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26 апреля, 20:49

The Fictional Country You Build When Your Home No Longer Exists

The 20th-century Bohemian writer Johannes Urzidil fled his embattled birthplace just before World War II, never to return—except in the stories he wrote.

26 апреля, 19:40

Jonathan Demme: 'A storyteller of bold and muscular force' | Peter Bradshaw

The Silence of the Lambs director, who has died aged 73, was an artist of brilliance and intuition as well as a master craftsman of great character dramasThe colossally talented and productive Jonathan Demme never assumed or wanted the status of an auteur, and in fact his one consciously cinephile project, The Truth About Charlie in 2002 – a remake of the 1960s caper Charade with nods to Truffaut – was not much liked. But Demme was a ceaselessly inventive and creative film-maker, a storyteller of bold and muscular force; a director who was plugged into the energies of commercial Hollywood cinema and who had imbibed the work ethic and the play ethic of his early mentor and producer Roger Corman.From Corman he learnt the values of populism and crowd-pleasing, and simply getting movies made on an industrial basis, and he developed this ethos which he endowed with something of the indie new wave spirit, morphing into 1980s brashness. He created cult hits like Melvin and Howard, Something Wild and Married to the Mob. But his career ascended to yet greater heights with some of the biggest hits of the 1990s: prominently Philadelphia, the HIV-Aids drama starring Tom Hanks — and of course the stone-cold grand guignol classic, The Silence of the Lambs, in 1991. This was the film which got him his best director Oscar: the hugely lucrative and award-garlanded version of Thomas Harris’s macabre novel about the serial killer Hannibal the Cannibal. Continue reading...

26 апреля, 16:51

5 Top-Ranked Stocks with Impressive Sales Growth to Bet On

One should keep in mind that solid sales growth is one of the major factors for the long-term success of any company.

26 апреля, 16:32

5 Low Price-to-Cash-Flow Stocks for Assured Returns

In value investing, investors pick stocks that are cheap but fundamentally sound. So, the chance of outperformance is high when the market moves higher.

26 апреля, 16:30

Zacks.com featured highlights: Bunge, Avid Technology, Dana, Univar and Alon USA Energy

Zacks.com featured highlights: Bunge, Avid Technology, Dana, Univar and Alon USA Energy

26 апреля, 16:30

Zacks.com featured highlights: Century Casinos, Potbelly, Commercial Vehicle Group, Nucor and Visteon

Zacks.com featured highlights: Century Casinos, Potbelly, Commercial Vehicle Group, Nucor and Visteon

26 апреля, 16:30

7 Stocks with Exciting Interest Coverage Ratio

Debt, which is crucial to financing operations for a majority of companies, comes at a cost called interest.

26 апреля, 15:00

How Banks Can Compete Against an Army of Fintech Startups

It’s been more than 25 years since Bill Gates dismissed retail banks as “dinosaurs,” but the statement may be as true today as it was then. Banking for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) has been astonishingly unaffected by the rise of the Internet. To the extent that banks have digitized, they have focused on the most routine customer transactions, like online access to bank accounts and remote deposits. The marketing, underwriting, and servicing of SME loans have largely taken a backseat. Other sectors of retail lending have not fared much better. Recent analysis by Bain and SAP found that only 7% of bank credit products could be handled digitally from end to end. The glacial pace at which banks have moved SME lending online has left them vulnerable. Gates’ original quote contended that the dinosaurs can be ”bypassed.” That hasn’t happened yet, but our research suggests the threat to retail banks from online lending is very real. If U.S. banks are going to survive the coming wave in financial technology (fintech), they’ll need to finally take digital transformation seriously. And our analysis suggests there are strategies that they can use to compete successfully online. Lending to small and medium-sized businesses is ready to move online Small businesses are starting to demand banking services that have engaging web and mobile user experiences, on par with the technologies they use in their personal lives. In a recent survey from Javelin Research, 56% of SMEs indicated a desire for better digital banking tools. In a separate, forthcoming survey conducted by Oliver Wyman and Fundera (where one of us works), over 60% of small business owners indicated that they would prefer to apply for loans entirely online. In addition to improving the experience for business owners, digitization has the potential to substantially reduce the cost of lending at every stage of the process, making SME customers more profitable for lenders, and creating opportunities to serve a broader swath of SMEs. This is important because transaction costs in SME lending can be formidable and, as our research in a recent HBS Working Paper indicates, some small businesses are not being served. Transaction costs associated with making a $100,000 loan are roughly the same as making a $1,000,000 loan, but with less profit to the bank, which has led to banks prioritizing SMEs seeking higher loan amounts. The problem is that about 60% of small businesses want loans below $100,000. If digitization can decrease costs, it could help more of these small businesses get funded. New digital entrants have spotted the market opportunity created by these dynamics, and the result is an explosion in online lending to SMEs from fintech startups. Last year, less than $10 billion in small-business loans was funded by online lenders, a fraction compared to the $300 billion in SME loans outstanding at U.S. banks. However, the current meager market share held by online lenders masks immense potential: Morgan Stanley estimates the total addressable market for online SME lenders is $280 billion and predicts the industry will grow at a 47% annualized rate through 2020. They estimate that online lenders will constitute nearly a fifth of the total SME lending market by then. This finding confirms what bankers fear: digitization upends business models, enabling greater competition that puts pressure on incumbents. Sometimes David can triumph over Goliath. As JPMorgan Chase’s CEO, Jamie Dimon, warned in a June 2015 letter to the bank’s shareholders, “Silicon Valley is coming.” Can banks out-compete the disruptors? Established banks have real advantages in serving the SME lending market, which should not be underestimated. Banks’ cost of capital is typically 50 basis points or less. These low-cost and reliable sources of funds are from taxpayer-insured deposits and the Federal Reserve’s discount window. By comparison, online lenders face capital costs that can be higher than 10%, sourced from potentially fickle institutional investors like hedge funds. Banks also have a built-in customer base, and access to proprietary data on depositors that can be used to find eligible borrowers who already have a relationship with the bank. Comparatively, online lenders have limited brand recognition, and acquiring small business customers online is expensive and competitive. But banks’ ability to use these strengths to build real competitive advantage is not a forgone conclusion. The new online lenders have made the loan application process much more customer-friendly. Instead of walking into a branch on Main Street and spending hours filling out paperwork, borrowers can complete online applications with lenders like Lending Club and Kabbage in minutes and from their laptop or phone at any hour of the day. Approval times are cut to days or, in some cases, a few minutes, fueled by data-driven algorithms that quickly pre-qualify borrowers based on a handful of data points such as personal credit scores, Demand Deposit Account (DDA) data, tax returns, and three months of bank statements. Moreover, in instances where borrowers want to shop and compare myriad options in one place, they turn to online credit brokers like Fundera or Intuit’s QuickBooks Financing for a one-stop shopping experience. By contrast, banks — particularly regional and smaller banks — have traditionally relied on manual, paper-intensive underwriting processes, which draw out approval times to as much as 20 days. The questions banks should ask themselves We see four broad strategies that traditional banks could pursue to compete or collaborate with emerging online players—and in some cases do both simultaneously. The choice of strategy depends on how much investment of time and money the bank is willing to make to enter the new marketplace, and the level of integration the bank wants between the new digital activities and their traditional operations. Two of the four options are low-integration strategies in which banks contract for new digital activities in arms-length agreements, or pursue long-term corporate investments in separate emerging companies. This amounts to putting a toe in the water, while keeping current operations relatively separate and pristine. On the other end of the spectrum, banks choose higher-integration strategies, like investing in partnership arrangements, where the new technologies are integrated into the bank’s loan application and decision making apparatus, sometimes in the form of a “white label” arrangement. The recent partnership between OnDeck and JPMorgan Chase is such an example. Some large and even regional banks have made even more significant investment to build their own digital front ends (e.g. Eastern Bank). And as more of the new fintech companies become possible acquisition targets, banks may look to a “build or buy” strategy to gain these new digital capabilities.   For banks that choose to develop their own systems to compete head-on with new players, significant investment is required to automate routine aspects of underwriting, to better integrate their own proprietary account data, and to create a better customer experience through truly customer-friendly design. The design and user experience aspect is especially out of sync with bank culture, and many banks struggle with internal resistance. Alternatively, banks can partner with online lenders in a range ways – from having an online lender power the bank’s online loan application, to using an online lender’s credit model to better underwrite and service bank loan applications. In these options, the critical question is whether the bank wants to keep its own underwriting criteria or use new algorithms developed by its digital partner. Though the new underwriting is fast and uses intriguing new data, such as current bank transaction and cash flows, it’s still early days for these new credit scoring methods, and they have largely not been tested through an economic downturn. Another large downside of partnering with online lenders is the significant level of resources required for compliance with federal “third party” oversight, which makes banks responsible for the activities of their vendors and partners. In the U.S., at least three federal regulators have overlapping requirements in this area, creating a dampening effect that regulatory reform in Washington could serve to mitigate. Banks that prefer a more “arm’s-length” arrangement have the option to buy loans originated on an alternative lender’s platform. This allows a bank to increase their exposure to SME loans and pick the credits they wish to hold, while freeing up capital for online lenders. This type of partnership is among the most prolific in the online small business lending world, with banks such as JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America, and SunTrust buying assets from leading online lenders. The familiar David vs. Goliath script of the scrappy, internet-fueled startup vanquishing the clunky, brick-and-mortar-laden incumbent is repeated so often in startup circles that it is sometimes treated as inevitable. But in the real world, sometimes David wins, other times Goliath wins, and sometimes the right solution involves a combination of both. SME lending can remain a big business for banks, but only with deliberate choices about where to play and how to win. Banks must focus on areas where they can build a distinct competitive advantage, and find ways to partner with or learn from the new innovators.

26 апреля, 03:20

Children In Poorest Neighborhoods Most Vulnerable To Fatal Child Abuse

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); (Reuters Health) - Children in America’s poorest communities have three times the risk of dying from child abuse before age 5 as children in the wealthiest neighborhoods, a new study finds. “We think our study should inform public health leaders and local clinicians to be aware that children living in high-poverty communities are really a vulnerable group at increased risk of death due to child abuse,” lead author Dr. Caitlin Farrell, a pediatrician at Boston Children’s Hospital, said in a phone interview. Farrell and her team analyzed death certificates for young children and U.S. Census poverty data from 1999 through 2014. For children ages 4 and under, counties with the highest concentrations of poverty had more than triple the rate of child-abuse fatalities compared to counties with the lowest concentrations of poverty, the study reported in Pediatrics found. Nearly 10 out of every 100,000 children died as a result of child abuse in the most impoverished counties, the study found. African-American children were the most vulnerable regardless of where they lived. Among every 100,000 young children, eight African-Americans died from assault, shaken-baby syndrome, abusive head trauma, suffocation, strangulation or another form of child abuse, compared to three white children, the study found. The fatality rate for African-American children in the richest counties was higher than the fatality rate for white children in the poorest. Farrell can’t explain why African-American infants and toddlers were most at risk of dying from abuse. She called for more research and for the development of policies and plans aimed specifically at protecting poor children and African-American children. During the 15 years covered by the study, 11,149 children died of child abuse before turning 5 years old. Children under the age of 3 comprised the vast majority, or 71 percent, of the deaths, the authors wrote. African-American children represented a disproportionate 37 percent of the nationwide child-abuse deaths. “We hope our study can serve as a catalyst for researchers to further explore the complex relationship between community poverty and child abuse,” Farrell said. “Ultimately, this information is needed for policymakers, public health officials and clinicians to enact effective prevention strategies.” In an accompanying editorial, Dr. Robert Block said the study’s findings should come as no surprise. “What may be surprising is that although this fact is both intuitive and now statistically proven, given the significant percentage of children living in poverty, the United States has yet to develop a comprehensive plan to address the issue,” he wrote. Block, who was not involved with the study, is a past president of the American Academy of Pediatrics and emeritus professor at the University of Oklahoma - Tulsa University School of Community Medicine in Tulsa. Poverty-related factors - such as food insecurity, unemployment and living in unsafe neighborhoods with a high prevalence of gun violence - can lead to frustrations and consequent stressors that can lead to child abuse, Block wrote. Parenting education could help, as could educating community leaders to address the challenges of poverty in an effort to reduce frustration, drug addiction, family violence and other stresses, he wrote. “To change the influence of poverty and race on the incidence of child-abuse deaths will not be easy,” Block said in an email. “Early identification of troubled parents as part of comprehensive pediatric evaluations might be a beginning.” Farrell also called for more preventive measures during children’s wellness checks in pediatric clinics. One limitation of the study is that it could not tease out pockets of poverty within affluent counties or pockets of wealth within poor counties. The study also could not detect possible bias on the part of the medical examiner in determining the cause of death.   SOURCE: bit.ly/2pYx9Bf and bit.ly/2pYLQnL Pediatrics, online April 24, 2017. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

25 апреля, 17:27

5 Best-Ranked Liquid Stocks for Impressive Returns

A company with a favorable liquidity position has the potential to provide higher returns as liquidity drives growth.

25 апреля, 16:30

Zacks.com featured highlights: PCTEL, Grupo Financiero Galicia, Pampa Energía, Ituran Location and Control and RELX NV

Zacks.com featured highlights: PCTEL, Grupo Financiero Galicia, Pampa Energía, Ituran Location and Control and RELX NV

25 апреля, 15:45

Brokers Love These 5 Stocks Right Now

With multiple earnings reports flooding the market, picking outperformers is a difficult task for individual investors in the absence of proper guidance.

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25 апреля, 13:00

How 34-Year-Old Intuit Became Tech's Resilient Force

Intuit CEO Brad Smith talks with FORBES' Rich Karlgaard about the secret to disruption and rapid innovation and about the best advice he ever got from Steve Jobs' mentor.

Выбор редакции
25 апреля, 10:50

Football transfer rumours: Tottenham's Dele Alli to Manchester City?

Today’s fluff is there in times of needSometimes it can be hard to take newspaper transfer gossip seriously, with many stories apparently inspired by little more than a mixture of intuition, blind guesswork and perhaps the occasional off-the-record whisper from a vested interest. However the source of Tuesday’s biggest and juiciest titbit has impeccable contacts and great football wisdom, and while it would be easy to dismiss any ordinary story linking Manchester City with a world record offer for Tottenham’s Dele Alli, it’s a little bit different when the story has come straight from the mouth of Xavi, the former Barcelona inspiration and one-time team-mate of Pep Guardiola. Related: Daniel Sturridge may have played last game for Liverpool because of injury Continue reading...

24 апреля, 17:53

Will PayPal (PYPL) Beat Estimates this Earnings Season?

PayPal Holdings, Inc. (PYPL) will report first-quarter 2017 earnings on Apr 26 after the bell.

24 апреля, 17:48

7 Stocks Near 52-Week High to Look Out For

Prolonged under reaction makes these stocks remain undervalued. However, sooner or later, the markets get a whiff of it and investors realize that their lack of enthusiasm is unwarranted.

24 апреля, 16:50

17 Spine-Tingling New Books For Fans Of Dystopia

The end of 2016 brought with it a spike in classic dystopian book sales. George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four and Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale ― which will be released as a Hulu show this month ― each piqued the interest of book buyers, who might’ve drawn uncomfortable parallels between the stories and the world around them. These books, of course, are not the only dystopian titles resonating with readers. The science fiction subgenre has enjoyed a long period of popularity thanks to YA installments like The Hunger Games, Divergent, The Maze Runner and The 100, each with its own onscreen offshoot. There are those in the sci-fi genre who are tired of dystopia’s proliferation; there are, after all, many ways to speculate about the future, and not all of them need be pessimistic. Still, as the subgenre grows, its capacity for holding a mirror to today’s problems ― climate change, stringent definitions of gender, and discrimination based on race or gender or nationality ― persists. If you still see the worth in dystopian stories ― for social change or for entertainment value ― there are, luckily, loads to choose from. Climate-fiction, or cli-fi, has emerged as a sub-subgenre of dystopian fiction, with authors like Lidia Yuknavitch and Jeff VanderMeer ― both of whom have upcoming film adaptations ― leading the charge. Other titles explore cryonics, religion, gender and more. We’ve included a few we’re excited about below. Just note that our definition of dystopia is a broad one; any vision of the future that could go awry qualifies. 1. American War by Omar El Akkad Fought amid a changing climate, America’s second Civil War ― lasting nearly 20 years ― was fought with homicide bombings and drones. An academic born during this period remembers the story of a girl who lived through it.    Buy it on Amazon or at your local indie bookstore.  2. The Book of Etta by Meg Elison In a town outside of Estiel ― what was once St. Louis ― a girl named Etta fulfills her duties as a forager, but must venture to face a tyrant called Lion when women from her community are kidnapped.   Buy it on Amazon or at your local indie bookstore.  Read Meg Elison on the possible future of reproductive health. 3. Book of Joan by Lidia Yuknavitch Lidia Yukanavitch is skilled at writing poetically about the human body, and about nature, so this book ― her first foray into science fiction ― makes sense. It’s a retelling of the story of Joan of Arc, but in a world ravaged by radiation, and with few land-based survivors.  Buy it on Amazon or at your local indie bookstore. Read Lydia Yuknavitch’s thoughts on writing in the time of Trump. 4. Borne by Jeff VanderMeer Rachel and Wick live in a city destroyed by drought and terrorized by a giant bear, doing what they can to prioritize their survival ― until Rachel finds Borne, a plant-animal she’s immediately attached to.   Buy it on Amazon or at your local indie bookstore.  Read Jeff VanderMeer on sci-fi solutions to climate change.  5. New York 2140 by Kim Stanley Robinson When two coders go missing, an entire future society is at risk. Robinson’s work may not be squarely dystopian, but he has a knack for drawing imagined worlds and their societal problems. In his latest, rising tides leave New York partly submerged.  Buy it on Amazon or at your local indie bookstore.  6. Void Star by Zachary Mason If the future of the ever-growing tech industry has a physical home, it’s San Fransisco, where Mason’s novel is set. Life extension, artificial memory and rising waters converge in a sprawling future epic.  Buy it on Amazon or at your local indie bookstore.  7. Proof of Concept by Gwyneth Jones Kir has been asked to join a project working towards the possibility of humans inhabiting another planet ― a project designed to give Earthlings, living on a planet that’s overcrowded and climate change-wrecked, a chance at survival. Will her brain ― wired for optimism ― be able to heed the warnings of the artificial intelligence she hosts?  Buy it on Amazon or at your local indie bookstore. 8. Tender by Sofia Samatar Sofia Samatar’s stories are more fantasy than sci-fi, and she’s more likely to chronicle an alternate or parallel reality than a possible future. Her story “How to Get Back to the Forest” earned a spot among the Best American Science Fiction and Fantasy Stories 2015. Buy it on Amazon or at your local indie bookstore. 9. The Ship by Antonia Honeywell Lalla’s father plans to escape the increasingly dangerous world of future-Britain via ship, but the boat turns out to be eerily different than expected.  Buy it on Amazon or at your local indie bookstore. 10. All Our Wrong Todays by Elan Mastai What if the world we’re living in now was the dystopian version of some happier, more progressive alternate reality? That’s the premise of Elan Mastai’s debut, which is centered around protagonist Tom, who has to make a tough choice between a thrumming, messy world or a neat and perfect one. Buy it on Amazon or at your local indie bookstore. 11. The Weaver by Emmi Itäranta On the surface, Eliana’s life is a pleasant one. She lives on an idyllic island where she works as a weaver, but she is forced to hide the fact that she’s capable of dreaming, lest she be cast out. The cracks in her perfect world begin to show when a young girl washes up on the shore, bearing a tattoo of Eliana’s name.  Buy it on Amazon or at your local indie bookstore.  Read Emmi Itäranta on sci-fi solutions to climate change.  12. Zero K by Don DeLillo Jeff’s father, Ross, has always been somewhat absent from his life; he’s a billionaire and he’s happily remarried. But when Ross’s second wife Artis gets sick, he invites his son to visit him at a mysterious cryogenics facility, where pseudo-science meets spiritual practice. Buy it on Amazon or at your local indie bookstore. Read our review of Zero K. 13. All the Birds in the Sky by Charlie Jane Anders Patricia’s a witch. Laurence is a tech wunderkind. Their star-crossed relationship is a love story for the 21st century, where spirituality and intuition are at odds with scientific advancements.  Buy it on Amazon or at your local indie bookstore. 14. Thirst by Benjamin Warner Eddie and Laura’s suburban life devolves amid an ecological disaster, one that forces them each to reconsider what it is that they cherish most.  Buy it on Amazon or at your local indie bookstore. 15. Black Wave by Michelle Tea The world, it turns out, is ending. That doesn’t stop Michelle from dating, from writing, from relocating to a new city to distance herself from her drug-addled past, or from proceeding more or less as normal, except that now, the apocalypse looms.  Buy it on Amazon or at your local indie bookstore. 16. Not Dark Yet by Berit Ellingsen For Ellingsen, the personal is political. His story’s hero, Brandon, retreats to the wilderness after his professor and lover makes him commit an act of violence. From there, he fosters hope for a future threatened by rising temperatures and the attendant damage done to the environment.  Buy it on Amazon or at your local indie bookstore. 17. Too Like the Lightning by Ada Palmer Near-future sci-fi may be all the rage; it would seem that it’s more capable of shedding new light on present dangers, anyway. But Palmer’s novel ― set in the 25th century, when society’s perceptions of gender and religion have morphed considerably ― gives those stories a run for their money.  Buy it on Amazon or at your local indie bookstore. Read Ada Palmer on sci-fi predictions for the future of sports. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

24 апреля, 16:48

5 Cheap Value Stocks Flaunting Low PEG Ratio

A low PEG ratio is always better for value investors.

24 апреля, 16:30

Zacks.com featured highlights: Constellation Brands, Ollie's Bargain Outlet Holdings, Sturm, Ruger, Ellington Financial and Monmouth Real Estate Investment

Zacks.com featured highlights: Constellation Brands, Ollie's Bargain Outlet Holdings, Sturm, Ruger, Ellington Financial and Monmouth Real Estate Investment

24 апреля, 16:30

Zacks.com featured highlights: Commercial Vehicle Group, United States Steel, DXC Technology, Chemours and Micron Technology

Zacks.com featured highlights: Commercial Vehicle Group, United States Steel, DXC Technology, Chemours and Micron Technology