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27 октября, 01:12

What Will The New Most Interesting Man In The World Do Next?

Heather Taylor He once cheated death… And death was perfectly okay with it. The newest Most Interesting Man in the World has arrived with a bang. Formerly portrayed by actor Jonathan Goldsmith (last seen jet setting off to the moon), the latest incarnation of the Dos Equis spokesperson is played by French actor Augustin Legrand. In the new Havas Worldwide New York commercial, the legend traverses the sand and Serengeti. Some of his impressive feats in the 47-second “Airboat” spot include whittling a football out of a coconut (and kicking it stadium style past a pair of giraffes), slicing a knife in half using another knife, and engaging in an outrageous sand dune race. He’s younger and scruffier. His tagline has been modified (“Stay thirsty, mis amigos”) and he’s joined by an adventurous female companion, but the enigmatic gent is still full of edgy mystique. And it taps into the character’s evolution for millennials well. As Toygar Bazarkaya, Chief Creative Officer of the Americas at Havas says, “The new Most Interesting Man is a man of action. He's never one to reminisce on times past, which stylistically changes everything. With a faster pace and more energy, we're reinvigorating and modernizing one of the greatest campaigns.” What’s the ad world’s take on the new Most Interesting Man anyway? Prior to the commercial’s release, I caught up with the industry’s best and brightest for their thoughts on what they’d like to see the icon do next. Intimately aware he has a legend that precedes him (such as being allowed to touch art in museums and how people hang on his every word, even his prepositions), here are the experiences they’d like to see the spokescharacter tackle. Sweep the 2016 Election “[He] will announce his bid as a write-in candidate for the U.S. presidency. Political analysts say he has the charisma of Kennedy and Reagan-like wit, he is unstoppable. The Augustin Legrand campaign captivates the public’s eye. Will he take the presidency?” — Christina Oswald, Digital Marketing Analyst, Moncur Win the new space race “The Most Interesting Man will beat Elon Musk to Mars using lost designs imagined by Leonardo da Vinci. The spacecraft will be built of timber, iron and an old hot air balloon. He will bring a Cheetah with him for company. Because he has to out-interesting the world's real most interesting man.” — Sean MacPhedran, Senior Content Strategist, SMITH Focus on doing good while looking good “I think the new guy will be ‘crunchier’ and more focused on doing good. He'll ride a corporate trend of doing well while doing good. He'll have a bit of a nonprofity feel at times. He'll still be attractive and edgy and funny.” — Barak Kassar, Partner, BKW Partners Break the internet — and then buy it “He will negotiate a lasting peace in the Middle East. And then foment a political revolution in the Midwest. He will rekindle the declining bee population in just one romantic evening. Mt. Everest will add him to its bucket list. He will get a ticket to mars, as a layover. He’ll break the Internet, and then buy it.” — “The Writer’s Room” at Brownstein Group Whatever happens, no memes please “My one request to Dos Equis, please don’t use DJ Khaled. We’ve all moved on.” — Jamie Delaney, Senior Copywriter, Moncur Stay thirsty for more commercial spots to come, mis amigos. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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19 октября, 20:05

Выключатель Gira + Z-Wave. 4-кнопочный радио выключатель на базе Z-Uno

Какие задачи решает радио выключатель: В комнате с готовым ремонтом переместили мебель, шкафом закрыли выключатель На этапе ремонта не продумали удобный выключатель около кровати В доме из бруса не эстетично тянуть наружную проводку, требуются радио выключатели, но с конкретным дизайном Интеграция с существующей системой автоматизации На данный момент существуют Z-Wave выключатели на батарейках, например Z-Wave.Me Wall Controller, но эти выключатели идут с определенным дизайном клавиш. Если вы хотите использовать выключатели Legrand, Gira и др., то тут на помощь приходит Z-Wave плата Z-Uno. Я покажу как из обычно выключателя Gira сделать радио выключатель на батарейках, который можно установить в любое удобное место. Видео работы выключателя в конце статьи. Читать дальше →

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03 октября, 15:06

Компания Legrand вложит около 1 млрд руб. в завод в Ульяновской области

Ввод нового предприятия в эксплуатацию запланирован до конца 2018 года

23 сентября, 20:45

Putin Sanctioned His Own People. But It Helped Him Win.

MOSCOW -- On Sept. 18, the Russian Federation held elections for the seventh session of the lower house of parliament. The political body, known as the State Duma, will now consist of only four political parties and will be dominated by the current government's party, United Russia, despite a noticeably declining standard of living across the country and the implementation of sanctions. The Communist Party, the nationalist Liberal Democratic Party of Russia and A Just Russia party will also hold seats. Support for United Russia in this election even as sanctions prevented the importation of food from the European Union and other nations seems to suggest a strengthening of President Vladimir Putin's reach, an impressive ability to incite nationalism and a much larger likelihood of his victory in the upcoming presidential elections. "At a time of difficulties, considerable uncertainty and risks, people naturally choose stability and trust the leading political force," said Putin following the vote. "The results ... are also citizens' reaction to external attempts to pressure Russia, to threats, to sanctions, and to foreign attempts to stir up the situation in our country." While a few other parties also secured single-seat constituency, United Russia, the party associated with Putin, still took enough seats to achieve a constitutional majority and can now alter the Russian constitution without the vote of other political parties. People cast their ballots at a polling station during the parliamentary election in Kazan, Russia on September 18, 2016. (Raynur Shakir/Getty Images) Is Putin right that Russians favor him even after resources are cut off from them because they trust the government to make the right decisions, or is there something else at play here? A new record of popularity of the pro-Kremlin political party could be surprising given the current economic crisis, which has troubled Russia since 2014. Usually the negative macroeconomic environment would reduce the motivation of the voters to vote for the ruling political party, as some international studies have noted. However, as the recent elections and a study done by the Russian Public Opinion Research Center, or VTsIOM, show -- in Russia, this rule works in reverse. The same study also suggested that in periods of rising inflation the number of Russians who are ready to vote for United Russia increases. Potential support for President Vladimir Putin's electorate also gets a boost. The especially high level of inflation has become a noticeable part of Russian everyday life. During the last couple of years, the especially high level of inflation has become a noticeable part of Russian everyday life. This has come in part not from Russian economy policy, but from Russia's relationship with the international community. One important manifestation of this has been the economic impact of Russia's annexation of Crimea, an event that despite its devastating economic impacts has given a boost to Russian support of Putin and the United Russia party. This August marked two years since Putin's declaration that Russia would prohibit food imports from the EU and some other nations. And earlier this year, EU sanctions on Russian were prolonged until 2017. Both continue to have ripple effects beyond their own countries. The International Effect Of Putin's Food Import Ban The story of the sanctions standoff, later called an "EU-Russia economic war," started when the United States and a number of European countries established sanctions against Russia in connection with Russia's controversial annexation of Crimea. Soon after, President Putin signed a law in response, establishing food sanctions against countries that had denounced the annexation, including the EU and the U.S. The list of prohibited products included all fruits and vegetables, fish, milk and other dairy products, pork, beef and poultry meat -- 73 percent of which came from the EU. A man holds a Crimean flag in front of the Crimean parliament building on March 17, 2014 in Simferopol, Ukraine. (Dan Kitwood/Getty Images) As a political gesture, the ban was a powerful move. The sanctions created significant economic problems for the EU, with trade on the banned products dropping at least 12 percent. According to the Russian Ministry of Economic Development, losses to exporting countries amounted to 8.6 billion dollars, totaling the EU losses at around 0.4 percent of its annual GDP then. According to the Austrian Institute of Economic Research, the introduction of sanctions will cost EU countries some 2 million jobs (around 500,000 in Germany alone). Italy has seen the impacts of this firsthand. Losses in exports for Italian farmers during the last two years have so far amounted to about 600 euros, according to Gaetano Menna of the main Italian agricultural organization Confagricoltura, which represents and protects local agricultural enterprises. Michael Lohse from the German Farmers' Association, also known as Deutscher Bauernverband, said that the measurable impact for the first year of the embargo amounted to 1 billion euros for German farmers. But since the end of the first year, agricultural exporters seem to have adapted and diversified, making it more difficult to measure the loss numerically, according to Lohse. A similar decline in the agricultural sector of the economy can be seen in some other European nations, he explained. In some countries, like France, the reaction was even stronger and has become physical. 'Russian sanctions are causing the ruin of the French agro-economy.' "Russian sanctions are causing the ruin of the French agro-economy. Our farmers have already protested against them a few times," said Phillipe Legrand, who works for a tourist agency in Marseille, France. A year after the sanctions against Russia started, close to 50 percent of the EU and Eastern Europe felt the sanctions hurt their economies, according to a Gallup poll. "The effect of Russian food sanctions on EU everyday life was simple -- prices on products, which were banned to export, like vegetables and meat, declined and maybe this had an impact on the current deflation," said Mark Field, an IT programmer living in Berlin. But many people still favor the sanctions. In countries such as Poland, Romania, Croatia and Estonia, about half or more residents support the sanctions, according to the previously referenced Gallup poll. Farmers distribute bags of fruit to people protesting against the Russian food ban on Sept. 5, 2014 in Madrid. (Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images) And while many have seen a decline in their economies, countries outside the EU have benefited greatly. In fact, the import ban resulting from the sanctions has strengthened Russian economic relations with Switzerland, Brazil and Turkey. The impacts of an increased Swiss relationship in particular not only hurts the EU in the short term, but will also keep trade relations from full recovery if they are to ever end, according to Michael Lohse. This, he noted, is due to the fact that Switzerland will establish a much stronger relationship with Russia, and it is unlikely to leave the market if sanctions are lifted. The Situation Inside Russia Looking at the perspective from inside Russia, however, we see that the social costs of sanctions implementation are very high, and the same moves have had a far worse impact here than in other parts of Europe. One major impact on the quality of life has been a lack of good essential foods available to Russians. Most Russians have noticed products prices rising, and many people indicated a change in purchasing habits as a result. And these perceptions are supported by official government data. According to the Ministry of Economic Development, Russian food prices have gone up by over 30 percent, and have partly resulted in an increase in the number of Russians living below poverty level. In fact, over the last two years the number has risen to around one in seven Russians (19.2 million, 13.4 percent of the total population) that find themselves below the poverty line. 'When we went for holidays to Italy this summer, we brought back with us 14 kilos of cheese and ham.' The quality of food within the country has also presented problems for Russians as well. According to the Russian agency that regulates animal-related products and sciences, Rosselkhoznadzor, a disturbing amount of dairy products in Russian shops are falsified and contain chalk or starch, especially cheese. The head of the Federal Service for Veterinary and Phytosanitary Surveillance (Rosselkhoznadzor), Dankvert Sergey Alexeevich, has gone so far as to say that the overall proportion of falsification for some types of products, such as sour cream and cheese, can reach 50 percent. For Ekaterina Pivolova, a biology student from Moscow, it has, for example, "become very difficult to obtain good cheese in Russian shops." And the concerns over value and variety of food extends beyond just cheese. Dmitry Almelkov, who works in a Moscow bookstore, noted the situation has caused most sea products such as shrimp to disappear as well. "Most other types of fish that I saw was either very expensive or of low quality," he said. Some Russians are lucky enough to be able to leave the country and find the food they have missed under the sanctions. And those lucky enough make sure to stock up. Elena Serogova, whose job as a saleswoman allows her to travel, said that this is characteristic of everyone she knows who has the opportunity to go abroad. "When we went for holidays to Italy this summer, we brought back with us 14 kilos of cheese and ham," she said. A customer selects cheese products in Moscow on Aug. 29, 2014. Prices for local produce increased due to the Russian-EU ban. (Andrey Rudakov/Getty Images) So why then, in spite of the inconvenience his actions have caused to the people of Russia, do they continue to support him, and for how long will this last? If we cast our minds back a few years to the presidency of Boris Yeltsin, a time when the transition to a market economy was achieved at immense cost, it is easy to see why President Putin's popularity among the middle class has been based on creating economic growth and a higher standard of living for the Russian population. It has been especially important for people, who have lived through the Soviet era of the 1980s that left them earning money, but struggling to find food, only to be followed by the post-Soviet Russia of the 1990s when even the possibility to earn a decent salary had disappeared. With the ban on import of a number of everyday foods, many Russians have felt this higher standard of living decline, and even felt a regression into these less stable economic times. For these people, the higher standard of living was the main reason to put up with fewer political rights and less room for private freedom. But now this advantage has disappeared and, according to official economic forecasts, it's not going to come back soon. Putin is lucky that defiance against the EU has ultimately strengthened his position and the standing of the sanctions among Russians. For those nearly 20 million below the poverty line, the problem still remains that together with other factors, food sanctions have crashed the main advantage of Putin's rule: the rise of standards of living. No longer do they have the main reason to put up with challenges to freedom of speech or the political setbacks. Putin is lucky that defiance against the EU has ultimately strengthened his position and the standing of the sanctions among Russians. It would be logical to expect that people would start expressing their opinions and try to influence the government policy in a situation such as this, but as the election results show, we see the opposite effect. According to the authors of a Russian Public Opinion Research Center and Ohio State University study, there are at least three possible explanations that explain the result of the sanctions. The most interesting of them, though is one about the West. Some Russians tend to view high inflation as an effect of Western sanctions, not those imposed by Russia. As a result, the majority of Russians do not blame the government. This point of view is depicted by the government, whose reach, through local media, still extends to a larger audience than any other group in the country and thus dominates the Russian perspective today. President Putin speaks with Prime Minister Medvedev during parliamentary elections in Moscow on September 18, 2016. (Alexei Druzhinin/Getty Images) Given this, it is not surprising that most Russians, according to a study by the Levada Center, perceive Putin's import ban as a sign of strength against the West and think it is important to continue. This fact also shows that for many Russians, their idea of Russia's place in the world has changed very little. A large part of the population still seems to think that there is a permanent opposition between Russia and the Western world -- much like the attitudes under the Soviet Union. In that logic, sanctions, of course, are an instrument of power, and it doesn't matter how much harm it can bring to the country itself -- Russia comes first, even if Russia is hurting. So it seems that President Vladimir Putin knew what he was talking about when commenting on the election results: "Let me say again that this election result is good, but it is without question an advance on the part of our people." If the tough economic crisis hasn't impacted Putin's popularity, then there is not much else that could. But if inflation falls more in the future, we may just see a change in the political tides. Earlier on WorldPost: -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

23 сентября, 20:45

Putin Sanctioned His Own People. But It Helped Him Win.

MOSCOW -- On Sept. 18, the Russian Federation held elections for the seventh session of the lower house of parliament. The political body, known as the State Duma, will now consist of only four political parties and will be dominated by the current government's party, United Russia, despite a noticeably declining standard of living across the country and the implementation of sanctions. The Communist Party, the nationalist Liberal Democratic Party of Russia and A Just Russia party will also hold seats. Support for United Russia in this election even as sanctions prevented the importation of food from the European Union and other nations seems to suggest a strengthening of President Vladimir Putin's reach, an impressive ability to incite nationalism and a much larger likelihood of his victory in the upcoming presidential elections. "At a time of difficulties, considerable uncertainty and risks, people naturally choose stability and trust the leading political force," said Putin following the vote. "The results ... are also citizens' reaction to external attempts to pressure Russia, to threats, to sanctions, and to foreign attempts to stir up the situation in our country." While a few other parties also secured single-seat constituency, United Russia, the party associated with Putin, still took enough seats to achieve a constitutional majority and can now alter the Russian constitution without the vote of other political parties. People cast their ballots at a polling station during the parliamentary election in Kazan, Russia on September 18, 2016. (Raynur Shakir/Getty Images) Is Putin right that Russians favor him even after resources are cut off from them because they trust the government to make the right decisions, or is there something else at play here? A new record of popularity of the pro-Kremlin political party could be surprising given the current economic crisis, which has troubled Russia since 2014. Usually the negative macroeconomic environment would reduce the motivation of the voters to vote for the ruling political party, as some international studies have noted. However, as the recent elections and a study done by the Russian Public Opinion Research Center, or VTsIOM, show -- in Russia, this rule works in reverse. The same study also suggested that in periods of rising inflation the number of Russians who are ready to vote for United Russia increases. Potential support for President Vladimir Putin's electorate also gets a boost. The especially high level of inflation has become a noticeable part of Russian everyday life. During the last couple of years, the especially high level of inflation has become a noticeable part of Russian everyday life. This has come in part not from Russian economy policy, but from Russia's relationship with the international community. One important manifestation of this has been the economic impact of Russia's annexation of Crimea, an event that despite its devastating economic impacts has given a boost to Russian support of Putin and the United Russia party. This August marked two years since Putin's declaration that Russia would prohibit food imports from the EU and some other nations. And earlier this year, EU sanctions on Russian were prolonged until 2017. Both continue to have ripple effects beyond their own countries. The International Effect Of Putin's Food Import Ban The story of the sanctions standoff, later called an "EU-Russia economic war," started when the United States and a number of European countries established sanctions against Russia in connection with Russia's controversial annexation of Crimea. Soon after, President Putin signed a law in response, establishing food sanctions against countries that had denounced the annexation, including the EU and the U.S. The list of prohibited products included all fruits and vegetables, fish, milk and other dairy products, pork, beef and poultry meat -- 73 percent of which came from the EU. A man holds a Crimean flag in front of the Crimean parliament building on March 17, 2014 in Simferopol, Ukraine. (Dan Kitwood/Getty Images) As a political gesture, the ban was a powerful move. The sanctions created significant economic problems for the EU, with trade on the banned products dropping at least 12 percent. According to the Russian Ministry of Economic Development, losses to exporting countries amounted to 8.6 billion dollars, totaling the EU losses at around 0.4 percent of its annual GDP then. According to the Austrian Institute of Economic Research, the introduction of sanctions will cost EU countries some 2 million jobs (around 500,000 in Germany alone). Italy has seen the impacts of this firsthand. Losses in exports for Italian farmers during the last two years have so far amounted to about 600 euros, according to Gaetano Menna of the main Italian agricultural organization Confagricoltura, which represents and protects local agricultural enterprises. Michael Lohse from the German Farmers' Association, also known as Deutscher Bauernverband, said that the measurable impact for the first year of the embargo amounted to 1 billion euros for German farmers. But since the end of the first year, agricultural exporters seem to have adapted and diversified, making it more difficult to measure the loss numerically, according to Lohse. A similar decline in the agricultural sector of the economy can be seen in some other European nations, he explained. In some countries, like France, the reaction was even stronger and has become physical. 'Russian sanctions are causing the ruin of the French agro-economy.' "Russian sanctions are causing the ruin of the French agro-economy. Our farmers have already protested against them a few times," said Phillipe Legrand, who works for a tourist agency in Marseille, France. A year after the sanctions against Russia started, close to 50 percent of the EU and Eastern Europe felt the sanctions hurt their economies, according to a Gallup poll. "The effect of Russian food sanctions on EU everyday life was simple -- prices on products, which were banned to export, like vegetables and meat, declined and maybe this had an impact on the current deflation," said Mark Field, an IT programmer living in Berlin. But many people still favor the sanctions. In countries such as Poland, Romania, Croatia and Estonia, about half or more residents support the sanctions, according to the previously referenced Gallup poll. Farmers distribute bags of fruit to people protesting against the Russian food ban on Sept. 5, 2014 in Madrid. (Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images) And while many have seen a decline in their economies, countries outside the EU have benefited greatly. In fact, the import ban resulting from the sanctions has strengthened Russian economic relations with Switzerland, Brazil and Turkey. The impacts of an increased Swiss relationship in particular not only hurts the EU in the short term, but will also keep trade relations from full recovery if they are to ever end, according to Michael Lohse. This, he noted, is due to the fact that Switzerland will establish a much stronger relationship with Russia, and it is unlikely to leave the market if sanctions are lifted. The Situation Inside Russia Looking at the perspective from inside Russia, however, we see that the social costs of sanctions implementation are very high, and the same moves have had a far worse impact here than in other parts of Europe. One major impact on the quality of life has been a lack of good essential foods available to Russians. Most Russians have noticed products prices rising, and many people indicated a change in purchasing habits as a result. And these perceptions are supported by official government data. According to the Ministry of Economic Development, Russian food prices have gone up by over 30 percent, and have partly resulted in an increase in the number of Russians living below poverty level. In fact, over the last two years the number has risen to around one in seven Russians (19.2 million, 13.4 percent of the total population) that find themselves below the poverty line. 'When we went for holidays to Italy this summer, we brought back with us 14 kilos of cheese and ham.' The quality of food within the country has also presented problems for Russians as well. According to the Russian agency that regulates animal-related products and sciences, Rosselkhoznadzor, a disturbing amount of dairy products in Russian shops are falsified and contain chalk or starch, especially cheese. The head of the Federal Service for Veterinary and Phytosanitary Surveillance (Rosselkhoznadzor), Dankvert Sergey Alexeevich, has gone so far as to say that the overall proportion of falsification for some types of products, such as sour cream and cheese, can reach 50 percent. For Ekaterina Pivolova, a biology student from Moscow, it has, for example, "become very difficult to obtain good cheese in Russian shops." And the concerns over value and variety of food extends beyond just cheese. Dmitry Almelkov, who works in a Moscow bookstore, noted the situation has caused most sea products such as shrimp to disappear as well. "Most other types of fish that I saw was either very expensive or of low quality," he said. Some Russians are lucky enough to be able to leave the country and find the food they have missed under the sanctions. And those lucky enough make sure to stock up. Elena Serogova, whose job as a saleswoman allows her to travel, said that this is characteristic of everyone she knows who has the opportunity to go abroad. "When we went for holidays to Italy this summer, we brought back with us 14 kilos of cheese and ham," she said. A customer selects cheese products in Moscow on Aug. 29, 2014. Prices for local produce increased due to the Russian-EU ban. (Andrey Rudakov/Getty Images) So why then, in spite of the inconvenience his actions have caused to the people of Russia, do they continue to support him, and for how long will this last? If we cast our minds back a few years to the presidency of Boris Yeltsin, a time when the transition to a market economy was achieved at immense cost, it is easy to see why President Putin's popularity among the middle class has been based on creating economic growth and a higher standard of living for the Russian population. It has been especially important for people, who have lived through the Soviet era of the 1980s that left them earning money, but struggling to find food, only to be followed by the post-Soviet Russia of the 1990s when even the possibility to earn a decent salary had disappeared. With the ban on import of a number of everyday foods, many Russians have felt this higher standard of living decline, and even felt a regression into these less stable economic times. For these people, the higher standard of living was the main reason to put up with fewer political rights and less room for private freedom. But now this advantage has disappeared and, according to official economic forecasts, it's not going to come back soon. Putin is lucky that defiance against the EU has ultimately strengthened his position and the standing of the sanctions among Russians. For those nearly 20 million below the poverty line, the problem still remains that together with other factors, food sanctions have crashed the main advantage of Putin's rule: the rise of standards of living. No longer do they have the main reason to put up with challenges to freedom of speech or the political setbacks. Putin is lucky that defiance against the EU has ultimately strengthened his position and the standing of the sanctions among Russians. It would be logical to expect that people would start expressing their opinions and try to influence the government policy in a situation such as this, but as the election results show, we see the opposite effect. According to the authors of a Russian Public Opinion Research Center and Ohio State University study, there are at least three possible explanations that explain the result of the sanctions. The most interesting of them, though is one about the West. Some Russians tend to view high inflation as an effect of Western sanctions, not those imposed by Russia. As a result, the majority of Russians do not blame the government. This point of view is depicted by the government, whose reach, through local media, still extends to a larger audience than any other group in the country and thus dominates the Russian perspective today. President Putin speaks with Prime Minister Medvedev during parliamentary elections in Moscow on September 18, 2016. (Alexei Druzhinin/Getty Images) Given this, it is not surprising that most Russians, according to a study by the Levada Center, perceive Putin's import ban as a sign of strength against the West and think it is important to continue. This fact also shows that for many Russians, their idea of Russia's place in the world has changed very little. A large part of the population still seems to think that there is a permanent opposition between Russia and the Western world -- much like the attitudes under the Soviet Union. In that logic, sanctions, of course, are an instrument of power, and it doesn't matter how much harm it can bring to the country itself -- Russia comes first, even if Russia is hurting. So it seems that President Vladimir Putin knew what he was talking about when commenting on the election results: "Let me say again that this election result is good, but it is without question an advance on the part of our people." If the tough economic crisis hasn't impacted Putin's popularity, then there is not much else that could. But if inflation falls more in the future, we may just see a change in the political tides. Earlier on WorldPost: -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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25 марта, 20:22

What's Really at Stake When Congressional Staff Deserve Better Pay

Earlier this week Roll Call published an OpEd by Lee Drutman that calls on Congress to pay their staff more. He argues that lower salaries result in inexperienced staff and empowered lobbyists. Having spent years as both staffers and lobbyists, we couldn't agree more. But Drutman forgot an important piece about low pay: it has also led to a congressional staff that is decidedly white, male, and economically privileged - which stands in stark contrast to the American population. That disparity has serious consequences for federal policymaking, from how people interact with their elected representatives to the actual legislation passed. Anyone who has walked the halls of Congress has seen the uncomfortable truth of hordes of white congressional staffers wearing suits that probably cost as much as their paycheck. But what does this have to do with pay? And more yet, our democracy? Everything. The traditional path up the Hill hierarchy starts with an unpaid college internship. For many students, especially students of color, fronting Washington rent and forgoing a paid gig is simply not an option. Even for those who are able to make it work, uprooting their lives for the chance at a $30,000 a year staff assistant job after graduation is a whole lot less feasible given student loans and other obligations. A bigger paycheck is one of the top reasons staff leave the Hill. It is an even more critical factor for those without family financial support and women who more highly rank the importance of compensation. That's no surprise given women staffers are paid less than their male counterparts. And both women and people of color face a very real glass ceiling, as they are most heavily concentrated in lower-paid roles, perhaps with the exception for those who work for Members of color and women. This - in addition to insular hiring networks, lack of mentorship opportunities, and more - has led to a congressional staff that doesn't reflect America. People of color make up over 36 percent of the U.S. population, but only 7.1 percent of top Senate staffers, for example, and 68% of top staff were male in 2011. Many staffers are dedicated and empathetic, with the very best of intentions. But that isn't an adequate stand-in for a diverse and representative congressional workforce -- especially given that most Members of Congress themselves don't reflect the backgrounds of their constituents. That won't change any time soon. Women still make up only 19% of Congress. Only 35% of black citizens have a U.S. Representative of their race, while only 22% Hispanics, 12% of Asians, and 8% of Native Americans do. The majority of those serving in Congress are millionaires, while the average American household's median net worth is $56,355. This is not just a problem because it is unfair. The strength of our democracy - the ability of Congress to represent the American people - is a stake. While this may sound overly dramatic, it's not. Research shows that the background of legislators profoundly influences the bills they sponsor and issues they champion. For example, women lawmakers are more likely to sponsor legislation on reproductive health and black legislators are more likely to introduce criminal justice reform bills. On top of that, according to research by Professor David Broockman, constituents are two times less likely to contact a lawmaker who is of a different race than them. As for class, well, Professor Nicholas Carnes's statistical analysis found that about a third of economic bills from 1999-2008, most of which benefited the wealthy, would not have passed if Congress matched the class composition of the American people. So while we forge ahead on the gargantuan task of diversifying Congress, let's also look at that lower hanging fruit - congressional staff. Let's make sure that the gatekeepers who write legislation, give vote recommendations, and represent their bosses are more representative of the American people. Fortunately, there are nonprofit or state-based programs that enable low-income students to intern in Washington, and Congress does have a helpful loan repayment program. Plus, Democratic offices deserve credit for more racial and gender diversity amongst their staff. Still, more needs to be done. Those who don't come from the traditional, homogenous networks may not have the support - financial or otherwise - to succeed. In addition to paying interns and staff competitive salaries, Congress should strengthen or reimagine efforts like those of the Senate Diversity Initiative and Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute to make sure there is more diversity in who gets their foot in the door and who makes it to the top. The very fiber of our country depends on it. Linda Forman Naval is the Senior Director for Public Policy and Strategic Initiatives for the Scholars Strategy Network. Ron LeGrand is the Vice President of Public Policy for the National Network to End Domestic Violence. Both are former long-time congressional staffers. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

10 марта, 23:13

FYI: Women Are Shaping The Future Of Music. Here Are Just 25 Of Them.

What will the future of music look like? New York Times Magazine published an ambitious multimedia feature on Thursday that purported to answer that question, and apparently the answer is: pretty masculine. The feature, which includes contributions from fantastic writers such as Marlon James, George Saunders, Jenna Wortham and Jezebel's Jia Tolentino, unscrolls beautifully through an introduction (focused on Beyoncé) and 25 brief articles on individual songs that are shaping the future of music. Snippets of the songs play as you reach the relevant article. It's a delightful multimedia experience. The writers who contributed are talented and diverse, and the selected songs include many written and performed by people of color -- an extremely important factor, especially given how often black performers and artists have been written out of music history, and still are to this day. The list celebrates Fetty Wap, Kendrick Lamar, Run The Jewels, D'Angelo, Pharrell, Vybz Kartel, Chance The Rapper, Vince Staples and a song from "Hamilton." But one imbalance remained glaring: Out of 25 artists given the primary credit on the track noted, only four were women. Wortham wrote about Syd tha Kyd and the Internet, a band formed by Sydney Bennett of Odd Future; and then there are blurbs for Rihanna in duet with Sza, classical composer and singer Caroline Shaw, and country singer Margo Price. Should I go on? Oh, I can't -- those are the only female performers whose songs are among the 25. (Beyoncé apparently makes the introduction, but not the list.) To be sure, there probably simply wasn't room on the list for Beyoncé or other musical women -- the list had to make room for bland pop dude Charlie Puth, bland pop band Twenty One Pilots, bland band Coldplay and Lionel Richie -- whose early-'80s "Hello" is on the list thanks, apparently, to Adele's current hit, "Hello." (Adele is not on the list.) Oh, and Justin Bieber. (He's No. 1.) The music industry has never been accused of being excessively gentle to women. In the past few months alone, the rampant sexual harassment and assault problem has made headlines, with female artists and music industry workers speaking out about men within the field who have allegedly victimized women with impunity. Pop star Kesha recently lost a court battle to be freed from her contract with producer Dr. Luke, despite her allegations that he had sexually assaulted her. None of this is remotely in the same category as the NYT Magazine list's far more mundane failure, but the current spotlight on women's struggles in the industry would, one would hope, be a reminder that female musicians face significantly greater obstacles to being viewed as serious artists as opposed to sexual objects and/or dilettantes among serious male professionals. Instead, in the formulation of this list, it seems that serious music cred and stardom is needed to qualify a woman for consideration, while men make the list for all sorts of reasons -- as a particular instance of blandness, of a retro trend, of whatever.  To be clear, this is probably not the fault of the writers bylined in the piece, who each contributed thoughtful musings on the songs they selected. Most of the songs included are well worth writing about and listening to, and the components of the feature were exceptionally well executed. So who was overseeing the totality of the project, making sure that it came together into something that truly looked like the future of music, not another version of a boys' club? How did this happen? As a little reminder that women are shaping the future of music as much as men, we've quickly compiled 25 other songs by women we think are showing us what music will look like, and why: Katy Brooks, Senior Culture Editor: Courtney Barnett, “Pedestrian at Best”: Barnett turns banal observations into rousing, lyrically innovative poetry, pairing her perfectly muttered words with hard guitar lines and pounding drums. In the age of confessional writing, Barnett unabashedly embraces her internal monologue -- showing us that small stories and big music still go hand in hand. Lizzo, “Batches and Cookies”: In a performance of this song at Terminal 5 in New York City last year, Lizzo and her crew took to the stage in aprons and began tossing cookies into the audience. She rapped and belted, all the while dancing in unison with her collaborator Sophia Eris, who previously stood behind a rig emblazoned with the words “BIG GRRRL.” In an interview with HuffPost, Lizzo described the performance and her work, stating, “Yes, my new music is super body-positive. I'm going to stand firm in that, and that's something I want to represent.” All hail Lizzo. Alabama Shakes, “Don’t Wanna Fight”: Brittany Howard blends blues, roots and rock in “Don’t Wanna Fight,” a song off the band’s latest album, “Sound & Color.” From the moment she begins singing, she rips her own range apart, swinging from screams to croons with ease. She has, arguably, more presence on stage -- in volume, expression and killer guitar skills -- than any other band front(wo)man today. Mavis Staples, “Take Us Back”: Born in 1939, Staples has been revolutionizing the R&B, folk and activist realms since the 1950s with her deep vocals and gospel roots. She released “Livin' On a High Note” in February of this year, proving that the future of music is not only built on -- but carried forward by -- the successes of women artists who’ve been performing for decades. Anohni, “Manta Ray”: Made in collaboration with J. Ralph, the song was featured in the documentary “Racing Extinction” and subsequently nominated for an Oscar for Best Original Song. (She became the only transgender performer ever to have been nominated for an Academy Award as a result, and wrote about her decision not to attend the ceremonies after her performance was cut “due to time.”) The song itself celebrates Anohni’s languid lyricism, that drifts along the delicate sounds of a piano, bemoaning a dramatic oceanic scene. It’s a beautiful example of how music can elevate films dedicated to big issues -- like the potential loss of at least half of the world's species. Claire Fallon, Culture Staff Writer Thao with the Get Down Stay Down, “Meticulous Bird”: Thao Nguyen marries folksiness with jangling discordance, and the symbiotic relationship between the two styles shines in this rhythmic, chanting ditty -- interspersed with breathless, belligerent exclamations of “oh my, oh my.” Kesha, “Tik Tok”: For reasons you may have heard about, Kesha hasn’t been releasing new music recently, but her hits keep going, ahem, right round our heads, with her juddering, sneery vocals and buoyant choruses. If she were able to keep creating new music, we suspect it would be the next generation of great party jams. Nicki Minaj ft. Beyoncé “Feeling Myself”: Everything about this collaboration is a win, especially the swaggering confidence with which Nicki raps about sex, money and fame, while Beyoncé’s sultry, self-assured tones remind us that she’s “feeling herself.” Beyond the old-school girl group, this is a joint project between two bonafide lady superstars, carried out with both genius and verve, and that smacks of the future to us. CHVRCHES, “Leave a Trace”: This is a band, but it’s identifiably fronted by singer Lauren Mayberry, whose soaring, crystalline voice forms the centerpiece of its best songs. “Leave a Trace” encapsulates the band’s injection of synth-driven, ‘80s-inflected dance-pop with anthemic, emotional choruses. Lorde, “Buzzcut Season”: The New Zealand wunderkind was inescapable when her first hit “Royals” climbed charts a couple years back, and her whole first album is redolent of the poetic approach that made “Royals” so startling and stripped-down. Language-driven, but more repetitive and simplistic than rap, Lorde’s dreamy, haunting melodies capture attention with startling images: “I remember when your head caught flame / It kissed your scalp and caressed your brain / Well you laughed, baby it's okay / It's buzzcut season anyway.” Maddie Crum, Culture Staff Writer Lana Del Rey, “High By the Beach”: When Lana Del Rey first burst on the scene, no one could tell whether or not her whole schtick -- the droning vocals, the juvenile, maudlin lyrics -- was a joke. Was her sadness over her boyfriend’s video game-playing negligence sincere, performative, or both? Years later, her slacker girl crooning is as popular as ever, bringing to life the feeling of listless youth. Beach House, “Space Song”: Your favorite ethereal band explores the most ethereal place of all: space! Fluid, dreamy instrumentals create the effect of floating, and Victoria Legrand’s rich voice juxtaposes the song’s airiness. It’s not exactly new ground for Beach House -- putting on one of their albums is an easy way to get lost in repetitive, slowly shifting sounds. The band dares to not experiment, sticking instead with a cohesive body of work. Taylor Swift, “Bad Blood”: The breakup queen veers away from upbeat longing to sing about something totally different: female rivalries. While Swift’s choice to pit women against women in the wildly popular music video is off-putting for some, her rally cry is a welcome departure from her usual boy-driven ballads. Plus, it’s catchy as hell. St. Vincent, “Digital Witness”: From its first second, this song -- like many of St. Vincent’s -- bursts with energy. A funky trumpet welcomes in her voice, immediately recognizable due to its range. “Digital Witness” is the title song for her latest album, which is heavily critical of our recent reliance on electronic forms of entertainment. “People turn the TV on,” the chorus goes. Mitski, “Townie”: Mitski isn’t afraid to sing about her pain, an avenue for expression that only became an option for women rockers in the '90s. But she’s no Alanis; her raw, dangerous lyrics are sometimes sounded off amid a sweet sheen of echoes and distorted vocals. Even in “Townie,” which could squarely be classified as garage rock, she doesn’t succumb to the nasally conventions of the genre -- her powerful, feminine voice shines through. Priscilla Frank, Culture Staff Writer FKA Twigs, “Glass & Patron”: Twigs’ ode to voguing is a formidable example of paying tribute to your influences, especially those who don’t have the same visibility or scope. Rather than appropriating voguing culture, Twigs identifies herself as a newcomer and shares the stage with those who paved her way, working the homage into a wildly danceable warrior jam that will inspire you to form your own magical-freaky vogue troupe in the woods.   Grimes, “Kill vs. Maim”: “Cuz I’m only a man, I do what I can,” Grimes sings in her demented cheerleader chant, bridging the space between a brutal warrior and a teenage girl. The amped up anthem is part Ace of Base, part K-Pop, part “Bring It On,” the perfect mix of girliness and badassery not to be messed with. Alessia Cara, “Here”: The 19-year-old singer got famous posting cover songs on YouTube, and her hit single “Here” shows that sometimes the wisest, oldest souls are those judging you at a high school party. With soulful power, Cara describes the overwhelming lameness of her peers getting stupid hammered at a party she doesn’t want to be at in the ultimate rebuke to “get faded in the club” hits. Finally, a party anthem for hermits who like to be in bed by nine. Tinashe, “All Hands On Deck": “All Hands On Deck” was the first song since probably “I’m A Slave 4 U” that had me dancing like an idiot in front of the music video, trying to learn all the moves. Tinashe is the quintessential contemporary R&B goddess, whose sheer star power (and ungodly abs) have me fangirling like a 13-year-old begging my parents for concert tickets. Erykah Badu, “U Use To Call Me”: Queen Badu responded to Drake’s super viral “Hotline Bling” with a mixtape called “But You Caint Use My Phone.” The song “U Use To Call Me” even features a Drake imitator rapping over a warped riff on Drake’s hip-hopified salsa beat. Combining the hyper-timeliness of the Internet age with classic old school soul influences, Badu’s album is a glorious example of the Internet eating itself and busting out something convoluted and gorgeous. Tricia Tongco, Culture Social Media Editor Waxahatchee, “Under a Rock”: When listening to “Under a Rock,” it feels like frontwoman Katie Crutchfield is singing to you in her bedroom. The natural, real intimacy of her lyrics and the song’s soaring chorus convey a moment of transition most young adults have felt or are still experiencing. With its familiarity and hybrid sound of folk and punk, the song is accomplished in its own right, sounding like the best of ‘90s indie rock without feeling forced. Carly Rae Jepsen, “Warm Blood”: “Warm Blood” is a warbling, sensual pop song off of Jepsen’s criminally underrated album "Emotion."  Produced by Vampire Weekend's Rostam Batmanglij, the song shows us how a pop star can emulate '80s synth sounds and yet still sound fresh. If her voice sounds grittier than usual, it’s because she was vaping too much while recording her album. This dose of pop genius is perfect for tipsy gyrating, obsessive replaying and late night driving. Savages, “Adore”: “Adore” by Savages is a slow release of life-affirming love for life in the face of certain death. Sound intense? Well, their entire album “Adore Life” is a dark, powerful exploration of love in many forms -- from sexual fluidity to sexual power. “Adore” cements the album as a positive one, embracing the choice to live and the sense of gratitude, freedom and urgency that goes along with that. Ellie Goulding, “On My Mind”: “On My Mind” is the epitome of pop music for adults. While still fun, the song is more sophisticated than teen pop and gets major points for realness. Goulding is a talented storyteller with a unique ability to create mature yet dramatic dance music. Missy Elliott, “WTF”: Oh, how we’ve missed Missy Elliott. Marking Missy’s return to music after a decade, “WTF” hit us hard and fast. Her lyrics might sound merely like shaming or throwing shade at tongue-waggling girls, but instead she’s bringing up the issue of cultural appropriation (Miley, what’s good?). But in true Missy fashion, she also infuses humor into the song, comparing herself to a Big Mac and dismissing competition with “Blah-blah-blah.”  Bonus -- you can check out the latest from any of these women and women-fronted groups to see glimpses of what music is and will be: HaimEsperanza SpaldingCardi BSleater KinneyAdeleTune-YardsAngel HazeDemi LovatoSharon JonesEsperanza SpaldingSharon Van EttenHolly HerndonAnna MeredithKim GordonFlorence & the MachinePurity RingSharon Van EttenNeko CaseRobynAzealia BanksJanelle MonaeKehlaniBjork Julee Cruise Angel Olsen TrinaCiara KelalaBrandyLady GagaJenny LewisWet Add your own favorites -- and listen to the selected songs (at least, the ones available on Spotify) -- to the playlist: -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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11 февраля, 15:06

Legrand sees strong sales of Internet connected devices

PARIS, Feb 11 (Reuters) - French power switch and socket maker Legrand expects strong growth from devices that can connect to the Internet and plans to double the number of its product ranges that can network by 2020.

06 января, 23:41

How Obama's Gun Control Push Helps Domestic Violence Survivors

Clai Lasher-Sommers was 13 when her abusive stepfather shot her in the back. It took her six months to walk again. On Tuesday, the 58-year-old sat steps from President Barack Obama as he announced his plan to curb gun violence through executive action. A few minutes into his emotional speech, Obama acknowledged Lasher-Sommers' pain -- and the pain of countless other women across the nation -- when he explicitly named domestic abuse as a source of deadly gun violence in the U.S. Lasher-Sommers was relieved. "As women who end up living in domestic violence situations, one of the things that happens is that you lose all power," she said. "When you don’t hear your government officials talking about it, you are just silenced one more time." Obama’s executive action on guns, while modest, includes a number of proposals that advocates and gun violence prevention experts say could help protect domestic violence survivors from armed abusers. That’s important, as research has found that the presence of a gun makes it five times more likely that a woman will be murdered by her abuser. A proposal to expand the definition of who is engaged in the business of selling guns -- and therefore must be licensed and conduct background checks -- could reduce domestic-related gun violence, said Allison Anderman, staff attorney at the Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence. "It means that more people will have to get a dealer license," she said. "Those people are more likely now to catch domestic abusers who try to buy guns, and it will limit the number of domestic abusers who will be able to buy guns without a background check." Under Obama’s plan, Anderman added, local authorities will be notified when prohibited individuals try to buy a gun. "Hopefully, what this will do is enable law enforcement to catch domestic abusers who knowingly lie on the federal form they are required to fill out in order to buy a gun," she said.   Federal law already prohibits individuals convicted of domestic violence misdemeanors or subject to a permanent protective order from owning or buying guns, but the system has some serious gaps. Currently, prohibited abusers can skirt restrictions by purchasing guns from private sellers at gun shows or online, where they aren’t required to undergo a background check. As women who end up living in domestic violence situations, one of the thing that happens is that you lose all power. Clai Lasher-Sommers Ron LeGrand, vice president of public policy at the National Network to End Domestic Violence, said another key proposal involves incentivizing states to provide complete records about domestic violence crimes to the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, so that abusers who aren’t allowed to buy guns are flagged. "We need to know who is out there, and if they are convicted of a domestic violence act. If we don’t know that, the background check is not as effective and efficient as it needs to be," LeGrand said. "It is not going to save everybody, but it is a step in the right direction." Thirty-eight percent fewer women are shot to death by intimate partners in states where background checks are required for all handgun sales, he added. Domestic violence is responsible for only a narrow slice of gun violence in the U.S., but it's highly significant for women: Most women who die in gun homicides are killed by intimate partners or other family members. In 2011, over half of all women killed in gun violence were victims of domestic violence. Indeed, in the first few days of 2016, about 10 women across the country were shot and killed in apparent domestic homicides, according to a cursory search of local news reports. Mass shootings in the U.S., meaning those in which four or more people are killed, are often related to domestic violence. In 57 percent of mass shootings, the shooter targeted either a family member or an intimate partner, according to a Huffington Post analysis of mass shooting data. In one immediate step to protect domestic violence survivors, Attorney General Loretta Lynch issued a memo this week directing every U.S. attorney’s office to "redouble" efforts to prevent abusers from obtaining firearms. "Continued aggressive enforcement of laws designed to help combat domestic violence, particularly those laws related to illegal firearms possession, is an important responsibility of the [United States attorney offices]," it read, in part. Lasher-Sommers said Obama’s new gun measures offer some hope, but she acknowledged the work was just beginning. "I want to know that my children aren’t going to get shot and taken from me," she said. "I want to grow old with my children." ______ Melissa Jeltsen covers domestic violence and other issues related to women's health, safety and security. Tips? Feedback? Send an email or follow her on Twitter. ______ Related stories: Surviving A Mass Shooting Means Learning To Cope With The Next One We're Missing The Big Picture On Mass Shootings Gun Violence Survivors Demand Action: 'We Can Do Better Than This' Why Didn't You Just Leave? Six Domestic Violence Survivors Explain Why It's Never That Simple This Is How A Domestic Violence Victim Falls Through The Cracks Men Offer Abhorrent Excuses For Killing Women. Don't Repeat Them. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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14 декабря 2015, 17:19

BRIEF-Legrand and Samsung partner to develop new hotel-room management systems

* Samsung and Legrand sign an international technological partnership to develop new hotel-room management systems Source text: http://bit.ly/1NZCCrT Further company coverage: (Gdynia Newsroom:)

12 ноября 2015, 23:03

Забить Козла.

У Саркозизи неприятности. В деле о коррупции, связанной с Ливией и убийством кредитора (Мухомора) появился вещьдок, который "эксперт жюдисьер" признал подлинным. Саркозла все еще не посадили на пожизненное только потому, что в его время судей поголовно вербовала его опричнина. Вообще вербовка, в крайнем случае подкуп (френчи очень скупы и вороваты) это основной инструмент саркозлиной кодлы. Но вот теперь у копытного "доктора МГИМО" неприятности: он под следствием по траффику кокаина, да еще вот мозгами и кровавым калом Мухомора измазался... Кстати, "философ" Глюксман на днях издох. Тоже надо бы поспрошать копытное: Глюксманн мог знать лишнее...Nicolas Sarkozy a reçu une mauvaise nouvelle. Le dossier d’instruction des juges René Cros et Emmanuelle Legrand, qui enquêtent depuis plus de deux ans sur une plainte pour « faux et usage de faux » de l’ancien président de la République après la publication par Mediapart d’un document officiel libyen sur des soupçons de corruption, s’est enrichi la semaine dernière d’une pièce déterminante. Il s’agit d’une expertise judiciaire qui conclut à un « document authentique ayant existé sur support physique ». Mediapart n'est pas surpris : nous ne cessons d'affirmer depuis trois ans que ce document, obtenu auprès des sources les plus fiables, est authentique.

09 октября 2015, 16:48

The 6 Best (and Worst) Horror Movies Coming Out This October

These are the best and worst horror movies hitting theaters this month.

09 сентября 2015, 16:30

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Shake Shack, Shopify, Entellus Medical and Summit Materials

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Shake Shack, Shopify, Entellus Medical and Summit Materials

08 сентября 2015, 19:05

4 Impressive IPOs of 2015 That Still Hold Promise

4 best performing IPOs so far in 2015 that still have potential in the long run are Shake Shack Inc. (SHAK), Shopify Inc. (SHOP), Entellus Medical, Inc. (ENTL) and Summit Materials, Inc. (SUM).

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30 июля 2015, 19:35

ance stocks higher at close of trade; CAC 40 up 0.58%

France stocks were higher after the close on Thursday, as gains in the Technology Hardware&Equipment, Utilities and Gas&Water sectors led shares higher. At the close in Paris, the CAC 40 rose 0.58%, while the SBF 120 index added 0.45%. The best performers of the session on the CAC 40 were Safran SA (PARIS:SAF), which rose 10.04% or 6.16 points to trade at 67.51 at the close. Meanwhile, Legrand SA (PARIS:LEGD) added 7.16% or 3.73 points to end at 55.80 and Alcatel Lucent SA (PARIS:ALUA) was up 5.64% or 0.184 points to 3.446 in late trade. The worst performers of the session were Renault SA (PARIS:RENA), which fell 7.99% or 7.22 points to trade at 83.13 at the close. Peugeot SA (PARIS:PEUP) declined 3.98% or 0.75 points to end at 18.11 and Orange SA (PARIS:ORAN) was down 2.60% or 0.40 points to 15.00. The top performers on the SBF 120 were Safran SA (PARIS:SAF) which rose 10.04% to 67.51, Legrand SA (PARIS:LEGD) which was up 7.16% to settle at 55.80 and Ingenico Group (PARIS:INGC) which gained 6.45% to close at 116.30. The worst performers were Coface (PARIS:COFA) which was down 21.00% to 9.14 in late trade, Elis Services SA (PARIS:ELIS) which lost 13.74% to settle at 15.76 and Aperam (AMS:APAM) which was down 11.80% to 33.78 at the close. Falling stocks outnumbered advancing ones on the Paris Stock Exchange by 426 to 391 and 53 ended unchanged. Shares in Legrand SA (PARIS:LEGD) rose to all time highs; rising 7.16% or 3.73 to 55.80. Shares in Coface (PARIS:COFA) fell to all time lows; falling 21.00% or 2.43 to 9.14. Shares in Legrand SA (PARIS:LEGD) rose to all time highs; rising 7.16% or 3.73 to 55.80. The CAC 40 VIX, which measures the implied volatility of CAC 40 options, was down 0.62% to 18.98. Gold for December delivery was down 0.40% or 4.40 to $1088.90 a troy ounce. Elsewhere in commodities trading, Crude oil for delivery in September fell 0.02% or 0.01 to hit $48.78 a barrel, while the September Brent oil contract rose 0.16% or 0.09 to trade at $53.47 a barrel. EUR/USD was down 0.77% to 1.0899, while EUR/GBP fell 0.58% to 0.7001. The US Dollar Index was up 0.65% at 97.86.