• Теги
    • избранные теги
    • Компании56
      • Показать ещё
      Страны / Регионы12
      • Показать ещё
      Показатели3
      Разное6
      • Показать ещё
      Издания2
      Люди2
      Международные организации1
17 октября 2014, 19:05

Handelsblatt: "Four German Banks On The Brink"

Several days ago we were confused why, out of the blue, a €1 billion loan BWIC appeared that was dumping German non-performing loans. After all, the whole point of the European "recovery" fable to date has been to deflect all the attention from the "pristine" German banks, up to an including world-record derivatives juggernaut Deutsche Bank,  and to focus on Greece and other insolvent peripheral European nation. Earlier today, German Handelsblatt provided an answer, when it reported that "four German banks are on the brink", i.e., four banks of which three are known, HSH Nordbank, IKB and MunchenerHyp, will likely fail the ECB's stress test whose results are due to be announced next Friday. Keep in mind that this is a significant fraction of the 24 German banks that are undergoing the ECB's Stress farce test. So one wonders: if one in six German banks is so unsafe even the ECB (which kept Cypriot banks going well past their insolvency) will give them a black stamp (because in Europe failing a bank stress test is first of all impossible since both Bankia and Dexia passed theirs with flying cololrs, but more importantly a death sentence), what does that leave for the rest of Europe's banks, all of which are in far more dire shape than sleepy Germany? In any case, here is Handlesblatt's warning: The European Central Bank will give the results of its so-called “stress tests” to the banks on October 24. Shortly thereafter, at a Sunday afternoon press conference in Frankfurt, it will inform the public about which of the banks passed the months-long checkup into the health of their balance sheets. The test is designed to give the ECB a clean slate when it takes over the role of supervising Europe’s largest banks on November 4.   While Germany’s largest banks, including Commerzbank, are expected to pass the test, there are still four smaller banks putting in extra hours in hopes of passing ECB muster, according to information received by Handelsblatt.   “In part, data and justifications need to be sent over, in order to convince the regulators,” said one insider, who declined to be named.   Sources in the financial industry have named the state-backed regional lender HSH Nordbank, as well as IKB, a Düsseldorf-based bank supporting small and mid-sized businesses. The southern regional bank MünchenerHyp is also on the edge. The fourth bank is still unknown. The sources say it is possible that, after the last consultations, only two are really at risk of failing the stress test.   Commerzbank, Germany’s second-largest bank that is still 17-percent owned by the German government, seems to have cleared the hurdles. Deutsche Bank is also not being treated as a problem bank. [ZH: Kinda odd considering this] The largest German bank’s future legal costs are not being considered in the stress test and its capital increase last spring has a positive impact on the stress test rating.   Observers also give the all-clear to the publicly listed Aareal Bank and the cooperative financial institutions DZ Bank and WGZ Bank. Spokespeople for the banks would not comment before the results are released. When it comes to Germany’s state savings banks, BayernLB considers itself to be not at risk. CEO Johannes-Jörg Riegler said on Thursday: “You can assume that we are very, very solidly equipped and have considerable buffers to cushion some things. Do not worry.”   But the situation in the very north of the country is more dramatic, where HSH Nordbank is struggling to convince regulators.   Following an increased guarantee worth billions of euros on the part of the public owners Hamburg and Schleswig-Holstein, the state bank is so well financially padded that it could financially cope with the tougher guidelines from the ECB on the assessment of ship loans. According to the guidelines of the central bank, a lump reduction of 12 percent based on the calculated value of the ship will be levied, which naturally has an impact with ship lending volume of €20 billion. Oh well: more bank failures means more central bank bailouts. All of which is, what else: bullish.     

16 апреля 2014, 10:42

В ЕС договорились о создании банковского союза

Европейские законодатели во вторник наконец-то договорились о новых правилах, облегчающих ликвидацию проблемных банков.   Голосованием в Европарламенте, состоявшимся незадолго до его роспуска перед майскими выборами, было окончательно одобрено агентство, которое будет закрывать слабые банки еврозоны. Это последняя в серии крупных реформ, направленных на создание банковского союза для 18 стран, использующих евро.   Почти через семь лет после того, как небольшой немецкий банк IKB стал первой европейской жертвой мирового финансового кризиса, регион все еще не может вывести свою экономику из депрессии. В отличие от США, где регуляторы и Центробанк безотлагательно приняли меры для решения банковских проблем, разнонаправленные национальные интересы в Европе не позволяли странам выступить единым фронтом, чтобы сделать то же самое.   Банковский союз должен будет изменить это. Он начнет работать, когда Европейский центробанк начнет контролировать сектор в этом году.   "Евросоюз выполняет свои обязательства, - сказал Мишель Барнье, комиссар ЕС по вопросам регулирования. - Банковский союз дополняет экономический и денежный союз, завершает эру масштабных программ помощи и гарантирует, что налогоплательщики больше не будут оплачивать счета, когда у банков проблемы".   Эта схема вводит новые правила, которые облегчают перекладывание потерь на держателей облигаций и даже крупных вкладчиков обанкротившихся банков, хотя вопрос о том, что делать, если обвалится очень большой банк, остается открытым.

Выбор редакции
19 октября 2013, 12:56

Banking Nationalism and the European Crisis

Authors: Nicolas Véron I recently wrote down the oral remarks I had prepared for a speech on the changing European financial system, given in Istanbul on 27 June 2013 at a symposium of the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association (EVCA). Read the full speech below. It seems to me that the issue of banking nationalism, to which most of the speech is devoted, has been a bit of a blind spot in many analyses of the crisis in Europe. Specifically, what is key in this perspective is the mismatch between, on the one hand, comprehensive market integration enforced by the EU under the single market policy, and on the other hand, the preservation of national banking sector policies until the decision made last year to move towards a banking union. This mismatch created powerful incentives for national authorities to promote or defend “their” banks on the European playing field and thus introduce competitive distortions that have ultimately been harmful to financial stability. Banking nationalism also exists outside of the EU of course, but without this toxic combination with the single market framework and its adverse consequences for the stability of the system. The speech uses this template to help explain both the build-up of risk in European banks in the run-up to the crisis, and the difficulty to resolve the crisis and restore trust since the inception of market turmoil in mid-2007. It concludes by identifying banking union as a potential game-changer, even though whether this will result in a positive outcome for Europe remains to be seen.  Istanbul, 27 June 2013 The European financial crisis is almost six years old. By now, it has too many strands to be reduced to a one-dimensional narrative. It is also part of a wider international sequence of financial turmoil. Its early phases were sparked by the US property market downturn and loss of confidence in US mortgage-based securities in mid-2007, and later by the shockwaves following the collapse of Lehman Brothers in September 2008. Inside Europe, different drivers of the crisis have been identified, including inadequate fiscal policies, structural rigidities and low productivity performance, and regional macroeconomic imbalances. Today I want to focus on one such driver which, in my reading, has been a central connecting thread of the crisis and bears some uniquely European characteristics. I am referring to the mismatch between, on the one hand, financial market integration, which is very much about banking as banks dominate credit intermediation in Europe; and, on the other hand, the fragmented nature of banking policy in Europe, which until now has remained principally in the hands of national authorities. This mismatch between market structures and institutional arrangements has resulted in a powerful and often under-recognized impact on the propensity of national authorities to view the competition among banks in Europe as a proxy for a competition among member states and their respective national interests, and to act accordingly in the execution of their banking policies and especially in bank supervision. This attitude can be labelled “banking nationalism” by analogy with “economic nationalism,” an expression which has become commonly used to refer to government supporting or protecting domestic corporate actors perceived as “national champions,” or undermining foreign such actors seen as champions of competing national interests, usually in contexts which involve an element of cross-border economic competition. Banking nationalism is often more potent than other forms of economic nationalism, because of the dense webs of relationships between banking sectors and governments. These include (but are not limited to) explicit guarantees of segments of banks’ activities and banking regulation to protect financial stability, as well as the role of banks in financing the national economy in general, and government operations in particular. These webs of relationships, and banking nationalism itself, are by no means unique to Europe. While they are never identical from one country to another, they exist in all developed and emerging economies. What is unique to the European Union is their coexistence with a legal framework that bans financial barriers between member states and creates a seamlessly integrated supranational financial market, at least in principle—developments earlier this year in Cyprus having shown that the abolition of national financial borders is less absolute and irreversible than had been previously assumed by many. In my analysis, the mismatch between European market integration and national banking policy and the resulting impact of banking nationalism have played a central role both in the buildup of financial risk in Europe prior to the crisis, and in the inability to resolve this crisis so far. I will conclude by briefly reflecting on the current initiatives to chart a path towards European banking union. The Run-up to the Crisis Before the crisis, banking nationalism and its interaction with the drive towards a single financial market should be assigned a significant, though not exclusive, share of responsibility in two developments that have greatly contributed to the fragility of the European financial system. The first of these is the excessive buildup of leverage in European banks, and the second is the comparatively stunted growth of non-bank finance. As is well known, the “abolition of obstacles to freedom of movement for capital” across borders in Europe was included as one of the missions of the European Community in the 1957 Treaty of Rome, alongside parallel freedoms for persons and services, and the elimination of customs duties and creation of a single market for goods. But that treaty’s chapter on capital also provided for considerable prudential exceptions. Until the late 1980s, Community policies to integrate Europe’s financial markets had remained comparatively timid, and financial systems had remained predominantly national. The late 1980s and 1990s brought four changes which radically transformed this context and materialized the promise of a single financial market. First, a 1988 directive mandated the abolition of capital controls. Second, the Maastricht Treaty enshrined this obligation in primary legislation, and further paved the way for the creation of the euro which came into existence in 1999. Third, the ex-communist candidate countries for EU membership in Central and Eastern Europe gradually privatized most of their financial institutions, and in most cases accepted their purchase by Western European banking groups; cross-border bank consolidation also gathered pace inside Western Europe, particularly at the subregional level, such as in the Benelux and in Scandinavia. Fourth, from 1999 onwards the European Commission developed a more assertive competition policy to prevent member states from erecting barriers against such cross-border banking consolidation or otherwise distort the European market, e.g., though the provision of state guarantees to selected banks. These steps brought Europe much closer to a united banking and financial market, and created the perception of an unstoppable trend towards cross-border integration. The sea change of market environment prompted banks to position themselves for what most thought was an inevitable incoming consolidation wave. To achieve this, banks sought size, and found it mainly through domestic acquisitions and financial leverage. In a different context, supervisors might have prevented these strategies. Authorities might have frowned on domestic consolidation which not only distracted bank executives from their risk-management duties, but also led to dangerously high levels of market concentration at least in some European member states. On the contrary, the creation of large national banking champions was viewed positively in most cases, as it made it more likely that domestic banks would act as acquirers rather than targets in future cross-border consolidations. In a similar spirit, many supervisors saw it as justified that domestic banks should be given further leeway to leverage their capital base in order to pursue their acquisition strategies or other forms of expansion. In this light, the active promotion by most European supervisors and by the European Union itself of the Basel II international capital accord, whose negotiation spanned the late 1990s and early 2000s, and which, to an extent, relaxed the capital and leverage constraints on banks, should come as no surprise, in contrast to the more cautious attitude of the United States. The general attitude appeared, at least implicitly, for supervisors to tolerate high levels of leverage as a necessary price to pay so that domestic banks would end up as winners in the pan-European race for prominence. The acceleration of cross-border bank mergers in the early 2000s, after the European Commission had started more assertively removing policy obstacles against inward acquisitions, could only have reinforced this attitude. Thus, banking nationalism played a significant role in the great expansion of European banks’ leverage in the 1990s and especially the 2000s. A related but separate issue in the run-up to the crisis is the relative lack of development of non-bank financing of the European economy, including high-yield bond issuance, loan securitization, and intermediation by non-bank financial firms (other than insurers). Banking nationalism is far from the only factor here, but it is likely to have played a role as regulator.  At least some countries may have felt that a significant expansion of non-bank finance could negatively affect the competitive position of “their” national banking champions. For example, several EU member states have maintained regulations that exclusively limit the provision of some financial services, such as leasing to credit institutions, to no obvious prudential avail, but with the effect of limiting the potential for growth of non-bank financial intermediaries. Still another related issue is the near-absence in several member states of large institutional investors other than those directly linked to banking or insurance groups, partly because pension systems are organized on a pay-as-you-go basis and partly because large segments of the investment industry are operated by the asset-management arms of larger financial conglomerates. The dominance of Europe’s financial systems by banks is a potential source of concern for two main reasons, respectively related to growth and financial stability. A diverse financial system offers more financing options to borrowers and especially fast-growing companies. Private equity investors are familiar with the fact that banks are not always the best financiers for risky ventures that can offer little or no tangible collateral. In particular, the shift of advanced economies from manufacturing to services and to increasingly knowledge-based dynamics of value creation suggests a trend towards a decrease of banks’ share of external financing of growth companies. Investments in technology, training, marketing, or process innovation typically involve the hiring of skilled employees rather than the purchase of tangible assets that can be pledged as collateral to a bank lender. The financial stability aspect, as illustrated in the crisis, is due to the fact that non-bank finance can, at least to an extent, take the baton from banks when they are forced to deleverage following a systemic shock. This played a large role in the United States in 2009 and later years, as the negative economic impact of bank restructuring was largely offset by other forms of financing, which contributed to mitigate the risk of serious credit scarcity. By contrast, if, as in Europe now (or as in East and Southeast Asia in the 1990s), non-bank finance is barely developed, then bank deleveraging can trigger a downward spiral of credit constraints, economic stagnation, and further pressure on banks’ balance sheets. In other terms, financial system diversity can result in better resilience, particularly in advanced economies. It is thus remarkable, in retrospect, how little attention was paid by most European policymakers to the need to diversify their financial system away from its dependence on banks and to lay down the infrastructure for further development of securities markets and alternative forms of financial intermediation. The “Lisbon Agenda,” the ill-starred EU initiative to promote competitiveness-enhancing structural reform, left financial policy entirely untouched: of the 24 “integrated guidelines for growth and jobs” endorsed by the European Council in mid-2005, not a single one is about financial sector policy. And to the extent that there were concerns about financial stability in Europe before mid-2007, they tended to be directed primarily against emerging forms of finance such as private equity and hedge funds (eventually resulting in the EU Alternative Investment Fund Managers Directive), rather than focused on the buildup of risk in the banking system that was happening at that time. From a political economy perspective, the ability of banking nationalism to drive policy choices, consciously or not, was helped by the absence of a coalition of countervailing interests that could have pulled policymakers in a different direction. Incumbent large corporate issuers gained both from intra-country bank consolidation, which created large banks able and incentivized to serve their financing needs, and from the creation of the euro, which strengthened their access to a large and liquid bond market for blue chips. Most family firms are inherently wary of the transparency requirements that come with most non-bank financing options, and many of them prefer not to grow rather than submitting themselves to the corresponding disciplines. Investor voices are largely muted by the scarcity of autonomous institutional investors in much of Europe and by a relative lack of financial literacy in much of Europe’s saving public: Thus, the interest that savers would have in the opportunities provided by a more diverse financial system has generally not been actively promoted in policy debates. High-growth firms in Europe, alas, are too few to form a powerful political constituency. Last but not least, the complacency associated with the misguided belief in the “Great Moderation” resulted in an insufficient attention of financial supervisors to systemic risk. The Financial Crisis and Policy Responses After the initial turbulence in credit markets started in July and August 2007, and even more so after the turmoil following Lehman Brothers’ collapse in September 2008, banking nationalism has pervaded most European financial policy responses to the crisis, to an extent that has often been under-recognized by observers and commentators. At least seven interrelated strands can be identified in this respect: bailouts; forbearance; regulatory laxity; lack of cooperation in crisis management; discouragement of inward acquisitions; ring-fencing; and an ad hoc response to the emergence of sovereign credit risk in the euro area. As a detailed analysis vastly exceeds the scope of these remarks, only a cursory review can be presented here. First: bailouts. At least in the first four years of the crisis, EU governments have fully compensated senior creditors, junior creditors (in almost all cases), and often even shareholders of failing banks, starting with Germany’s in the case of IKB in late July 2007. Financial stability considerations have evidently played a large part in this generosity on behalf of domestic taxpayers. However, banking nationalism has certainly played a role too. In many cases, national policymakers appear to have acted out of a concern that domestic banks should not be disadvantaged in their own access to credit by the perception that their creditors might suffer a loss in a scenario of failure. This is likely to have led them to go farther in terms of bailout of private creditors or state guarantees, including for smaller banks whose systemic relevance was debatable, than would have been necessary from an exclusive stability perspective. The counterexample here is Denmark, where the regulatory legacy of the early-1990s crisis forced the imposition of losses on creditors and even unsecured depositors of two banks in 2011. This happened without triggering systemic contagion, but other Danish banks complained vocally about the competitive disadvantage this created for them vis-à-vis European peers. Second: forbearance. It is now apparent that in many cases that in most EU member states (at least those which are home to significant banking groups’ headquarters), national supervisory authorities were aware of banks’ problems and chose not to disclose them to EU institutions, other national authorities, or the public. Perhaps the most egregious, but far from unique, examples are those of bank collapses that happened shortly after the publication of results of pan-European “stress tests” in 2010 and 2011, in which the same banks had been given a clean bill of health. The financial jargon calls “supervisory forbearance” the propensity of national supervisors to refrain from forcing public disclosure of losses by banks, in the hope that better future market conditions or other factors that may improve the bank’s fortunes would lead to a reversal of those losses and bring the bank back to financial health. Notable past examples of supervisory forbearance include US savings and loan supervisors in the 1980s, French authorities overseeing Crédit Lyonnais in 1992–93, and Japanese banking authorities following the market downturn of the early 1990s and until 2002. As these examples illustrate, forbearance is often associated with supervisory failures with a significant economic, fiscal, and reputational cost. As with bailouts, supervisory forbearance in the European Union since 2007 may have been partly motivated by financial stability concerns, but also partly by the notion that disclosing one’s domestic bank problems, while other member states did not, may have put the national champions at a competitive disadvantage (or conversely, that hiding domestic losses while other countries were more transparent would favour domestic actors in the cross-border competitive game). Needless to say, such ideas are typically promoted through various channels by the banks themselves. This created the conditions for a race to the bottom, in which more market integration begets more supervisory forbearance, and fewer incentives to resolve the crisis. Third: regulatory laxity. This is directly related to supervisory forbearance and designates the tendency to water down regulatory requirements, including capital standards and disclosure requirements, to allow weak banks to avoid recapitalization or restructuring. One example is when EU pressure forced the International Accounting Standards Board to create retroactive exemptions to its standard on financial instruments accounting, known as IAS 39, in an emergency procedure that violated its due process in mid-October 2008. Another relevant example is the deviation from the letter and spirit of the Basel III international accord in its recent transposition into EU legislation (known as the Capital Requirements Regulation, or CRR), specifically as regards the definition of capital, with the result that some European banks which would be considered undercapitalized under a strict application of Basel III will be deemed compliant with CRR. Fourth: lack of cooperation in crisis management. Concern for national banking champions created disincentives for EU member states to adopt joint approaches to address the crisis. In this respect, the landmark meeting of heads of state and government of euro area countries and the United Kingdom, at the Elysée Palace in Paris on October 12, 2008, both marked a high point of togetherness among EU countries, and planted the seeds of future adverse developments. In this meeting, leaders agreed on a joint approach for crisis managements, modelled on measures announced a few days earlier by the United Kingdom and consisting of a combination of enhanced liquidity support, state guarantees of bank liabilities, and public recapitalizations, mostly through hybrid instruments. In the short term, this show of unity allowed market participants to regain confidence, and marked the end of the most disorderly phase of the crisis. But the decision involved each country dealing with its own banks in a separate manner, with no central steering, opening the way for the combination of forbearance and regulatory laxity which ultimately prevented a proper crisis resolution. Fifth: discouragement of inward acquisitions. The openness of the European market for corporate control, including cross-border bank mergers and acquisitions, is vigorously policed by the European Commission, so that national policymakers must refrain from public statements of a policy that would restrict possibilities of foreign banks acquiring domestic players. Nevertheless, there are clear indications that, at least in the first half-decade of the crisis, member states have favoured national buyers (or nationalizations) over purchases from other countries, in several instances when a domestic bank could no longer sustain its independence (the most significant exception being the acquisition of Fortis Belgium by BNP Paribas). A revealing instance is when the revelation of an embarrassing trading loss made Société Générale appear fragile in early 2008, and the French Prime Minister rushed to declare that Société Générale would in any case “remain a major French bank,” which was widely understood as a signal that if the bank should be sold (a scenario which eventually did not materialize), the acquirer should be another French bank. Sixth: national ring-fencing. It is well known in the financial community that supervisory authorities in numerous EU member states have exerted what the financial jargon delicately refers to as “moral suasion” to nudge locally operating banks towards prioritizing the country in their internal capital and funding allocation decisions—even though such policies are typically not made public, as they would run the risk of being deemed in breach of those member states’ commitments under the European treaties. (The exception here is the imposition of capital controls in Cyprus, which has been explicitly endorsed at the European level as an extraordinary measure.) This has happened in countries experiencing current-account deficits, but also in countries in surplus. In such cases, and more generally in all policies that are referred to under the imprecise label of “financial repression,” banking nationalism is less a driver than an enabler: the perception, and often the reality, is that such moral suasion is more effective when applied to a domestic bank than to the domestic banking arm of a foreign-based group. In other terms, the perception that government can, and may need to, leverage their influence over domestic banks for objectives deemed of national interest, even if the same objectives are incompatible with the wider European interest, is a powerful motivator of banking nationalism. Seventh: ad hoc responses to sovereign crisis developments. On this, the impact of banking nationalism has been particularly visible when the perception was that the sovereign crisis was limited to comparatively small “periphery” countries, including Greece and Ireland. In the case of Greece, following the revelation of larger fiscal deficits than previously thought in late 2009, the concern was that a rapid restructuring would particularly impact banks in several EU member states that had built material cross-border exposures to Greek sovereign credit risk. It appears likely that this concern contributed significantly to the absence of rapid restructuring action, which was recently criticized with hindsight by the International Monetary Fund as a major shortcoming of European crisis response (the participation of private-sector creditors was eventually forced in March 2012, after banks from most EU countries outside Greece had significantly reduced their exposure). In the case of Ireland, assistance was provided in November 2010 on the condition that all senior creditors be made whole, ostensibly against the wishes of the then Irish government which desired to save its taxpayers’ money by “burning the bondholders.” Here again, banking nationalism is impossible to entirely disentangle from financial stability concerns. Nevertheless, it is likely that some member states were specifically motivated to prevent a tightening of interbank credit conditions that may have resulted from a more aggressive restructuring of Irish banks, and could have put some of their domestic players at a competitive disadvantage. Clearly, banking nationalism has not been the only factor or driver of the European crisis. The point here is to identify its impact on the behaviour of national regulatory and supervisory authorities. This summary review suggests a significant impact, with mostly negative consequences for Europe in terms of financial fragility, “zombification” of the banking system, and credit scarcity for viable borrowers. Recent Developments and Outlook Since 2010 the crisis has become more complex. Unemployment has reached dramatic levels in many EU countries, transforming the political context. Fiscal difficulties have put into question the very architecture of the euro area, and have led to the adoption of unprecedented European surveillance and intervention instruments. In mid-2011, the risk perception has moved from the smaller countries of the periphery to Spain and Italy, two large sovereign issuers, and also briefly to French banks. Leaders of EU member states, or at least the euro area, have eventually converged on the acknowledgment that the bank-sovereign vicious circle had to be addressed, and in late June 2012 made what appears to be an irrevocable (if still very incomplete) decision to move towards banking union, which on the face of it should imply a farewell to banking nationalism. In the meantime, the European public has grown less tolerant of public bailouts, and policymakers have shifted, rhetorically and in some cases also practically, towards the advocacy of more systematic “bail-in” of private-sector creditors in bank restructurings. At the same time, and compared with the situation just before the crisis in mid-2007, market integration has gone sharply backwards. Fragmentation of the EU financial system, specifically in the euro area, has moved from being a risk to being an observable trend. Thus, the mismatch between an integrated market and a fragmented policy environment, which underlies the unique features and impact of banking nationalism in Europe, is being eroded from both sides—less market integration, and more policy integration promised by banking union. Which one of these contradictory trends will eventually predominate is hard to predict at this point. On the face of developments in the last 12 months, it appears that the willingness of European member states to hang together is stronger than their reluctance to pool responsibilities, decisions, and resources. If it is carried through, banking union is bound to lead to a gradual attrition of banking nationalism, which in turn would have a profound impact on financial structures in Europe, and is likely to unlock a transformation of Europe’s financial system that could make it both more diverse and more resilient. But this is a huge if. The completion of banking union is inevitably dependent on a much broader agenda of economic, fiscal, and political union in Europe. Whatever the outcome, there is little doubt that this crisis will be transformational for Europe’s financial system, its underlying structures, and the attitudes of European policymakers to banks. Read more...

Выбор редакции
03 октября 2013, 11:23

ЕАБР привлек у европейских банков кредит на финансирование закупки оборудования для БМЗ

"ЕАБР подписал кредитную документацию с группой европейских банков в составе Societe Generale Corporate & Investment Banking, IKB Deutsche Industriebank AG и AKA Ausfuhrkredit-Gesellschaft mbH на получение займа в размере около 107,8 млн. евро сроком до 10 лет", - отметили в банке.

Выбор редакции
14 июля 2013, 20:12

Goldman's 'Fabulous Fab' Heads To Trial

By Nate Raymond NEW YORK, July 14 (Reuters) - The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission heads to trial Monday against a former Goldman Sachs bond trader in a case it says highlights what went wrong on Wall Street in the financial crisis. Jury selection begins in federal court in New York in the civil fraud case against Fabrice Tourre, 34, who the SEC says misled investors in an ill-fated mortgage securities investment called Abacus 2007-AC1. It is the highest-profile trial to date stemming from the SEC's investigation of the events leading up to the 2008 crisis and, legal experts say, presents a chance for the SEC to hold an individual responsible at trial. The SEC's case, as summed up by U.S. District Judge Katherine Forrest last month, is that Tourre "handed Little Red Riding Hood an invitation to grandmother's house while concealing the fact that it was written by the Big Bad Wolf." According to the SEC, the wolf in question is John Paulson, a hedge fund billionaire whose bet against the subprime mortgage market was chronicled in "The Greatest Trade Ever" by Gregory Zuckerman. In 2006, Paulson's hedge fund, Paulson & Co Inc, turned to Goldman Sachs Group Inc for help betting against subprime mortgages, the SEC said. They began discussing Abacus, which would give Paulson a role in picking the underlying portfolio of mortgage securities, the SEC said. Paulson could then short, or bet against, it through an insurance product called a credit default swap. At the time, Tourre, a French national, was 28 years old and working at Goldman Sachs in New York. He became the bank's principal employee working on what became Abacus, known in the financial industry as a synthetic collateralized debt obligation. The SEC said Abacus's marketing materials failed to disclose Paulson's role in picking the underlying assets, instead saying that a subsidiary of ACA Capital Holdings Inc selected them. Tourre's goal, the SEC contends, was to deceive investors into buying the liabilities of Abacus. In a much-cited email sent on Jan. 23, 2007, to his girlfriend at the time, Tourre said of the financial markets: the "whole building is about to collapse anytime now." "Only potential survivor, the fabulous Fab ... standing in the middle of all these complex, highly leveraged, exotic trades he created without necessarily understanding all of the implications of those monstruosities!!!" When the underlying mortgage securities turned sour, investors including IKB Deutsche Industriebank AG and ABN AMRO Bank NV, now owned by Royal Bank of Scotland Group , lost over $1 billion, the SEC said. Paulson, meanwhile, netted around $1 billion, the SEC said. The SEC sued Tourre and Goldman in April 2010. It accused Tourre of fraud, negligence and aiding and abetting Goldman Sachs in violating securities laws. Paulson was not sued, and Goldman agreed in July 2010 to pay $550 million to settle the lawsuit. Tourre, who has left Goldman and is earning a doctorate in economics at the University of Chicago, rejected a settlement offer that came just before Goldman settled, a source familiar with the matter said. Tourre's lawyers have said they will seek to convince the jury in U.S. District Court in Manhattan that the Abacus offering documents, while not disclosing Paulson's role, contained all the information investors might consider material. Sophisticated investors like IKB had the tools to analyze the mortgage investments tied to the collateralized debt obligation, Tourre's lawyers have said, and so it did not matter how the investments were chosen. Tourre's lawyers have also indicated in court papers they will point to news reports at the time to show how investors should have known that Paulson was betting against the subprime market. Besides Tourre himself, witnesses at the trial are expected to include Laura Schwartz, who the SEC says was Tourre's "primary point of contact" at ACA, the company listed on Abacus's marketing materials as selecting its securities. The SEC said Schwartz, now a managing director at the Seaport Group, will testify that she understood from Tourre that Paulson was investing in the equity of Abacus rather than betting against it. Tourre's lawyers have indicated they will try to challenge Schwartz's credibility as a witness because the SEC has investigated her role in a different collateralized debt obligation. It recently closed that probe. On Tourre's witness list, meanwhile, is Paulson, who with a net worth of $11.2 billion ranked No. 91 on Forbes' list of richest people in the world. A lawyer for Paulson did not respond to a request for comment. Both sides are heavily lawyered up. In a sign of how seriously the SEC is taking the case, it will be represented by Matthew Martens, its chief litigation counsel. Former SEC lawyers say it is rare for someone in that position to try a case himself. Tourre, whose defense is being paid for by Goldman, is represented by former prosecutor Pamela Chepiga, a lawyer at Allen & Overy who counts former Marsh & McLennan Companies CEO Jeffrey Greenberg among her prior clients. More recently Tourre brought on Sean Coffey, who is primarily known for obtaining from banks $6.1 billion in settlements for investors in WorldCom Inc. Tourre is "confident that when all the evidence is considered, the jury will soundly reject the SEC's charges," Chepiga and Coffey said in a statement. The lawsuit is one of several enforcement actions the SEC has taken against banks and individuals involved in putting together toxic mortgage financial products. But while the SEC has reached sizeable settlements with banks, it has suffered setbacks in cases against individuals. Notably, a federal jury in Manhattan rejected the SEC's claims that former Citigroup manager Brian Stoker was liable for violating securities laws in connection with a $1 billion collateralized debt obligation. Disappointments like the Stoker case have heightened the stakes for the SEC in the Tourre's trial, legal experts say. David Marder, a former assistant district administrator for the SEC in Boston, said the case not only presents a chance for the SEC to redeem itself but also a rare chance for the courts to weigh in on wrongdoing during the financial crisis. "The court could use this case to make a statement," said Marder, now at Robins, Kaplan, Miller & Ciresi. "And one of best ways would be to impose a substantial penalty." The case is SEC v. Tourre, U.S. District Court, Southern District of New York, No. 10-03229. (Reporting by Nate Raymond; Editing by Eddie Evans and Leslie Adler)

Выбор редакции
14 июля 2013, 20:12

Goldman's 'Fabulous Fab' Heads To Trial

By Nate Raymond NEW YORK, July 14 (Reuters) - The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission heads to trial Monday against a former Goldman Sachs bond trader in a case it says highlights what went wrong on Wall Street in the financial crisis. Jury selection begins in federal court in New York in the civil fraud case against Fabrice Tourre, 34, who the SEC says misled investors in an ill-fated mortgage securities investment called Abacus 2007-AC1. It is the highest-profile trial to date stemming from the SEC's investigation of the events leading up to the 2008 crisis and, legal experts say, presents a chance for the SEC to hold an individual responsible at trial. The SEC's case, as summed up by U.S. District Judge Katherine Forrest last month, is that Tourre "handed Little Red Riding Hood an invitation to grandmother's house while concealing the fact that it was written by the Big Bad Wolf." According to the SEC, the wolf in question is John Paulson, a hedge fund billionaire whose bet against the subprime mortgage market was chronicled in "The Greatest Trade Ever" by Gregory Zuckerman. In 2006, Paulson's hedge fund, Paulson & Co Inc, turned to Goldman Sachs Group Inc for help betting against subprime mortgages, the SEC said. They began discussing Abacus, which would give Paulson a role in picking the underlying portfolio of mortgage securities, the SEC said. Paulson could then short, or bet against, it through an insurance product called a credit default swap. At the time, Tourre, a French national, was 28 years old and working at Goldman Sachs in New York. He became the bank's principal employee working on what became Abacus, known in the financial industry as a synthetic collateralized debt obligation. The SEC said Abacus's marketing materials failed to disclose Paulson's role in picking the underlying assets, instead saying that a subsidiary of ACA Capital Holdings Inc selected them. Tourre's goal, the SEC contends, was to deceive investors into buying the liabilities of Abacus. In a much-cited email sent on Jan. 23, 2007, to his girlfriend at the time, Tourre said of the financial markets: the "whole building is about to collapse anytime now." "Only potential survivor, the fabulous Fab ... standing in the middle of all these complex, highly leveraged, exotic trades he created without necessarily understanding all of the implications of those monstruosities!!!" When the underlying mortgage securities turned sour, investors including IKB Deutsche Industriebank AG and ABN AMRO Bank NV, now owned by Royal Bank of Scotland Group , lost over $1 billion, the SEC said. Paulson, meanwhile, netted around $1 billion, the SEC said. The SEC sued Tourre and Goldman in April 2010. It accused Tourre of fraud, negligence and aiding and abetting Goldman Sachs in violating securities laws. Paulson was not sued, and Goldman agreed in July 2010 to pay $550 million to settle the lawsuit. Tourre, who has left Goldman and is earning a doctorate in economics at the University of Chicago, rejected a settlement offer that came just before Goldman settled, a source familiar with the matter said. Tourre's lawyers have said they will seek to convince the jury in U.S. District Court in Manhattan that the Abacus offering documents, while not disclosing Paulson's role, contained all the information investors might consider material. Sophisticated investors like IKB had the tools to analyze the mortgage investments tied to the collateralized debt obligation, Tourre's lawyers have said, and so it did not matter how the investments were chosen. Tourre's lawyers have also indicated in court papers they will point to news reports at the time to show how investors should have known that Paulson was betting against the subprime market. Besides Tourre himself, witnesses at the trial are expected to include Laura Schwartz, who the SEC says was Tourre's "primary point of contact" at ACA, the company listed on Abacus's marketing materials as selecting its securities. The SEC said Schwartz, now a managing director at the Seaport Group, will testify that she understood from Tourre that Paulson was investing in the equity of Abacus rather than betting against it. Tourre's lawyers have indicated they will try to challenge Schwartz's credibility as a witness because the SEC has investigated her role in a different collateralized debt obligation. It recently closed that probe. On Tourre's witness list, meanwhile, is Paulson, who with a net worth of $11.2 billion ranked No. 91 on Forbes' list of richest people in the world. A lawyer for Paulson did not respond to a request for comment. Both sides are heavily lawyered up. In a sign of how seriously the SEC is taking the case, it will be represented by Matthew Martens, its chief litigation counsel. Former SEC lawyers say it is rare for someone in that position to try a case himself. Tourre, whose defense is being paid for by Goldman, is represented by former prosecutor Pamela Chepiga, a lawyer at Allen & Overy who counts former Marsh & McLennan Companies CEO Jeffrey Greenberg among her prior clients. More recently Tourre brought on Sean Coffey, who is primarily known for obtaining from banks $6.1 billion in settlements for investors in WorldCom Inc. Tourre is "confident that when all the evidence is considered, the jury will soundly reject the SEC's charges," Chepiga and Coffey said in a statement. The lawsuit is one of several enforcement actions the SEC has taken against banks and individuals involved in putting together toxic mortgage financial products. But while the SEC has reached sizeable settlements with banks, it has suffered setbacks in cases against individuals. Notably, a federal jury in Manhattan rejected the SEC's claims that former Citigroup manager Brian Stoker was liable for violating securities laws in connection with a $1 billion collateralized debt obligation. Disappointments like the Stoker case have heightened the stakes for the SEC in the Tourre's trial, legal experts say. David Marder, a former assistant district administrator for the SEC in Boston, said the case not only presents a chance for the SEC to redeem itself but also a rare chance for the courts to weigh in on wrongdoing during the financial crisis. "The court could use this case to make a statement," said Marder, now at Robins, Kaplan, Miller & Ciresi. "And one of best ways would be to impose a substantial penalty." The case is SEC v. Tourre, U.S. District Court, Southern District of New York, No. 10-03229. (Reporting by Nate Raymond; Editing by Eddie Evans and Leslie Adler)

Выбор редакции
27 июня 2013, 13:55

Europe Make Cyprus "Bail-In" Regime Continental Template

Turns out that for Europe, Cyprus was a "bail-in" template after all, and following an agreement reached early this morning, Europe now has a joint failed-bank resolution mechanism. Several hours ago, EU finance ministers announced that they had reached agreement on the principles governing the imposition of losses on creditors in bank 'bail ins'. Having already agreed to establish "depositor preference" in the pecking order of creditors at risk, the stumbling block to agreement was the availability of flexibility at the national level to complement the bail in with injections of funds from other sources. Under the compromise achieved overnight, once a bail in equivalent to 8% of total liabilities has been implemented, support from other sources can be used (up to 5% of total liabilities) with approval from Brussels. So investors (i.e. yield chasers) and not taxpayers will foot the cost of bank bailouts going forward for a change? Maybe on paper: "From 2018, the so-called “bail-in” regime can force shareholders, bondholders and some depositors to contribute to the costs of bank failure. Insured deposits under €100,000 are exempt and uninsured deposits of individuals and small companies are given preferential status in the bail-in pecking order." In reality, last night's agreement is the usual fluid melange of semi-rigid rules filled with loopholes designed to benefit large banks whose impairment may be detrimental to "systemic stability". To wit, from the FT: "While a minimum bail-in amounting to 8 per cent of total liabilities is mandatory before resolution funds can be used, countries are given more leeway to shield certain creditors from losses in defined circumstances." In other words, here is the bail in regime... which we may decide to ignore under "defined circumstances." Next, since the "package must be agreed with the European parliament, a process that could stretch until the end of 2013" we urge no breath holding, especially since it was in late 2012 that news of a joint European bank regulator was announced, and one year later this concept has crashed and burned. In fact the bail-in deal will "open debate on further stages of financial integration, including on establishing a central authority to shut down eurozone banks" and "Germany is strongly resisting centralising such important powers to shut down banks under existing treaties." In other words, yet another European agreement that is at best worth the price of the paper it is printed on. In the meantime, if indeed some of the systemic European banks keel over and die - say Credit Lyonnaise, Natexis or Deutsche - the last thing that anyone will think about to avoid a systemic collapse will be impairing even more banks. As a reminder, these are the most undercapitalized banks in Europe as reported by Goldman yesterday:   But golf clap to Europe for finally admitting that reason and logic also apply to the most banana continent of all: after all, it took years of legislating to realize that the insolvency impairment waterfall, a concept rooted in logic and not in political BS, applies in Europe as it does everywhere else in the world too (except for the TBTFs in the US of course). And all of the above, from a slightly less jaded perspective, via Reuters: The European Union agreed on Thursday to force investors and wealthy savers to share the costs of future bank failures, moving closer to drawing a line under years of taxpayer-funded bailouts that have prompted public outrage.   After seven hours of late-night talks, finance ministers from the bloc's 27 countries emerged with a blueprint to close or salvage banks in trouble. The plan stipulates that shareholders, bondholders and depositors with more than 100,000 euros ($132,000) should share the burden of saving a bank.   The deal is a boost for EU leaders, who meet later on Thursday in Brussels, and can show that they are finally getting to grips with the financial crisis that began in mid-2007 with the near collapse of Germany's IKB.   "For the first time, we agreed on a significant bail-in to shield taxpayers," said Dutch Finance Minister Jeroen Dijsselbloem, referring to the process in which shareholders and bondholders must bear the costs of restructuring first.   The rules break a taboo in Europe that savers should never lose their deposits, although countries will have some flexibility to decide when and how to impose losses on a failing bank's creditors.   "They can affect German savers just as well as they can affect any other investor in the world," German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble said after the meeting.   * * *   But thorny issues lie ahead, not least whether countries or a central European authority should have the final say in shutting or restructuring a bad bank.   The European Commission, the EU executive, is expected to unveil its proposal for a new agency to carry out this task of "executioner" as early as next week, officials said.   "The most important discussion has yet to start and that is how decisions on restructuring will be made," said Nicolas Veron, a financial expert at Brussels-based think tank Bruegel. "It's premature to say that Europe is getting its act together."   Many Europeans remain angry with bankers and the easy credit that helped create property bubbles in countries including Ireland and Spain, which then burst and plunged Europe into a recession from which it has yet to recover.     

Выбор редакции
03 апреля 2013, 23:00

Bundesbank Probing Deutsche Bank, Or Not Much Ado About TBTF

Back in December we reported that "Deutsche Bank Hid $12 Billion In Losses To Avoid A Government Bail-Out" in which we wrote "that Europe's most important and significant bank, Deutsche Bank, hid $12 billion in losses during the financial crisis, helping the bank avoid a government bail-out, according to three former bank employees who filed complaints to US regulators. US regulators, whose chief of enforcement currently was none other than the General Counsel of Deutsche Bank at the time." Our somewhat cynical conclusion at the time was that "since every bank in the world is forced to lie, cheat and mismark its own balance sheets every single day... this may just be completely ignored." Perhaps we were a little bit premature because as the FT reports, "The Bundesbank has launched an investigation into claims that Deutsche Bank hid billions of dollars of losses on credit derivatives during the financial crisis, according to people familiar with the situation." That said, we still stand by our conclusion from four months ago: this, too, theatrical distraction will come and go and nothing at all will change. From the FT: Investigators from Germany’s central bank are scheduled to fly to New York next week as part of an inquiry into allegations that misvaluing credit derivatives allowed Deutsche to hide up to $12bn in losses, helping it avoid a government bailout.   They intend to interview people, including former employees, who have knowledge of Deutsche’s dealings in complex credit derivatives – known as leveraged super senior trades – between 2006 and 2009.   Deutsche has denied the allegations. On Wednesday the bank reiterated that the allegations were “more than two and a half years old” and had been the “subject of a careful and thorough” investigation by a law firm, which found them “wholly unfounded”.   “Moreover, the investigation revealed that these allegations stem from people without responsibility for, or personal knowledge of, key facts and information,” Deutsche said. “We have and will continue to co-operate fully with our regulators on this matter.” Three employees approached the SEC independently with allegations that the bank misvalued a giant derivatives position, worth $130bn on a notional basis.   The complainants, who include Eric Ben-Artzi, a risk manager, and Matthew Simpson, a senior trader, alleged that the bank misvalued the positions by failing to account for losses it faced when the market worsened.   Had the proper valuations been made on the positions during the tumultuous period, they allege, the losses for the whole portfolio would have exceeded $4bn and could have risen to as much as $12bn. $130 billion? That's what JPM's mismarking and prop trading division - the "London Whale" CIO unit used to call an oddlot. And remember the furious punishment the US unleashed on JPM after that whole theatrical Senate hearing involving all JPM traders who were paid tens of millions before being told to retire somewhere warm. Remember? Neither do we. As for our initial skeptical and cynical assessment, we stand by it, for the same reason as Reuters explained in its piece: "German reliance on Deutsche Bank outweighs scandals" Germany has become so dependent on Deutsche Bank to grease the wheels of its export driven economy that it looks willing to gloss over scandals involving its largest bank.   Deutsche is one of several European banks under investigation by regulators in Europe and the United States for its suspected role in rigging benchmark interest rates. It is cooperating with German authorities in a separate inquiry into alleged tax fraud. Deutsche has denied allegations it misvalued derivatives and mis-sold mortgage-backed securities.   Such an array of inquiries could be expected to damage any bank's reputation. But back-up from business leaders and key members of the bank's supervisory board appear to be helping Deutsche's new co-chief executives Anshu Jain and Juergen Fitschen put the scandals behind them. The two men, with more than 40 years experience at Deutsche between them, took over as co-CEOs on June 1.   This bedrock of support is crucial for Deutsche, especially in a German election year when banks' perceived excesses and misdemeanors could become a campaign issue.   A web of support for Deutsche has emerged among German blue-chip and mid-sized companies, which have grown more dependent on the country's largest bank since rivals including IKB, WestLB, LBBW, Commerzbank and Dresdner Bank shut down or slashed international investment banking and lending.   Burkhard Lohr, Chief Financial Officer at K+S Group, a supplier of specialty fertilizers and salt, with activities in Canada, Chile and Brazil said a strong Deutsche was vital. "We need banks with a global network, because our markets are also global," Lohr said. Or, all of the above visually as of 2010 as Zero Hedge first reported over three years ago on the suddenly (post Cyprus) so critical topic of bank assets to host country GDP: In other words: Deutsche Bank is far TBTF, perhaps Too Bigger To Fail than any other bank in the world, as manifested by DB's razor thin Core Tier 1 ratio to total assets, the lowest in the entire world: the bank knows it can never be allowed to fail which is why it is willing to work with virtually unlimited leverage. After all, if anything happens to it, the German (and global) taxpayers get it. And everyone knows it. But judicial activist sideshows such as this one are surely great for political brownie points.

Выбор редакции
29 марта 2013, 12:21

With Cyprus, Europe risks being too tough on banking moral hazard

Authors: Nicolas VéronEurope has long been far too tolerant of moral hazard in its banking system. But with the Cyprus plan, the pendulum may now be swinging too far in the opposite direction. This danger was made clear when Jeroen Dijsselbloem, the Dutch president of the eurogroup of finance ministers, rocked financial markets on Monday by hinting at a new doctrine that would put the full burden of future bank restructuring on creditors and depositors rather than taxpayers. In his words, “where you take on the risks you must deal with them, and if you can’t deal with them then you shouldn’t have taken them on”. This hardline stance echoes the memorable advice of Andrew Mellon, US Treasury secretary in the early 1930s, as reported by then President Herbert Hoover: “Liquidate labour, liquidate stocks, liquidate farmers, liquidate real estate… It will purge the rottenness out of the system… People will work harder, live a more moral life.” In July 2007, the opposite position was enunciated by Jochen Sanio, then Germany’s top financial supervisor. As IKB, a medium-sized German bank, revealed massive subprime-related losses, he argued that not bailing it out would trigger “the worst financial crisis since 1931” – an intentionally frightening reference. EU countries have since then implemented the “Sanio doctrine” by scrupulously reimbursing all creditors, including junior ones, of almost all failed banks with few and rather small exceptions in Denmark, Ireland and the UK. That this consistent dismissal of moral hazard originated in a German decision is ironic in light of later events. Then change has come, gradually. In Deauville in October 2010, Angela Merkel, German chancellor, and President Nicolas Sarkozy of France announced that holders of euro area sovereign debt could face losses, but soon afterwards Ireland was still forbidden from “burning” senior bank bondholders. However, policy makers slowly realised that guaranteeing all bank liabilities reinforced a damaging “doom loop” between banks and sovereigns. In July last year, Mario Draghi, president of the European Central Bank, noted that “the question of burden sharing with senior bond holders is evolving at the European level”. Spain’s bank restructurings later that year imposed losses on many subordinated creditors. Earlier this year Ireland negotiated a deal that involved a loss for some senior bank bondholders. A largely silent revolution was instilling more market discipline into the financing of Europe’s banks. This gradual shift was welcome. But in Cyprus it accelerated out of control, all the way to full “Mellon doctrine”. The island’s two biggest banks are now being liquidated, even though the process is administrative rather than judicial, with no government financial assistance. In an echo of Deauville, European leaders signalled on March 16 that deposits were no longer safe, after which the German finance minister Wolfgang Schäuble confirmed that deposit guarantees were “only as good as a state’s solvency”. This move annihilated trust in Cypriot banks and made the imposition of capital controls inevitable. Just as the Sanio doctrine was made unsustainable by moral hazard and fiscal constraints, the Mellon doctrine is made unsustainable by the reality of systemic risk – today as in the 1930s. In fairness to Mr Dijsselbloem, he acknowledged that governments may not impose full financial discipline “in times of crisis”, but then implied that we are in no such times right now: a heroic claim. Governments have a responsibility to protect their citizens from catastrophic meltdowns. This is why a chastened US government had to bail out AIG, the insurance group, a day after letting Lehman Brothers go bankrupt. As the US learnt the hard way, predictability is essential in such matters but also difficult to attain. Europe must now chart a path between untenable Sanio and unrealistic Mellon. The trade-off is not only between moral hazard and systemic fragility, but also between national fiscal responsibility and European integration. The eurogroup’s new insistence that “all insured depositors in all banks will be fully protected” may or may not be seen as a form of “deposit reinsurance”, meaning that a deposit guarantee can indeed be stronger than a member state’s own solvency. But this declaration will have little impact on depositors’ behaviour unless a European backing of national deposit guarantee systems is made explicit. Similarly, the insistence on orderly bank restructurings in an integrated market calls for a centralised process, which should be in place before the ECB conducts a comprehensive balance sheet assessment of all 150-odd banks transferred under its direct supervisory authority, a deadline now planned around mid-2014. The clock is ticking. This article was first published in The Financial Times.Read more...

22 марта 2013, 01:43

«Тайна двух океанов» в формате 4 D. Запахи смерти (9)

Часть II (9). Ароматы утонченно-фантичного дерьма. Чтобы завершить разговор о разных видах CDO, покопаемся в дерьме 5-й степени ядовитости – синтетических CDO, - не разгребая пока на компоненты основу этого дерьма – CDS. То есть, кредитно-дефолтные свопы.Заветам Федота-стрельца верны !Эти свопы заслуживают отдельного и очень подробного разговора, и посему пока скажу лишь, что именно данные «инновационные финансовые инструменты», - которые можно сравнить с пари на скачках или со спором на то, какой воробей из стайки взлетит с дерева быстрее - послужили средством окончательной отвязки деривативно-ипотечного дерьма  от малосимпатичной и вонючей «закваски». От оборванцев, в дырявых карманах которых обитали только вошь на аркане, да клоп на цепи.То есть, у С/Котов появилась возможность действовать  согласно заветам незабвенного филатовского героя, так говорившего по поводу «насекомой»:«Вошь, оно, конечно, что ж ?// Вошь, оно  неплохо тож//  Но на этой насекомой// Далеко не уплывешь».Гении Уолл-стрит к этому мнению прислушались. Благодаря синтетическим CDO, финансовое дерьмо они упрятали еще в один слой фантиков. Почти запахо- и звуконепроницаемый. Ценность данного факта многократно повышается благодаря еще нескольким нюансикам.Во-первых, отпала необходимость окучивания огромного количества оборванцев. Страховка от дефолта оборванцев по ипотечным кредитам (в виде кредитно-дефолтного свопа, CDS), приобретенная, например, Майклом Бэрри (1, стр. 92), встраивалась в синтетические CDO, что исключало из процесса этап беготни за оборванцами.А это, во-вторых, позволило мошенникам с Уолл-стрит сэкономить приличные деньги на мошенниках низшего уровня, ипотечных брокерах, до этого гонявшихся за оборванцами с их насекомыми (только в Калифорнии таких брокеров насчитывалось около 500 тысяч).И в-третьих, в качестве вишенки на торте, CDS позволяли банкстерам множить и множить финансовое дерьмо 5-й степени ядовитости в неограниченных количествах.Свидетельства очевидцев:Не нужно быть гением, чтобы понять, какие баснословные прибыли сулит превращение облигаций с рейтингом «ВВВ» в облигации с рейтингом «ААА». Но только гений мог отыскать для отмывания 20 миллиардов долларов (как Goldman в истории с AIG) в облигациях с рейтингом «ВВВ». Ведь в первоначальных кредитных башнях – исходных ипотечных облигациях – рейтинг «ВВВ» получал один единственный этаж/транш. Из миллиарда долларов низкокачественных ипотечных кредитов можно было получить сомнительных траншей класса «ВВВ» лишь на 20 миллионов долларов. То есть, для создания CDO на миллиард долларов на основании исключительно облигаций с рейтингом «ВВВ» нужно было выдать реальным людям кредиты на 50 миллиардов долларов (то есть, окучить около 20000 человек). На это нужны были время и силы. Дефолтные свопы не требовали ни того, ни другого.  (1, стр. 155)… такой подход позволил Goldman создать новые облигации, идентичные первоначальным во всех отношениях, за исключением одного: за ними не стояли реальные ипотечные кредиты или покупатели жилья. Реальными были только убытки или прибыли от спекуляций с облигациями.Таким образом, чтобы генерировать 1 миллиард долларов в низкокачественных ипотечных облигациях с рейтингом «ВВВ», Goldman не нужно было выдавать кредиты на 50 миллиардов долларов (и обхаживать для этого около 20000 оборванцев).Им надо было всего лишь убедить Майка Бэрри или другого пессимиста выбрать 100 различных облигаций класса «ВВВ» и купить дефолтный своп на 10 миллионов долларов для каждой из них. Сформированный пакет (синтетическая CDO – такое название придумали для CDO, за которой не было ничего, кроме дефолтных свопов) передавали для оценки Moody’s и Standard & Poor’s.«Рейтинговые агентства собственной моделью оценки CDO, по большому счету, не располагали, - говорит один из бывших трейдеров по CDO из Goldman Sachs. – Банки предоставляли им свои модели и просили их оценить». Так или иначе, почти 80% рискованных облигаций с рейтингом «ВВВ» становились похожими на облигации с рейтингом «ААА». Оставшиеся 20% с более низким кредитным рейтингом   продать было довольно трудно, однако, как бы невероятно это ни звучало, из них можно было сложить еще одну башню и еще раз переработать в новые облигации класса «ААА». Механизм превращения чистого свинца в сплав, состоящий на 80% из золота и на 20% из свинца (то есть, дерьма в конфетку), принимал оставшийся свинец и тоже превращал его на 80% в золото… масса ненадежных кредитов по большей части превращалась в пачки облигаций уровня «ААА», а львиная доля оставшихся облигаций низкого качества перерабатывалась в CDO класса «ААА».… в общем, для многократного воспроизведения наихудших из существующих облигаций стали использовать дефолтные свопы. (1, стр. 90, 91)То есть, проблема с предложением прибыльных «ценных бумаг» была решена. А что со спросом на них ? – Здесь ловкачам из «сияющего града на холме»  очень удачно подвернулся рояль в кустах - «глупые немцы из Дюссельдорфа».Дерьмо – оно такое дерьмо. Разное.Майкл Льюис, автор книги «Большая игра на понижение: Тайные пружины финансовой катастрофы», большой знаток дерьма, - финансового, амерзкой выпечки. В ходе своего знакомства с Германией посткризисных лет (в рамках подготовки следующей своей книги, - «Бумеранг. Как из развитой страны превратиться в страну третьего мира», издана в 2011 году, переведена в России в 2013 году) Льюис был немало удивлен тем вниманием, которое, оказывается, немцы уделяют дерьму. Но дерьму другого рода – обыденному, вульгарному. Равно как и процессу его сотворения.Написанная в начале 1980-х известным американским антропологом по имени Алан Дандес, книжка «Жизнь похожа на насест в курятнике» (Alan Dundes, Life is Like a Chicken Coop Ladder) являет собой попытку описать немецкий характер с помощью историй, которые немцы любят рассказывать друг другу. Дандес отмечает, что в нем «встречается необычайно много текстов со словами Scheisse (дерьмо),  Dreck (помет), Mist (навоз), Arsch (задница)… Возьмите народные песни, сказки, пословицы, загадки, народную речь – везде есть свидетельства давнишнего пристрастия немцев к этой стороне жизнедеятельности».… у немцев есть популярный народный персонаж по имени Dukatenscheisser (Гадящий Дукатами), которого обычно изображают с выпадающими из заднего прохода монетами. Первый в мире музей, посвященный исключительно туалетам, находится в Мюнхене. В немецком языке некогда даже существовало распространенное выражение нежности: «моя дерьмовочка».Первое, что попробовал напечатать Гутенберг после Библии, был, оказывается, график приема слабительного, который он назвал «Календарь очищения кишечника». А еще есть немыслимое число немецких поговорок, связанных с задним проходом. «Как для рыбы вода, так для дерьма задница!» - вот лишь один из бесчисленных примеров. Дальше – больше.Идея, положившая начало реформаторскому движению, у Мартина Лютера, отличавшегося жуткой склонностью к непристойностям типа «Я – созревшее дерьмо, а мир – гигантская задница», родилась во время пребывания на толчке. Из писем Моцарта, по словам Дандеса, следует, что его ум не имел себе равных в измышлении фигур речи на фекальные темы. У Гитлера любимым словечком было Scheisskler (засранец), и, судя по всему, он называл этим словом не только других, но и себя. После войны врачи Гитлера рассказывали офицерам разведки США, что их пациент удивительно много времени тратил на изучение собственных фекалий… Дандес предположил, что в основе уникальной способности Гитлера убеждать людей, возможно, лежало то, что он разделял с ними типичную немецкую черту: показное, на публике, отвращение к мерзости, маскировавшее одержимость ею. «Сочетание чистого и грязного: чистота снаружи – грязь внутри, или чистая форма и грязное содержание – весьма типичная черта немецкого национального характера» (2, стр. 161-163).Смешно, кстати, но Дандес почему-то ничего не говорит о характере американской элиты в этом плане. А сходства здесь много: прославление своей чистоты -  в сочетании с выделением ядовитого дерьма, скрываемого под красивыми обертками...Шайссе-вульгарис присутствует даже во взаимоотношениях между немецкими банкирами. Скучность работы которых (дебет-кредит, никаких гениальных нововведений) заставляет их забавляться в традиционном стиле, с использованием мотивов фольклора.Коммерцбанк-Тауэр (3)В Германии есть закон, запрещающий строить здания выше 20 этажей, но Франкфурт допускает исключения. Небоскреб Коммерцбанк-Тауэр имеет 53 этажа и необычную форму: он напоминает гигантский трон.  Верхняя часть здания, подлокотники трона, скорее декоративна, чем функциональна. Немецкий финансист, бывший частым посетителем банка, отметил интересную деталь – стеклянную комнату на 49 этаже с видом на Франкфурт. Это мужской туалет.Благодаааать! (4)Сотрудники Commerzbank приводили его туда, чтобы показать, как на виду у всех он может нас..ть на Deutsche Bank (Основанные в 1870-е Commerzbank, Deutsche Bank и Dresdner Bank являются единственными крупными частными банками Германии. И, естественно, отчаянно конкурируют друг с другом. Во всех смыслах).Довольно странно, но при всей глубине своих познаний в дерьмеусе-вульгарисе, большинство немцев оказались полными невеждами во всем, что касалось дерьмеуса-виртуалиса. В том числе, и одной его разновидности – обсуждающихся нами  синтетических CDO.Разумные и расчетливые с виду немчики купились на яркие обертки-фантики, и не рассмотрели/не унюхали скрывающееся под этими фантиками зловонное и ядовитое дерьмо. Повелись на штампик «ААА». - Ну как же, мол, можно было сомневаться в его ценности, если ставили штампик честнейше-мудейшие рейтинговые агентства. Раз штампик поставлен, это значит, что предлагаемый фарш продукт – высочайшего качества. И в нем не может быть конины дерьмовых компонентов. Глупые немцы из Дюссельдорфа ? Или …Тем более, что некоторые немцы, оказывается, сочли, будто могут оценить риски благородного (помните, - ведь штампик «ААА»  на упаковке?) дерьма с точностью до 0,01%.Еще в феврале 2004 года финансовый аналитик из Лондона по имени Николас Данбар опубликовал сенсационный материал о немцах из Дюссельдорфа, которые работали в банке IKB и изобрели нечто новое. «Название IKB постоянно мелькало в Лондоне благодаря продавцам облигаций, - рассказывает Данбар. – Банк воспринимался как тайная дойная корова». В крупных фирмах с Уолл-стрит были сотрудники, в обязанности которых входило получение кучи денег и ублажение клиентов из Дюссельдорфа, когда те приезжали в Лондон.Рассказ Данбара, в котором он описывал, как малозаметный немецкий банк стремительно превращался в крупнейшего клиента Уолл-стрит, был напечатан в журнале Risk… Это было частное финансовое учреждение, которое, судя по всему, шло в гору. И вот они берут на работу человека по имени Дирк Ретиг, для развития новых интересных начинаний.С помощью Ретига банк IKB создал некое подобие банка под названием Rhineland Funding, который был учрежден в Делавэре и котировался на бирже в Дублине. Свое создание они не называли банком, так как в противном случае у них могли поинтересоваться, почему «это» не подлежит банковскому регулированию. Так что название своему детищу они дали мутное – «кондуит». Преимущество этого слова заключалось в том, что никто толком не знал его значение.Rhineland заимствовал деньги на короткий срок, выпуская так называемые коммерческие бумаги. На полученные деньги он покупал «долгосрочные структурированные кредиты», которые на самом деле были облигациями, обеспеченными американскими потребительскими кредитами (CDO, в которых перед кризисом преобладали ипотечные кредиты). Прибыли Rhineland складывались из разницы между процентной ставкой за кредит и более высокой ставкой по средствам, предоставляемым им взаймы путем покупки облигаций. Так как все предприятие было гарантировано IKB, агентство Moody’s присвоило Rhineland самый высокий рейтинг, что позволило «кондуиту» получать дешевое финансирование.Немцы из Дюссельдорфа выполняли критически важную работу: консультировали это оффшорное предприятие относительно облигаций, которые ему следовало покупать. «Мы меньше всего стремимся отдавать деньги Rhineland на сторону, - поведал Ретиг журналу , - но тем не менее наша компетентность позволяет получать прибыль». Далее Ретиг объяснил, что  IKB инвестировал в специальные инструменты для анализа сложных облигаций, называемых CDO и навязываемых в то время дельцами с Уолл-стрит. «Я бы сказал, что это стоящее вложение, потому что пока убытков у нас не было», - заявил он. В феврале 2004 года все это представлялось хорошей идеей – настолько хорошей, что многие другие немецкие банки даже последовали примеру IKB и либо брали в аренду кондуит IKB, либо создавали собственные оффшорные фирмы для покупки низкокачественных облигаций. «Похоже, что это довольно выгодная стратегия», - сказал журналу Risk представитель агентства Moody’s, присвоившего коммерческим бумагам Rhineland рейтинг «ААА».… Сумма объявленных убытков, которые эта «выгодная стратегия» принесла IKB, составила 15 миллиардов долларов, хотя реальные убытки были, вероятно, еще больше… (2, стр. 184-187)Сам Ретиг без излишних шума и пыли  слинял, кстати, из банка в декабре 2005 года. А что больше там ему делать было – ведь процесс пошел.А в 2004 году Ретиг продолжал описывать то, что выглядело как скрупулезно продуманная и сложная инвестиционная политика, а на деле оказалось бессмысленной, основанной на правилах стратегией. «IKB мог оценить CDO с точностью до одного базисного пункта (0,01%)», - сообщил один восторженный наблюдатель журналу в 2004 году. Однако это было бессмысленно. «Они, например, с мелочной дотошностью выясняли, под кредиты какой ипотечной компании выпущены эти CDO, - говорит Николас Данбар. – Они предпочитали не связываться с кредитами First Franklin, но принимали Countrywide. А разницы не было никакой. Они дотошно спорили по поводу облигаций, которые впоследствии упали до уровня в 2-3% от номинала. То есть, в результате споров они покупали облигации, падавшие не до трех процентов, а до двух»…Портфель IKB вырос с 10 миллиардов долларов в 2005 году до 20 миллиардов в 2007 году, «и рос бы дальше, но им не хватило времени». (то есть, рынок кончился – shed). Ребята продолжали покупать, даже когда рынок рухнул.  Ведь у них была амбициозная цель – дойти до 30 миллиардов долларов.К середине 2007 года все фирмы с Уолл-стрит осознали, что рынку низкокачественных ценных бумаг скоро придет конец, и лихорадочно пытались закрыть свои позиции.  Последними покупателями во всем мире, как сообщили Льюису финансисты с Уолл-стрит, были эти сознательно игнорирующие реальность немцы (2, стр. 187-189).В связи с некоторыми особенностями порядков в стране, в Германии не имели возможности разгуляться финансисты-евреи  с их стремлением к «инновациям» (2, стр. 173). Так что, немецкие банки занимались в основном скучной бухгалтерской работой. Дебет-кредит, понимаешь. Получая за это скучные деньги, особенно по американским меркам.Американские трейдеры на рынке облигаций потопили свои фирмы из-за того, что закрывали глаза на риски, присущие низкокачественным облигациям. Но попутно они сколотили состояние за счет получения многомиллионных бонусов, и к ответу их, по большей части, не привлекли. Им платили за то, что они подвергали свои фирмы риску, и поэтому трудно сказать, делали они это намеренно, или нет.Их немецким коллегам платили примерно по 100000 долларов в год, плюс бонус не более 50000.  То есть, как правило немецким банкирам платили гроши за принятие риска, потопившего из банки, и это, по мнению Льюиса, убедительно доказывает, - они действительно не понимали, что творят.Но странная вещь – в отличие от американских банкиров, немецкая общественность считает мошенниками своих банкиров.По мнению Дирка Ретига, в современной финансовой системе существует коварная разница между англо-американскими и немецкими банкирами. «Довольно сильно ощущалось межкультурное непонимание. Этих банкиров никогда не баловали продавцы с Уолл-стрит. А тут появляется некто с платиновой карточкой American Express, и этот господин может пригласить их на Гран-при в Монако и в другие подобные места. Он ничем не ограничен. Банкиры из Landesbanks, например, были самыми неинтересными в Германии и никогда не пользовались таким вниманием. И вдруг появляется умник из Merrill Lynch и начинает обхаживать их. Они подумали: «О, да мы ему нравимся!»». Дирк заканчивает мысль: «Американские трейдеры куда хитрее европейских. Он очень хорошие актеры».В сущности, по словам Ретига, немцы исключали возможность того, что американцы играют не совсем по официальным правилам. Немцы понимали правила буквально: они изучали историю облигаций с рейтингом «ААА» и принимали на веру официальную версию о том, что облигации с рейтингом «ААА» абсолютно безрисковые.И такое исключительное почитание правил наблюдалось не только в банковском деле.На кутеже с проститутками в бане, устроенном перестраховочной фирмой Munich Re для своих лучших клиентов как раз накануне краха в июне 2007 года, все было организовано на высшем уровне. Проституток пометили белыми, желтыми и красными лентами, чтобы знать, кому какая предназначалась. После каждого полового акта жрице любви ставили на руку печать, дабы все знали, сколько раз ею пользовались… (2, стр. 189-191).Коварная разница между англо-американскими и немецкими банкирами объяснялась, скорее всего, следующим.Немцы предполагали, что во всем должен быть естественный порядок, примером которого может служить естественный круговорот в природе естественного дерьма, идущий на пользу всему организму и – при правильном использовании дерьма - окружающей среде. Хотя некоторые этапы этого круговорота припахивают не очень приятноУ англосаксов наблюдается -  особенно в последние десятилетия – неестественный круговорот в природе неестественного дерьма, идущий на пользу только паразиту, присосавшемуся к когда-то сильному организму. Хотя все этапы этого круговорота – по мнению чайников  любителей англосаксов - цветут и благоухаютНемцы применили правила  естественного круговорота к круговороту виртуально-паразитическому. То есть, возомнив себя величайшими мастерами карточной игры, сели играть с шулерами, у которых козыри во всех рукавах.Купились немцы на благоухание синтетическое, поверив в шутку в духе папы Карло – Маркса  – в соответствии с которой Запад слил в единое целое три разнородных элемента: демократию, разум и капитализм (5, стр. 522).Хотя умные люди давно предупреждали людей доверчивых:  Не ходите, дети лохи, в Африку  на конкурентный рынок гулять:- «Встречающиеся на определенных уровнях правила рыночной экономики, какими описывает их классическая экономическая наука, намного реже действовали в своем обличье свободной конкуренции в верхней зоне - зоне расчетов и спекуляции. Там начинается "теневая зона", сумрак, зона деятельности посвященных, которая, я считаю, и лежит в основе того, что можно понимать под словом "капитализм". А последний - это накопление могущества (он строит обмен на соотношении силы в такой же и даже в большей мере, нежели на взаимности потребностей), это социальный паразитизм...»;- «То, что я назвал бы «капитализмом», это есть  присвоение капитала одними с исключением других» (6, стр.  XIV, 236)Многие годы до последнего кризиса финансовые гении с Уолл-стрит пели (и еще продолжают петь), убаюкивая весь остальной мир:«Мы, чистюли, в дерьме абсолютно не разбираемся. У нас, в отличие, например, от помешанных на дерьме немцев, только одно неприличное слово в основном и используется».Точно-точно, в основном одно - shit. Но это амерзкое shit по ядовитости всю дойчевскую шайссе-парфюмерию легко обскакало.СШАйссе «Глаза Клауса-Питера Мёллера затуманиваются, когда он вспоминает начало 1970-х и первое за всю историю отделение немецкого банка в Нью-Йорке, куда герр Мёллер [на момент разговора с Льюисом бывший главой Commerzbank] пошел работать. А также, когда он рассказывает истории об американцах, с которыми тогда занимался бизнесом. Одна из историй повествует об американском инвестиционном банкире, по оплошности сорвавшем сделку с ним. Так вот, тот находит Мёллера и вручает ему конверт с 75 штуками баксов со словами, что у него не было намерений нагреть немецкий банк на этой сделке. «Вы должны понять, - многозначительно говорит Мёллер – как тогда формировалось мое мнение об американцах. Но за последние несколько лет, добавляет он, это мнение изменилось… Я верил, что в Нью-Йорке самый лучший контроль за банковской системой. Я считал работу Федеральной резервной системы и Комиссии по ценным бумагам и биржам непревзойденной. Я никогда бы не подумал, что инвестиционные банкиры в электронной переписке будут говорить, что они продают…». Наступает пауза. Он решает, что не следует говорить «дерьмо», и заканчивает словом «грязь». – «По большому счету, для меня это стало самым большим разочарованием в профессиональной сфере. Слишком проамеркански я был настроен. И у меня был определенный набор американских ценностей» (2, стр. 177 - 180). Не будем рассуждать здесь о том, насколько чистосердечен/близорук герр Мёллер, - опытный финансист, не сумевший, по его словам, рассмотреть хоть малую толику грязи, копившуюся в финансовых закромах СШАйссе последние несколько десятилетий.Как бы то ни было, но часть этой грязи финансовые гении СШАйссе выплеснули и на Германию.Чрезвычайно находчивые трейдеры с Уолл-стрит напридумывали крайне нечестные, дьявольски сложные инструменты и отправили своих сотрудников прочесывать мир в надежде выискать идиотов, которые согласятся это дерьмо купить. В предкризисные годы в Германии таких идиотов нашлось безумное количество. Как рассказывал Майклу Льюису Аарон Кирхфельд, репортер новостного агентства Bloomberg News во Франкфурте: «Бывало, разговариваешь с инвестиционным банкиром из Нью-Йорка, и он заявляет: «Никто в жизни не купит эту хрень. Да нет – вообще-то, подождите,  Landesbanks точно купит»… вот почему, спрашивая где-то в июне 2007 года хитрожо.ого хитроумного трейдера по низкокачественным ипотечным облигациям с Уолл-стрит о том, кто все еще покупает его хрень, можно было получить простой ответ: «Глупые немцы из Дюссельдорфа»» (2, стр. 180 - 181).В числе тех, кто с  огромным и нескрываемым удовольствием нагревал «глупых немцев из Дюссельдорфа», был, кстати, и американец,  работавший в Нью-Йоркском отделении Deutsche Bank. Совсем не похожий на того ангельски честного американца из времен юности герра Мёллера. Но об этом человеке разговор будет в следующем материале.Что же касается чистоты помыслов продавцов амерзкого дерьма в ярких упаковках, то любому верующему в эту чистоту достаточно было немного поговорить по душам с амером по имени Вин Чау. Как это сделал Стив Айсман:… Когда впоследствии Айсман принимался объяснять причины финансового кризиса, то всегда начинал с обеда с Вином Чау. Только там он в полной мере осознал роль так называемых мезонинных CDO, состоящих преимущественно из низкокачественных ипотечных облигаций с рейтингом «ВВВ», - и их синтетических аналогов,  CDO, состоящих исключительно из дефолтных свопов на низкокачественные ипотечные облигации с рейтингом «ВВВ». «Вы должны понять, - говорил он. – Это же настоящая адская машина»… Теперь эти облигации можно было продавать инвесторам – пенсионным фондам и страховым компаниям, имеющим право инвестировать лишь в ценные бумаги с высоким рейтингом. Айсман с удивлением узнал, что у руля рокового корабля стоял Вин Чау и ему подобные. Этот малый контролировал примерно 15 миллиардов долларов, вложенных исключительно в CDO, обеспеченные траншами с рейтингом «ВВВ», или, по определению самого Айсмана, «собачьим дерьмом по сравнению с исходными облигациями». За год до 2006 года в качестве основного покупателя траншей низкокачественных CDO с рейтингом «ААА» … выступала компания AIG. После того, как AIG покинула рынок,  основными покупателями CDO стали менеджеры вроде Вина Чау -  «невысокого  роста человека с типичным для Уолл-стрит брюшком – не огромный барабан, а аккуратное утолщение, как у белки перед зимой» …… Чау беспечно рассказывал Айсману, что просто перекладывал на крупных инвесторов риск дефолта ипотечных кредитов, лежащих в основе облигаций, хотя инвесторы нанимали его как раз для оценки этих самых облигаций… С сентября 2007 года до сентябрьского краха [фирма Чау] занимала позицию крупнейшего в мире менеджера низкокачественных облигаций.… «И тут Чау выдал такое, что просто убил меня наповал, - вспоминает Айсман. – Он заявил: «Мне нравятся те, кто, как вы, играет на понижение на моем рынке. Не будь вас, что бы я покупал ?... Чем больше вы радуетесь своей правоте, - говорил он – тем больше заключаете сделок. А чем больше вы заключаете сделок, тем больше продукта для меня»».И вот тогда-то Айсман увидел все безумие ситуации. До тех пор, он, делая ставки в Goldman Sachs и Deutsche Bank на судьбу траншей низкокачественных облигаций с рейтингом «ВВВ», не до конца понимал, почему эти банки так охотно принимают их. Когда же Айсман оказался лицом к лицу с человеком с другой стороны дефолтных свопов, он понял: дефолтные свопы, пропущенные через CDO, использовались для тиражирования облигаций, обеспеченных реальными ипотечными кредитами. Число неплатежеспособных американцев, берущих кредиты, не удовлетворяло спрос инвесторов на конечный продукт. Ставки Айсмана были нужны Уолл-стрит для синтезирования  новых бумаг. «Им было мало реальных заемщиков, покупающих в кредит дома, которые они не могли себе позволить, - рассказывал Айсман. – Уолл-стрит создавала их из воздуха. Множила и множила ! Вот почему реальные убытки финансовой системы оказались во много раз больше объема низкокачественных кредитов. Только в этот момент я понял, что мы просто подпитывали процесс». (1, стр. 155-159).CDS превращались в CDO, и в результате: 400 миллионов долларов в год (или 2,4 миллиарда долларов за шесть лет ожидаемого времени до погашения облигаций) (1, стр. 92)  безрисковой прибыли для Goldman, неестественно разросшегося среднего пальца (Goldfinger), несколько последних десятилетий показывавшегося банкстерами всему остальному миру.Глупые немцы из Дюссельдорфа ? Или … засланный казачок ?Так все дело только в глупости и недостаточном мастерстве немецких банкиров ? Или в чем-то еще ? Здесь стоит припомнить историю возникновения банка IKB.«Дюссельдорфский IKB - Deutsche Industriebank (IKB) учрежден в 1924 г. для сбора налогов с компаний для репараций после Первой мировой войны. Специализируется на кредитовании малого и среднего бизнеса. Его крупнейший акционер (38% акций) — госбанк KfW. Активы IKB на 31 марта 2007 г. — 52,05 млрд евро, чистая прибыль за 2006 финансовый год — 179,7 млн евро» (7).А помогал немецкому банку приобщиться к финансовым инновациям, как мы помним, ответственный специалист. Немец с опытом работы в … СШайссе.От казачка – двойная польза тем, кто его засылал:- и часть дерьма ядовитого из своих вод в воды европейские направили;- и Германию обкакали; а то портит она Америке постиндустриальную «картину маслом»: непорядок же, когда у «грязнули», индустриальной Германии, дела идут лучше, чем у «чистюли» Америки.Так что получи Германия, за свою наглость, счет на 11 миллиардов долларов – чтобы своих волков позорных  лохов, банк IKB, из задницы вытянуть:«За кризис на рынке высокорискованных ипотечных облигаций США уже расплачивается немецкое правительство. Чтобы спасти IKB Deutsche Industriebank, инвестировавший 17,5 млрд евро в подобные инструменты, государственные и коммерческие немецкие банки выделят более 11 млрд евро. Но вряд ли это поможет — вчера IKB подешевел почти на 40%» (7).---------------------1)  Льюис, Майкл, «Большая игра на понижение: Тайные пружины финансовой катастрофы». – М.: Альпина Паблишерз, 20112)  Льюис, Майкл, «Бумеранг: Как из развитой страны превратиться в страну третьего мира». – М.: Альпина Паблишерз, 20133)  http://www.emdelight.com/en/projects/contemporary-architecture/0017_comm...4)  http://www.divapor.com/blog/2010/10/top-6-toilet-vistas/5)  Сол, Джон Ролстон, «Ублюдки Вольтера. Диктатура разума на Западе», М.: АСТ: Астрель, 2007 (книга написана в 1992 г.), 6)  Бродель, Фернан, «Материальная цивилизация, экономика и капитализм, XV – XVIII вв. Том 2, Игры обмена», Москва, издательство «Весь мир», 2007, 156-168 (пер. с фр. книги, изданной в 1986 г.)7)  «pro-credit», 03 августа 2007 http://www.pro-credit.ru/press/pressa/article-item_2766

Выбор редакции
21 ноября 2012, 15:00

Объёмы теневого банкинга превысили 67 триллионов долларов

Источник перевод для mixednews – molten18.11.2012Как заявляет Совет по финансовой стабильности (FSB), т.н. «теневой банкинг», который многие обвиняют в обострении мирового финансового кризиса, в прошлом году вырос до нового рекордно высокого уровня в 67 триллионов долларов.В появившемся в воскресенье докладе Совета подтверждаются опасения политиков в отношении того, что теневой банкинг продолжает процветать, находясь вне досягаемости нормативной сети, регулирующей традиционную банковскую деятельность.В исследовании говорится, что мировой теневой банкинг в предшествующие удару кризиса в 2007 году пять лет более чем удвоился, достигнув 62 триллионов долларов.Но в 2011 году вся система достигла $67 триллионов, что больше, чем общий годовой ВВП всех стран мира.Многотриллионная долларовая активность хедж-фондов и частных фондовых компаний часто приводят как пример теневой банковской деятельности.По оценкам FSB, у США крупнейшая теневая банковская система объёмом в $23 триллиона, затем идёт еврозона с $22 триллионами, и Соединенное Королевство с $9 триллионами.Одной из форм теневого банкинга может быть секьюритизация, позволяющая превратить банковские кредиты в торгуемые инструменты, которые затем могут быть использованы для рефинансирования кредита, что облегчает кредитование.Однако перед кризисом некоторые банки вроде немецкого IKB набрали на миллиарды евро таких инструментов на внебалансовых механизмах, которые позже развалились.Другим примером является соглашение об обратном выкупе, или repo, когда игрок, например, хедж-фонд, может продать принадлежащие ему правительственные облигации банку с тем условием, что позже выкупит их назад.Этот банк затем может занять эти облигации другому хедж-фонду, заняв по государственному долгу позицию. Такие соглашения используются банками для займов и кредитований. Риски такой деятельности в том, что если обанкротится один из участников цепи, под угрозой окажутся все.Ссылка

Выбор редакции
21 ноября 2012, 09:46

Объёмы теневого банкинга превысили 67 триллионов долларов

    Как заявляет Совет по финансовой стабильности (FSB), т.н. «теневой банкинг», который многие обвиняют в обострении мирового финансового кризиса, в прошлом году вырос до нового рекордно высокого уровня в 67 триллионов долларов.   В появившемся в воскресенье докладе Совета подтверждаются опасения политиков в отношении того, что теневой банкинг продолжает процветать, находясь вне досягаемости нормативной сети, регулирующей традиционную банковскую деятельность.   В исследовании говорится, что мировой теневой банкинг в предшествующие удару кризиса в 2007 году пять лет более чем удвоился, достигнув 62 триллионов долларов.   Но в 2011 году вся система достигла $67 триллионов, что больше, чем общий годовой ВВП всех стран мира.   Многотриллионная долларовая активность хедж-фондов и частных фондовых компаний часто приводят как пример теневой банковской деятельности.   По оценкам FSB, у США крупнейшая теневая банковская система объёмом в $23 триллиона, затем идёт еврозона с $22 триллионами, и Соединенное Королевство с $9 триллионами.   Одной из форм теневого банкинга может быть секьюритизация, позволяющая превратить банковские кредиты в торгуемые инструменты, которые затем могут быть использованы для рефинансирования кредита, что облегчает кредитование.   Однако перед кризисом некоторые банки вроде немецкого IKB набрали на миллиарды евро таких инструментов на внебалансовых механизмах, которые позже развалились.   Другим примером является соглашение об обратном выкупе, или repo, когда игрок, например, хедж-фонд, может продать принадлежащие ему правительственные облигации банку с тем условием, что позже выкупит их назад.   Этот банк затем может занять эти облигации другому хедж-фонду, заняв по государственному долгу позицию. Такие соглашения используются банками для займов и кредитований. Риски такой деятельности в том, что если обанкротится один из участников цепи, под угрозой окажутся все.

Выбор редакции
07 сентября 2012, 01:53

Goldman, Citi & UBS Hauled to Court - Analyst Blog

On Wednesday, IKB Deutsche Industriebank AG (IKB), a German lender, filed a lawsuit against The Goldman Sachs Group Inc. (GS) and Citigroup Inc. (C) for misrepresentation of documents while selling securities. Moreover, UBS AG (UBS) was also sued by Sealink Funding Ltd.

Выбор редакции
26 июля 2012, 08:49

Moody's понизило прогноз по рейтингам 17 немецких банков

Агентство Moody's в среду понизило прогноз по рейтингам 15 немецких региональных банков, а также IKB Deutsche Industriebank и Deutsche Postbank. Решение об изменении прогноза последовало после того, как на пересмотр с возможностью понижения были помещены прогноз по кредитному рейтингу Германии - в начале недели был изменен со стабильного на негативный. ...