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23 января, 22:45

Real Estate Lessons from Mr. Universe

If there's one thing I've learned that's worth remembering, it's that you never know when or where you're going to discover something you can use. More specifically, you never know who is going to teach you something to guide you along on your journey--be it a friend, a client, or just some random individual who happens to come across your path. To be honest, though, I wasn't expecting it might ever be Arnold Schwarzenegger who'd send me some tasty nuggets for thought, but that's exactly why a successful entrepreneur should always keep an open mind. You may or may not know it, but like me, the well-known actor, politician and bodybuilder has also enjoyed a very successful career as a commercial real estate magnate. Beginning with his first purchase of a building in Santa Monica, California, he's gone on to build a substantial portfolio as an entrepreneur in this area with many profitable investments over the years. "I wanted an investment that would earn money, so that I could cover the mortgage through rents instead of having to pay it myself," Arnold wrote in his 2012 autobiography, Total Recall. "The math of real estate really spoke to me (and) it was just a talent I had," he said, recounting the two-and-a-half years he spent researching the market in Santa Monica before making his first move. He learned about every building in the city and examined numerous options and opportunities before finally making his first purchase of an apartment building off Wilshire Boulevard back in 1974. But while this was all part of an interesting story, there was something a little deeper here that really struck me. In particular, Arnold went on to talk about his nay-saying friend and how negatively he reacted when "The Terminator" decided to take this initial risk with commercial real estate. "How can you stand the pressure?" asked his friend, whom Arnold described as someone who never wanted any risks in his life. "You have the responsibility of renting out the other five units. You have to collect the rent. What if something goes wrong?" "Problems were all he could see," Arnold wrote. But then the light bulb went on for the former California governor. "I caught myself listening," he said, and that's when he remembered not to let the fears of others prevent him from taking risks. More significantly, Arnold remembered he didn't even want to hear that negativity coming from someone else, as letting himself get attached to it could cloud his own judgment, which in the case of these investments certainly seemed to be sound and on the money. "Don't tell me any more of this information," he told his friend. "I like to always wander in like a puppy ... Don't tell me (the problem) ahead of time." "Often it's easier to make a decision when you don't know as much, because then you can't overthink," he wrote. "If you know too much, it can freeze you. The whole deal looks like a minefield." This is very sound advice. Certainly one is going to want to do due diligence with their research--as Arnold himself demonstrated--but that doesn't mean it's going to be in your best interests to seek opinions or take surveys around other people's fears. On the contrary, once an investor has obtained adequate information to be an informed consumer, they're probably going to be better served letting their intuition side-step in and trusting their own judgment with what feels like the right move at that time. There are no guarantees, of course. It's not an exact science. But in my own experience I find putting some trust in my instincts--provided they're clear and informed--makes for a truly sound investment. And of course, it always pays to keep an open mind. You never know where your next nugget of wisdom is coming from ... -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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23 января, 22:32

Радужный лабиринт |

Оригинал взят у vladimir_dianov в Радужный лабиринт |Эта красивая инсталляция была создана специально для экспозиции «Luneng Sanya Bay Light and Art Festival» в китайском Хайнане. Лабиринт, получивший название «Yuzhou» придумали дизайнеры европейской студии «Brut Deluxe», возглавляемой Беном Бушэ (Ben Busche). Стенки конструкции выполнены из прозрачных акриловых панелей высотой почти два с половиной метра, а в их поверхность врезаны геометрические элементы в виде окружностей. Эти «пузырьки» подсвечиваются разноцветными светодиодами, которые тонко смешивают оттенки, создавая у зрителя эффект погружения в некий волшебный, радужный мир. Стенки внешнего периметра лабиринта дополнительно покрыты зеркальной пленкой, которая вызывает у находящегося внутри посетителя иллюзию бесконечности. продолжение...

23 января, 22:05

New York Times Apologizes For Much-Ridiculed Story About Fathers

The reporter and editor responsible for publishing a much-derided New York Times story about fathers are sorry for running the article, they told The Huffington Post Monday morning. “It was a bad idea from the get-go,” said Wendell Jamieson, the editor who oversees the Times’ Metro section, where the story appeared on Sunday. “It was conceived with the best intentions, but it fell flat. And I regret it.” Filip Bondy, the freelancer who wrote the story, said, “Sorry, sorry, sorry.” The Times story, “How Vital Are Women? This Town Found Out as They Left to March,” ran the day after millions of women took to the streets around the world to stand up for their rights. The article, however, wasn’t about women or the extraordinary political challenges they’re likely to face under President Donald Trump. Rather, it focused on upper-class suburban dads in the liberal enclave of Montclair, New Jersey, who on Saturday had to ― gasp! ― look after their own children while their wives marched for equality. “Routines were radically altered,” Bondy noted in the story, explaining that fathers had to bring kids to play dates and sports events. They also apparently had to feed the children: “Growling stomachs required filling on a regular basis.” Breaking news: Fathers care for their kids! The piece seemed to reinforce three old-fashioned tropes about gender and parenting: Men can’t handle parenting tasks; men who manage to handle the basics of parenting are exceptional and worthy of a news story; and parenting is fundamentally the work of women. Moms sometimes leave their kids with dad for a few hours and the NYT is ON IT. @NYTOnIthttps://t.co/4oUgr3ySNA— Ben Casselman (@bencasselman) January 23, 2017 .@nytimes @filipbondy perpetuates 1950's fiction that doing family work is not a normal part of fatherhood. Should stick to sports writing. https://t.co/frrXaZKzVP— Melissa Cresswell (@msweetk) January 23, 2017 I took care of my kids while my husband was away for work last week. @nytimes when would you like to interview me?https://t.co/C41dyMfPpL— Corinne Purtill (@corinnepurtill) January 23, 2017 By treating “men perform parental duties” as headline news, the Times’ story came across as an artifact from some earlier era ― maybe 1983, when the Michael Keaton comedy “Mr. Mom” considered the wacky, topsy-turvy scenario of a dad taking care of his own children. Bondy, a 65-year-old freelancer and former sportswriter for the Daily News, read the critical tweets on Sunday while he was babysitting for his 5-year-old granddaughter at home. His daughter-in-law was traveling back from the Washington march. “I deserved it,” he said of the response to his story. Bondy ― who, like many journalists, including a number of New York Times staffers, lives in Montclair ― said he should have known better. He did a lot of parenting work when he was raising his children along with his wife ― both of them working full-time, he said. “It was a piece about the women go off to war and what happens back home,” he said. “You know, more conventionally the men go off to war and the women stay home.” It was pointed out to Bondy that these days women go to war, too. The piece was meant to be lighthearted, he said. “But these are not light times.”  Bondy said he chose Montclair as the setting for his piece because its residents voted overwhelmingly for Hillary Clinton.  That made the article’s misfire seem all the more poignant. “We all voted for Hillary, but don’t get it twisted. The division of labor in our homes is straight-up 19th century,” tweeted Heather Havrilesky of New York magazine. (Havrilesky lives in California.) "We all voted for Hillary, but don't get it twisted. The division of labor in our homes is straight up 19th century" https://t.co/xIa2JGJ8uB— Heather Havrilesky (@hhavrilesky) January 23, 2017 Jamieson told HuffPost that the story was conceived by men at the Times who thought it would be a “fun look” at what happens in a town when all the women are away. Jamieson noted that female editors on the Metro desk did look at the piece. Nevertheless, “we blew it,” he told HuffPost. While some critics on Twitter suggested the article is an example of what happens when newsrooms skew male, Jamieson disagreed. “Metro is a very gender-diverse department,” he said. The deputy editor of the Times’ Metro section, Dean Chang, also tweeted a mea culpa. “The tone was tricky, and we didn’t end up in the right place,” Chang wrote Sunday on Twitter. “But [Bondy] is a... fine man and a fine writer. I’ll take the blame.” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

23 января, 22:05

New York Times Apologizes For Much-Ridiculed Story About Fathers

The reporter and editor responsible for publishing a much-derided New York Times story about fathers are sorry for running the article, they told The Huffington Post Monday morning. “It was a bad idea from the get-go,” said Wendell Jamieson, the editor who oversees the Times’ Metro section, where the story appeared on Sunday. “It was conceived with the best intentions, but it fell flat. And I regret it.” Filip Bondy, the freelancer who wrote the story, said, “Sorry, sorry, sorry.” The Times story, “How Vital Are Women? This Town Found Out as They Left to March,” ran the day after millions of women took to the streets around the world to stand up for their rights. The article, however, wasn’t about women or the extraordinary political challenges they’re likely to face under President Donald Trump. Rather, it focused on upper-class suburban dads in the liberal enclave of Montclair, New Jersey, who on Saturday had to ― gasp! ― look after their own children while their wives marched for equality. “Routines were radically altered,” Bondy noted in the story, explaining that fathers had to bring kids to play dates and sports events. They also apparently had to feed the children: “Growling stomachs required filling on a regular basis.” Breaking news: Fathers care for their kids! The piece seemed to reinforce three old-fashioned tropes about gender and parenting: Men can’t handle parenting tasks; men who manage to handle the basics of parenting are exceptional and worthy of a news story; and parenting is fundamentally the work of women. Moms sometimes leave their kids with dad for a few hours and the NYT is ON IT. @NYTOnIthttps://t.co/4oUgr3ySNA— Ben Casselman (@bencasselman) January 23, 2017 .@nytimes @filipbondy perpetuates 1950's fiction that doing family work is not a normal part of fatherhood. Should stick to sports writing. https://t.co/frrXaZKzVP— Melissa Cresswell (@msweetk) January 23, 2017 I took care of my kids while my husband was away for work last week. @nytimes when would you like to interview me?https://t.co/C41dyMfPpL— Corinne Purtill (@corinnepurtill) January 23, 2017 By treating “men perform parental duties” as headline news, the Times’ story came across as an artifact from some earlier era ― maybe 1983, when the Michael Keaton comedy “Mr. Mom” presented a dad taking care of his own children as a wacky, topsy-turvy scenario. Bondy, a 65-year-old freelancer and former sportswriter for the Daily News, read the critical tweets on Sunday while he was babysitting for his 5-year-old granddaughter at home. His daughter-in-law was traveling back from the Washington march. “I deserved it,” he said of the response to his story. Bondy ― who, like many journalists, including a number of New York Times staffers, lives in Montclair ― said he should have known better. He did a lot of parenting work when he was raising his children along with his wife ― both of them working full-time, he said. “It was a piece about the women go off to war and what happens back home,” he said. “You know, more conventionally the men go off to war and the women stay home.” It was pointed out to Bondy that these days women go to war, too. The piece was meant to be lighthearted, he said. “But these are not light times.”  Bondy said he chose Montclair as the setting for his piece because its residents voted overwhelmingly for Hillary Clinton.  That made the article’s misfire seem all the more poignant. “We all voted for Hillary, but don’t get it twisted. The division of labor in our homes is straight-up 19th century,” tweeted Heather Havrilesky of New York magazine. (Havrilesky lives in California.) "We all voted for Hillary, but don't get it twisted. The division of labor in our homes is straight up 19th century" https://t.co/xIa2JGJ8uB— Heather Havrilesky (@hhavrilesky) January 23, 2017 Jamieson told HuffPost that the story was conceived by men at the Times who thought it would be a “fun look” at what happens in a town when all the women are away. Jamieson noted that female editors on the Metro desk did look at the piece. Nevertheless, “we blew it,” he told HuffPost. While some critics on Twitter suggested the article is an example of what happens when newsrooms skew male, Jamieson disagreed. “Metro is a very gender-diverse department,” he said. The deputy editor of the Times’ Metro section, Dean Chang, also tweeted a mea culpa. “The tone was tricky, and we didn’t end up in the right place,” Chang wrote Sunday on Twitter. “But [Bondy] is a... fine man and a fine writer. I’ll take the blame.” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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23 января, 21:55

Amie Siegel's Strata review – from the depths of the Earth to the heights of excess

Amie Siegel follows marble from quarry to tasteful, lifeless New York apartments. What will her cryptic excavations turn up?Amie Siegel’s HD videos and films are rich, complex affairs. They slow you down. In her largest British show to date, the American artist fills the South London Gallery with recent works. The camera burrows deep underground, between fissures and sunken lakes lit in greenish light. Neptune, from Gustav Holst’s Planets suite, accompanies us as we go down into the world’s deepest underground quarry, in Vermont. Then comes the heavy machinery clawing at the stone, great blocks sliding on a slurry of broken and pulverised rock. Glimpsing a worker, we suddenly understand the shocking scale and volume of the caverns. Flywheels spin and terrifyingly dangerous machinery saws the stone, hollowing out the mountain with a whining, shrieking roar.Now all you can hear is the hum of the air-conditioning in an empty apartment. The camera sweeps along a marble kitchen worktop. The hob, like a low industrial complex, interrupts the level plain. It has never seen spilt soup or a spatter of pasta sauce. Further along, you can botanise among the orchids and lilies in their massive pots, every bloom coiffed, no leaf or petal out of place. This is beginning to creep me out. Continue reading...

23 января, 21:25

For mourning Democrats, Michelle Obama offers hope

The former first lady’s superfans, still wishing she would run, hotly anticipate her next move.

23 января, 21:25

Does Warren Buffet Ever Get Mad?

Has anyone ever seen Warren Buffett mad? originally appeared on Quora - the knowledge sharing network where compelling questions are answered by people with unique insights. Answer by Peter Lynch, on Quora: I wish I could say I had a personal reference, but I have only ever seen him once, and he was anything but mad. He came to Dallas for the grand opening of the Nebraska Furniture Mart and held a public event and charitable auction at the retail location. I was astounded by how he managed to charm the crowd. He walked out on stage and stated that he wanted to sing the national anthem. As he approached his seat, he casually took the auctioneers cowboy hat and placed it on his head, which got a laugh. Once seated he produced a banjo from behind his seat and sang "The Eyes of Texas" (instead of the national anthem). He then turned the banjo over to the auctioneer, and the bidding began. As the high bid approached $19,000 with no takers remaining, the salesperson looked over his shoulder to Buffett in an attempt to continue the bidding war. Rather than pit himself against the audience, Warren just chuckled and said he would match it, but that the banjo should go to the lady in the audience. He then stood up, put the cowboy hat back on the auctioneer, waved and walked off stage. He was probably there for twenty minutes, and he owned the crowd. As I watched him on stage, I recall thinking how none of this had come to him naturally. At fifteen, he struggled to fit in at school and read Carnegie's "How to Win Friends and Influence People" to learn how to interact gracefully with students. I think he has spent a lifetime learning how to work with people, and that even the events that likely make him mad are controlled. My favorite example is his interaction with the founder of the Nebraska Furniture Mart, Mrs. Rose Blumkin (Mrs. B). When Buffett was making the acquisition he is said to have asked himself the following: One question I always ask myself in appraising a business is how I would like, assuming I had ample capital and skilled personnel, to compete with it. I'd rather wrestle grizzlies than compete with Mrs. B and her progeny. They buy brilliantly; they operate at expense ratios competitors don't even dream about, and they then pass on to their customers much of the savings. It's the ideal business--one built upon exceptional value for the client that in turn translates into excellent economics for its owners. [1] To put it lightly, Mrs. B was a formidable competitor. When Dillard's opened a location in Omaha they actually decided not to sell furniture because they didn't want to compete with her either. After the acquisition, everything went smoothly for a while, but then the second generation, Mrs. B's children, assumed control of the business. Mrs. B complained to Buffett that they were not running the business as she intended. When he didn't respond, she moved across the street to open a competing business. Buffett's response? He went to visit Mrs. B and brought her two dozen pink roses and a five-pound box of chocolates. The two made amends, and Buffet bought her out a second time. (Note: I believe the second time he had her sign a non-compete.) When asked for her opinion of Warren Buffett only months before the second transaction, Mrs. B replied, "He's a real gentleman." [2] Early in my career I sat in on a heated negotiation that was going in circles. Finally, one of the principals stood up, and in a very stern voice threatened to kill the transaction. He was very calm and controlled, and he got what he wanted. He told me later that controlled outbursts can be a tool if seldom used. My guess is that Buffett takes this to the extreme and that he prefers to substitute charm for anger whenever possible. [1] The Warren Buffett CEO: Secrets from the Berkshire Hathaway Managers: Robert P. Miles [2] The Warren Buffett CEO: Secrets from the Berkshire Hathaway Managers: Robert P. Miles This question originally appeared on Quora - the knowledge sharing network where compelling questions are answered by people with unique insights. You can follow Quora on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+. More questions: Investing: How should a young person invest money? Warren Buffett: How does Warren Buffett invest? Berkshire Hathaway: Why doesn't Warren Buffett invest in startups? -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

23 января, 21:10

5 Horrific Wars That Brought Humanity to Its Knees (And Killed Millions)

Kyle Mizokami Security, But World War II was the worst of them all...  The most lethal war in human history is almost certainly World War II. Other wars may have been more lethal but lack credible records. Sixty to eighty million people died between 1939 and 1945. Twenty one to twenty five million of the deaths were military, the remainder civilian. All wars are awful. Some wars are much, much more awful than others. This is by no means a comprehensive list, nor does it comprise anything but a fraction of the overall deaths in wars in human history. Still, the five wars on this list may have collectively killed up to a quarter of a billion people. These wars were big and upset the status quo. The Chinese Civil War turned more than half a billion people Red. World War II destroyed a totalitarian menace. Even the Mongol invasions echo in the present as an estimated 16 million people worldwide carry the genes of Genghis Khan. Chinese Civil War The Chinese Civil War was fought between the forces of the Republic of China (ROC) and the Chinese Communist Party (CCP). The war was fought on and off for more than 20 years, from 1927 to 1950, and resulted in the establishment of the People’s Republic of China on the mainland and the Republic of China on the island of Taiwan. Some eight million were killed in a conflict complicated by the presence of Japanese forces in China. Like all civil wars in China’s history, social disruption was the main killer and affected civilians the most. Fighting generated refugees, leaving them vulnerable to disease and starvation. Reprisals by one side against cities, towns and villages thought to be sympathetic to the other killed more civilians. Military casualties in the beginning of the civil war were relatively light, as the CCP primarily fought a guerrilla war. At the end of World War II the Soviet Army provided captured Japanese weapons to the CCP’s military forces, dramatically increasing their effectiveness in the field. Within five years the ROC had been swept from China into Taiwan and pockets of Southeast Asia. Read full article

23 января, 20:58

MLK VS BLM

As the annual celebration of Black History Month looms, America is in the midst of a heated debate about racism and police brutality. In light of this hostile environment, fomented by social justice warriors and aided by pundits and politicians, including the so-called "first black President" Barack Obama, InfoWars reporter Ashley Beckford (@actually1ashley) interviewed people in Harlem New York City, asking whether or not they think that the non-violence civil rights advocate, Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., would have supported Black Lives Matter. The Alex Jones Show (c) copyright, Free Speech Systems .LLC 1995 - 2017 All Rights Reserved. May use for fair use and educational purposes. Help us spread the word about the liberty movement, we're reaching millions help us reach millions more. Share the free live video feed link with your friends & family: http://www.infowars.com/show Follow Alex on TWITTER - https://twitter.com/RealAlexJones Like Alex on FACEBOOK - https://www.facebook.com/AlexanderEmerickJones Infowars on G+ - https://plus.google.com/+infowars/ :Web: http://www.infowars.com/ http://www.prisonplanet.com/ http://www.infowars.net/ :Subscribe and share your login with 20 friends: http://www.prisonplanet.tv http://www.InfowarsNews.com Visit http://www.InfowarsLife.com to get the products Alex Jones and his family trust, while supporting the growth of our expanding media operation. [http://bit.ly/2dhnhbS] Biome Defense™ [http://bit.ly/2bnEj91] Bio-True Selenium™ [http://bit.ly/1WYw8jp] Vitamin Mineral Fusion™ [http://bit.ly/1QYBNBv] Joint Formula™ [http://bit.ly/1nNuR3r] Anthroplex™ [http://bit.ly/1ljfWfJ] Living Defense™ [http://bit.ly/1Iobcj2] Deep Cleanse™ [http://bit.ly/1DsyQ6i] Knockout™ [http://bit.ly/1Kr1yfz] Brain Force™ [http://bit.ly/1R5gsqk] Liver Shield™ [http://bit.ly/1cOwQix] ProstaGuard™ [http://bit.ly/1mnchEz3] Child Ease™ [http://bit.ly/1xs9F6t] WinterSunD3™ [http://bit.ly/1L3gDSO] Ancient Defense™ [http://bit.ly/1EHbA6E] Secret-12™ [http://bit.ly/1txsOge] Oxy Powder™ [http://bit.ly/1s6cphV] Occu Power™ [http://bit.ly/1rGOLsG] DNA Force™ [http://bit.ly/1nIngBb] X2 Survival Shield™ [http://bit.ly/1kaXxKL] Super Female Vitality™ [http://bit.ly/1mhAKCO] Lung Cleanse™ [http://bit.ly/1mGbikx] Silver-Bullet - Colloidal Silver™ [http://bit.ly/1xcoUfo] Super Male Vitality™ [http://bit.ly/1z5BCP9] Survival Shield - Nascent Iodine™ [http://bit.ly/1o4sQtc] Patriot Blend 100% Organic Coffee™ [http://bit.ly/1iVL6HB] Immune Support 100% Organic Coffee™ All available at - http://www.infowarsshop.com/ INFOWARS HEALTH - START GETTING HEALTHY BEFORE IT'S TOO LATE - http://www.infowarshealth.com/ Newsletter Sign up / Infowars Underground Insider : http://www.infowars.com/newsletter The Alex Jones Show © copyright, Free Speech Systems .LLC 1995 - 2017 All Rights Reserved. May use for fair use and educational purposes

23 января, 20:47

The 5 Best Frequent Flyer Programs To Join In 2017

If you plan on traveling often this year (and trust us, you should), then it’s time to choose a frequent flier program. While some experts point out awards aren’t what they used to be and credit card programs may ultimately be the best way to rack up benefits, frequent flier programs are still free to join and can only help you in your quest to get the most out of your travels. Signing up is truly a no-brainer. But to which airline should you commit? WalletHub released a ranking of frequent flier programs that’ll get you the biggest bang for your buck in 2017. The personal finance site analyzed 11 major airline programs on criteria like their number of flights, miles or points value earned per $100 spent, and how quickly awards expire.  Because how much you travel can affect which program is best for you, programs were ranked by their respective benefits to “light,” “average” and “frequent” travelers. WalletHub defined the “average” traveler as someone who spends roughly $3,105 on flights every year, which sounds high to us. But no matter: The top programs offer general greatness all the same, and you’d be smart to join any of them. Here are the top 5 frequent flier programs for “average” travelers in 2017:  1. Delta Delta earned the highest marks for all three types of travelers, partly due to the high number of destinations they serve and the fact that their awards miles never expire because of inactivity. 2. Alaska  Alaska offers a particularly large redemption value on awards miles, and it allows passengers to book awards travel further in advance than most other airlines.  3. Hawaiian WalletHub calculated that Hawaiian Airlines fliers get about $21 worth of rewards for every $100 they spend with the airline, making it the best in value.  4. United United scored big for the number of partner carriers it works with, which means fliers can earn United miles on various smaller airlines.  5. American American got a perfect score for the number of destinations it serves, as well as a good score for “retroactive flight credits,” meaning it’s fairly lenient with granting awards miles for trips you’ve already taken.  We should note that airlines are increasingly basing awards on money spent instead of miles flown, so travelers who find cheap flight deals aren’t rewarded as handsomely as those who book pricey business trips. If this is your focus, a credit card may ultimately be a better way to rack up points.  But whether you do it by booking flights or buying groceries, joining a rewards program equals free travel all the same. And THAT’s got us flying high. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

23 января, 20:31

12 Beauty Treatments That Make Your Morning Routine Way Faster

Hoping to streamline your morning routine? These beauty treatments can help you feel a little more low-maintenance when you get ready each day.

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23 января, 20:01

MARKET WATCH: NYMEX crude prices fall on US oversupply worries

The benchmark for light, sweet crude oil prices on the New York Mercantile Exchange began Jan. 23 on the decline after Baker Hughes Inc.’s latest US rig count rejuvenated oversupply concerns.

23 января, 19:54

What Brunch Tells Us About Culture And Economics

Illustration by Olivia Deng Brunch arose from relatively humble beginnings--a simple family meal eaten on Sundays, oftentimes after church. For brunch as it is commonly known today, certain aspects were retained--comfort food such as bacon and eggs eaten on weekends. But a lot more has changed. The rosy, wholesome family association has largely faded to give rise to new brunch metropolises and with that, a new identity as hangover food consumed by urban millennials. Kae Burke, co-founder of Brooklyn-based House of Yes, an arts community and space that offers brunch, said that brunch has skyrocketed in popularity in the past 10 years. "I've gone from being a broke artist and student where brunch was an indulgence you could do once in a while with your boyfriend," Burke said. "Now it's not so much 'are we going to brunch' as it is 'where are we going to brunch?'" But brunch is more complex than the perfectly-plated Eggs Benedict and colorful cocktails captured on an iPhone and posted to Instagram. Brunch reflects larger cultural and economic trends in the United States. The demographic shift explains brunch's transformation from a mostly basic meal enjoyed with family to an oftentimes decadent meal enjoyed with friends, said David Just, an economics professor at Cornell University's School of Applied Economics and Management. "You could see a lot of younger folks entering the restaurants mid-morning on Saturdays or Sundays, then you just start catering to them, figuring out what sorts of things bring them in," Just said. "[For] families with children, mid-morning meals aren't something you can engage in very often. If you think of religious families, they're probably disappearing on Saturdays and Sundays from restaurants." Young people want to kick back, relax and socialize, according to Just. Derek Thompson said in a video for The Atlantic, "In boozy brunch, mimosas are kind of like the hook that make you a profitable customer later on when you eat at the restaurant again and again and recommend it to your friends." Mimosas are the most-demanded drink at Plow, a San Francisco breakfast and lunch restaurant. "I would say a vast majority of people who go for breakfast want mimosas," said Joel Bleskacek, co-owner of Plow. "For some reason that's ingrained into popular culture that mimosas are what you have." Alcohol has joined bacon and eggs as a brunch staple, with restaurants clamoring to offer bottomless cocktail deals to reel in customers. According to Just, 20 years ago, the brunch foods and alcohol combination would have been "bizarre." Now, bottomless cocktail deals are commonplace, as many restaurants stand to profit greatly from offering a service consumers may not take full advantage of, according to Just. According to social media data collected through analytics firm Crimson Hexagon, "boozy brunch" is predominantly a trend in large cities such as New York City and college towns such as State College, home to Pennsylvania State University. Additionally, social media data shows that the social aspect of brunch is more important to a younger population--76 percent of people discussing "brunch squad" are under 25-years-old, according to Crimson. var divElement = document.getElementById('viz1484993664071'); var vizElement = divElement.getElementsByTagName('object')[0]; vizElement.style.width='100%';vizElement.style.height=(divElement.offsetWidth*0.75)+'px'; var scriptElement = document.createElement('script'); scriptElement.src = 'https://public.tableau.com/javascripts/api/viz_v1.js'; vizElement.parentNode.insertBefore(scriptElement, vizElement); Graphic by Olivia Deng Source: Crimson Hexagon Despite the booming popularity of brunching with friends, brunching with family after church hasn't completely disappeared. In many Midwestern and Southern states, "church brunch" is very much alive and well, according to social media data collected through Crimson. And it is not just the older population that is talking about church brunch. 54 percent of the church brunch conversation is generated by people 18 to 24-years-old. var divElement = document.getElementById('viz1484993683269'); var vizElement = divElement.getElementsByTagName('object')[0]; vizElement.style.width='100%';vizElement.style.height=(divElement.offsetWidth*0.75)+'px'; var scriptElement = document.createElement('script'); scriptElement.src = 'https://public.tableau.com/javascripts/api/viz_v1.js'; vizElement.parentNode.insertBefore(scriptElement, vizElement); Graphic by Olivia Deng Source: Crimson Hexagon Just said that millennials in the Midwest face a different set of problems from millennials living on the East and West Coasts. With different problems come different coping mechanisms. "A lot of the issues that face millennials in big cities really aren't there in the Midwest and in other areas in the country. In terms of the types of employment, in terms of the types of opportunities that are available to them to socialize," Just said. "[In] New York City, it's really super expensive to get an apartment. Job markets are tight and people are sort of pulling together socially in a way to cope with that sort of a market. If you're looking in the Midwest, housing's still relatively cheap and while the job market isn't great, there are reasonable ways to get by. I don't think the lifestyle of younger people in those areas has changed as much. You see that in how they access restaurants and what restaurants are popular." The Midwest has its own popular chain restaurants and comfort food. Midwestern comfort food oftentimes serves as cuisine inspiration for restaurants nationwide, but Plow draws inspiration from Midwestern hospitality. "We really wanted to have that kind of Midwestern vibe that was friendly, welcoming," Bleskacek said. "We wanted to create something that was neighborhood-oriented. We wanted something that was an extension of our home where we do entertaining friends and family." Plow is located in an architecture studio in Potrero Hill, a quiet neighborhood in San Francisco. "For Plow it's [the space] incredible--it has huge windows, tall ceilings, very open, lots of natural light, it's almost kind of pastoral, it feels very calm," Bleskacek said. While millennials may not have more disposable income than older generations, they are driving brunch innovation, Just said. In many cases, time and desire are more important factors than income. "The younger folks have been driving these trends because their lifestyle, the opportunities they have, all of those things are very different from the young people before them. They face a very different job market, very different income profile, very different sorts of opportunities...What previous generations were using their money for probably looked very different. You go to movies or social events like that, these guys are heading out to brunch." Just said. "For older folks, they've had their habits for a long, long time and it's not necessarily worth chasing after them for more dollars. Young people have dollars that can be chased and they're developing their habits and their trends and that's why they tend to be where innovation happens." Food is served at Plow. Photo courtesy of Plow. Classic brunch foods remain, but they've been upgraded. "So it's still going to include eggs, it's still going to include breakfast-like food. But it can be higher end food, more experimental, a little edgier," Just said. "It's still got to look a little 'brunchy' but it can have a little bit more daring to it." Plow's goal is to elevate breakfast foods with locally-sourced quality ingredients. "Most people think of $3.99 big plate of greasy eggs and soggy hashbrowns," Bleskacek said. "I spend a tremendous amount of time at the farmers' market especially during the summer. This week's fruit is not last week's fruit so we're picking up stone fruit that's going to be ready to serve that day or the next few days as opposed to ordering it from a third party where who knows how ripe or good the fruit could be?" Bleskacek said that while it is costlier to use fresh ingredients, by doing so, Plow supports local farms and its staff. Plow also offers Chinese breakfast, inspired by Plow co-owner Maxine Siu's childhood growing up eating foods such as steamed rice and braised pork. For House of Yes, they've been infusing Middle East cuisine into brunch offerings. "We have a lot of cool items from the Middle East. The shakshuka is amazing. It's eggs baked into tomato sauce. We have latkes with eggs on top [and] a Bloody Mary spiced with harissa," Burke said. There are few signs that point to brunch dying down in the near future. While the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election has many rethinking consumerism, Just said that the election's impact on brunch remains unknown. "I'm skeptical it will have much of an impact. Political views that shift along those sorts of lines tend to stop right at the boundary of the practical implications in one's life. Brunch popped up as an easy way to socialize, a practical experience." According to Burke, who has been throwing themed brunch parties for House of Yes since it started offering brunch, brunch will become more social in 2017. "More brunches are going to turn into brunch parties. Brunch parties that have more music and dancing, theme-based, DJs and costumes. Brunch celebrations and day parties becoming more popular," Burke said. In contrast to House of Yes' avant-garde approach to brunch, Plow is taking a quieter route. "We don't want to reinvent the wheel. We want to keep people happy, we want to keep the quality of food consistent," Bleskacek said. But like House of Yes, Plow understands that at the core of brunch is its ability to bring people together. "It's very communal," Bleskacek said. "People hang outside, they talk, it's a good time where people can put down their screens and actually have a conversation." This was written as a blog post for analytics firm Crimson Hexagon -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

23 января, 18:18

Hockey Team Uses Jumbotron To Throw Shade At Trump

Remember when President Trump said his inauguration had “a million and a half people” in attendance when, well — it didn’t?  Crowd-estimate experts deduced that the number of attendees was closer to a third of the 1.8 million people who showed up for former President Barack Obama’s first inauguration in 2009. In light of this hyperbole, the Dallas Stars decided to play around with the exaggeration. During a game against the Washington Capitals at the American Airlines Center in Texas on the evening of the inauguration, the team posted on a Jumbotron that 1.5 million people happened to be in attendance at that very game. Stars Jumbotron with a topical joke. pic.twitter.com/9vsmTG1Agj— Kate Morrison (@unlikelyfanatic) January 22, 2017 Seeing that the American Airlines Center holds a mere 20,000 people, it’s safe to say that that was also a bit of an exaggeration. Much like White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer’s insistence that the inauguration had “largest audience to ever witness an inauguration, period, both in person and around the globe.”  Not an exaggeration? This was simply perfect Trump trolling. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

23 января, 18:17

White House Removes QVC Tout From Melania Trump's Biography

For a brief time at the dawn of the new administration, a QVC jewelry line was touted on the White House website. The TV shopping network was originally part of the extensive biography of new first lady Melania Trump that appeared on the site. It includes her years of modeling and the name of several magazine covers she has appeared on and photographers she has worked with. It also noted on the day of the inauguration that she’s an entrepreneur: “In April 2010, Melania Trump launched her own jewelry collection, ‘Melania™ Timepieces & Jewelry,’ on QVC.” But, according to The Washington Post, that portion was quickly changed to: “In April 2010, Melania Trump launched her own jewelry collection.” Someone may have decided the QVC pitch didn’t have the right decorum for a first lady’s biography — or it could be because QVC currently has no connection to a Melania Trump jewelry line. “At this time, QVC does not have an active relationship with the brand,” according to a statement from the company. A YouTube video from 2012 reveals her one-time “sparkly” QVC line with different designs based on the idea of New York, Palm Beach and Paris looks. The bio also notably mentions that the first lady “paused” her college studies to pursue a  modeling career. During Trump’s campaign, her bio said she was a college graduate. The mention of the jewelry line on the White House website underscores concerns that the Trump family will use its political position for private financial gain, even if Melania Trump’s QVC line isn’t currently available for purchase. The line in that bio is reminiscent of Trump’s daughter Ivanka’s appearance with her father after the election on “60 Minutes.” She wore an $11,000 bracelet from her own jewelry line that was touted the next day in a mass email advertisement. After criticism, a spokesman for her company said the pitch was mistakenly forwarded by an over-eager marketing employee. Ivanka’s company also touted a dress she wore at the Republican National Convention, which sold out. Paul Light, a New York University professor of public service, who’s an expert on presidential transitions and government reform, told The Huffington Post at that time that what Ivanka Trump’s brand did before her father was president may have been legal, but it looks “tacky.” “Presidents represent the nation, as do their spouses and children,” Light wrote in an email. “The White House is not a shopping mall.”  Ivanka Trump’s situation also changed dramatically when she became a member of her father’s transition team. Shop Ivanka's look from her #RNC speech: https://t.co/ma42A92DYa #RNCinCLE pic.twitter.com/DwHvSOu8Ue— Ivanka Trump (@IvankaTrump) July 22, 2016 type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related Coverage + articlesList=58402a08e4b017f37fe2d6b0,581b8d41e4b0e80b02c89274,579f4ab2e4b07066ba1f5bfd,578dd95ce4b0c53d5cfac0dc -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

23 января, 18:17

White House Removes QVC Tout From Melania Trump's Biography

For a brief time at the dawn of the new administration, a QVC jewelry line was touted on the White House website. The TV shopping network was originally part of the extensive biography of new first lady Melania Trump that appeared on the site. It includes her years of modeling and the name of several magazine covers she has appeared on and photographers she has worked with. It also noted on the day of the inauguration that she’s an entrepreneur: “In April 2010, Melania Trump launched her own jewelry collection, ‘Melania™ Timepieces & Jewelry,’ on QVC.” But, according to The Washington Post, that portion was quickly changed to: “In April 2010, Melania Trump launched her own jewelry collection.” Someone may have decided the QVC pitch didn’t have the right decorum for a first lady’s biography — or it could be because QVC currently has no connection to a Melania Trump jewelry line. “At this time, QVC does not have an active relationship with the brand,” according to a statement from the company. A YouTube video from 2012 reveals her one-time “sparkly” QVC line with different designs based on the idea of New York, Palm Beach and Paris looks. The bio also notably mentions that the first lady “paused” her college studies to pursue a  modeling career. During Trump’s campaign, her bio said she was a college graduate. The mention of the jewelry line on the White House website underscores concerns that the Trump family will use its political position for private financial gain, even if Melania Trump’s QVC line isn’t currently available for purchase. The line in that bio is reminiscent of Trump’s daughter Ivanka’s appearance with her father after the election on “60 Minutes.” She wore an $11,000 bracelet from her own jewelry line that was touted the next day in a mass email advertisement. After criticism, a spokesman for her company said the pitch was mistakenly forwarded by an over-eager marketing employee. Ivanka’s company also touted a dress she wore at the Republican National Convention, which sold out. Paul Light, a New York University professor of public service, who’s an expert on presidential transitions and government reform, told The Huffington Post at that time that what Ivanka Trump’s brand did before her father was president may have been legal, but it looks “tacky.” “Presidents represent the nation, as do their spouses and children,” Light wrote in an email. “The White House is not a shopping mall.”  Ivanka Trump’s situation also changed dramatically when she became a member of her father’s transition team. Shop Ivanka's look from her #RNC speech: https://t.co/ma42A92DYa #RNCinCLE pic.twitter.com/DwHvSOu8Ue— Ivanka Trump (@IvankaTrump) July 22, 2016 type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related Coverage + articlesList=58402a08e4b017f37fe2d6b0,581b8d41e4b0e80b02c89274,579f4ab2e4b07066ba1f5bfd,578dd95ce4b0c53d5cfac0dc -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

23 января, 18:00

One of the Best Buy Signals You Can Get

When companies spend millions of dollars buying back outstanding shares, it’s a powerful signal for investors.

23 января, 17:43

What Covering Hate As A Muslim Journalist Taught Me About The Media

It’s Sept. 9, 2016. A Trump supporter in Brooklyn has allegedly attacked two Muslim women and their babies. I think about my pregnant friends in the area. I don’t want to call and worry them. A month later, “Fuck Allah” and “Fuck Arabs” are among the anti-Muslim messages spray-painted on the Muslim Community Miraj Center in Bayonne, New Jersey. A friend texts me the photo of the mosque before it makes the news. I live 20 minutes from that center. Another month goes by. A Muslim teacher in Atlanta is told to hang herself with her headscarf. Several of my friends are teachers. They all wear the Islamic headscarf, or the hijab. I can’t stop thinking about them. For all of 2016, The Huffington Post tracked anti-Muslim rhetoric and actions across the country. Our list included vandalism, hate speech, policies and many acts of physical aggression. We counted almost 400 instances in total. As a hijab-wearing Muslim journalist, there was no clocking in or clocking out. I spent my days interviewing victims, collecting reports and compiling information that could very likely predict what could happen to me at any time. Working on this project made one thing abundantly clear: There is a severe lack of nuance in the way the media depicts Muslims. The coverage is simplistic and doesn’t reflect the richness of the most diverse religious group in the world. These generalizations are putting Muslims in danger on a regular basis, producing a climate where too many people feel emboldened to attack their neighbors. After the San Bernardino shooting in 2015, journalists swarmed the home of Syed Farook and his wife, Tashfeen Malik. National news networks quickly broadcast close-ups of the items left behind in the apartment, including a Quran, a Muslim prayer rug and prayer beads, as if these were evidence of terrorism.   In the wake of the Pulse nightclub shooting last year, one news outlet mistook a Muslim reporter for the wife of a terrorist because the women shared the same first name: Noor. What if they were both white and named Emily? Would the same happen? Politicians aren’t helping matters, either. President Donald Trump rode a wave of anti-Muslim sentiment right into the Oval Office. Even Hillary Clinton fell into this rhetoric when she said during her last 2016 debate against Trump that Muslim Americans “need to be part of our eyes and ears on our front lines” in the fight against terrorism. Just Muslims? How about other citizens? Muslims are doctors, lawyers, teachers and parents. When Trump contemplates the idea of a Muslim registry or Clinton uses the community as a pawn for policies, it reinforces a false narrative that Muslims are not part of American society, and contributes to a notion that we are and will always be outsiders. Then, it becomes all too easy for other Americans to justify hate crimes and bigotry. And that’s what I saw this year. Again. And again. And again. In reaction to the negative coverage of the Muslim community, many outlets seem to feel a need to overcompensate. Whenever a Muslim is doing something normal or “good” for society, it is as if journalists are stunned. Hannah Allam, a journalist at McClatchy, summed up this issue in a tweet last year: Anti-Muslim hostility has led to a well-meaning but sad genre of corrective journalism that says 'Look at this Muslim doing a normal thing!'— Hannah Allam (@HannahAllam) November 29, 2016 In order to prevent further hate crimes and cases of discrimination like the ones we documented this year, we need to change the conversation we are having about the Muslim community. This means stepping aside and giving the mic to Muslims in medicine, television, media and other fields beyond the political realm. It also means providing room for nuance in the way we cover the Muslim community. The most obvious way to fix this problem is to hire more Muslims in the newsroom. Then the media can publish stories that cover a rich community, and shine a light on Muslim contributions to American society. We are at a crossroads in the way we cover Muslims. We just inaugurated a president whose administration has deeply troubling ideas about Islam. At the same time, hate crimes and Islamophobia are increasing at a terrifying rate. Now, more than ever, it’s time to change the narrative about who Muslims are.   -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

23 января, 17:40

Ryerson Holding (RYI): Is it a Good Choice for Value Investors?

Value investing is easily one of the most popular ways to find great stocks in any market environment.

23 января, 17:35

Is Chemtura Corporation a Great Stock for Value Investors?

Value investing is easily one of the most popular ways to find great stocks in any market environment.

04 декабря 2014, 15:20

Саудовская Аравия с января 2015 года снижает поставочные цены на нефть для США и Азии

ЛОНДОН, 4 декабря. /ТАСС/. Саудовская Аравия с января 2015 года снизит поставочные цены на нефть для США и Азии. Об этом сообщает агентство Bloomberg. Стоимость нефти Arab Light снижена на $2 за баррель. Как ранее сообщал Wall Street Journal со ссылкой на источники, Саудовская Аравия не намерена сокращать объемы добычи нефти и рассматривает в качестве допустимой для себя цену барреля Brent в $60. Крупнейший производитель нефти в рядах ОПЕК Саудовская Аравия считает, что нефтяные цены способны стабилизироваться в районе $60 за баррель. Эр-Рияд и другие страны Персидского залива уверены, что способны выдержать этот ценовой уровень", - пишет издание. Страны Персидского залива не установили для себя определенную целевую цену барреля, и если она упадет ниже $60, то длительное время на данном уровне не продержится, говорит источник WSJ. По мнению источников газеты, нынешний подход Саудовской Аравии означает, что в ближайшей перспективе она не пойдет на сокращение добычи, даже если цены на нефть продолжат падение. Глава "Роснефти" Игорь Сечин также допускает, что цена нефти может упасть до $60 за баррель и ниже в первой половине 2015 года. В интервью австрийской Die Presse, опубликованном 27 ноября, он отметил, что у "Роснефти" достаточно запасов и места для маневра.