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04 декабря, 16:02

Quotation of the Day…

(Don Boudreaux) Tweet… is from page 222 of James Bovard’s 1991 book, The Fair Trade Fraud: The ITC [U.S. International Trade Commission] acts as if American companies have a right not to be injured by foreign competition, regardless of how poorly they serve their American customers. DBx:  Indeed.  And yet Generalissimo Trump and his fans imagine that, […]

02 декабря, 01:20

Nucor (NUE) Raises Quarterly Dividend Payout to 37.75 Cents

Nucor Corporation's (NUE) board has hiked the regular quarterly cash dividend on its common stock by 0.7% to 37.75 cents.

28 ноября, 15:01

Bull of the Day: Sunrun Inc. (RUN)

Bull of the Day: Sunrun Inc. (RUN)

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21 ноября, 17:49

Consumer Choice Hangs In The Balance Of ITC's IP Infringement Case

(AP Photo/Carlos Giusti) If a patent is violated and the government agrees that the infringing product should be banned from importation, reasonable steps should be considered to limit any immediate impact on consumers, when necessary. An infringement case on a medical device used for cancer treatment provides a prime example of [...]

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12 ноября, 20:00

COP22: Geneva agencies highlight important role of trade in addressing climate change

Trade has an important role to play in addressing climate change and helping countries meet their commitments to the Paris Agreement, which entered into force on 4 November. This was the main message from the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), the World Trade Organization (WTO) and the International Trade Centre (ITC) at an event held on 12 November at the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP22).

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08 ноября, 12:37

New global trade alert system launched to boost market access for developing countries

A new online alert system designed to help government agencies and small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) keep track of the latest information on regulatory requirements for international trade was launched today (8 November) by the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA), the World Trade Organization (WTO) and the International Trade Centre (ITC).

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07 ноября, 16:07

C5 Capital buys cyber security group ITC for £24m

Fourth acquisition made by London-based fund manager in the sector

07 ноября, 15:51

Hillary Had My Back

The year 2001, when I became president of the United Steelworkers union and Hillary Clinton took office as a U.S. Senator for New York, was a desperate, terrible time for steelworkers and the steel industry in this country. I turned to her, among many others, for help. Something had to be done. Within a half dozen years, 50,000 steelworkers would lose their jobs and 30 steel companies would go bankrupt. The primary culprit was unfair trade, as it is now. As I fought to save jobs, I found that some lawmakers were true to their word, and Sen. Hillary Clinton was one of them. When she promised me she would co-sign a bill or testify in front of the International Trade Commission, she did it. She never let workers down. American steel and aluminum producers are in crisis again. I want a President I know I can trust based on past experience to help these workers. That is Hillary Clinton.  Leo Gerard and Hillary Clinton at rally in Pittsburgh Let me take you back to 1997. That’s when the steel disaster began with a financial crisis in Thailand. It spread across Asia and later to Russia and even Brazil. These countries maintained steel production and employment with government subsidies then dumped the excess metal at below-market costs in the United States. This created a massive global oversupply of steel, further sinking the price. The result was a near record level of steel imports into the United States in 1997, followed by a one-third increase over that in 1998. And the numbers worsened year after year. American steel companies collapsed. Tens of thousands of U.S. steelworkers lost their jobs. More than 100,000 retired steelworkers lost health care benefits that had been funded by steel companies that liquidated. Many more steelworkers lost pension benefits. Companies that supplied the steel industry went bankrupt and their workers lost jobs. Communities dependent on steel were devastated. The steel industry and the USW filed literally dozens of individual trade cases asking for relief from imports of specific kinds of steel products and won them all. They also sought special, broader relief called Section 201 from then-President George W. Bush. And that’s where Hillary Clinton was particularly helpful. I asked the freshman senator to testify for us. And she did it twice, even though she was dealing with the horrible consequences of the 9/11 attack in her home state. She got up to speed on the complicated trade issues, and by the time she spoke for us, she understood clearly how unfair trade affected steelworkers in New York and workers across the country. Here is some of her testimony to the International Trade Commission (ITC) in 2003 asking for an extension of the Section 201 intervention: “As our country faces difficult economic and international challenges, a vital, healthy domestic steel industry is important not only for the economic health of our nation, but for our national security as well. . .” “Yet New York, which was once a major steel producer, has seen mill after mill close as a result of dumped and subsidized imports. . .” “The President’s Section 201 decision was based on the idea that by limiting the ability of illegally traded imports to pour freely into the U.S. market, temporary import relief would make it possible for the domestic industry to attract the investment it desperately needed to fund consolidation and modernization. And, indeed, this is exactly what happened. . .” “The steel industry’s workers have also invested heavily in the industry. As you can see, many steelworkers are attending today’s hearing, a testament to their commitment to the future of the steel industry. In fact, in terms of the sacrifices they have made, their investment dwarfs that of Wall Street.  .  . America’s steelworkers have agreed to dramatic changes in work rules and compensation, all to make the American steel industry more competitive. . .” “With worldwide steelmaking overcapacity expected to continue for the near future, it is critically important that the Section 201 measures be allowed to run the full three years.” Frankly, I couldn’t have asked for better testimony. And I really appreciated that she acknowledged that workers had given up so much to make mills profitable. She also noted that untold numbers of workers and retirees had lost health and pension benefits. Workers, she told the ITC, participated in steel’s recovery. Unfortunately for me and the members of my union, the overcapacity issue she mentioned at the end of her 2003 testimony hasn’t been resolved in the 13 years since. China accounts for 99 percent of the world overcapacity problem now. It promises and pledges and assures the world community that it will stop, that it will cut back, that it will control production. But then it just adds more capacity and dumps the extra steel and aluminum into the world market at undercut government-subsidized prices that violate international trade law, prices that kill U.S. and European producers. As a result, American steel and aluminum jobs are being lost again. Right now, 13,500 steelworkers are laid off. Thousands of aluminum workers have been furloughed in the past three years as record numbers of smelters have closed. Twenty-three smelters operated in the United States in 2000. That number was down to 10 in 2013. Now, three years later, only five remain. Look, I know from experience that steelworkers can’t solve this problem by ourselves. So we partner with our employers on trade cases. And we are working with U.S. Steel on its effort to have China barred from exporting steel to the United States altogether because of its egregious violations of international law, including hacking into the corporation's computers and stealing trade secrets. We do those things because we believe we are stronger together. We believe in Hillary Clinton’s slogan: Stronger Together. It sounds like a union slogan to us. We believe that when we all stand together, when we all have each other’s backs, we can do anything. We would like to have Hillary Clinton on our team.  *** Photo by Steve Dietz -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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04 ноября, 14:10

NRG Energy (NRG) Beats on Q3 Earnings, Revenues Miss

NRG Energy (NRG) third quarter earnings were ahead of Zacks Consensus Estimate but total revenues lagged the same.

25 октября, 04:23

The TPP And Free Trade: Time To Retake The English Language

The proponents of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) are planning to do a full court press in the lame duck session of Congress following the election. We will be bombarded with speeches and columns from President Obama and other illustrious figures telling us how it is important to approve the TPP for a variety of reasons. We can be certain that one of the reasons will be the inherent virtues of free trade. They will not be telling the truth. The TPP is not about free trade. It does little to reduce tariffs and quotas for the simple reason that these barriers are already very low. In fact, the United States already has trade deals with six of the other eleven countries in the TPP. This is why the non-partisan United States International Trade Commission (ITC) estimated that when the full gains from the TPP are realized in 2032, they will come to just 0.23 percent of GDP. This is a bit more than a normal month's growth. In fact, the TPP goes far in the opposite direction, increasing protectionism in the form of stronger and longer patent and copyright protection. These forms of protection for prescription drugs, software, and other products, often raise the price by a factor of a hundred or more above the free market price. This makes them equivalent to tariffs of several thousand percent. The TPP is not about free trade. It does little to reduce tariffs and quotas for the simple reason that these barriers are already very low. These forms of protection do serve a purpose in promoting innovation and creative work, but we have other more efficient mechanisms to accomplish this goal. Furthermore, the fact that they serve a purpose doesn't mean they are not protectionist. After all, protectionism always serves some purpose. A quota to protect the U.S. sugar industry doesn't stop being protectionism because it ensures the survival of a domestic sugar industry. It is likely the case that the strengthening of patent and copyright related protections in the TPP does more to impede free trade than the modest reductions in tariffs do to promote free trade. Unfortunately, neither the ITC nor anyone else has attempted to quantify the cost of the protectionist measures in the TPP so we don't have a good basis for comparison at this point. The other point to be made about free trade and protectionism is that our push for free trade has always been very selective. NAFTA and other trade deals were explicitly designed to make it as easy as possible for U.S. corporations to manufacture goods in the developing world and ship them back to the United States. This pattern of trade had the predicted and actual effect of reducing jobs and lowering pay for manufacturing workers. This pattern of trade has been an important factor in the wage stagnation seen by workers without college degrees over the last four decades. But there was nothing inevitable about this process. While manufacturing workers in the developing world are willing to work for much lower pay than manufacturing workers in the United States, so are doctors in the developing world. Unlike manufacturing workers, doctors are powerful enough to get protection. It is not generally possible for a doctor trained in another country to practice medicine in the United States unless they pass a U.S. residency program -- for which there is a strict quota on foreign trained students. As a result of this restriction, doctors in the United States earn on average twice as much as doctors in Canada, Germany, and other wealthy countries. This protectionism costs the United States roughly $100 billion a year (around $700 per family) in higher health care costs. If our trade negotiators actually were interested in "free trade," they would have constructed a system whereby foreign trained doctors could be certified as meeting U.S. standards. They would then have the same freedom to practice as any doctor born and trained in the United States. Note that this is a trade issue, not an immigration issue. Foreign doctors could probably get away with working in restaurants or construction in the U.S., they just can't get away with working as doctors. If we had a number of additional foreign doctors enter the U.S. equal to just one month's normal flow of immigrants, it would hugely transform the market for physicians in the United States. The potential gains from eliminating the barriers that prevent foreign doctors and other highly paid professionals from working in the United States are enormous. These barriers are not removed in trade deals because the people negotiating them all have parents, siblings, and/or children in these professions. They want to protect their incomes; they don't care about the income of autoworkers and textile workers. So let's be clear. President Obama and other proponents of TPP are protectionists. This matters hugely in public debate because most educated people have a Trumpian-type commitment to anything labeled as "free trade." They think that they have to support it because otherwise they will be bad people. The real story here is that the TPP is a deal about redistributing more income upward. It's imposing more competition on those at the middle and the bottom while maintaining and increasing forms of protectionism that benefits those at the top. When reporters call the TPP a "free trade" deal, they are acting as advocates, not reporters. The TPP is a protectionist pact for those at the top who are worried that free trade will undermine their income -- like it did for those at the middle and bottom. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

25 октября, 04:23

The TPP And Free Trade: Time To Retake The English Language

The proponents of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) are planning to do a full court press in the lame duck session of Congress following the election. We will be bombarded with speeches and columns from President Obama and other illustrious figures telling us how it is important to approve the TPP for a variety of reasons. We can be certain that one of the reasons will be the inherent virtues of free trade. They will not be telling the truth. The TPP is not about free trade. It does little to reduce tariffs and quotas for the simple reason that these barriers are already very low. In fact, the United States already has trade deals with six of the other eleven countries in the TPP. This is why the non-partisan United States International Trade Commission (ITC) estimated that when the full gains from the TPP are realized in 2032, they will come to just 0.23 percent of GDP. This is a bit more than a normal month's growth. In fact, the TPP goes far in the opposite direction, increasing protectionism in the form of stronger and longer patent and copyright protection. These forms of protection for prescription drugs, software, and other products, often raise the price by a factor of a hundred or more above the free market price. This makes them equivalent to tariffs of several thousand percent. The TPP is not about free trade. It does little to reduce tariffs and quotas for the simple reason that these barriers are already very low. These forms of protection do serve a purpose in promoting innovation and creative work, but we have other more efficient mechanisms to accomplish this goal. Furthermore, the fact that they serve a purpose doesn't mean they are not protectionist. After all, protectionism always serves some purpose. A quota to protect the U.S. sugar industry doesn't stop being protectionism because it ensures the survival of a domestic sugar industry. It is likely the case that the strengthening of patent and copyright related protections in the TPP does more to impede free trade than the modest reductions in tariffs do to promote free trade. Unfortunately, neither the ITC nor anyone else has attempted to quantify the cost of the protectionist measures in the TPP so we don't have a good basis for comparison at this point. The other point to be made about free trade and protectionism is that our push for free trade has always been very selective. NAFTA and other trade deals were explicitly designed to make it as easy as possible for U.S. corporations to manufacture goods in the developing world and ship them back to the United States. This pattern of trade had the predicted and actual effect of reducing jobs and lowering pay for manufacturing workers. This pattern of trade has been an important factor in the wage stagnation seen by workers without college degrees over the last four decades. But there was nothing inevitable about this process. While manufacturing workers in the developing world are willing to work for much lower pay than manufacturing workers in the United States, so are doctors in the developing world. Unlike manufacturing workers, doctors are powerful enough to get protection. It is not generally possible for a doctor trained in another country to practice medicine in the United States unless they pass a U.S. residency program -- for which there is a strict quota on foreign trained students. As a result of this restriction, doctors in the United States earn on average twice as much as doctors in Canada, Germany, and other wealthy countries. This protectionism costs the United States roughly $100 billion a year (around $700 per family) in higher health care costs. If our trade negotiators actually were interested in "free trade," they would have constructed a system whereby foreign trained doctors could be certified as meeting U.S. standards. They would then have the same freedom to practice as any doctor born and trained in the United States. Note that this is a trade issue, not an immigration issue. Foreign doctors could probably get away with working in restaurants or construction in the U.S., they just can't get away with working as doctors. If we had a number of additional foreign doctors enter the U.S. equal to just one month's normal flow of immigrants, it would hugely transform the market for physicians in the United States. The potential gains from eliminating the barriers that prevent foreign doctors and other highly paid professionals from working in the United States are enormous. These barriers are not removed in trade deals because the people negotiating them all have parents, siblings, and/or children in these professions. They want to protect their incomes; they don't care about the income of autoworkers and textile workers. So let's be clear. President Obama and other proponents of TPP are protectionists. This matters hugely in public debate because most educated people have a Trumpian-type commitment to anything labeled as "free trade." They think that they have to support it because otherwise they will be bad people. The real story here is that the TPP is a deal about redistributing more income upward. It's imposing more competition on those at the middle and the bottom while maintaining and increasing forms of protectionism that benefits those at the top. When reporters call the TPP a "free trade" deal, they are acting as advocates, not reporters. The TPP is a protectionist pact for those at the top who are worried that free trade will undermine their income -- like it did for those at the middle and bottom. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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18 октября, 18:52

Qualcomm начала патентное разбирательство с Meizu в США, Германии и Франции

Компания Qualcomm, специализирующаяся на разработке и исследовании беспроводных средств связи, а также систем на кристалле, объявила в конце прошлой недели о предпринятом комплексе мер в США, Германии и Франции в связи с нарушением китайским производителем Meizu её патентов. В частности, Qualcomm обратилась с жалобой в Комиссию по международной торговле США (U.S. International Trade Commission, ITC), подала иск по поводу нарушения патентных прав в земельный суд Мангейма и инициировала действия по определению посягательств на нарушение патентных прав во Франции с целью получения доказательств для проведения в дальнейшем судебного процесса. Recode

18 октября, 16:17

SolarCity Creates over $300M in Funds for Solar Projects

SolarCity Corporation (SCTY) has created funds to develop more residential solar projects in the U.S. worth over $300 million.

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17 октября, 16:23

Qualcomm (QCOM) Sues Meizu in U.S., Germany and France

QUALCOMM (QCOM) recently leveled charges against smartphone maker, Meizu in the U.S., Germany and France

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08 октября, 17:33

SK Hynix обвиняется в нарушении патентов Netlist на память для серверов

По данным южнокорейских источников, в начале октября американская Комиссия по международной торговле (ITC) начала расследовать дело о возможном нарушении компанией SK Hynix шести патентов компании Netlist. Казалось бы, дела у южнокорейской компании SK Hynix как у производителя памяти начали налаживаться. Снижение цен на микросхемы и модули DRAM в первой половине текущего года сменилось ростом, и до конца года память подорожает не менее чем на 30 %. Однако начавшееся расследование может привести к огромным штрафам, что нивелирует потенциальную прибыль. businesskorea.co.kr

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07 октября, 00:30

SMEs disproportionally hit by int'l trade standards

An International Trade Centre (ITC) report warned Thursday that small firms across the world are twice as affected as their large enterprises counterparts when complying with standards and regulations required to conduct international business.

05 октября, 16:30

Zacks Industry Outlook Highlights: CenterPoint Energy, Duke Energy, Great Plains Energy, Westar Energy and American Water Works

Zacks Industry Outlook Highlights: CenterPoint Energy, Duke Energy, Great Plains Energy, Westar Energy and American Water Works