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25 мая, 12:37

Во Владивостоке открыто производство источников бесперебойного питания

18 мая компания Инсистемс (входит в Группу компаний ЛАНИТ ) и Группа Legrand открыли во Владивостоке производство источников бесперебойного питания на базе созданного специально для этого проекта предприятия ДВ-Инжиниринг . Подробнее читайте на нашем сайте www.oilru.com

23 мая, 05:24

Производство источников бесперебойного питания наладят во Владивостоке

Соответствующее соглашение подписали Корпорация развития Дальнего Востока, компания "ДВ-Инжиниринг" и группа Legrand

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13 мая, 14:00

В Ульяновской области стартовало строительство завода Legrand

Французская компания Legrand начала строительство нового завода на территории Ульяновской области. 11 мая 2017 года состоялась церемония закладки камня на месте строительства будущего завода. Новая промышленная площадка разместится в промышленной зоне «Заволжье» г. Ульяновск.

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12 мая, 13:05

В Ульяновской области стартовало строительство завода Legrand

Французская компания Legrand начала строительство нового завода на территории Ульяновской области. 11 мая 2017 года состоялась церемония закладки камня на месте строительства будущего завода. Новая промышленная площадка разместится в промышленной зоне «Заволжье» г. Ульяновск.До конца 2018 года компания «Легран» планирует построить завод по производству низковольтного коммутационного оборудования площадью более 22 тысяч кв. м. За 2017-2018 годы инвестор вложит в строительство новой площадки более 1 млрд рублей. В рамках реализации проекта будут созданы не менее 300 новых рабочих мест.Одной из основных целей международной компании является организация в России выпуска полного спектра оборудования для комплексного обеспечения крупных проектов в различных отраслях. В Ульяновской области уже работают два предприятия Legrand, где осуществляется сборка источников бесперебойного питания и конденсаторных установок, производ...

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12 мая, 11:58

В Ульяновской области приступили к строительству завода Legrand

В Ульяновской области приступили к строительству завода Legrand

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12 мая, 11:57

В Ульяновской области приступили к строительству завода Legrand

В Ульяновской области приступили к строительству завода Legrand

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01 мая, 21:33

Wyoming Residents Troll Homophobic Senator In The Most Delightful Way

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Wyoming took its reputation as “The Equality State” to heart this weekend when residents responded to a senator’s tone-deaf assessment of the LGBTQ community in a truly epic way.  During an April 25 visit to Greybull High School and Middle School in Greybull, Wyoming, Senator Mike Enzi (R-Wyo.) was asked about his efforts to protect the state’s queer residents. Noting that the state needed “civility” above anything else, the senator appeared to suggest that those who identify as LGBTQ face discrimination only if they’re too open about it.  “We always say that in Wyoming you can be just about anything you want to be, as long as you don’t push it in somebody’s face,” he said. “I know a guy who wears a tutu and goes to bars on Friday night and is always surprised that he gets in fights. Well, he kind of asks for it.”  Mullen & Vanata: tutu foremen. #liveandlettutu #resistinginthered #stillnotaskingforit A post shared by Wyoming Art Party (@wyomingartparty) on Apr 27, 2017 at 6:10pm PDT Needless to say, the remarks sparked an immediate backlash. Later that day, Enzi released a statement apologizing for what he called “a poor choice of words.”  Despite the senator’s backpedaling, Wyoming residents responded by visiting bars, restaurants and other establishments dressed in colorful tutus. They later shared snapshots of their tulle-heavy protests on Twitter, Instagram and other social media outlets with the hashtag #LiveAndLetTutu.  @krszjz took thr best photo from last night...#liveandlettutu #wyoming #laramie pic.twitter.com/1Z3TVzi4Xw— Nina McConigley (@ninawyo) April 29, 2017 Patrick Harrington, who is a resident of Laramie, told Wyoming Public Media he came up with the idea to show Enzi “that he really is representing a large group of people and a really diverse group of people.” Harrington’s friend Mike Vanata, who helped organize the effort, added, “I’m really upset that Wyoming kind of lives in this dark shadow of a myth that we’re just a completely gay-hating state or something, and I think from this action, we’re correcting that.” Take a look at some incredible photos from the #LiveAndLetTutu effort below.  Hey @SenatorEnzi three friends walked into a bar wearing tutus and they weren't "asking for it". #liveandlettutu #Wyoming #Equality pic.twitter.com/MQpj9c3zc8— AMCuprill (@AMCuprill) April 29, 2017 Hey @senatorenzi here is a message from four votes in Lander Wyoming, house district 54. We see your blatant disregard for minorities and your loudly expressed privilege and ignorance - we will raise you three tutu's and a "please show up to any town hall meeting, ever." #Wyoming #liveandlettutu #wyomei #landerwyoming A post shared by Mei Ratz (@meiratz) on Apr 28, 2017 at 8:00pm PDT Happy International Dance Day from all of us at West Potomac's Billy Elliot. #liveandlettutu #BillyElliot #tutu #dance #ballet #tap #theatre pic.twitter.com/jOppBi4vNy— West Potomac Theatre (@WestPoTheatre) April 29, 2017 So Ali and I walked into a bar and asked for a beer. We got em,@SenatorEnzi. #liveandlettutu pic.twitter.com/uoViglV7cP— Dave's not here (@writesdave) April 29, 2017 This one is for Mike Enzi. #liveandlettutu A post shared by Eric Krszjzaniek (@krszjz) on Apr 28, 2017 at 6:11pm PDT Portraits of Real Wyoming #5 Vickie and Sissy Goodwin. Sissy, being Wyoming's most famous crossdresser and a man who has fought against bigotry for longer than I've been alive, who Mike Enzi called personally to apologize about his recent comments, is also a retired professor, loving husband for 49 years, and loving father of two. At the end of the night, as I thanked him for making the trip down to Laramie, and as we stood in a bar halfway between the spot where he had been arrested 30 years ago for dressing in women's clothing and the bar where Matthew Shepherd had ordered his final drink, Sissy intimated that the evening was the highlight of his life. There's more beauty in Wyoming than just mountains and open spaces, and there's more to its people than Cheneys and closed minds. #liveandlettutu A post shared by Eric Krszjzaniek (@krszjz) on Apr 29, 2017 at 10:24am PDT #liveandlettutu pic.twitter.com/qwOZBhLH9r— Gloria Garayua (@GloriaGarayua) April 30, 2017 The dogs getting into #liveandlettutu #wyoming #laradise @SenatorEnzi pic.twitter.com/zrjEKbrte8— Meg Wilson (@Megglizzard) April 28, 2017 I had to miss the #liveandlettutu festivities in Laramie in exchange for a trip to @nwc_photo - I was so excited to see this tutu when I arrived. Thank you all endlessly for your work and support for our friends and neighbors. Who else is excited to work with Enzi on inclusive legislation!? ✋ A post shared by Legrand Wolf (@legrand.wolf) on Apr 28, 2017 at 8:46pm PDT #liveandlettutu at the Lander Bar pic.twitter.com/xPvVFx9sP7— Katherine Boehrer (@kboehrer) April 29, 2017 Lander's operation tutu! Love this town!!! #operationtutu #liveandlettutu #normalizetutu A post shared by Liz Hardwick (@lizard_wick) on Apr 28, 2017 at 9:16pm PDT #liveandlettutu Because everyone deserves to be treated with respect. Because victims are not to blame for the ignorance and violence they encounter. Because I look soooooooo cute in this tutu! Shoutout to #stonewallkickballdc for a great event! #TAPthat A post shared by Carlvert Green (@ceyonce) on Apr 30, 2017 at 7:54pm PDT Went out tonight donned in my tutu to make a statement and take a stand for equality. Was such a good night filled with many positive conversations bringing awareness to a cause many were unaware of in the state of Wyoming. It was also a night filled with many reconnections that I am so very grateful for that I was unsure were even possible because of mistakes I have made in the past. It was also a night I found myself in a precarious situation in which the phrase "dude, I'm sooo gay!" turned out to be a phrase that would help to alleviate a potentially violent encounter when the very suspicion of my sexuality resulted in violence in the past. I do want to reiterate that the night was amazing and overwhelmingly positive for the reconnections I was able to make even though I probably don't deserve it. The night was also amazing because of the questions and positive conversations I had with complete strangers as a result of said questions about my attire for the evening. This night has only served to confirm that I indeed lead a very quirky life. #liveandlettutu A post shared by Zeke (@justsomedude999) on Apr 28, 2017 at 11:52pm PDT For more ways to combat bigotry, check out the Queer Voices newsletter.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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09 февраля, 04:22

Французская Legrand планирует разместить в ТОР "Хабаровск" сборочное производство

По оценкам, эффективной реализации проекта будет способствовать тот факт, что спрос на продукцию компании растет как на Дальнем Востоке России, так и на азиатском рынке

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31 января, 07:34

Montblanc обтянула ручки кожей аллигатора

Компания-производитель часов и пишущих инструментов Montblanc выпустила коллекцию ручек Masters for Meisterstück Firenze Alligator, посвященную флорентийским ремесленникам-кожевникам. Перьевая и шариковая ручки в размере LeGrand обтянуты натуральной кожей аллигатора с ручной прошивкой.

21 декабря 2016, 22:41

13 Biggest Brand Mascot Stories of 2016

By Heather Taylor 2016 was a definitive year for brand mascots doing very big things. From debuting in Rio de Janeiro to driving a NUTmobile cross country, these icons launched major comebacks, hit the election campaign trail, and even dropped mixtapes. It’s a brand mascot’s world and we’re just living in it. Here’s a refresher on our favorite stories from 2016 starring these familiar faces (with a couple of fresh ones in between!). Comebacks Thumping his way into 2016 bigger, better, and bunnier than ever before is everyone’s favorite pink hare, the Energizer Bunny. With a reloaded comeback courtesy of San Francisco ad agency Camp + King, the 27-year-old mascot has a new tagline (Still Going™) and multimedia campaign where today’s media landscape serves as a playground for his disruptive nature. He’s got his own Spotify playlist and rocked the runway at New York Fashion Week at designer Angela Simmons’ fashion show. He even shared what he looks like without his infamous sunglasses! All across the United States, reports of sightings of another brand mascot keep popping up. Witnesses have revealed that he’s tall, covered in leaves, and wearing a green toga. Why, it’s none other than the Green Giant! #TheGiantAwakens teaser, created by Deutsch New York, shares shadowy glimpses of the big guy’s return to the Valley with the promise that he has big things in store. Debuts As the original Most Interesting Man in the World departed for a mission to Mars, his new counterpart made his debut for Dos Equis. Created by the team at Havas Worldwide New York and played by French actor Augustin Legrand, the latest Most Interesting Man in the World is just as adventurous as his predecessor. His tagline has been modified to “Stay thirsty, mis amigos,” he’s joined by an audacious female companion, and his legendary status includes sparring in Samurai armor and racing airboats down sand dunes. It’s never easy for a spokescharacter to retire, but Norm Shearer, CCO and partner at Cactus, thinks the transition was exceptionally done, “When Dos Equis had to replace the retiring actor, the core idea was so strong (and the agency handled the transition so well as part of the narrative) that switching the actor out took a great mascot and great idea and refreshed it." How about some fried chicken to go with your beer? 2016 saw the debut of many, many new Colonels for KFC with actors including Mad Men’s Vincent Kartheiser and comedian Rob Riggle getting into character. Chris Walker, Creative Director at HZDG, is a big fan of the ever-rotating faces for the chicken ‘n biscuits chain. “This is a great way to ‘freshen’ up a mascot that's been around for a long time. Each new KFC campaign stands out even more because it has a different actor playing the part, like George Hamilton as the Extra Crispy Colonel Sanders.” Major Events + Awards As the world spent the summer glued to the Rio 2016 Olympics, they also met Vinicius and Tom, the official mascots for the Olympic and Paralympic games. A pair “born out of excitement” for the sporting event, the two were instantly beloved by audiences universally. But the Olympic mascot fun isn’t over yet! Kelsey Nelson, Director of Social Influence at Ferebee Lane + Co., loved the under-the-radar announcement of Soohorang and Bandabi, mascots for the PyeongChang 2018 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games. Speaking of gold medals and awards, this year we celebrated our 13th Annual Madison Avenue Walk of Fame. More than 60,000 voted online and the results are in: the winning mascots are the FOX Robot and Woodsy Owl! Political Campaigns Election season dominated 2016 media coverage with one candidate running for office with an alTUNAtive political platform: StarKist’s Charlie® the Tuna. Throwing his red hat into the ring, Charlie joined us for a fireside chat where we discussed his “pro-good taste” stance and ambitions for making mundane meals full of flavor and fun. What has Charlie been up to since his campaign ended? Andy Mecs, Director of Marketing and Innovation at StarKist and Charlie’s campaign manager, has the scoop. “Charlie brought levity and fun to the election. He engaged his beloved fans to select his VP swimming-mate, Sallie the Salmon, and his fans were behind him 100 percent throughout the entire presidential race. Although he didn’t win the election, Charlie accepted an even bigger job as President of Charlie's® World — a 360-degree digital oasis filled with videos, activities for kids, recipes and more!” Birthdays + Anniversaries General Mills kicked off 2016 turning 150-years-old, as the home to icons like the Pillsbury Doughboy, Betty Crocker, and Green Giant. Shortly afterward, another icon hit a major milestone: Mr. Peanut’s 100th birthday. For Jeff Siegel, VP and Creative Director at CP+B Miami, Mr. Peanut turning 100 is hands-down the best brand mascot story of the year. “Not just because he’s been single-handedly keeping the monocle alive for decades, but because he was invented by a 14-year-old, proving you don’t need a fully formed brain to make great advertising.” The dapper gent was honored with festive events held throughout the year including travelling across the country in a 27-foot-long NUTmobile with his Peanutter pals, an appearance on Good Morning America, and a birthday party sweepstakes for fans. As Mr. Peanut enters his 101st year, the Planters team shares that he will continue to share Planters’ nut varieties with consumers everywhere, all while touting the irresistibility of his favorite snack.  There ain’t no party like an M&M’S 75th anniversary party! Amanda Kloos, Associate Creative Director at HZDG, loved seeing the whole squad’s commercial spots represented in the “Candyman” remix by Zedd and Aloe Blacc. “M&M’S 75th anniversary spot, which featured past and present M&M’S mascots, was one of my favorites of the year. Great way to celebrate a candy brand that has been one of America's (and one of mine!) favorites for generations.”   In Memoriam In April 2016, actor Arthur Anderson passed away at 93. He provided the vocal talent for Lucky the Leprechaun at Lucky Charms, spanning the generations from 1963 to 1992. In 2005, he told ABC News that he always thought Lucky was a fun character to play. “Hardly a day goes by when somebody doesn’t ask me to sing the Lucky Charms jingle, and I’m proud of that.” Jingle Notes It’s time for a remix, Mr. Clean! This year, Leo Burnett Toronto remixed Mr. Clean’s jingle for a millennial audience. The newly revamped ditty features electric and acoustic guitars mixed in with its familiar chorus. Finally, we leave you with some fire tracks courtesy of Hamburger Helper’s Lefty. In April, he quietly dropped the mixtape “Watch the Stove” on Soundcloud. The mix became an overnight sensation online and proved to fans that this oven mitt knows when it’s lit on and off the stove. (And ICYMI, Lefty even gave us a little insight into his creative process and dream collab too.) -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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27 октября 2016, 01:12

What Will The New Most Interesting Man In The World Do Next?

Heather Taylor He once cheated death… And death was perfectly okay with it. The newest Most Interesting Man in the World has arrived with a bang. Formerly portrayed by actor Jonathan Goldsmith (last seen jet setting off to the moon), the latest incarnation of the Dos Equis spokesperson is played by French actor Augustin Legrand. In the new Havas Worldwide New York commercial, the legend traverses the sand and Serengeti. Some of his impressive feats in the 47-second “Airboat” spot include whittling a football out of a coconut (and kicking it stadium style past a pair of giraffes), slicing a knife in half using another knife, and engaging in an outrageous sand dune race. He’s younger and scruffier. His tagline has been modified (“Stay thirsty, mis amigos”) and he’s joined by an adventurous female companion, but the enigmatic gent is still full of edgy mystique. And it taps into the character’s evolution for millennials well. As Toygar Bazarkaya, Chief Creative Officer of the Americas at Havas says, “The new Most Interesting Man is a man of action. He's never one to reminisce on times past, which stylistically changes everything. With a faster pace and more energy, we're reinvigorating and modernizing one of the greatest campaigns.” What’s the ad world’s take on the new Most Interesting Man anyway? Prior to the commercial’s release, I caught up with the industry’s best and brightest for their thoughts on what they’d like to see the icon do next. Intimately aware he has a legend that precedes him (such as being allowed to touch art in museums and how people hang on his every word, even his prepositions), here are the experiences they’d like to see the spokescharacter tackle. Sweep the 2016 Election “[He] will announce his bid as a write-in candidate for the U.S. presidency. Political analysts say he has the charisma of Kennedy and Reagan-like wit, he is unstoppable. The Augustin Legrand campaign captivates the public’s eye. Will he take the presidency?” — Christina Oswald, Digital Marketing Analyst, Moncur Win the new space race “The Most Interesting Man will beat Elon Musk to Mars using lost designs imagined by Leonardo da Vinci. The spacecraft will be built of timber, iron and an old hot air balloon. He will bring a Cheetah with him for company. Because he has to out-interesting the world's real most interesting man.” — Sean MacPhedran, Senior Content Strategist, SMITH Focus on doing good while looking good “I think the new guy will be ‘crunchier’ and more focused on doing good. He'll ride a corporate trend of doing well while doing good. He'll have a bit of a nonprofity feel at times. He'll still be attractive and edgy and funny.” — Barak Kassar, Partner, BKW Partners Break the internet — and then buy it “He will negotiate a lasting peace in the Middle East. And then foment a political revolution in the Midwest. He will rekindle the declining bee population in just one romantic evening. Mt. Everest will add him to its bucket list. He will get a ticket to mars, as a layover. He’ll break the Internet, and then buy it.” — “The Writer’s Room” at Brownstein Group Whatever happens, no memes please “My one request to Dos Equis, please don’t use DJ Khaled. We’ve all moved on.” — Jamie Delaney, Senior Copywriter, Moncur Stay thirsty for more commercial spots to come, mis amigos. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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19 октября 2016, 20:05

Выключатель Gira + Z-Wave. 4-кнопочный радио выключатель на базе Z-Uno

Какие задачи решает радио выключатель: В комнате с готовым ремонтом переместили мебель, шкафом закрыли выключатель На этапе ремонта не продумали удобный выключатель около кровати В доме из бруса не эстетично тянуть наружную проводку, требуются радио выключатели, но с конкретным дизайном Интеграция с существующей системой автоматизации На данный момент существуют Z-Wave выключатели на батарейках, например Z-Wave.Me Wall Controller, но эти выключатели идут с определенным дизайном клавиш. Если вы хотите использовать выключатели Legrand, Gira и др., то тут на помощь приходит Z-Wave плата Z-Uno. Я покажу как из обычно выключателя Gira сделать радио выключатель на батарейках, который можно установить в любое удобное место. Видео работы выключателя в конце статьи. Читать дальше →

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03 октября 2016, 15:06

Компания Legrand вложит около 1 млрд руб. в завод в Ульяновской области

Ввод нового предприятия в эксплуатацию запланирован до конца 2018 года

23 сентября 2016, 20:45

Putin Sanctioned His Own People. But It Helped Him Win.

MOSCOW -- On Sept. 18, the Russian Federation held elections for the seventh session of the lower house of parliament. The political body, known as the State Duma, will now consist of only four political parties and will be dominated by the current government's party, United Russia, despite a noticeably declining standard of living across the country and the implementation of sanctions. The Communist Party, the nationalist Liberal Democratic Party of Russia and A Just Russia party will also hold seats. Support for United Russia in this election even as sanctions prevented the importation of food from the European Union and other nations seems to suggest a strengthening of President Vladimir Putin's reach, an impressive ability to incite nationalism and a much larger likelihood of his victory in the upcoming presidential elections. "At a time of difficulties, considerable uncertainty and risks, people naturally choose stability and trust the leading political force," said Putin following the vote. "The results ... are also citizens' reaction to external attempts to pressure Russia, to threats, to sanctions, and to foreign attempts to stir up the situation in our country." While a few other parties also secured single-seat constituency, United Russia, the party associated with Putin, still took enough seats to achieve a constitutional majority and can now alter the Russian constitution without the vote of other political parties. People cast their ballots at a polling station during the parliamentary election in Kazan, Russia on September 18, 2016. (Raynur Shakir/Getty Images) Is Putin right that Russians favor him even after resources are cut off from them because they trust the government to make the right decisions, or is there something else at play here? A new record of popularity of the pro-Kremlin political party could be surprising given the current economic crisis, which has troubled Russia since 2014. Usually the negative macroeconomic environment would reduce the motivation of the voters to vote for the ruling political party, as some international studies have noted. However, as the recent elections and a study done by the Russian Public Opinion Research Center, or VTsIOM, show -- in Russia, this rule works in reverse. The same study also suggested that in periods of rising inflation the number of Russians who are ready to vote for United Russia increases. Potential support for President Vladimir Putin's electorate also gets a boost. The especially high level of inflation has become a noticeable part of Russian everyday life. During the last couple of years, the especially high level of inflation has become a noticeable part of Russian everyday life. This has come in part not from Russian economy policy, but from Russia's relationship with the international community. One important manifestation of this has been the economic impact of Russia's annexation of Crimea, an event that despite its devastating economic impacts has given a boost to Russian support of Putin and the United Russia party. This August marked two years since Putin's declaration that Russia would prohibit food imports from the EU and some other nations. And earlier this year, EU sanctions on Russian were prolonged until 2017. Both continue to have ripple effects beyond their own countries. The International Effect Of Putin's Food Import Ban The story of the sanctions standoff, later called an "EU-Russia economic war," started when the United States and a number of European countries established sanctions against Russia in connection with Russia's controversial annexation of Crimea. Soon after, President Putin signed a law in response, establishing food sanctions against countries that had denounced the annexation, including the EU and the U.S. The list of prohibited products included all fruits and vegetables, fish, milk and other dairy products, pork, beef and poultry meat -- 73 percent of which came from the EU. A man holds a Crimean flag in front of the Crimean parliament building on March 17, 2014 in Simferopol, Ukraine. (Dan Kitwood/Getty Images) As a political gesture, the ban was a powerful move. The sanctions created significant economic problems for the EU, with trade on the banned products dropping at least 12 percent. According to the Russian Ministry of Economic Development, losses to exporting countries amounted to 8.6 billion dollars, totaling the EU losses at around 0.4 percent of its annual GDP then. According to the Austrian Institute of Economic Research, the introduction of sanctions will cost EU countries some 2 million jobs (around 500,000 in Germany alone). Italy has seen the impacts of this firsthand. Losses in exports for Italian farmers during the last two years have so far amounted to about 600 euros, according to Gaetano Menna of the main Italian agricultural organization Confagricoltura, which represents and protects local agricultural enterprises. Michael Lohse from the German Farmers' Association, also known as Deutscher Bauernverband, said that the measurable impact for the first year of the embargo amounted to 1 billion euros for German farmers. But since the end of the first year, agricultural exporters seem to have adapted and diversified, making it more difficult to measure the loss numerically, according to Lohse. A similar decline in the agricultural sector of the economy can be seen in some other European nations, he explained. In some countries, like France, the reaction was even stronger and has become physical. 'Russian sanctions are causing the ruin of the French agro-economy.' "Russian sanctions are causing the ruin of the French agro-economy. Our farmers have already protested against them a few times," said Phillipe Legrand, who works for a tourist agency in Marseille, France. A year after the sanctions against Russia started, close to 50 percent of the EU and Eastern Europe felt the sanctions hurt their economies, according to a Gallup poll. "The effect of Russian food sanctions on EU everyday life was simple -- prices on products, which were banned to export, like vegetables and meat, declined and maybe this had an impact on the current deflation," said Mark Field, an IT programmer living in Berlin. But many people still favor the sanctions. In countries such as Poland, Romania, Croatia and Estonia, about half or more residents support the sanctions, according to the previously referenced Gallup poll. Farmers distribute bags of fruit to people protesting against the Russian food ban on Sept. 5, 2014 in Madrid. (Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images) And while many have seen a decline in their economies, countries outside the EU have benefited greatly. In fact, the import ban resulting from the sanctions has strengthened Russian economic relations with Switzerland, Brazil and Turkey. The impacts of an increased Swiss relationship in particular not only hurts the EU in the short term, but will also keep trade relations from full recovery if they are to ever end, according to Michael Lohse. This, he noted, is due to the fact that Switzerland will establish a much stronger relationship with Russia, and it is unlikely to leave the market if sanctions are lifted. The Situation Inside Russia Looking at the perspective from inside Russia, however, we see that the social costs of sanctions implementation are very high, and the same moves have had a far worse impact here than in other parts of Europe. One major impact on the quality of life has been a lack of good essential foods available to Russians. Most Russians have noticed products prices rising, and many people indicated a change in purchasing habits as a result. And these perceptions are supported by official government data. According to the Ministry of Economic Development, Russian food prices have gone up by over 30 percent, and have partly resulted in an increase in the number of Russians living below poverty level. In fact, over the last two years the number has risen to around one in seven Russians (19.2 million, 13.4 percent of the total population) that find themselves below the poverty line. 'When we went for holidays to Italy this summer, we brought back with us 14 kilos of cheese and ham.' The quality of food within the country has also presented problems for Russians as well. According to the Russian agency that regulates animal-related products and sciences, Rosselkhoznadzor, a disturbing amount of dairy products in Russian shops are falsified and contain chalk or starch, especially cheese. The head of the Federal Service for Veterinary and Phytosanitary Surveillance (Rosselkhoznadzor), Dankvert Sergey Alexeevich, has gone so far as to say that the overall proportion of falsification for some types of products, such as sour cream and cheese, can reach 50 percent. For Ekaterina Pivolova, a biology student from Moscow, it has, for example, "become very difficult to obtain good cheese in Russian shops." And the concerns over value and variety of food extends beyond just cheese. Dmitry Almelkov, who works in a Moscow bookstore, noted the situation has caused most sea products such as shrimp to disappear as well. "Most other types of fish that I saw was either very expensive or of low quality," he said. Some Russians are lucky enough to be able to leave the country and find the food they have missed under the sanctions. And those lucky enough make sure to stock up. Elena Serogova, whose job as a saleswoman allows her to travel, said that this is characteristic of everyone she knows who has the opportunity to go abroad. "When we went for holidays to Italy this summer, we brought back with us 14 kilos of cheese and ham," she said. A customer selects cheese products in Moscow on Aug. 29, 2014. Prices for local produce increased due to the Russian-EU ban. (Andrey Rudakov/Getty Images) So why then, in spite of the inconvenience his actions have caused to the people of Russia, do they continue to support him, and for how long will this last? If we cast our minds back a few years to the presidency of Boris Yeltsin, a time when the transition to a market economy was achieved at immense cost, it is easy to see why President Putin's popularity among the middle class has been based on creating economic growth and a higher standard of living for the Russian population. It has been especially important for people, who have lived through the Soviet era of the 1980s that left them earning money, but struggling to find food, only to be followed by the post-Soviet Russia of the 1990s when even the possibility to earn a decent salary had disappeared. With the ban on import of a number of everyday foods, many Russians have felt this higher standard of living decline, and even felt a regression into these less stable economic times. For these people, the higher standard of living was the main reason to put up with fewer political rights and less room for private freedom. But now this advantage has disappeared and, according to official economic forecasts, it's not going to come back soon. Putin is lucky that defiance against the EU has ultimately strengthened his position and the standing of the sanctions among Russians. For those nearly 20 million below the poverty line, the problem still remains that together with other factors, food sanctions have crashed the main advantage of Putin's rule: the rise of standards of living. No longer do they have the main reason to put up with challenges to freedom of speech or the political setbacks. Putin is lucky that defiance against the EU has ultimately strengthened his position and the standing of the sanctions among Russians. It would be logical to expect that people would start expressing their opinions and try to influence the government policy in a situation such as this, but as the election results show, we see the opposite effect. According to the authors of a Russian Public Opinion Research Center and Ohio State University study, there are at least three possible explanations that explain the result of the sanctions. The most interesting of them, though is one about the West. Some Russians tend to view high inflation as an effect of Western sanctions, not those imposed by Russia. As a result, the majority of Russians do not blame the government. This point of view is depicted by the government, whose reach, through local media, still extends to a larger audience than any other group in the country and thus dominates the Russian perspective today. President Putin speaks with Prime Minister Medvedev during parliamentary elections in Moscow on September 18, 2016. (Alexei Druzhinin/Getty Images) Given this, it is not surprising that most Russians, according to a study by the Levada Center, perceive Putin's import ban as a sign of strength against the West and think it is important to continue. This fact also shows that for many Russians, their idea of Russia's place in the world has changed very little. A large part of the population still seems to think that there is a permanent opposition between Russia and the Western world -- much like the attitudes under the Soviet Union. In that logic, sanctions, of course, are an instrument of power, and it doesn't matter how much harm it can bring to the country itself -- Russia comes first, even if Russia is hurting. So it seems that President Vladimir Putin knew what he was talking about when commenting on the election results: "Let me say again that this election result is good, but it is without question an advance on the part of our people." If the tough economic crisis hasn't impacted Putin's popularity, then there is not much else that could. But if inflation falls more in the future, we may just see a change in the political tides. Earlier on WorldPost: -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

23 сентября 2016, 20:45

Putin Sanctioned His Own People. But It Helped Him Win.

MOSCOW -- On Sept. 18, the Russian Federation held elections for the seventh session of the lower house of parliament. The political body, known as the State Duma, will now consist of only four political parties and will be dominated by the current government's party, United Russia, despite a noticeably declining standard of living across the country and the implementation of sanctions. The Communist Party, the nationalist Liberal Democratic Party of Russia and A Just Russia party will also hold seats. Support for United Russia in this election even as sanctions prevented the importation of food from the European Union and other nations seems to suggest a strengthening of President Vladimir Putin's reach, an impressive ability to incite nationalism and a much larger likelihood of his victory in the upcoming presidential elections. "At a time of difficulties, considerable uncertainty and risks, people naturally choose stability and trust the leading political force," said Putin following the vote. "The results ... are also citizens' reaction to external attempts to pressure Russia, to threats, to sanctions, and to foreign attempts to stir up the situation in our country." While a few other parties also secured single-seat constituency, United Russia, the party associated with Putin, still took enough seats to achieve a constitutional majority and can now alter the Russian constitution without the vote of other political parties. People cast their ballots at a polling station during the parliamentary election in Kazan, Russia on September 18, 2016. (Raynur Shakir/Getty Images) Is Putin right that Russians favor him even after resources are cut off from them because they trust the government to make the right decisions, or is there something else at play here? A new record of popularity of the pro-Kremlin political party could be surprising given the current economic crisis, which has troubled Russia since 2014. Usually the negative macroeconomic environment would reduce the motivation of the voters to vote for the ruling political party, as some international studies have noted. However, as the recent elections and a study done by the Russian Public Opinion Research Center, or VTsIOM, show -- in Russia, this rule works in reverse. The same study also suggested that in periods of rising inflation the number of Russians who are ready to vote for United Russia increases. Potential support for President Vladimir Putin's electorate also gets a boost. The especially high level of inflation has become a noticeable part of Russian everyday life. During the last couple of years, the especially high level of inflation has become a noticeable part of Russian everyday life. This has come in part not from Russian economy policy, but from Russia's relationship with the international community. One important manifestation of this has been the economic impact of Russia's annexation of Crimea, an event that despite its devastating economic impacts has given a boost to Russian support of Putin and the United Russia party. This August marked two years since Putin's declaration that Russia would prohibit food imports from the EU and some other nations. And earlier this year, EU sanctions on Russian were prolonged until 2017. Both continue to have ripple effects beyond their own countries. The International Effect Of Putin's Food Import Ban The story of the sanctions standoff, later called an "EU-Russia economic war," started when the United States and a number of European countries established sanctions against Russia in connection with Russia's controversial annexation of Crimea. Soon after, President Putin signed a law in response, establishing food sanctions against countries that had denounced the annexation, including the EU and the U.S. The list of prohibited products included all fruits and vegetables, fish, milk and other dairy products, pork, beef and poultry meat -- 73 percent of which came from the EU. A man holds a Crimean flag in front of the Crimean parliament building on March 17, 2014 in Simferopol, Ukraine. (Dan Kitwood/Getty Images) As a political gesture, the ban was a powerful move. The sanctions created significant economic problems for the EU, with trade on the banned products dropping at least 12 percent. According to the Russian Ministry of Economic Development, losses to exporting countries amounted to 8.6 billion dollars, totaling the EU losses at around 0.4 percent of its annual GDP then. According to the Austrian Institute of Economic Research, the introduction of sanctions will cost EU countries some 2 million jobs (around 500,000 in Germany alone). Italy has seen the impacts of this firsthand. Losses in exports for Italian farmers during the last two years have so far amounted to about 600 euros, according to Gaetano Menna of the main Italian agricultural organization Confagricoltura, which represents and protects local agricultural enterprises. Michael Lohse from the German Farmers' Association, also known as Deutscher Bauernverband, said that the measurable impact for the first year of the embargo amounted to 1 billion euros for German farmers. But since the end of the first year, agricultural exporters seem to have adapted and diversified, making it more difficult to measure the loss numerically, according to Lohse. A similar decline in the agricultural sector of the economy can be seen in some other European nations, he explained. In some countries, like France, the reaction was even stronger and has become physical. 'Russian sanctions are causing the ruin of the French agro-economy.' "Russian sanctions are causing the ruin of the French agro-economy. Our farmers have already protested against them a few times," said Phillipe Legrand, who works for a tourist agency in Marseille, France. A year after the sanctions against Russia started, close to 50 percent of the EU and Eastern Europe felt the sanctions hurt their economies, according to a Gallup poll. "The effect of Russian food sanctions on EU everyday life was simple -- prices on products, which were banned to export, like vegetables and meat, declined and maybe this had an impact on the current deflation," said Mark Field, an IT programmer living in Berlin. But many people still favor the sanctions. In countries such as Poland, Romania, Croatia and Estonia, about half or more residents support the sanctions, according to the previously referenced Gallup poll. Farmers distribute bags of fruit to people protesting against the Russian food ban on Sept. 5, 2014 in Madrid. (Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images) And while many have seen a decline in their economies, countries outside the EU have benefited greatly. In fact, the import ban resulting from the sanctions has strengthened Russian economic relations with Switzerland, Brazil and Turkey. The impacts of an increased Swiss relationship in particular not only hurts the EU in the short term, but will also keep trade relations from full recovery if they are to ever end, according to Michael Lohse. This, he noted, is due to the fact that Switzerland will establish a much stronger relationship with Russia, and it is unlikely to leave the market if sanctions are lifted. The Situation Inside Russia Looking at the perspective from inside Russia, however, we see that the social costs of sanctions implementation are very high, and the same moves have had a far worse impact here than in other parts of Europe. One major impact on the quality of life has been a lack of good essential foods available to Russians. Most Russians have noticed products prices rising, and many people indicated a change in purchasing habits as a result. And these perceptions are supported by official government data. According to the Ministry of Economic Development, Russian food prices have gone up by over 30 percent, and have partly resulted in an increase in the number of Russians living below poverty level. In fact, over the last two years the number has risen to around one in seven Russians (19.2 million, 13.4 percent of the total population) that find themselves below the poverty line. 'When we went for holidays to Italy this summer, we brought back with us 14 kilos of cheese and ham.' The quality of food within the country has also presented problems for Russians as well. According to the Russian agency that regulates animal-related products and sciences, Rosselkhoznadzor, a disturbing amount of dairy products in Russian shops are falsified and contain chalk or starch, especially cheese. The head of the Federal Service for Veterinary and Phytosanitary Surveillance (Rosselkhoznadzor), Dankvert Sergey Alexeevich, has gone so far as to say that the overall proportion of falsification for some types of products, such as sour cream and cheese, can reach 50 percent. For Ekaterina Pivolova, a biology student from Moscow, it has, for example, "become very difficult to obtain good cheese in Russian shops." And the concerns over value and variety of food extends beyond just cheese. Dmitry Almelkov, who works in a Moscow bookstore, noted the situation has caused most sea products such as shrimp to disappear as well. "Most other types of fish that I saw was either very expensive or of low quality," he said. Some Russians are lucky enough to be able to leave the country and find the food they have missed under the sanctions. And those lucky enough make sure to stock up. Elena Serogova, whose job as a saleswoman allows her to travel, said that this is characteristic of everyone she knows who has the opportunity to go abroad. "When we went for holidays to Italy this summer, we brought back with us 14 kilos of cheese and ham," she said. A customer selects cheese products in Moscow on Aug. 29, 2014. Prices for local produce increased due to the Russian-EU ban. (Andrey Rudakov/Getty Images) So why then, in spite of the inconvenience his actions have caused to the people of Russia, do they continue to support him, and for how long will this last? If we cast our minds back a few years to the presidency of Boris Yeltsin, a time when the transition to a market economy was achieved at immense cost, it is easy to see why President Putin's popularity among the middle class has been based on creating economic growth and a higher standard of living for the Russian population. It has been especially important for people, who have lived through the Soviet era of the 1980s that left them earning money, but struggling to find food, only to be followed by the post-Soviet Russia of the 1990s when even the possibility to earn a decent salary had disappeared. With the ban on import of a number of everyday foods, many Russians have felt this higher standard of living decline, and even felt a regression into these less stable economic times. For these people, the higher standard of living was the main reason to put up with fewer political rights and less room for private freedom. But now this advantage has disappeared and, according to official economic forecasts, it's not going to come back soon. Putin is lucky that defiance against the EU has ultimately strengthened his position and the standing of the sanctions among Russians. For those nearly 20 million below the poverty line, the problem still remains that together with other factors, food sanctions have crashed the main advantage of Putin's rule: the rise of standards of living. No longer do they have the main reason to put up with challenges to freedom of speech or the political setbacks. Putin is lucky that defiance against the EU has ultimately strengthened his position and the standing of the sanctions among Russians. It would be logical to expect that people would start expressing their opinions and try to influence the government policy in a situation such as this, but as the election results show, we see the opposite effect. According to the authors of a Russian Public Opinion Research Center and Ohio State University study, there are at least three possible explanations that explain the result of the sanctions. The most interesting of them, though is one about the West. Some Russians tend to view high inflation as an effect of Western sanctions, not those imposed by Russia. As a result, the majority of Russians do not blame the government. This point of view is depicted by the government, whose reach, through local media, still extends to a larger audience than any other group in the country and thus dominates the Russian perspective today. President Putin speaks with Prime Minister Medvedev during parliamentary elections in Moscow on September 18, 2016. (Alexei Druzhinin/Getty Images) Given this, it is not surprising that most Russians, according to a study by the Levada Center, perceive Putin's import ban as a sign of strength against the West and think it is important to continue. This fact also shows that for many Russians, their idea of Russia's place in the world has changed very little. A large part of the population still seems to think that there is a permanent opposition between Russia and the Western world -- much like the attitudes under the Soviet Union. In that logic, sanctions, of course, are an instrument of power, and it doesn't matter how much harm it can bring to the country itself -- Russia comes first, even if Russia is hurting. So it seems that President Vladimir Putin knew what he was talking about when commenting on the election results: "Let me say again that this election result is good, but it is without question an advance on the part of our people." If the tough economic crisis hasn't impacted Putin's popularity, then there is not much else that could. But if inflation falls more in the future, we may just see a change in the political tides. Earlier on WorldPost: -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.