. Jeremy Jenkins489. Kris Kimball490. Cherilyn Eagar491. Chia-Chi Teng492. Richard SnelgroveVERMONT (DEM)493. Peter Shumlin494. Martha Allen495. Tim JermanVIRGINIA (DEM)496. James O’Connor497. Vivian Paige498. Delegate Lashrecse Aird499. Bethany Johnston Rowland500. Jasper Hendricks501. Deb Fitzgerald502. Harold Boyd503. Ginny Peter504. Jeanette Sarver505. Kathy Stewart Shupe506. Keith Scarborough507. Susan Rowland508. Terry FryeWASHINGTON (DEM)509. Varisha Khan510. Brent Chiafolo511. Ryleigh Ivey512. Levi Guerra513. Phillip Tyler514. Julie Johnson515. Chris Porter516. Dan Carpita517. Esther John518. Eric Herde519. Robert Satiacum520. Elizabeth CaldwellWEST VIRGINIA (GOP)521. Ron Foster522. Patrick Morrisey523. Ann Urling524. Mac Warner525. Bill ColeWISCONSIN (GOP)526. Steve King527. Mary Buestrin528. Kim Travis529. Kim Babler530. Brian Westrate531. Brad Courtney532. Kathy Kiernan533. Dan Feyen534. Jim Miller535. Bill BerglundWYOMING (GOP)536. Karl Allred537. Bonnie Foster538. Teresa Richards

01 ноября, 22:23

Occidental Petroleum (OXY) Loss Wider than Expected in Q3

Occidental Petroleum Corporation (OXY) reported third-quarter 2016 loss of 15 cents per share, wider than the Zacks Consensus Estimate of a loss of 13 cents

01 ноября, 20:07

How Waning Competition Deepens Labor’s Plight

Eduardo Porter: How Waning Competition Deepens Labor’s Plight: ...collectively, mergers ... are reconfiguring the American economy in ways that seem to be tilting the scales toward the interests of ever-larger corporations, to the broad detriment of labor. ... Three years...

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28 октября, 17:55

Overview of TIAA-CREF Mid-Cap Value Retirement Fund (TRVRX)

TIAA-CREF Mid-Cap Value Retirement Fund (TRVRX) a Zacks Rank #1 (Strong Buy) was incepted in October 2002 and is managed by Teachers Advisors LLC

28 октября, 00:00

How a Pillar of German Banking Lost Its Way

Fichtner, Goos, & Hesse, Der SpiegelFor most of its 146 years, Deutsche Bank was the embodiment of German values: reliable and safe. Now, the once-proud institution is facing the abyss. SPIEGEL tells the story of how Deutsche's 1990s rush to join the world banking elite paved the way for its own downfall.

27 октября, 23:46

5 Tips for Developing an Effective Employee Training Program

You spend a fair amount of money onboarding employees, so you want to be certain you’re maximizing that investment by providing ongoing training that keeps them up to date on trends that are pertinent to their job. You Can’t Afford to Skimp on Training It costs a lot of money to onboard a new employee. Anyone who owns a business or has worked in HR knows this to be the case. According to business expert Jason Hesse, the typical business pays an entry-level employee roughly £21,800 in typical wage rates for a professional or skilled worker. On top of this, you have to account for things like payroll, pension contributions, national insurance contributions (estimated to be £13,900), legal fees, sickness absences, and more. Interestingly, the smaller your growing business is, the more costly it can be to comply with regulations and administrative burdens. When it’s all said and done, you aren’t just paying an employee’s wages. You’re also spending time and money on contracts, benefits, interviews, IT equipment, office furniture, and other basics. And this is just within the first few days! When a worker sticks around for a few years, you have to tack on retirement contributions, pay raises, paid time off, new equipment, and so on. So where does training fit into all of this? Training is how you maximize your investment. Do you really want to spend thousands of pounds on an employee and then toss him or her aside? You have to make training a priority so you can help each employee become his or her best version … one that can handle all the responsibilities and duties hand over. Thus, though you might believe a training program is only necessary for established corporations that have thousands of employees, the truth is, growing businesses can’t afford to ignore the opportunities of training. Otherwise, you risk throwing your investment down the drain. Five Tips for a Successful Training Program How do you go about developing a successful training program for your business? We’ve compiled five basic tips that have helped countless other growing businesses develop and perfect their programs. Take a look: 1. Identify Clear Goals and Outcomes Any good program starts with clear and definable goals. Training merely for the purpose of having it is futile. You need concrete outcomes in order to stand any chance of deploying materials and a curriculum that add value to your firm. Here are a few essential factors that might play into your company’s current needs -- and therefore shape your goals and outcomes for the training program. Stage of business. What stage is your business is in? Are you a growing business that's adding multiple employees every month or are you a more established organization with low turnover? These are two highly different situations and no training program is a one-size-fits-all solution. Employee roles and responsibilities. When it comes to training specific groups of employees, you have to consider their roles. What will they be doing, and what won’t they be doing? Without a clear understanding of everyone’s responsibilities, training efforts could be misguided. Industry requirements. Depending on the various organizations your business is involved in and the licensing or oversight groups that have jurisdiction over it, certain types of training could be mandatory to stay in business. Firsthand knowledge. You can’t always quantify what your employees need. Sometimes, you have to simply observe what’s going on to recognize a shortcoming that needs addressing. These are just a few examples of factors that come into play when you’re seeking to establish training goals and outcomes. Don’t overlook this all-important aspect of the process, because it essentially creates the foundation for the rest of the program. 2. Develop Engaging Training Resources In addition to having the correct goals and the best intentions, you also need materials and a curriculum that are sufficiently interesting to engage your employees and keep them focused. It comes down to three choices: Develop your own resources. In 2016 and beyond, it’s now possible for your business to create cost-effective training programs in-house by leveraging new technologies that allow you to combine content, develop visuals, and build courses without any preexisting knowledge of training program development. Bring in an outside party. While you can save a lot of money developing your own resources, it takes a fair amount of time. If you want to streamline the process, you may choose to outsource training to another firm. Use generic industry resources. Finally, you can turn to generic industry resources such as books, guides, online videos, manuals, etc., if you’re looking for cheap and easy. This is pretty much guaranteed to be the least effective method, however. So you have options for developing training materials and resources. You’ll have to weigh such factors as cost, time, and quality when you think about how to proceed. 3. Establish a Consistent Schedule Effective training is all about consistency. Instead of trying to cram all of your company’s required training into a three-day period at the end of the calendar year, try spreading things out and commit to a couple hours of training every week or month. This kind of consistency not only lessens the burden on your company, but it also raises the probability that your employees will become committed to ongoing learning. (They’ll also retain more information this way.) 4. Give Employees a Say in the Curriculum Though you’ll have the final say over which curriculum your organization uses for its training programs, don’t deny your employees the opportunity to get involved. Ask them about concepts and topics they feel would help them grow as employees, leaders, etc. There’s a lot of potential value in getting their input, and you may stumble across some ideas you hadn’t previously considered. 5. Bridge the Gap Between Knowledge and Action One of the biggest mistakes organizations too often make is failing to bridge the gap between knowledge and action. In other words, they expend generous amounts of time and money on training, but don’t give employees a timely opportunity to transfer the knowledge they’ve acquired into action. Employee training expert Julie Winkle Giulioni believes in developing an action plan: “Organizations, leaders and individuals invest heavily in training and development through traditional classroom-based workshops, elearning, webinars, apps, mentoring, experiences, and more,” Giulioni explains. “But formal and informal learning efforts fall short of the full range of possible outcomes if we don’t metaphorically cross the finish line by bringing the learning to life. Action planning is what does this, bridging insights and intentions to results.” You can increase the odds that your employees will convert knowledge into action by setting them up for success. Always enable employees to debrief before they leave any training session. Ask questions like “What will you do differently now that you know X?” Host follow-up meetings with your team to see what progress they’re making. Simple things like these can have a significant impact. Make an Investment in Your Future Employee training is designed to equip your employees with the skills and knowledge needed to become better professionals in their own careers. But it ultimately benefits your business more than any other party. An investment in a robust training program is an investment in your future. Is that an investment you’re willing to make? This is a situation where the benefits can far outweigh the costs. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

27 октября, 15:48

Bernie Sanders Slams AT&T-Time Warner Merger

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) laid out his disapproval of the merger between AT&T Inc. and Time Warner Inc. in a feisty letter addressed to Acting Assistant Attorney General Renata B. Hesse on Wednesday. “This proposed merger is just the latest effort to shrink our media landscape, stifle competition and diversity of content, and provide consumers with less while charging them more,” he wrote in Medium. He asked Hesse to enforce antitrust laws and block the merger. AT&T announced over the weekend that it had agreed to buy Time Warner for $85.4 billion ― the biggest deal in the world this year ― in an effort to combine the former’s high-speed network with the latter’s viewing content.  The deal has major consequences for democracy, Sanders added, since one company will now have control over a wide range of brands. “Our democracy thrives when there is a diversity of viewpoints, and when citizens have unlimited access to information,” he wrote. “This merger represents a gross concentration of power that runs counter to the public good and should be blocked.” Sanders quoted critics, like nonprofit Public Citizen, to bolster his claim that one company controlling so much power is never a good thing. Competition is stifled, he argued, and it becomes more challenging for new players to enter the market. Other major telecommunications companies have already made similar moves. Comcast purchased NBCUniversal in 2011. Verizon Communications Inc. bought AOL, The Huffington Post’s parent company, in 2015 and is in the process of acquiring Yahoo Inc. for about $4.8 billion. Sanders then explained how the merger would affect the average consumer. “This deal would almost certainly lead to price hikes and reduced choice,” he wrote. Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump also has demanded that the merger be blocked. “It’s too much concentration of power in the hands of too few,” he said at a rally on Saturday. Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton took a much more muted position on the merger. “I am going to follow it closely, and obviously if I am fortunate enough to be president, I will expect the government to conduct a very thorough analysis before making a decision,” she said. This post has been updated with comment from Clinton. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.