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19 января, 16:46

Five Ways Retailers Can Take Their Mobile Customer Experience from Good to Great

By Robi Ganguly It's been shown that people who use retail mobile apps while shopping in-store visit the store more frequently, spend more time in the store, and spend more money overall. So, how can retailers make the impact of their mobile app even more significant? Working with dozens of the world's leading retailers, I've seen firsthand how great mobile customer experiences impact the success of the entire business. In this article, I'll share where retailers' biggest opportunities are, and outline five mobile app features that retail brands with prominent mobile customer experiences have introduced to increase sales, loyalty and retention. The Power of Mobile Apps for Retail A study by Wefi found that on average, shoppers who use retailers' apps visit the brands' stores one extra time a month. Kohl's showed the highest increase in customer visits by those who use their app, with 86 percent more visits than customers who don't use their app. What can retailers do to gain a bigger competitive advantage using mobile? In our experience, retailers that create positive customer experiences -- with mobile at the heart -- see the biggest impact on their business overall. Five Tactics to Improve Mobile Customer Experience Commitment to taking your mobile customer experience from good to great will positively impact everything from loyalty to LTV, brand reputation and revenue.  Here are five mobile app features retailers can consider introducing to improve their mobile customer experience: Build "store mode" into your app's functionality. A handful of retailers have apps made for in-store shopping (such as Target), but creating an app that has a built-in "store mode" can create a better experience for customers because they aren't required to download a separate app to aid their in-store shopping experience. By consolidating all of your consumers' needs into one app, retailers can create a streamlined customer experience that simplifies the lives of their customers. 1. Replace manual chores with digital solutions. People are busy. Apps that allow consumers to save time are cherished, which is why building features that replace manual chores with digital solutions is a smart move. Walgreens sets a great example for how to do this well: It has replaced the manual (and menial) chore of calling in a prescription refill with the ability to request a refill directly through its mobile app by scanning the barcode on the pill bottle.   2. Implement in-app messaging. As mentioned in the above example, people are busy and don't often have the time to call customer service or their pharmacist with questions. The flexibility in-app messaging brings empowers customers to contact brands when it's convenient for them and allows companies to set expectations for when they'll respond to inquiries. Walgreens recognized the inconvenience of calling the pharmacy during business hours, so it created Pharmacy Chat for mobile app customers. Any customers with a question about their prescription can open Pharmacy Chat in the app to message a pharmacist directly. 3. Streamline the checkout process. The introduction of mobile payment options has opened the door for retailers to make the checkout process less cumbersome by eliminating the need to pull out credit cards for each purchase. Amazon and Kohl's are most notable for their investment in mobile payment capabilities. Amazon's one-touch checkout functionality is as frictionless and simple as it gets. And Kohl's' recently-introduced app feature "Kohl's Pay" simplifies the checkout process by automatically adding discounts and rewards points when the in-app credit card is scanned. 4. Invest in a functional in-app search. Often overlooked, a functional in-app search is instrumental in helping customers find what they're looking for. A poor search experience can result in lost sales. According to Google, mobile search is a key signal that consumers are interested in buying. It found 92 percent of consumers who searched for a product on mobile made a related purchase. Retail is undergoing a shift, and investing in a better digital experience is absolutely crucial to adapting to changing consumer expectations. While there is a wide array of features retailers can build into their mobile apps to boost their customer experience, improving in-app search, introducing mobile payment options, implementing in-app messaging, creating "store mode," and making chores digital are features we've seen work well for retailers with successful apps. Regardless of what features are right for your specific customers, investing in a better mobile customer experience can help increase sales, app adoption and customer engagement, as well as allow you to fully capitalize on the benefits retail mobile apps have to offer. Robi Ganguly is the CEO of Apptentive, the easiest way for companies with a mobile app to listen to, engage, and retain their customers. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

19 января, 15:18

Target (TGT) Stock Down on Soft Holiday Sales, View Cut

Target (TGT) released soft sales results for the holiday season 2016.

Выбор редакции
18 января, 22:24

Target's Poor Holiday Sales Signal Retail's Widespread Woes, The Enemy Within

When Macy’s, J.C. Penney and Kohl’s reported disappointing holiday results, some tried to spin it as a department store problem. Now here comes discounter Target, which posted an eyebrow raising sales decline for the make-or-break selling period: November and December comp-store sales fell 1.3%. Houston — uh, retail, we’ve got a problem. [...]

18 января, 17:30

B&G Foods, Kohl's, Dave & Buster's Entertainment, AK Steel and Applied Materials highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day

B&G Foods, Kohl’s, Dave & Buster’s Entertainment, AK Steel and Applied Materials highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day

18 января, 16:50

Why Kohl's (KSS) Could Be Positioned for a Slump

Kohl's (KSS), has witnessed a significant price decline and negative trend in earnings estimate revisions

18 января, 15:48

What Took Away Sheen from Tiffany's Holiday Season Sales?

Tiffany (TIF) posted lower-than-expected sales results for the November-December holiday period.

18 января, 14:25

Big 5 (BGFV) Raises Q4 Earnings Guidance on Solid Top Line

Encouraged by top-line performance, Big 5 Sporting Goods Corp. (BGFV) raised the lower end of its earnings guidance for the fourth quarter and provided its estimates for fiscal 2016.

18 января, 12:30

Bear of the Day: Kohl's (KSS)

Bear of the Day: Kohl's (KSS)

16 января, 22:08

ETFs & Stocks Unfazed by Softer December Retail Sales

December retail sales came in softer than expected, but still position these ETFs and stocks for further profits.

16 января, 16:03

Wal-Mart Streamlining its Online Team to Compete with Amazon

Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. (WMT) is reorganizing its e-commerce unit and changing job roles to enhance focus on customers and strengthen its online team.

16 января, 13:41

GameStop (GME) Plunges on Sluggish Holiday Sales Results

The challenging retail landscape, aggressive promotional strategies and waning store traffic weighed on GameStop (GME) holiday sales results.

13 января, 17:35

Is Kohl's Worth Considering For a Value Buy Right Now?

Let's see if Kohl's Corporation (KSS) stock is a good choice for value-oriented investors right now from multiple angles.

13 января, 14:53

SodaStream (SODA) Hits a 52-Week High on High Demand

Shares of SodaStream International Ltd. (SODA) scaled a new 52-week high of $41.85 on Jan 12.

12 января, 17:04

Hanesbrands' Maidenform Forays Into Activewear for Women

Everyday basic apparel retailer, Hanesbrands Inc.'s (HBI) renowned brand Maidenform has forayed into active lifestyle with its first collection of women's sports innerwear??? Maidenform Sport.

11 января, 22:56

What Dampened the Holiday Mood of These Department Stores?

The impact of challenging retail landscape, stiff competition from online retailers and waning store traffic was clearly visible on these stocks.

11 января, 16:54

Ascena Stock Plunges on Soft Holiday Sales & Lowered View

Ascena Retail Group Inc.'s (ASNA) stock plunged nearly 10% after the company posted dismal sales data for the holiday season extending from Nov 19, 2016 through Jan 2, 2017.

10 января, 21:42

10,000 Jobs Donald Trump Doesn't Care About At All

Facing seismic shifts in the way Americans shop, Macy’s recently announced it was closing 68 stores around the country, laying off thousands of workers  ― many of them low-paid sales associates, plenty of women and people of color, many working at failing malls where jobs are getting harder to come by. In total, after Macy’s is done cutting back, more than 10,000 people will lose their jobs.  President-elect Donald Trump doesn’t appear to care about those workers. Trump, who ran on a platform of bringing back and creating jobs, responded to Macy’s layoff news with glee ― as a personal victory for himself. [email protected] was one of the worst performing stocks on the S&P last year, plunging 46%,” Trump tweeted. “Very disloyal company. Another win for Trump! Boycott.” .@Macys was one of the worst performing stocks on the S&P last year, plunging 46%. Very disloyal company. Another win for Trump! Boycott.— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 7, 2016 At first glance, the tweet is easy to understand: In the summer of 2015, Macy’s cut ties with Trump in response to the offensive remarks the then-GOP presidential candidate had made about Mexicans. Trump and his followers launched a boycott. So, of course, the president-elect sees the company’s news in personal terms. But there’s something else going on. And it has everything to do with the kinds of jobs Trump feels are worthy of attention. So far, he has been almost totally concerned with old-school factory and manufacturing jobs, on the whole a declining part of the job market. Meanwhile, he’s ignored retail jobs, which employ a huge segment of working-class Americans. About 15 million Americans work in the retail industry, a number projected by the Labor Department to grow to 16 million by 2024. Manufacturing jobs are projected to decline by 2 million over that time period. The problem is: retail jobs aren’t great jobs. The median hourly wage for a retail salesperson is $10.47 an hour, according to the Labor Department. The benefits are poor. Women make up the majority of low-paid retail workers, according to a 2015 report from progressive think tank Demos. A common misconception about who works in retail is that they are teenagers and students putting themselves through school, but the Demos report paints a different picture. Among low-wage earning retail workers who are women, 36 percent have children at home. “Donald Trump isn’t worried about losing these jobs or aiming to raise standards for people working in these jobs,” Amy Traub, associate director of policy and research at Demos told The Huffington Post. But retail jobs aren’t going away and as increasing numbers of working families depend on the wages from these jobs, it’s imperative to find a way to improve them. Americans depend on their wages from retail jobs to raise families. They need to be able to get time off to deal with sick kids or a pregnancy, they need to put food on the table, to see the doctor. Traub notes that the way you make these jobs better is hardly a secret. First, you raise the minimum wage. Second, you enact paid sick leave and paid parental leave. You put in place better regulations around scheduling ― as some states have done ― so that working parents aren’t at the mercy of daily changing schedules. It’s worth noting that the factory jobs Trump is so keen on saving didn’t used to be great jobs. Unions fought for better working conditions and pay and the federal government put in place laws to protect these unions. “Making it easier for workers to organize may be the key to turning service jobs into good jobs, as well,” Traub said. Don’t hold your breath for a Trump administration that supports unions. Trump’s pick to head up the Department of Labor, fast-food CEO Andy Puzder, vehemently opposes the Fight for $15 movement, which seeks to raise the federal minimum wage to $15 from its current $7.25. Union officials see him as an opponent of working people.  More than 10,000 layoffs at Macy's and we hear nothing from the president-elect. And yet Trump models himself as the champion of the working man. “Too many of our leaders have forgotten that it’s their duty to protect the jobs, wages and well-being of American workers before any other consideration,” Trump said in a speech on jobs in September in New York. He proposed turning this situation around by lowering taxes, reducing regulations and offering working families a child care tax credit. (None of those moves would’ve saved the jobs of those Macy’s workers, by the way.) Macy’s is facing immense competition from the web and from speciality and discount stores that are steadily stealing away its clientele. These days, women buy their makeup at stores like Sephora, and their clothes at discount retailers like TJ Maxx. And of course, everyone shops online where Amazon is seeing tremendous growth. All of this has spelled doom for the nation’s malls, where Macy’s once dominated as the anchor store that brought in the business. Other middle-of-the-road department stores are struggling too, including Kohl’s, JC Penney and Sears. Even if Macy’s hadn’t insulted Trump, there’s little reason to believe he would’ve intervened to save the jobs of its workers. Their struggles simply don’t fit Trump’s view of the American job market or who gets to be a real American worker. “More than 10,000 layoffs at Macy’s and we hear nothing from the president-elect compared to 700 jobs in Indiana,” Traub said, referring to a tax deal Trump put together to save 800 jobs at Carrier Corporation’s gas furnace factory. “By ignoring this, Trump is telling his base these aren’t real jobs and the people working at them aren’t real Americans.” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

10 января, 21:42

10,000 Jobs Donald Trump Doesn't Care About At All

Facing seismic shifts in the way Americans shop, Macy’s recently announced it was closing 68 stores around the country, laying off thousands of workers  ― many of them low-paid sales associates, plenty of women and people of color, many working at failing malls where jobs are getting harder to come by. In total, after Macy’s is done cutting back, more than 10,000 people will lose their jobs.  President-elect Donald Trump doesn’t appear to care about those workers. Trump, who ran on a platform of bringing back and creating jobs, responded to Macy’s layoff news with glee ― as a personal victory for himself. [email protected] was one of the worst performing stocks on the S&P last year, plunging 46%,” Trump tweeted. “Very disloyal company. Another win for Trump! Boycott.” .@Macys was one of the worst performing stocks on the S&P last year, plunging 46%. Very disloyal company. Another win for Trump! Boycott.— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 7, 2016 At first glance, the tweet is easy to understand: In the summer of 2015, Macy’s cut ties with Trump in response to the offensive remarks the then-GOP presidential candidate had made about Mexicans. Trump and his followers launched a boycott. So, of course, the president-elect sees the company’s news in personal terms. But there’s something else going on. And it has everything to do with the kinds of jobs Trump feels are worthy of attention. So far, he has been almost totally concerned with old-school factory and manufacturing jobs, on the whole a declining part of the job market. Meanwhile, he’s ignored retail jobs, which employ a huge segment of working-class Americans. About 15 million Americans work in the retail industry, a number projected by the Labor Department to grow to 16 million by 2024. Manufacturing jobs are projected to decline by 2 million over that time period. The problem is: retail jobs aren’t great jobs. The median hourly wage for a retail salesperson is $10.47 an hour, according to the Labor Department. The benefits are poor. Women make up the majority of low-paid retail workers, according to a 2015 report from progressive think tank Demos. A common misconception about who works in retail is that they are teenagers and students putting themselves through school, but the Demos report paints a different picture. Among low-wage earning retail workers who are women, 36 percent have children at home. “Donald Trump isn’t worried about losing these jobs or aiming to raise standards for people working in these jobs,” Amy Traub, associate director of policy and research at Demos told The Huffington Post. But retail jobs aren’t going away and as increasing numbers of working families depend on the wages from these jobs, it’s imperative to find a way to improve them. Americans depend on their wages from retail jobs to raise families. They need to be able to get time off to deal with sick kids or a pregnancy, they need to put food on the table, to see the doctor. Traub notes that the way you make these jobs better is hardly a secret. First, you raise the minimum wage. Second, you enact paid sick leave and paid parental leave. You put in place better regulations around scheduling ― as some states have done ― so that working parents aren’t at the mercy of daily changing schedules. It’s worth noting that the factory jobs Trump is so keen on saving didn’t used to be great jobs. Unions fought for better working conditions and pay and the federal government put in place laws to protect these unions. “Making it easier for workers to organize may be the key to turning service jobs into good jobs, as well,” Traub said. Don’t hold your breath for a Trump administration that supports unions. Trump’s pick to head up the Department of Labor, fast-food CEO Andy Puzder, vehemently opposes the Fight for $15 movement, which seeks to raise the federal minimum wage to $15 from its current $7.25. Union officials see him as an opponent of working people.  More than 10,000 layoffs at Macy's and we hear nothing from the president-elect. And yet Trump models himself as the champion of the working man. “Too many of our leaders have forgotten that it’s their duty to protect the jobs, wages and well-being of American workers before any other consideration,” Trump said in a speech on jobs in September in New York. He proposed turning this situation around by lowering taxes, reducing regulations and offering working families a child care tax credit. (None of those moves would’ve saved the jobs of those Macy’s workers, by the way.) Macy’s is facing immense competition from the web and from speciality and discount stores that are steadily stealing away its clientele. These days, women buy their makeup at stores like Sephora, and their clothes at discount retailers like TJ Maxx. And of course, everyone shops online where Amazon is seeing tremendous growth. All of this has spelled doom for the nation’s malls, where Macy’s once dominated as the anchor store that brought in the business. Other middle-of-the-road department stores are struggling too, including Kohl’s, JC Penney and Sears. Even if Macy’s hadn’t insulted Trump, there’s little reason to believe he would’ve intervened to save the jobs of its workers. Their struggles simply don’t fit Trump’s view of the American job market or who gets to be a real American worker. “More than 10,000 layoffs at Macy’s and we hear nothing from the president-elect compared to 700 jobs in Indiana,” Traub said, referring to a tax deal Trump put together to save 800 jobs at Carrier Corporation’s gas furnace factory. “By ignoring this, Trump is telling his base these aren’t real jobs and the people working at them aren’t real Americans.” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

10 января, 17:49

The Death of a Critical Sector

Malls are dying... and so are traditional retail stocks. But this situation is creating big opportunities for ahead-of-the-curve investors.

10 января, 16:39

Genesco Posts Flat Holiday Comps, Updates View; Stock Up

Genesco (GCO) reported flat comparable sales (comps) - including both stores and direct sales - for the fourth quarter through Jan 5, 2017.