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19 сентября, 05:15

Brown University To Offer Segregated Student Dinners For Black, Muslim Students

Authored by Coy Westbrook via TheCollegeFix.com, University will host dinners as part of ‘racial reconciliation’ program To promote “racial reconciliation” after the deadly clashes between white nationalists and counterprotesters in Charlottesville last month, Brown University plans to offer segregated events to its black students and female Muslim students. The university received a $30,000 grant from the Association of American Colleges and Universities, which represents liberal arts schools, to create a campus center whose mission is to “break down racial hierarchies and create a positive narrative about race in the community,” according to The Brown Daily Herald. These grants, provided with the assistance of the Newman’s Own Foundation and W.K. Kellogg Foundation, will go towards hosting racially and religiously segregated “dinner discussion groups.” These discussions are being led by Brown University Chaplain Rev. Janet Cooper Nelson, who told The Daily that “one [group will be] for black students and the other [will be for] for Muslim women on campus.” Nelson told The Daily she hopes that the Muslim women’s dinner group will “allow the women to engage in topics such as the intersection of race, Islam and gender fluidity.” Nelson did not respond to The College Fix’s request for comment, nor did Brown’s media relations department. The Fix also reached out to the university’s Black Student Union for comment on the black student discussion dinner. The group did not respond. The Association of American Colleges and Universities has charged Brown and nine other universities with “addressing the historic and contemporary effects of racism and leading transformative change,” according to a press release from Brown. The initiative seeks to “educate, prepare and inspire the next generation of leaders to advance justice and build equitable communities.” According to The Daily, the American Association of Colleges and Universities will host the inaugural “Truth, Racial Healing and Transformation Institute” this January in Washington, D.C. Representatives from the ten chosen campuses will attend the institute in order to “develop transformative action plans to advance racial healing,” AACU spokeswoman Anne Jenkins told The Fix via email. Recent years have seen an increased push for segregated spaces and events on campuses across the country. Last spring, Harvard hosted its first-ever blacks-only student graduation ceremony; a number of other universities hosted similar segregated graduation events.   Last winter, students at the University of Michigan demanded a “no-whites-allowed space.”   A year ago California State University’s Los Angeles campus offered segregated housing for black students.   And in May, American University barred white students from a cafe in order to create a “sanctuary” for nonwhite students, a demand the provost of the university called “reasonable.”

13 сентября, 17:30

Zacks Industry Outlook Highlights: Amazon.com, Unilever, Coca-Cola, Procter & Gamble and Kellogg

Zacks Industry Outlook Highlights: Amazon.com, Unilever, Coca-Cola, Procter & Gamble and Kellogg

13 сентября, 17:27

Zacks Industry Outlook Highlights: Tyson Foods, Kellogg, Procter & Gamble, Kimberly-Clark and J. M. Smucker

Zacks Industry Outlook Highlights: Tyson Foods, Kellogg, Procter & Gamble, Kimberly-Clark and J. M. Smucker

12 сентября, 23:15

Consumer Staples: Rescuer Amid Global Tensions

Consumer Staples: Rescuer Amid Global Tensions

11 сентября, 22:11

Consumer Staples Stock Outlook - September 2017

Consumer Staples Stock Outlook - September 2017

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11 сентября, 17:06

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Home Depot, Aetna, Dickinson, Kellogg and FirstEnergy

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Home Depot, Aetna, Dickinson, Kellogg and FirstEnergy

11 сентября, 17:06

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Home Depot, Aetna, Dickinson, Kellogg and FirstEnergy

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Home Depot, Aetna, Dickinson, Kellogg and FirstEnergy

30 июня, 22:27

White House releases salary info for Trump's aides

Priebus, Bannon, Spicer and Conway all pull in annual salaries of $179,700.

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20 июня, 10:05

Advertisers Are Actually Teaming Up To Fight Sexism. For Real.

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Yes, sex sells. But sexism, increasingly, seems less and less marketable. The latest sign: On Thursday, some of the world’s largest companies and advertising agencies will announce a new initiative to banish gender stereotypes from advertising. The Unstereotype Alliance, which will be launched at Cannes Lions, an industry conference in France, is a partnership between U.N. Women and several major global companies, including Unilever, Johnson & Johnson, Procter & Gamble, Mattel and Diageo. Facebook, Google and Twitter have also signed on, as well as major ad agencies WPP and IPG. “Every day, hundreds of millions of people around the world are exposed to the communications our industry creates,” said Martin Sorrell, chief executive of WPP. “That influence can either be used to reinforce negative stereotypes or to set new standards of empowerment and equality.” The new initiative is the brainchild of Unilever, which committed itself to ridding its own advertising of sexist stereotypes last year, most notably by revamping marketing of Axe body spray. Axe ads, reviled by most feminists for their blatant sexism and objectification of women, launched a new campaign urging men to find their “magic” ― a 180-degree shift from commercials that had featured hyper-sexualized women drooling over men who smelled nice. Unilever produces millions of ads, but it is now analyzing them for the way they portray women. The company will change its ads that communicate old-fashioned stereotypes, says Keith Weed, Unilever’s chief marketing and communications officer. The hope is that the companies in the alliance will commit to similar types of analysis and action, but for now this influential group is only at the talking stage. “There has been a lot of progress made in the industry on this issue but not enough,” Weed says. The campaign comes as more companies strive to portray themselves as feminist champions. You may have noticed this during the Super Bowl in February, when automaker Audi’s ad highlighted the gender pay gap. The Audi spot brings up a separate issue for many of these companies. Audi’s leadership team, and that of many companies, is still dominated by men.  A few years ago, Always’ “Like a Girl” ad was celebrated for its fresh, empowering portrayal of little girls, shaking up the staid world of sanitary napkin ads (blue water, dancing ladies clad in white, etc.). Recently even Carl’s Jr., known for creating burger commercials targeting teenage boys that featured women in bikinis, announced it was walking away from its sexist marketing strategy. Still, advertising remains a cesspool of outmoded conceptions of women. Just 3 percent of ads feature women in leadership or managerial roles, according to an industry-wide analysis conducted by Unilever in 2015. And 1 in 2 women are shown as sexualized in magazine advertising, the study found. Women are also disproportionately the ones to appear in domestic settings in commercials ― we’re always cleaning and rarely seen heading into the office. A decade ago it would’ve been hard to find any commercials celebrating female empowerment or suggesting anyone but a woman bought food, did laundry or cleaned a house, but things are shifting. “You’re seeing a change in society’s values. As society shifts, [sexist ads] become less tolerable,” said Derek Rucker, a marketing professor who teaches advertising strategy at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management. Social media is also fueling the change as consumers increasingly become sensitive to offensive advertising ― remember Kendall Jenner’s Pepsi ad ― and can quickly voice their displeasure on social media.   Unilever’s Dove brand is considered a pioneer in the feminist advertising space. It launched body-positive ads more than a decade ago:  And its internal revamp caught the attention of U.N. Women. “The Unilever initiative raised the issue of [stereotypes in advertising] significantly,” says Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, under-secretary-general and U.N. Women executive director. U.N. Women works on very pressing and serious issues for women around the world, including sexual violence. Teaming up with a bunch of corporate behemoths to improve their advertising might seem frivolous by comparison. However, changing the way women and men are portrayed in media is a critical piece in the fight for gender equality, says Mlambo-Ngcuka. Many developed countries have fairly strong laws meant to prohibit gender discrimination, but laws aren’t enough, Mlambo-Ngcuka says. When stereotypes persist, they hold back progress. You can see how this plays out in the United States, where rules and regulations around discrimination and sexual assault are undercut with stereotypes about the way men and women are supposed to behave.   Exhibit A sits in the Oval Office. A dozen women accused President Donald Trump of sexual misconduct and he even admitted to grabbing women in a leaked audio tape, but millions of voters either didn’t believe those women or dismissed his behavior as “locker room talk.”  Stereotypes matter. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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20 июня, 03:45

How Would You Describe The MBA Graduates From Your Business School?

Which three words best describe MBA graduates of the top schools? A company like McKinsey might talk about the people skills, analytical horsepower and humility of Kellogg MBAs. The school's Assistant Dean, Admissions and Financial Aid, Kate Smith looks at how Kellogg helps its students to grow

19 июня, 16:19

Kellogg Company (K) Invests $2 Million in Bright Greens

Kellogg Company's (K) venture-capital fund (eighteen94 capital) invested $2 million in Bright Greens -- a maker of plant-based frozen smoothies.

17 июня, 13:33

Quotation of the Day…

(Don Boudreaux) Tweet… is from page 8 of J.R. Shackleton’s new book, Working to Rule: Employment regulation is often justified in terms of some category of ‘market failure’ – an increasingly popular term which is interpreted to mean that free contracting by individuals and firms leads to economically or socially undesirable outcomes.  Such problems are frequently exaggerated.  […]

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13 июня, 16:30

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Facebook, Wal-Mart, Merck, Kellogg and PACCAR

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Facebook, Wal-Mart, Merck, Kellogg and PACCAR

12 июня, 13:35

"Интерпайп" назначил директором по персоналу экс-HR-менеджера производственного сегмента PepsiCo Russia

Международная вертикально интегрированная трубно-колесная компания (ТКК) "Интерпайп" объявила о назначении нового директора по персоналу Игоря Басай, занимавшего аналогичную должность производственного сегмента компании PepsiCo Russia, а также работавшего в British American Tobacco, компании Kellogg's и в энергетическом секторе.

12 июня, 13:34

What New York City Can Learn From New Orleans

The city of New Orleans recently removed from public display statutes of Confederate Generals P.G.T. Beauregard and Robert E. Lee and Confederate President Jefferson Davis and a monument to an 1874 uprising staged by the local White League. New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu explained the decision to take down the statues that were prominently displayed in public areas. “While we must honor our history, we will not allow the Confederacy to be put on a pedestal in the heart of New Orleans. As we near our City’s 300th anniversary, we must continue to find courage to stand up to hate and embrace justice and compassion.” Beauregard, Lee, and Davis each betrayed their allegiance to the United States to take up arms in defense of slavery. Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was a Louisiana native, West Point graduate, and Superintendent of the military academy who resigned his commission in the United States Army to lead Confederate forces at the Battle of Bull Run. He also ordered the bombardment of Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor, the first shots fired in the Civil War. Robert E. Lee, another West Point graduate and Superintendent of the military academy, commanded the Army of Northern Virginia during the Civil War. Jefferson Davis was a U.S. Senator and a Cabinet member before he became president of the Confederacy. Beauregard, Lee, and Davis were all slaveholders. In September 1874 five thousand members of the White League, a Klan like organization of Confederate army veterans, took over the Louisiana statehouse, an armory, and downtown New Orleans before they were routed by federal troops. At least seven members of the New Orleans police force were killed by the insurgents. No members of the White supremacist militia was every brought up on criminal charges for these acts. In 1891, New Orleans erected a monument to commemorate the insurrection and a racist plaque was added in 1932. The inscription read “McEnery and Penn having been elected governor and lieutenant-governor by the white people, were duly installed by this overthrow of carpetbag government, ousting the usurpers, Governor Kellogg (white) and Lieutenant-Governor Antoine (colored). United States troops took over the state government and reinstated the usurpers but the national election of November 1876 the recognized white supremacy in the South and gave us our state.” The inscription was finally removed in 1993, but the monument remained on display until it was taken down on April 24, 2017. Across the South controversy continues over display of the Confederate flag, which the Anti-Defamation League labels a hate symbol. The principal of a New Orleans charter school was suspended after he was pictured at a rally protesting the removal of the Robert E. Lee statue standing next to a Confederate flag. Mississippi is the last state to prominently feature the Confederate image on its state flag. However, in protest, some Mississippi cities will no longer display the flag. Surprisingly New York City, far from the Deep South and 190 years after New York State ended slavery, still has statues, plaques, and official buildings and parks commemorating supporters of slavery and racism. High schools and school complexes are named after slaveholders Peter Stuyvesant, George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, James Monroe, and Francis Lewis, who was also a slave trader. There are monuments to Samuel Cox in Tompkins Square, Samuel Morse in Central Park, and James Gordon Bennett in Herald Square who prominently opposed the abolition of slavery. A park in the Bronx is named after John Mullaly, who was arrested, but not convicted, of inciting the 1863 Draft Riot that led to the death of over 100 people. Many were Black men lynched by mobs. For me, the most offensive statue is the monument to J. Marion Sims in Central Park across the street from Mt. Sinai Hospital. In the 1840s and 1850s Sims conducted experimental gynecological operations on enslaved African women in South Carolina without the benefit of anesthesia or antiseptics. In April, Brooklyn Assembly member Charles Barron and twenty-six co-sponsors introduced a bill in the state legislature to establish a committee “to acknowledging the fundamental injustice, cruelty, brutality, and inhumanity of slavery in the city of New York and the state of New York” and to “examine the institution of slavery” and its continuing impact on “living African-Americans and to make recommendations on appropriate remedies.” One recommendation that I would like to see is the renaming of Mullaly Park. It is a few blocks from Yankee Stadium and it would be appropriate to name it after Elston Howard, the first African-American to play for the Yankees and the American League Most Valuable Player in 1963. New York City has a lot to learn from New Orleans. Follow Alan Singer on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ReecesPieces8 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

09 июня, 18:09

Kellogg (K) Up 3.6% Since Earnings Report: Can It Continue?

Kellogg (K) reported earnings 30 days ago. What's next for the stock? We take a look at earnings estimates for some clues.

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08 июня, 10:16

Tennis player faces legal action over Special K nickname

Kellogg's takes legal action to stop Thanasi Kokkinakis using his nickname Special K commercially.