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26 апреля, 19:01

Convenience the byword for retail hotshots

IN retailing, it seems that small is indeed beautiful. Convenience stores have been a rare bright spot in a sector where foot-traffic is slowly being eroded by online shopping. Small, ubiquitous convenience

26 апреля, 12:46

Inside The Immigrant-Prosecuting Machine That Transformed America's Deportation Policy

TUCSON, Ariz. ― One morning last October, Irlando sat hunched over a table in the back of a federal courthouse, looking to a court-appointed lawyer for help. Border Patrol agents had found him the day before, wandering through the desert 150 miles away outside Lukeville, Arizona, and he still hadn’t showered. His hands were black with grime and he smelled of dried sweat after spending almost a week trekking in the hot sun. Irlando had worked as a commercial truck driver in a town north of Guatemala City and fled his homeland after a local gang started extorting his company. First, they killed drivers when the company didn’t pay up. Then gang members killed his boss, and Irlando decided he had to escape. A friend suggested he try to make it through Mexico and into the United States, where he could earn enough money to help support his wife and four children he was leaving behind. His youngest daughter was just two months old. When Border Patrol picked him up crossing into Arizona, he’d been thankful just to have a sip of water. But now the reality was sinking in: He was going to be deported back to Guatemala. Irlando’s lawyer, Eréndira Castillo, said she was sorry, but none of his backstory would matter to the judge. He wasn’t in immigration court. He was facing a criminal prosecution for crossing the border illegally, and this judge had no authority to decide whether he should stay in the country. All the judge would see is that he was arrested while trying to jump the border and that he had a prior conviction for attempting to do the same thing in Texas in 2013.  (Castillo talked to Irlando privately about his right to confidentiality and he decided to waive that right so his story could be told, on the condition that only his first name be used.) Irlando could accept the plea agreement in front of him, which came with a 75-day jail sentence, or he could take his case to trial, where virtually all defendants lose, and then face two years in prison. Either way, he’d almost certainly be deported after his release.  It was about 9:30 a.m., and Irlando needed to make up his mind before the proceedings started that afternoon. After a few minutes of discussion, he took the plea deal, which was typed in English. Castillo verbally translated the document for him before he signed it. “There’s no one to tell that I’m here trying to save my life?” Irlando asked his lawyer. “My baby girl needs three bottles of milk every week. Who’s going to give them to her?” “It’s very sad, but that’s the way it is,” Castillo replied, patting him on the knee. “The law doesn’t have a heart.” Improvising An Immigrant-Prosecuting Machine  When President Donald Trump took control of the immigration enforcement system, he inherited a well-oiled machine for prosecuting immigration violations that has continued to grow even as illegal border crossings decline. When Trump talks about imposing a “deportation force,” most observers interpret that as a reference to Immigration and Customs Enforcement or Border Patrol. But the most powerful tool he wields against unauthorized immigrants may well be the criminal courts. While residing in the U.S. without authorization is a civil offense, the act of crossing the border illegally is a misdemeanor, punishable by up to six months in jail. Those who get caught again face the felony charge of “illegal re-entry,” with a prison sentence of up to two years that can expand to two decades if the offender has a criminal record. Today, roughly one-quarter of immigrants expelled from the U.S. face criminal prosecution for crossing the border illegally and serve jail time before they are deported. Immigration prosecutions topped 91,000 in 2013 ― 28 times the number of prosecutions in 1993. This marks a fundamental transformation of both deportation policy and the federal courts. While less than 5 percent of federal prosecutions involved immigration in 1993, the first year of Bill Clinton’s presidency, illegal entry and re-entry prosecutions now account for roughly half the federal criminal docket, sapping limited resources to prosecute violent or white-collar crimes. Immigration authorities have had the power to refer migrants caught making illegal crossings to the criminal courts since the passage of the Immigration and Nationality Act in 1952. But the Justice Department’s priorities didn’t begin their steady shift until the Clinton era. Entering office during one of the largest mass migrations from Mexico in U.S. history and nearly a decade after President Ronald Reagan extended a pathway to U.S. citizenship for some 3 million people, Clinton faced major public backlash against illegal immigration and bipartisan hostility toward incoming migrants. Prior benevolence, Democrats and Republicans largely agreed, had only encouraged more illegal crossings. Clinton signed immigration reform laws that fast-tracked deportations and helped lay the foundation for the sprawling immigrant detention system that now reserves space to lock up 34,000 immigrants at a time. In a less-publicized development of his presidency, the number of immigration prosecutions ― particularly felony cases ― also steadily crept up, although the process was haphazard and no formal policies governed whether the migrants arrested should face criminal or civil penalties. That changed dramatically during George W. Bush’s presidency. Seeking a way to deter unauthorized immigrants more effectively, Customs and Border Protection began formalizing a whole host of previously informal policies. In one of the most sweeping changes, CBP teamed up with the Justice Department to funnel more people who jump the border into criminal court. The model program, called Operation Streamline, was implemented in southern Texas in 2005, when a sudden influx of Central American migrants left immigration authorities with a shortage of bed space in immigrant detention facilities. “We were taking a look at what consequences were available to us within existing law,” David Aguilar, a top Border Patrol official in the 1990s and CBP commissioner from 2011 to 2013, told HuffPost. “Prosecution was in fact one of those consequences.” Because the laws were already on the books, neither CBP nor the Justice Department needed to ask Congress for approval. The new system spread over the next decade, immigration violations swallowed up an ever-larger chunk of the federal criminal docket. The number of criminal immigration prosecutions doubled over Barack Obama’s two terms in office, despite the fact that illegal crossings plummeted by roughly half between 2009 and 2016. The continued criminal prosecution of illegal border crossings meant America’s first black president jailed more people of color on federal charges than any president in modern U.S. history. But because the Justice Department classifies almost all Hispanics as “white” in official statistics, that fact has largely been obscured. The immigrant-prosecuting machine improvised under Clinton, formalized under Bush and institutionalized by Obama barely merited a mention during last year’s immigration-obsessed presidential election. But Trump noticed. On the campaign trail, he pledged to raise the mandatory minimum sentence for illegal re-entry to five years. Within a week of taking office, he issued an executive order cracking down on sanctuary cities that contained a provision calling for more immigration prosecutions. On April 11, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced plans to consider criminal charges for any person caught in the U.S. who has been deported before, regardless of where they’re arrested ― a massive expansion of a constitutionally questionable process that routinely sucks in asylum-seekers and people with long histories in the United States. “It’s going to break the bank in terms of paying for the jail and prison beds that these people are going to occupy if they are prosecuted,” said Judy Greene, the author of the book Indefensible: A Decade of Mass Incarceration of Migrants Prosecuted for Crossing the Border. “But that’s only one way to look at the cost,” she added. “The other way to look at it is to realize there is a huge cost in human misery for the people who are prosecuted ― their families, their neighbors ― if this happens the way Trump and Sessions have envisioned.” Two Decades Defending Immigrants  After meeting with Irlando that morning last fall, his lawyer, Castillo, walked to a nearby restaurant where she half-heartedly picked at a pair of tacos. A first-generation Mexican immigrant who speaks Spanish with native fluency, Castillo wears her black hair in a ponytail and an indigenous embroidered shirt called a huipil beneath her dark blue blazer. She loves practicing law, but hates cases like Irlando’s. “It’s so upsetting, because I feel complicit,” she told HuffPost. Castillo has worked these cases since 1998, when she joined the Federal Public Defender’s Office in Tucson to help expand its immigration unit. The job initially excited her: She’d already begun to specialize in immigration before going to law school, processing legalization applications for undocumented immigrants who became eligible to apply for U.S. citizenship under Reagan’s 1986 reform law. But Castillo’s enthusiasm faded as she faced uncomfortable situations that seemed to flout basic protections for criminal defendants, like the right to due process or the right to keep communications with your attorney confidential. The process from initial hearing to conviction and sentencing ― which routinely takes months, even years, in felony criminal cases ― was collapsed into a few hours for dozens of people at a time. She only got a few minutes to speak with each client, and they spoke in an open room where others could hear their conversations. “I was a brand-new lawyer,” Castillo said. “[Our bosses] never said, ‘This is the right way, this is the wrong way, this is what we expect from you.’ We just did what they said. I think, in retrospect, I would say, ‘No, the federal public defenders office shouldn’t be doing it this way. This is unconstitutional.’” Many legal experts agree. But their objections haven’t kept the system from growing. Within five years of joining the public defender’s office, the immigration unit Castillo helped pioneer had grown larger than the office’s entire criminal defense unit ― a reflection of the Justice Department’s shifting priorities. Castillo left the public defender’s office for private practice three years ago, but still defends immigrants accused of illegal crossings once a week. She takes pride in making small gestures to make the process less painful: offering her clients a glass of water, or calling their family members so she can tell them what’s happening. (The clients aren’t allowed to use the phone in court, so she calls on speakerphone while they listen in silence.) “I have to explain it’s not my fault,” Castillo said. “I’m a lawyer, I was appointed by the court.” ‘This Process Does Get Somewhat Repetitive’  Irlando’s hearing started at 1:30 p.m. A row of five microphones stood in front of Judge Bruce Macdonald. Each of the 41 defendants, lined up on benches before the judge, was a brown-skinned national of Mexico or Central America. They’d already signed plea agreements like Irlando’s, differing only in the length of their sentences. Macdonald took the bench and explained the process. Everyone would acknowledge their guilt in groups of five. He asked the 14 defense attorneys if their clients were competent to go forward with their hearings. They affirmed in unison. “You’ll quickly notice that I’m asking the same series of questions,” Macdonald told the defendants. “This process does get somewhat repetitive.” When Irlando’s turn came to plead guilty, Castillo mentioned his fear of returning to Guatemala. The judge said Irlando would be able to raise the issue once he was transferred to immigration court for deportation proceedings after his jail sentence. At least three other defendants said they feared for their safety if deported. Border Patrol policy dictates that they should have been channeled to an asylum officer or a civil immigration court to hear those claims, but the judge gave them the same reply he gave Irlando. Several people seemed only hazily aware they faced criminal prosecution at all. One woman, asked how she pleaded, said “yes.” Three defendants, all of them Guatemalan and all represented by the same attorney, said they didn’t speak Spanish as a first language. (A foreign government official, who declined to be identified because he was not authorized to speak with the media, later told HuffPost there were seven indigenous defendants that day who didn’t speak fluent Spanish.) Macdonald quickly moved on after the lawyer insisted the indigenous language speakers understood the agreement. The lawyer representing the three indigenous Guatemalans declined to comment about their cases, but acknowledged he wasn’t well qualified to handle their claims. “I don’t really know about immigration,” he said. “I usually call up a friend if there’s an asylum issue to get advice.” The Consequence Delivery System About the same time Castillo first went to work defending immigrants facing prosecution in Tucson, John Lawson arrived in the Arizona town of Douglas as a newly minted Border Patrol agent. The town is roughly 260 miles east of where Irlando was picked up crossing. In 1997, Lawson found only about 100 yards of fencing separating the United States from Mexico. That was a year authorities caught 1.4 million people crossing the border illegally ― almost four times the rate of apprehension in 2016. At that time, Border Patrol had half as many agents trying to stop those migrants, and the barrier between the U.S. and Mexico in that area was an opaque wall, so agents couldn’t see people throwing rocks and or lobbing cinder blocks at passing patrol cars. “It was kind of Wild West out here,” Lawson said as he led a tour of the border at Nogales in October. “It was insanity, everyone trying to catch who they could.” In the 1990s, Border Patrol agents usually escorted people they apprehended back to the other side ― a procedure known as “voluntary return.” Unlike a formal deportation, a voluntary return has no legal consequences and returnees can apply for a U.S. immigration visa a minute after returning to Mexico. It wasn’t uncommon for Lawson to catch the same person crossing illegally three times in a single day. Border Patrol agents struggled to deter people from simply crossing again. Mexico was limping through an economic crisis in the mid-1990s, just as the country’s 1970s baby boom generation reached working age. The 1994 North Atlantic Free Trade Agreement made matters worse, compelling some 2 million Mexicans to flee the country’s farms when they couldn’t compete with subsidized agricultural imports from the United States. Foreign-owned assembly plants sprouted in border towns to take advantage of the cheap labor and lower import taxes NAFTA offered, which pulled out-of-work Mexicans to cities within walking distance of the United States like magnets. Border Patrol couldn’t control the underlying reasons for the immigration explosion, so the agency worked to make deterrents more effective. Rather than returning the migrants they arrested to the same cities where they crossed, agents might bus them hours away, making the crossing more expensive and breaking the link between migrants and their smugglers. Instead of voluntary removals, Border Patrol increasingly sent unauthorized immigrants to get fingerprinted and face formal deportation proceedings. “Now everyone gets an alien registration number,” Lawson said. “That’s as permanent as it gets. It stays with you for the rest of your life.” By the mid-2000s, CBP had institutionalized these policies into a list of penalties the agency calls the “consequence delivery system.” The harshest of those consequences is criminal prosecution. Lawson is proud of CBP’s work. The sporadic links of opaque fencing have stretched into hundreds of miles of steel beams, which are reinforced with cameras and underground sensors. People scale the barrier so often that the rust has scraped off some of the beams, but Lawson is confident that agents catch most of the people who make it over. When they do, the migrants’ fingerprints tell them everything they need to know. If a person has tried to cross illegally within the last two decades, a record of the deportation appears. If he or she has ever committed a crime in the United States, that’s there too. Though there are some exceptions ― children, asylum-seekers or people who appear sick ― agents are supposed to deal out a consequence to every unauthorized migrant they apprehend. There’s only enough slots at the federal courthouse in Tucson to prosecute 70 border-crossers per day. If agents find more unauthorized migrants near that jurisdiction, they’ll face deportation instead. But these days, there are far fewer illegal crossings, so the courthouse rarely fills to capacity for its daily three hours of illegal entry and re-entry cases. “There’s a bunch of reasons why that could be happening,” Lawson said. “But we’re fairly certain that a lot of it has to do with these consequences.” Prosecuted Far From The Border These prosecutions aren’t just happening to migrants picked up along the border. Felony illegal re-entry charges were filed in all but four of the 94 U.S. district courts last year.   Around the time Irlando was convicted, a gray-haired woman stood before a judge in a federal courtroom in Phoenix in a red jumpsuit, shackled at the wrists and ankles. Two of her daughters, both born in the United States, watched from the benches. The woman, whom HuffPost is not identifying because her family fears she’ll be deported, was born in the Mexican state of Michoacán but came to the U.S. when she was 9 years old. In 2003, she spent two months in jail for heroin possession and distribution charges, and was then deported. She returned illegally soon after, as unauthorized immigrants with U.S.-born children often do. She found work cleaning houses and avoided trouble with the law, but ICE arrested her last year. Her daughters are unsure why their mother was targeted, but suspect someone may have reported her. Given her 13-year-old drug charges, the woman had little choice but to take a plea agreement. To secure a conviction, the only evidence prosecutors needed was a prior order of deportation. Each conviction on a person’s record can enhance their jail sentence. She faced the possibility of 10 years in prison, but was released on time served ― seven months ― in February after taking the deal. It’s very sad, but that’s the way it is. The law doesn’t have a heart. Attorney Eréndira Castillo It’s unclear whether she was deported. The woman’s attorney, Kaitlin Verdura, declined to discuss the specifics of her client’s case, but said her situation is not uncommon. “There are people in the United States that have been here for a very long time, who have assimilated into the country, and get prosecuted for the crime of illegal re-entry,” she said. When Sessions announced on April 11 the Justice Department’s plans to consider prosecution for anyone who enters the country illegally, he likely wasn’t directing his attention at border-crossers like Irlando. People like the woman in Phoenix will probably bear the brunt of the Trump administration’s changes. The Justice Department did not reply to HuffPost’s request for comment. It’s unclear how many of the 11 million undocumented immigrants who live in the United States have deportations on their records. But the number is likely high, given Border Patrol’s efforts to make sure most people the agency apprehends pass through formal deportation proceedings. Since prosecutors can easily secure convictions for illegal re-entry, Sessions’ order could fundamentally transform the federal justice system in a way CBP never imagined when it recommended systematically hauling border-crossers into criminal court with Operation Streamline in 2005. People nowhere near the border who would’ve previously been deported could further swell the court system and federal prisons. ‘Legalized Racism’ Castillo sees the direction the Justice Department is moving under Trump and it unsettles her. Even after two decades of serving agreements to people pleading guilty of immigration violations, she rarely thinks of her clients as criminals. She sees parents trying to return to their children, jobless people looking for work, and people like Irlando who are scared for their lives. She’s fought losing battles to convince judges that the weight of the law falls too heavily on her clients. She’s represented people who grew up in Phoenix and wound up with criminal records at a time when former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio famously targeted Hispanics for traffic stops to identify undocumented immigrants. A federal court ruled in 2013 that those tactics amounted to racial profiling and ordered him to stop. But some of the people who got profiled and wound up with convictions and deportations showed up later in federal court for illegal re-entry charges. They face enhanced penalties that can boost their sentences up to 20 years. “It’s legalized racism,” Castillo said. “That’s the whole problem with the criminal justice system ― we’re not allowed to talk about racism as a factor of a person’s story. But their criminal records are overrepresented ... I’ve brought this up in court and the judges just sort of look at me with this blank stare.”   Like most of Castillo’s clients with immigration convictions, Irlando served his 75 days in the custody of the U.S. Marshals Service, then faced a swift deportation back to Guatemala. Despite Judge Macdonald’s assurances, the immigration court never heard his appeals about how he feared for his safety back home. “They didn’t listen to anything I had to say,” Irlando said on a phone call from Guatemala last month. Unable to return to his old job, he now works planting corn. He said he feels safe for the moment, but is unsure about his future in Guatemala. “Who knows,” he said. “I might try to cross again.”   -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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25 апреля, 15:59

Why Lawson Products (LAWS) Might Be a Diamond in the Rough

Lawson Products, Inc. (LAWS) stock has seen estimates rise over the past month for the current fiscal year but that is not yet reflected in its price.

19 апреля, 20:19

Newspaper Which Reported On Gay Abuse In Chechnya Fears For Staff

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Russia’s most famous campaigning newspaper said on Friday it had appealed to the Kremlin to protect its staff after Chechen clerics said the paper faced “retribution” for alleging that gay men in Chechnya were being tortured and killed. Novaya Gazeta published an article this month which said authorities in the majority Muslim southern Russian republic had rounded up over 100 gay men or men suspected of being gay and tortured them. It said at least three of them had been killed. Kremlin critics saw the report as further evidence that Moscow allows authorities in Chechnya to run the region - which has been consumed by two wars since the Soviet collapse - as a feudal fiefdom in exchange for separatist and radical Islamist sentiment being brutally suppressed. Chechnya’s Moscow-backed president Ramzan Kadyrov denies allegations human rights are routinely flouted. His spokesman Alvi Karimov called Novaya’s report “an absolute lie”, saying there were no gay men in Chechnya to be persecuted. “Nobody can detain or harass anyone who is simply not present in the republic,” Karimov told the Interfax news agency. Novaya’s report also caused outrage among Chechnya’s Muslim clerics, who adopted a resolution saying it had insulted the dignity and Islamic faith of Chechen men and society. “We promise that retribution will catch up with the hate-mongers wherever and whoever they are and with no statute of limitations,” the resolution read. Dmitry Muratov, Novaya’s editor, said on Friday that the resolution was an incitement to violence and that he was worried about his staff’s safety. “This resolution is encouraging religious fanatics to retaliate against our journalists,” he said in a statement, calling on the authorities to protect journalists and stop anyone whipping up hatred against them. Two of Novaya’s reporters specializing in Chechnya - Anna Politkovskaya and Natalya Estermirova - have been murdered in the last decade. Neither case has been fully solved. Set up with financial help from ex-Soviet president Mikhail Gorbachev in 1993, Novaya Gazeta is well-known in Russia for its investigations into official corruption, its reporting on Chechnya, criticism of the authorities and coverage of the opposition in a media landscape where most big-circulation newspapers are loyal to the Kremlin. The Kremlin said it was following the situation closely and that anyone who thought Novaya’s report was false should contest it through the courts. “We are against any actions that could pose a threat to the safety or lives of journalists,” Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters. Peskov said that reports about gay men being tortured in Chechnya could not be regarded as reliable at this stage however, and that the Kremlin was not aware of the police receiving any complaints on the subject. Novaya said Russian investigators had so far ignored a request it sent to the authorities to investigate the contents of its report.   (Additional reporting by Denis Pinchuk; Editing by Hugh Lawson) -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

18 апреля, 20:30

В супермаркетах Японии продавцов хотят заменить роботами

Правительство Японии договорилось о сотрудничестве с пятью крупнейшими операторами сетей супермаркетов (Seven & I Holdings, Lawson, Ministop, FamilyMart Uny Holdings и East Japan Railway) о совместной разработке системы автоматических магазинов без продавцов к 2025 году. […]

18 апреля, 11:44

Обзор финансово-экономической прессы: США реформируют соглашение о свободной торговле с Южной Кореей

Nikkei Asian Review В Японии появятся магазины без продавцов к 2025 году Правительство Японии договорилось о сотрудничестве с пятью крупнейшими операторами сетей супермаркетов (Seven & I Holdings, Lawson, Ministop, FamilyMart Uny Holdings и East Japan Railway), чтобы совместно разработать систему автоматических магазинов без продавцов к 2025 году. Об этом сообщает издание Nikkei Asian Review. Новая система позволит не пробивать штрих-код каждого товара по-отдельности, а считывать информацию продуктов в корзинке покупателя одновременно с помощью специальных чипов. Внедрение такой системы в 50 тыс. магазинов страны может обойтись в $46 млн. Reuters Boeing уволит более 100 инженеров в 2017 году Американская корпорация по производству авиационной техники Boeing намерена уволить более сотни инженеров в текущем году. Об этом сообщает Reuters. «Мы продолжаем идти дальше и приближаемся ко второй фазе, связанной с вынужденным сокращением некоторых специалистов в штате Вашингтон и в других регионах. Ожидается, что сокращения затронут около сотни инженеров», - заявили в компании. США реформируют соглашение о свободной торговле с Южной Кореей Вице-президент США Майк Пенс на встрече с представителями бизнеса Южной Кореи заявил, что администрация президента Соединенных Штатов проведет реформу соглашения о свободной торговле между Сеулом и Вашингтоном, заключенного пять лет назад, передает Reuters. По словам Пенса, торговый дефицит в США за этот период увеличился более чем в два раза. ВВС Google пошел на мировую с ФАС и выплатит штраф в $6,75 млн Во многих современных смартфонах установлена операционная система Android, разрабатываемая специалистами Google Федеральная антимонопольная служба и интернет-гигант Google заключили мировое соглашение, поставив тем самым точку в судебных разбирательствах о злоупотреблении доминирующем положении Google на разрабатываемой им мобильной платформе Android. В рамках мирового соглашения Google также выплатить штраф в 438 млн рублей (6,75 млн долларов), назначенный ранее. Кроме того, согласно условиям мирового соглашения, Google откажется от эксклюзивной предустановки своих приложений на мобильных устройствах Android и не будет ограничивать предустановку приложений третьих сторон. Информационно-аналитический отдел TeleTradeИсточник: FxTeam

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13 апреля, 23:37

Trump's Mar-a-Lago Restaurant Busted For 10 Health Code Violations

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); As president, Donald Trump has already hosted two world leaders for dinner at his Mar-a-Lago estate in Florida instead of at the White House. But he might want to re-think what he serves with that chocolate cake.  The Mar-a-Lago Club was cited for its highest-ever number of health code violations in January, the Miami Herald reported.  Records from a routine inspection January 26 note 10 violations in all, including three deemed “high priority,” the most severe category. In coolers, foods like shrimp and burgers were found at temperatures up to 50 degrees Fahrenheit, much warmer than the required 41 degrees. A ham was stored at 57 degrees. And fish that was intended to be served raw had not undergone proper parasite destruction and needed to be cooked or thrown away immediately, inspectors said.  The number of violations was bigly for the property, but it’s not an uncommon number for a restaurant undergoing routine inspection, according to Stephen Lawson, a spokesman for the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation. A statement from Mar-a-Lago pointed out that all of the urgent violations were corrected on the same day they were found. As far as restaurants go, Mar-a-Lago’s inspection was relatively average. But then again, when the Japanese prime minister is one of your upcoming dinner guests, one bad fish could really screw things up.  News of Mar-a-Lago’s inspection started trending after the Miami Herald dug up the report, which was made available on January 26. Less serious violations included a lack of hand-washing signage in a restroom and rust on freezer shelves. Lawson said diners have no cause to avoid the restaurant, which requires a $200,000 membership to enter.  We’ll stay away anyway, thanks. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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13 апреля, 23:37

Trump's Mar-a-Lago Restaurant Busted For 10 Health Code Violations

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); As president, Donald Trump has already hosted two world leaders for dinner at his Mar-a-Lago estate in Florida instead of at the White House. But he might want to re-think what he serves with that chocolate cake.  The Mar-a-Lago Club was cited for its highest-ever number of health code violations in January, the Miami Herald reported.  Records from a routine inspection January 26 note 10 violations in all, including three deemed “high priority,” the most severe category. In coolers, foods like shrimp and burgers were found at temperatures up to 50 degrees Fahrenheit, much warmer than the required 41 degrees. A ham was stored at 57 degrees. And fish that was intended to be served raw had not undergone proper parasite destruction and needed to be cooked or thrown away immediately, inspectors said.  The number of violations was bigly for the property, but it’s not an uncommon number for a restaurant undergoing routine inspection, according to Stephen Lawson, a spokesman for the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation. A statement from Mar-a-Lago pointed out that all of the urgent violations were corrected on the same day they were found. As far as restaurants go, Mar-a-Lago’s inspection was relatively average. But then again, when the Japanese prime minister is one of your upcoming dinner guests, one bad fish could really screw things up.  News of Mar-a-Lago’s inspection started trending after the Miami Herald dug up the report, which was made available on January 26. Less serious violations included a lack of hand-washing signage in a restroom and rust on freezer shelves. Lawson said diners have no cause to avoid the restaurant, which requires a $200,000 membership to enter.  We’ll stay away anyway, thanks. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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11 апреля, 14:49

Swedish economics establishment and pluralism in economics

from Lars Syll In the latest issue of Fronesis yours truly and a couple of other academics (e.g. Julie Nelson, Tony Lawson, and Phil Mirowski) made an effort at introducing its readers to heterodox economics and its critique of mainstream economics. Rather unsurprisingly this hasn’t pleased the Swedish economics establishment. On the mainstream economics blog […]

09 апреля, 16:00

Allies Of Syria's Assad Say U.S. Attack Crosses 'Red Lines'

AMMAN (Reuters) - A joint command center made up of the forces of Russia, Iran and militias supporting Syrian President Bashar al-Assad said the U.S. strike on a Syrian air base on Friday crossed “red lines” and it would respond to any new aggression and increase its support for its ally. The United States fired dozens of cruise missiles at a Syrian air base on Friday from which it said a deadly chemical weapons attack had been launched earlier in the week, escalating the U.S. role in Syria and drawing criticism from Assad’s allies including Russia and Iran. “What America waged in an aggression on Syria is a crossing of red lines. From now on we will respond with force to any aggressor or any breach of red lines from whoever it is and America knows our ability to respond well,” said the statement published by the group on media outlet Ilam al Harbi (War Media). U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, meanwhile, blamed Russian inaction for helping fuel the chemical weapons attack it had reacted to, saying Moscow had failed to carry out a 2013 agreement to secure and destroy chemical weapons in Syria. He said the United States expected Russia to take a tougher stance against Syria by rethinking its alliance with Assad because “every time one of these horrific attacks occurs, it draws Russia closer into some level of responsibility.”   PUTIN, ROUHANI SPEAK Russian President Vladimir Putin and Iran’s Hassan Rouhani said in a phone call that aggressive U.S. actions against Syria were not permissible and violated international law, the Kremlin said on Sunday. The two leaders also called for an objective investigation into an incident involving chemical weapons in Syria’s Idlib and said they were ready to deepen cooperation to fight terrorism, the Kremlin said in a statement on its website. Syrian army forces had been losing ground across the country until Russia intervened militarily in September 2015, propping up Assad and protecting its own interests in the region. Assad has also drawn heavily on foreign Shi’ite militias sponsored by Iran, led by Lebanon’s Hezbollah group, for his most important gains since the Russian intervention. The joint command center also said the presence of U.S troops in northern Syria where Washington has hundreds of special forces helping the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) to oust Islamic State was “illegal” and that Washington had a long-term plan to occupy the area. The regional alliance said the U.S. cruise missile strikes on a Syrian base which Washington said was involved in a chemical attack that killed dozens of civilians would not deter their forces from “liberating” all of Syrian territory. In Iran, Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei said the U.S. missile strike was a “a strategic error, and a repeat of the mistakes of the past,” the state news agency IRNA reported. “The Islamic Republic has shown that.. it does not back off and its people and officials ... do not retreat in the face of threats,” said Khamenei. Many Syrians opposed to Assad’s rule consider Lebanon’s Hezbollah and Iranian-backed troops as occupiers seeking to drive out mainly Sunni Syrians from the areas they live in. They hold Iran and its allies responsible for the displacement of millions outside the country. They also see Russia as a foreign occupier whose relentless aerial bombardment of rebel-held areas has led to thousands of civilian casualties. Some accuse Moscow of applying a “scorched-earth policy” that targets hospitals, schools and residential areas more than frontlines to break the resolve of the anti-Assad insurgency.   (Reporting by Suleiman Al-Khalidi; Additional reporting by Dubai newsroom; Editing by Hugh Lawson and Stephen Powell) -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

06 апреля, 01:53

House Democrats Are Inviting Trump To Expand Social Security

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); WASHINGTON ― Rep. John Larson (D-Conn.) introduced a bill Wednesday to expand Social Security benefits and shore up the program’s finances. The Social Security 2100 Act already has 156 co-sponsors, all of them Democrats, giving it the support of some 80 percent of the party’s House caucus. Surrounded by seniors advocacy groups and fellow Democratic House members at a press conference on Capitol Hill, Larson said he was “optimistic” about the bill’s prospects despite Republicans’ control of both chambers of Congress. A key reason: President Donald Trump’s campaign-trail promises to protect the program. “We do have a president who did stand out, in a very difficult time when he didn’t have to, and talked about not just preserving Social Security, but expanding it,” Larson said. “So we think this is an opportunity for us to seize on what the president of the United States has said and join with us.” In fact, Trump vowed only that he would not reduce benefits, and his first budget did not address Social Security at all. Larson’s staff shared the legislation and related materials with the White House, and is hoping to arrange a meeting to discuss it. The White House did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the bill or confirm that it had received Larson’s overture. Seeking Trump’s cooperation on Social Security is an unlikely strategy for congressional Democrats, who have been locked in conflict with the president virtually since he took office. And even if Trump were personally inclined to consider a bill that expands benefits, he has surrounded himself with ultra-conservative figures like budget director Mick Mulvaney, a former member of the hard-right House Freedom Caucus. Mulvaney claims he is trying to convince Trump of the need to dramatically scale back Social Security and Medicare. Instead, Larson appears to be trying a less aggressive variation of what Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) has done in the Senate, using Trump’s campaign promises to protect Social Security against him. Sanders invoked those comments when introducing his own expansion bill back in February. If Democrats constantly remind voters of Trump’s pledges, the lawmakers’ thinking goes, he will either feel pressure to stick to them, or suffer politically if he does not. Should Trump take Larson up on his offer to collaborate, however, he may find the legislation more palatable than other progressive Social Security expansion bills that seek to raise taxes on more people. Larson’s Social Security 2100 Act would increase benefits across the board through a change in Social Security’s benefit formula. It would also adopt a cost-of-living adjustment tailored for older Americans that has historically been more generous, and create a minimum benefit that would be 125 percent of the poverty level. The legislation would pay for these increases by subjecting earnings of $400,000 or more to the 6.2 percent payroll tax. (At present, Americans only pay into Social Security on the first $127,200 of their earnings, a limit that climbs in tandem with the average wage index.) The added revenue would also enable Social Security to pay out promised benefits for the next 75 years, according to an analysis by the Social Security Administration’s chief actuary. Sanders’ Social Security expansion bill, by contrast, would pay for its benefit increases by taxing incomes of $250,000 or more. And Larson’s legislation would cut the taxes of some Social Security beneficiaries by raising the income threshold for seniors’ benefits to be taxed. The Connecticut Democrat’s Social Security expansion bill comes as Democrats seek to go on the offensive after the collapse of the Republican Obamacare replacement bill. The progressive wing of the party, in particular, views this moment as an ideal time to generate support for single-payer health insurance, or “Medicare for all.” A universal Medicare bill introduced by Rep. John Conyers (D-Mich.) has picked up a dozen more co-sponsors since the GOP health care bill’s defeat last month. Asked whether the two legislative pushes were part of a common strategy by Democrats to get behind ambitious progressive reforms, Larson demurred, calling health care and Social Security “separate issues entirely.” Larson does not plan to join Conyers’ bill, since he likes the idea of preserving both private and public health insurance options to ensure competition. Instead, he intends to introduce legislation that would lower the Medicare eligibility age to 50. However, Social Security Works, a group advocating for Social Security expansion that backs Larson’s bill, supports single-payer health insurance. Alex Lawson, executive director of Social Security Works, said the organization welcomes a variety of measures that would increase access to Medicare. “This is the debate I want to have,” Lawson said of disagreements between Democrats who want to lower the Medicare age and those who would like to make the program universal. “We’re going to support Bernie Sanders’ Medicare-for-all bill when it comes out,” Lawson said. “And we’ll support Larson’s push to lower the age to 50, because both of those are wise policy and politics.” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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05 апреля, 16:49

Чистая прибыль "Синергии" за 2016 год выросла на 14%

Чистая выручка ПАО "Синергия" по МСФО за 2016 год выросла на 17% и составила 35,9 млрд рублей, говорится в материалах компании. Продажи компании выросли на 21% и составили 57,37 млрд руб., чистая прибыль увеличилась на 14% - до 275 млн рублей, валовая прибыль увеличилась на 15% - до 14,5 млрд руб. Рост продаж бренда Beluga в целом составил 31%, экспортные продажи бренда увеличились на 36%. Компания также сообщает, что вместе с Bacardi подписали стратегическое соглашение по розливу и упаковке виски WILLIAM LAWSON'S.

05 апреля, 16:12

Should You Dump Bemis (BMS) Stock from Your Portfolio?

Bemis Company Inc. (BMS) seems to be an underachiever of late and needs to be plucked out of investors' stock garden immediately.

01 апреля, 15:22

25 Worst TV Shows Ever Made

Not every series can be Emmy-worthy. Take a trip down memory lane with a list of the worst TV shows to ever hit the small-screen.

31 марта, 20:51

What's behind South African finance minister's sacking? - Inside Story

South Africa's political and economic crisis has taken another twist. President Jacob Zuma has sacked Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan just months after appointing him to the job. Nine other ministers have also been fired in an unprecedented cabinet reshuffle. Zuma's decision is facing strong criticism from both ruling party members and the opposition. They are worried over South Africa's economy just at a time when many believed it was starting to stabilise. But Zuma argues "radical socio-economic transformation" is urgently required to help lift South Africans out of poverty. What is behind Gordhan's sacking? Does it reveal a deep division in the country? Presenter: Sami Zeidan Guests: Bongani Mbindwane - ANC-supporter, businessman and newspaper columnist Lawson Naidoo - executive director of Council for the Advancement of the South African Constitution Aly-Khan Satchu - CEO of Rich Management - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/

31 марта, 16:07

5 Reasons To Dump Sealed Air (SEE) Stock from Your Portfolio

In this write-up we have highlighted 5 reasons to dumo Sealed Air Corporation (SEE) for your portfolio.

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30 марта, 10:00

The 20 best Nigella Lawson recipes: part 4

An indulgent selection of puddings and cakes – from lemon pavlova to a boozy British trifleI make this with a jar of shop-bought lemon curd, but obviously I wouldn’t stop you from making your own. Should you want, proceed as follows: whisk together 2 large eggs, the yolks from 2 further large eggs and 150g caster sugar in a heavy-based saucepan (off the heat). Add the finely grated zest and juice of 2 unwaxed lemons and 100g soft unsalted butter, cut into 1cm cubes or teaspooned out into similar-sized blobs, and put the pan over a medium heat, stirring constantly with a little flat whisk, until thickened. This will take around 5-7 minutes, but keep taking it off the heat – stirring or whisking all the while – at regular intervals during this time. When thickened, pour and scrape into a cold bowl and let it cool, stirring occasionally. Continue reading...

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29 марта, 10:00

The 20 best Nigella Lawson recipes: part 3

More of Observer Food Monthly’s favourite recipes by one of Britain’s great cookery writers – from a stately roast rib of beef to quick mirin-glazed salmonThe final part of this series launches on ThursdayThis must be the fastest way there is to create a culinary sensation. You do scarcely a thing – just dibble some salmon steaks in a dark glossy potion, most of which you get out of a jar – and what you make tastes as if you had been dedicating half your life to achieving the perfect combination of sweet, savoury, tender and crisp. Continue reading...

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28 марта, 10:00

The 20 best Nigella Lawson recipes: part 2

A comforting steak and kidney pudding and an easy fish pie – more of our favourite Nigella dishes• The 20 best Nigella Lawson recipes: part 3 My mother used to make this fairly often in my childhood, but mostly, I associate it with feeling under the weather: this is my idea – or rather my mother’s – of hand-on-the-brow comfort food. My mother always put a tomato cut in half in the dish, but I once, unaccountably, found myself at home and tomato-less, so bunged in some peas from the deep-freeze, instead, and was very happy with the innovation. You could do either or both, as suits you; fresh bread, thickly sliced and buttered, is non-negotiable, however. Continue reading...

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27 марта, 10:00

The 20 best Nigella Lawson recipes: part 1

From her famed Coca-Cola glazed ham to chicken Cosima, Observer Food Monthly’s selection of favourite Nigella Lawson dishes• Part 2 of this series launches on TuesdayThis may well be – indeed is – the smell, the taste, the dish that says “family” to me and my siblings, and brings our long-absent mother back to the kitchen and the table with us. But the fact that I’ve cooked it more often and over more years than I’ve cooked anything else doesn’t make writing a recipe for it any easier. If anything, it makes it harder, much harder. Continue reading...

23 июля 2016, 19:05

Самая большая частная яхта в мире

Немецкая компания под названием Lürssen, которая специализируется на выпуске элитных и роскошных яхт выпустила в 2013 году самую огромную в мире мега яхту, назвав ее Azzam.Данная яхта является самым большим чартерным моторным судном. Фото 2. Помимо того, что модель класса Аззам является самым большим судном на всем свете, даже больше чем яхта самого Романа Абрамовича, она также является одной из самых скоростных в своем классе. Её размеры поражают. Только представьте: 180 метров – это два футбольных поля или 12 железнодорожных вагонов. При этом Azzam может легко разгоняться до максимальной скорости 30 узлов (55 км/ч). В этом ей помогают две газовые турбины общей мощностью 94 000 л.с., четыре водомётные установки и турбокомпрессорный дизельный двигатель Wärtsilä-Sulzer RTA96-C мощностью 108 920 л.с. (80 088 кВт).Это самый большой двигатель в мире: его длина – 27,1 м, высота – 13,4 м, вес – более 2 300 т. Изначально разработанный для контейнеровозов, он идеально подошёл для 180-метровой мега-яхты. Можно не сомневаться, что при таких габаритах на борту мега-яхты осталось достаточно места, чтобы реализовать любые фантазии заказчика. Даже главный салон у неё не имеет аналогов в мире: длина – 29 м, ширина 18 м.Фото 3. Для обслуживания судна таких внушительных размеров необходимо пятьсот человек экипажа. В бак яхты этого класса можно залить около одного миллиона топлива, что дает возможность своему владельцу и гостям путешествовать по миру круглый год, при этом не заходить в порт для заправки судна. Одним из достоинств яхты класса аззам является, то, что она с легкостью может ходить по мелководью на очень большой скорости.Фото 4. Дизайном внутренней отделки занимался популярный и талантливый французский дизайнер, имя которого Кристоф Леони. Знаменитый дизайнер в своей работе придерживался стиля ампир.Фото 5. Подробной информации об интерьере судна на данный момент нет, однако известно из достоверных источников, что площадь самого большого салона azzam составляет тридцать на двадцать метров, данный салон не содержит столбов, которые разделяют внутреннее пространство. Также известно, что длина открытой террасы составляет свыше восемнадцати метров.Фото 6. Интерьер яхты, Кристоф Леони оформил в великолепном императорском, дорогом и роскошном стиле. Большинство мебели, которые гармонично размещены на судне, являются антикварными, изготовленными из ценных и дорогих пород деревьев.Частично антикварная мебель расписана золотом и украшена ювелирными камнями. Говорят, что яхта этого класса на своем борту имеет подводную лодку, а также вертолет.Фото 7. Конструкторы сообщили, что данное судно является наиболее сложным и длительным проектом фирмы. Mubarak Saad al Ahbabi является ведущим инженером, который занимался строительством суперяхты.Фото 8. Заказчик и текущий владелец яхты Azzam – Халифа ибн Зайд Аль Нахайян, президент ОАЭ и эмир Абу-Даби, чьё состояние оценивается Forbes в 15 миллиардов долларов США. Постройке судна предшествовал конкурс проектов, в котором победили экстерьер от миланской студии Nauta Yacht Design и интерьер от французского дизайнера Christophe Leoni. Техническое управление постройкой осуществляла компания Burgess Yachts. Главным инженером выступил Мубарак Саад аль Ахбаби. Была версия, что вот этот Принц на белой яхте владелец яхты.Фото 9. Nauta Yachts является итальянской компанией, которая занималась проектированием судна класса Azzam, а непосредственно строительством этой великолепной и величественной мега яхты занималась немецкая фирма Lurssen, которая расположена в городе Бремен.Фото 10. Известно, что стиль, в котором оформлены внутренние помещения Azzam, близок к неоклассицизму начала XIX века – времени правления Наполеона Бонапарта. В отсутствие фотографий с борта мега-яхты – их ещё никому не удавалось получить, даже авторитетным международным яхтенным изданиям – можно представить нечто напоминающее императорские спальни в Версале.Фото 11. Azzam зарегистрирована как чартерная яхта, однако открытой информации о возможности и стоимости её чартера нигде не представлено. Крайне редко яхту можно встретить в Аравийском море, ещё реже в Средиземноморье. В мае 2015 года очевидцам удалось увидеть её проходящей Гибралтар. В настоящее время – и большую часть времени года – Azzam пришвартована в порту Халифа в Абу-Даби.Фото 12. Фото 13. Фото 14. Фото 15. Фото 16. Фото 17. Фото 18. Фото 19. Фото 20. Фото 21. Фото 22. Фото 23. Фото 24. Фото 25. Фото 26. источникиhttp://yachtrus.ru/yacht-azzam/http://www.themilliardaire.co/yacht/azzam-the-worlds-largest-yacht-5927/http://ruyachts.com/journal/azzam-lurssen-0960/http://www.pravda.ru/photo/album/21532/http://www.infoniac.ru/news/Azzam-samaya-bol-shaya-yahta-v-mire-sdelano-v-Germanii.htmlВот еще несколько интересных кораблей: вот например действительно ли Экраноплан необходим нам … как покойнику калоши, а вот Самый длинный в мире контейнеровоз. Помните про Невезучего великана «Thomas W.Lawson» и Самая большая подводная лодка в мире. Вот еще Мобильная платформа десанта или пирс в океане и знаменитая Неуязвимая Вайолетт