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Марио Монти
19 мая, 23:23

Weekend Roundup: Why New Talks With North Korea Are In The Cards

North Korea’s recent launch of a missile it claims is capable of carrying a nuclear warhead — and its possible role in intercontinental cyberattacks — have upped the stakes in what is already arguably the most dangerous global crisis. Paradoxically, Pyongyang’s heightened provocations, combined with the limited arsenal of tenable responses by the international community, are pushing the relevant powers in conflict closer to talking than ever before. Indeed, U.S. President Donald Trump has said he is willing to talk to North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. South Korea’s newly elected president, Moon Jae-in, also said in his first days in office that he is open to visiting the North under the right circumstances. Yoon Young-Kwan, a former South Korean foreign minister, writes that Moon’s policy is akin to the “Ostpolitik” approach of former German Chancellor Willy Brandt, which prepared the way for German unification after the end of the Cold War.  Top Chinese diplomat Fu Ying spells out the urgent realism that is forcing a fresh approach that departs from the sanctions plus “strategic patience” thinking that has guided the policy of America and its allies in recent years. As I write in my piece summarizing our discussion, “Madame Fu’s fundamental point is that increased sanctions or threats of military action without talks is precisely what is driving North Korea to intensify its weapons program.” Trying to outsource the problem to China won’t work, in her view, because, as I relay, “China is not a party to the antagonism and hostility that has caused the security dilemma of North Korea. The country’s deep insecurity comes from its constant fear of the kind of regime change preceded by sanctions that the United States and its allies have executed elsewhere, including in Iraq.” The best that can be achieved, Madame Fu argues, now appears to be a “Pareto-optimal” solution. Such a path, I write, recapping her words, “may not meet the optimal benefits every party seeks but would ensure the minimum interest of all parties with minimal cost. In other words, compromise all around.” To make that work, she explains in a Brookings Institution historical review, action aimed at reducing the present high level of tension must be both “synchronized and reciprocal.”  Former U.S. Defense Secretary William Perry also soberly warns that military action is unrealistic. “If the U.S. conducted a preemptive military strike,” he writes, noting that he planned such an option back in 1994 before the North crossed the nuclear threshold, “it would trigger bloody reprisal attacks on Seoul, quite possibly leading to a second Korean war, this one entailing the use of nuclear weapons.” The only alternative now, he concurs with Fu Ying, is for the U.S. and China to adopt a common approach. “I believe that there is now an opportunity for creative diplomacy that has not previously existed. This opportunity has opened because China is now more deeply concerned than in the past about the damaging consequences of the North’s nuclear program. ... The U.S. could seize this opportunity not by insisting that China should solve the problem, but by working together with China to solve it.” Conflict scholar David Cortright agrees with Fu Ying that “the leaders of North Korea will not give up the bomb until they feel more secure.” To reach that end, he argues that, as with Iran, the U.S. should promise “to lift sanctions and renew trade in exchange for nuclear restrictions.” Writing from Seoul, Seok-Hyun Hong, the publisher of one of South Korea’s largest newspapers who spoke with President Trump this week as President Moon’s envoy, says “time is running out for my country” and that “South Korea must prevent a war at any cost.” He then lays out a two-stage roadmap for Trump to draw back from the brink. In the first stage, North Korea would agree to stop development of nuclear arms and missiles at the current level. On that basis, a new dialogue or negotiations would start with Pyongyang in stage two. “Donald Trump,” he writes, “may be the U.S. president who can turn the tables in the region to transform troubles and threats into opportunity and bring us closer to resolving the North Korean issue. But this will only be possible if he stops to think and channel his aggression into a concrete plan such as the one I have suggested.” The urgency of the North Korean crisis masks the historical significance of another longer-term development underway of worldwide significance ― China taking the lead as the champion of the next stage of globalization. In his speech at the recently concluded Belt and Road Forum for International Cooperation in Beijing, senior Chinese strategist Zheng Bijian notes that, according to International Monetary Fund projections, by 2018, the developing world could comprise 59 percent of the global economy, compared to the 41 percent of the advanced nations. “The global economy as a whole, driven by the developing world, will continue to gather new momentum for growth in the second, third and fourth decades of this century,” he asserts. “The more rapid growth in the developing economies will in turn stimulate renewed growth in the developed world by becoming an even larger market for its goods and services. The new phase of globalization will thus be a reverse from the past in which the developed world was the growth engine.” The whole idea of China’s “One Belt, One Road” initiative for infrastructure investment, says Zheng, is to tie together maritime and inland trading routes, thus boosting the prospect of greater prosperity across Eurasia to Africa. European participants at the forum, however, had their doubts. “The [European Union] has dealt a blow to Chinese President Xi Jinping’s bid to lead a global infrastructure revolution,” The Guardian reports this week, “after its members refused to endorse part of the multi-billion-dollar plan because it did not include commitments to social and environmental sustainability and transparency.”  In an interview, Singapore’s Kishore Mahbubani underscores the non-Western perspective on the fate of globalization expressed by Zheng. “Globalization has not failed,” he says. “All discussions on globalization are distorted because Western analysts focus on the roughly 15 percent of the world’s population who live in the West. They ignore the 85 percent who are the rest. The last 30 years of human history have been the best 30 years that the rest have enjoyed. Why? The answer is globalization.” The perception in the advanced economies that globalization has failed is due to a simple fact, according to Mahbubani: “Western elites who enjoyed the fruits of globalization did not share them with their Western masses.” Other highlights in The WorldPost this week include: Somalia Is On The Brink of Famine, And Time is Running Out Xi Jinping Primes China To Be Leader Of The Free-Trade Pack Parag Khanna: Swiss Direct Democracy + Singapore’s Smart Rulers = Direct Technocracy What Iran’s Election Could Mean For The Nuclear Deal And U.S. Relations This Year’s U.S. Worldwide Threat Report Warns Of Cyberattacks, Nukes And Climate Change For more on Somalia’s drought, check out our WorldPost video, adapted from this week’s op-ed, “Somalia Is On The Brink Of Famine, And Time Is Running Out,” below: WHO WE ARE     EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Rosa O’Hara is the Social Editor of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at HuffPost, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

19 мая, 23:23

Weekend Roundup: Why New Talks With North Korea Are In The Cards

North Korea’s recent launch of a missile it claims is capable of carrying a nuclear warhead — and its possible role in intercontinental cyberattacks — have upped the stakes in what is already arguably the most dangerous global crisis. Paradoxically, Pyongyang’s heightened provocations, combined with the limited arsenal of tenable responses by the international community, are pushing the relevant powers in conflict closer to talking than ever before. Indeed, U.S. President Donald Trump has said he is willing to talk to North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. South Korea’s newly elected president, Moon Jae-in, also said in his first days in office that he is open to visiting the North under the right circumstances. Yoon Young-Kwan, a former South Korean foreign minister, writes that Moon’s policy is akin to the “Ostpolitik” approach of former German Chancellor Willy Brandt, which prepared the way for German unification after the end of the Cold War.  Top Chinese diplomat Fu Ying spells out the urgent realism that is forcing a fresh approach that departs from the sanctions plus “strategic patience” thinking that has guided the policy of America and its allies in recent years. As I write in my piece summarizing our discussion, “Madame Fu’s fundamental point is that increased sanctions or threats of military action without talks is precisely what is driving North Korea to intensify its weapons program.” Trying to outsource the problem to China won’t work, in her view, because, as I relay, “China is not a party to the antagonism and hostility that has caused the security dilemma of North Korea. The country’s deep insecurity comes from its constant fear of the kind of regime change preceded by sanctions that the United States and its allies have executed elsewhere, including in Iraq.” The best that can be achieved, Madame Fu argues, now appears to be a “Pareto-optimal” solution. Such a path, I write, recapping her words, “may not meet the optimal benefits every party seeks but would ensure the minimum interest of all parties with minimal cost. In other words, compromise all around.” To make that work, she explains in a Brookings Institution historical review, action aimed at reducing the present high level of tension must be both “synchronized and reciprocal.”  Former U.S. Defense Secretary William Perry also soberly warns that military action is unrealistic. “If the U.S. conducted a preemptive military strike,” he writes, noting that he planned such an option back in 1994 before the North crossed the nuclear threshold, “it would trigger bloody reprisal attacks on Seoul, quite possibly leading to a second Korean war, this one entailing the use of nuclear weapons.” The only alternative now, he concurs with Fu Ying, is for the U.S. and China to adopt a common approach. “I believe that there is now an opportunity for creative diplomacy that has not previously existed. This opportunity has opened because China is now more deeply concerned than in the past about the damaging consequences of the North’s nuclear program. ... The U.S. could seize this opportunity not by insisting that China should solve the problem, but by working together with China to solve it.” Conflict scholar David Cortright agrees with Fu Ying that “the leaders of North Korea will not give up the bomb until they feel more secure.” To reach that end, he argues that, as with Iran, the U.S. should promise “to lift sanctions and renew trade in exchange for nuclear restrictions.” Writing from Seoul, Seok-Hyun Hong, the publisher of one of South Korea’s largest newspapers who spoke with President Trump this week as President Moon’s envoy, says “time is running out for my country” and that “South Korea must prevent a war at any cost.” He then lays out a two-stage roadmap for Trump to draw back from the brink. In the first stage, North Korea would agree to stop development of nuclear arms and missiles at the current level. On that basis, a new dialogue or negotiations would start with Pyongyang in stage two. “Donald Trump,” he writes, “may be the U.S. president who can turn the tables in the region to transform troubles and threats into opportunity and bring us closer to resolving the North Korean issue. But this will only be possible if he stops to think and channel his aggression into a concrete plan such as the one I have suggested.” The urgency of the North Korean crisis masks the historical significance of another longer-term development underway of worldwide significance ― China taking the lead as the champion of the next stage of globalization. In his speech at the recently concluded Belt and Road Forum for International Cooperation in Beijing, senior Chinese strategist Zheng Bijian notes that, according to International Monetary Fund projections, by 2018, the developing world could comprise 59 percent of the global economy, compared to the 41 percent of the advanced nations. “The global economy as a whole, driven by the developing world, will continue to gather new momentum for growth in the second, third and fourth decades of this century,” he asserts. “The more rapid growth in the developing economies will in turn stimulate renewed growth in the developed world by becoming an even larger market for its goods and services. The new phase of globalization will thus be a reverse from the past in which the developed world was the growth engine.” The whole idea of China’s “One Belt, One Road” initiative for infrastructure investment, says Zheng, is to tie together maritime and inland trading routes, thus boosting the prospect of greater prosperity across Eurasia to Africa. European participants at the forum, however, had their doubts. “The [European Union] has dealt a blow to Chinese President Xi Jinping’s bid to lead a global infrastructure revolution,” The Guardian reports this week, “after its members refused to endorse part of the multi-billion-dollar plan because it did not include commitments to social and environmental sustainability and transparency.”  In an interview, Singapore’s Kishore Mahbubani underscores the non-Western perspective on the fate of globalization expressed by Zheng. “Globalization has not failed,” he says. “All discussions on globalization are distorted because Western analysts focus on the roughly 15 percent of the world’s population who live in the West. They ignore the 85 percent who are the rest. The last 30 years of human history have been the best 30 years that the rest have enjoyed. Why? The answer is globalization.” The perception in the advanced economies that globalization has failed is due to a simple fact, according to Mahbubani: “Western elites who enjoyed the fruits of globalization did not share them with their Western masses.” Other highlights in The WorldPost this week include: Somalia Is On The Brink of Famine, And Time is Running Out Xi Jinping Primes China To Be Leader Of The Free-Trade Pack Parag Khanna: Swiss Direct Democracy + Singapore’s Smart Rulers = Direct Technocracy What Iran’s Election Could Mean For The Nuclear Deal And U.S. Relations This Year’s U.S. Worldwide Threat Report Warns Of Cyberattacks, Nukes And Climate Change For more on Somalia’s drought, check out our WorldPost video, adapted from this week’s op-ed, “Somalia Is On The Brink Of Famine, And Time Is Running Out,” below: WHO WE ARE     EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Rosa O’Hara is the Social Editor of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at HuffPost, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

05 мая, 21:57

Weekend Roundup: If You Don’t Have Solid Borders, You Get Walls

Even if U.S. President Donald Trump never ends up building an actual wall along the Mexican border, it was the compelling metaphor of shutting out a menacing world and protecting his own tribe that won the day in the election last year. That such a message would so resonate in a nation founded and sustained by immigrants is a sign of just how disruptive the fluid flows of globalization have been to any solid sense of cultural and social cohesion. Without boundaries that define who we are, any community is at a loss over how to secure its fate by navigating the constant churn and endless flux of today’s world. In the end, it is this sense of loss of control over one’s destiny ― whether as a result of technological change, globalization or the related issue of mass immigration ― that is at the root of the populist backlash. Identity politics is an effort to create a safe and familiar space for you and your kind in a world of tumult fomented by strangers. The French philosopher Régis Debray saw the backlash coming. In his 2010 Éloge des frontières (In Praise of Borders), he understood that unlike the universalizing reason behind globalization, culture is rooted in the vernacular wellspring of emotional attachment and belonging. Debray argued that if borders don’t secure cultural affinity, walls will be erected in their place by insecure identities fearing contamination. “The border,” he wrote, is “a vaccine against the epidemic of walls.” The Brexit vote, Trump’s victory and the strong showing of Marine Le Pen’s National Front in the first round of France’s election ought to impress this lesson upon progressive political leaders searching for a way to reconnect with an electorate that marginalized them. Those with a liberal outlook surely must read the writing on Trump’s wall that every country has the right to control its borders and insist upon clear criteria for obtaining citizenship ― including language, knowledge of laws and acceptance of host country values and norms.  Helen Clark writes from Perth that changes being proposed to Australia’s immigration policy would do just that — require an “Australian values” section in the test for citizenship. In 2015, Australia’s immigration authority defined those values in this way: Australian society values respect for the freedom and dignity of the individual, freedom of religion, commitment to the rule of law, Parliamentary democracy, equality of men and women and a spirit of egalitarianism that embraces mutual respect, tolerance, fair play and compassion for those in need and pursuit of the public good; Australian society values equality of opportunity for individuals, regardless of their race, religion or ethnic background; The English language, as the national language, is an important unifying element of Australian society. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is right to argue that the diversity that comes with immigration is a core strength of society — it is linked to creativity, innovation and even security. Yet, as Paul May points out, immigration policies in Canada are based primarily on the skills and economic needs of Canadian society and not mostly family based as they are in the U.S. and much of Europe. “In the U.S., about two-thirds of permanent residents are admitted to reunite with family members,” May writes. “Less than 20 percent are admitted because of their professional skills. In Canada, by contrast, it’s almost the opposite: more than 60 percent of permanent residents are admitted via the economy class, and only a quarter are admitted because of family reunification.” Bob Dane, the executive director of the Federation for American Immigration Reform, argues that the U.S. needs a more merit-based immigration policy ― perhaps like Canada’s ― as Trump has vaguely called for. “Our current immigration system fails to serve any identifiable national or public interests,” he writes. Following Canada’s example, however, is not so easy for a country like the U.S. As May points out, unlike Canada, the U.S. has plenty of demand for low-wage workers and shares a long border with a largely impoverished nation whose laborers are hungry for work. Nonetheless, moving in the direction of such a system would go some distance toward recovering a sense of lost control over the American border and weaken the impetus behind the appeal of a wall. Jerry Nickelsburg reinforces May’s point about the structural need in the American economy for lower-wage workers, particularly in agriculture. In an article titled “If You Want Strawberry Fields Forever, You Need Migrant Labor,” Nickelsburg offers an alternative to the present immigration quandary. “One option would be to normalize the status of undocumented farm workers, perhaps via a new version of the bracero program of 1942 to 1964 that permitted U.S. farmers to recruit temporary agricultural help from Mexico. ... It also would have the side benefits of reducing illegal border crossings — U.S. farms would not be providing jobs to newly arrived undocumented immigrants — and this would allow undocumented immigrants already here to come out of the shadows.” Among others, former Mexican President Ernesto Zedillo has argued for a similar course. Edward Leamer argues that, indeed, “aliens” are taking American jobs. But those aliens are legal robots, not undocumented immigrants. Harvard Historian Calder Walton warns of the dangers of paranoid and conspiracy-minded leaders, whether Joseph Stalin or Donald Trump, making decisions based on raw intelligence. Other highlights this week include: Trump’s Tough Talk About North Korea Might Actually End The Crisis Forget North Korea. The Next Nuclear Crisis Festers On The India-Pakistan Border Triangular Diplomacy At Work Again With China, India And Russia Playing One Off Against The Other Angela Merkel Chooses Not To Wear A Headscarf In Saudi Arabia WHO WE ARE     EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Rosa O’Hara is the Social Editor of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at HuffPost, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

05 мая, 21:57

Weekend Roundup: If You Don’t Have Solid Borders, You Get Walls

Even if U.S. President Donald Trump never ends up building an actual wall along the Mexican border, it was the compelling metaphor of shutting out a menacing world and protecting his own tribe that won the day in the election last year. That such a message would so resonate in a nation founded and sustained by immigrants is a sign of just how disruptive the fluid flows of globalization have been to any solid sense of cultural and social cohesion. Without boundaries that define who we are, any community is at a loss over how to secure its fate by navigating the constant churn and endless flux of today’s world. In the end, it is this sense of loss of control over one’s destiny ― whether as a result of technological change, globalization or the related issue of mass immigration ― that is at the root of the populist backlash. Identity politics is an effort to create a safe and familiar space for you and your kind in a world of tumult fomented by strangers. The French philosopher Régis Debray saw the backlash coming. In his 2010 Éloge des frontières (In Praise of Borders), he understood that unlike the universalizing reason behind globalization, culture is rooted in the vernacular wellspring of emotional attachment and belonging. Debray argued that if borders don’t secure cultural affinity, walls will be erected in their place by insecure identities fearing contamination. “The border,” he wrote, is “a vaccine against the epidemic of walls.” The Brexit vote, Trump’s victory and the strong showing of Marine Le Pen’s National Front in the first round of France’s election ought to impress this lesson upon progressive political leaders searching for a way to reconnect with an electorate that marginalized them. Those with a liberal outlook surely must read the writing on Trump’s wall that every country has the right to control its borders and insist upon clear criteria for obtaining citizenship ― including language, knowledge of laws and acceptance of host country values and norms.  Helen Clark writes from Perth that changes being proposed to Australia’s immigration policy would do just that — require an “Australian values” section in the test for citizenship. In 2015, Australia’s immigration authority defined those values in this way: Australian society values respect for the freedom and dignity of the individual, freedom of religion, commitment to the rule of law, Parliamentary democracy, equality of men and women and a spirit of egalitarianism that embraces mutual respect, tolerance, fair play and compassion for those in need and pursuit of the public good; Australian society values equality of opportunity for individuals, regardless of their race, religion or ethnic background; The English language, as the national language, is an important unifying element of Australian society. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is right to argue that the diversity that comes with immigration is a core strength of society — it is linked to creativity, innovation and even security. Yet, as Paul May points out, immigration policies in Canada are based primarily on the skills and economic needs of Canadian society and not mostly family based as they are in the U.S. and much of Europe. “In the U.S., about two-thirds of permanent residents are admitted to reunite with family members,” May writes. “Less than 20 percent are admitted because of their professional skills. In Canada, by contrast, it’s almost the opposite: more than 60 percent of permanent residents are admitted via the economy class, and only a quarter are admitted because of family reunification.” Bob Dane, the executive director of the Federation for American Immigration Reform, argues that the U.S. needs a more merit-based immigration policy ― perhaps like Canada’s ― as Trump has vaguely called for. “Our current immigration system fails to serve any identifiable national or public interests,” he writes. Following Canada’s example, however, is not so easy for a country like the U.S. As May points out, unlike Canada, the U.S. has plenty of demand for low-wage workers and shares a long border with a largely impoverished nation whose laborers are hungry for work. Nonetheless, moving in the direction of such a system would go some distance toward recovering a sense of lost control over the American border and weaken the impetus behind the appeal of a wall. Jerry Nickelsburg reinforces May’s point about the structural need in the American economy for lower-wage workers, particularly in agriculture. In an article titled “If You Want Strawberry Fields Forever, You Need Migrant Labor,” Nickelsburg offers an alternative to the present immigration quandary. “One option would be to normalize the status of undocumented farm workers, perhaps via a new version of the bracero program of 1942 to 1964 that permitted U.S. farmers to recruit temporary agricultural help from Mexico. ... It also would have the side benefits of reducing illegal border crossings — U.S. farms would not be providing jobs to newly arrived undocumented immigrants — and this would allow undocumented immigrants already here to come out of the shadows.” Among others, former Mexican President Ernesto Zedillo has argued for a similar course. Edward Leamer argues that, indeed, “aliens” are taking American jobs. But those aliens are legal robots, not undocumented immigrants. Harvard Historian Calder Walton warns of the dangers of paranoid and conspiracy-minded leaders, whether Joseph Stalin or Donald Trump, making decisions based on raw intelligence. Other highlights this week include: Trump’s Tough Talk About North Korea Might Actually End The Crisis Forget North Korea. The Next Nuclear Crisis Festers On The India-Pakistan Border Triangular Diplomacy At Work Again With China, India And Russia Playing One Off Against The Other Angela Merkel Chooses Not To Wear A Headscarf In Saudi Arabia WHO WE ARE     EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Rosa O’Hara is the Social Editor of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at HuffPost, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

28 апреля, 22:44

Weekend Roundup: In France, Reality Has Escaped Its Institutions

The first round of France’s presidential elections last weekend demonstrated that the clear-cut division of loyalties to the old mainstream parties ― the left and right political divide born during the French Revolution ― has collapsed in France. In the industrial era, the left always stood for social protection from the insecurities spawned by the market, while the right championed the blood, soil and tradition of “a certain idea of France,” as Charles de Gaulle once put it. All that has now been fatally disrupted by globalization and rapid technological change. Alain Touraine, the country’s “dean” of sociology, captured the moment well at a Berggruen Institute meeting in Lisbon last week. “Reality has escaped its institutions,” he quipped. And not just in France. As in the election of U.S. President Donald Trump in America and the Brexit vote in the United Kingdom, this partisan dissipation has been accompanied by the consolidation of a territorial rift between rural and deindustrialized zones of France on the one hand and the globally integrated, cosmopolitan coastal zones and cities on the other.   The French elections, as Pascal Perrineau writes from Paris, pitted “patriots” against “globalists” worried about a Brexit-like split from Europe that far-right candidate Marine Le Pen has promised. He also notes that Le Pen’s anti-immigrant, anti-elite and anti-globalization narrative, which also embraces a strong welfare state, attracted significant numbers of working-class voters once faithful to the left.   Surprisingly, Le Pen appealed widely to young voters as well in her campaign against the centrist “En Marche!” vision of Emmanuel Macron, who came out on top in the first round. Together, Le Pen and Jean-Luc Mélenchon, on the opposite extreme of the spectrum, garnered more than 50 percent of the youth vote. Mélenchon attracted that support in part through cutting-edge social media and hologram appearances at rallies, as well as through his calls for a 100 percent marginal tax rate on the rich and the limiting of CEO pay to 20 times that of the lowest-paid employee. His campaign exploited longstanding fears over the “Uberization” of the economy by Macron’s pro-Europe, pro-market proposals for American-style deregulation and a “flexible” labor market that would only create a new “precariat class” of insecure, part-time, low-paid workers with few benefits. Unlike the other competing candidates and parties, Mélenchon has so far refused to support Macron against Le Pen in the final vote on May 7, throwing open a desperate contest to win over his constituency. Anne Sinclair reacts to these results and lays out the new political landscape as it now stands as the country prepares for the runoff election. “One quarter of French people dream of a gentler and less precarious life,” she writes. “Another quarter prioritize taxes and debt reduction. A third quarter is seeking national security and a populist leader who doesn’t represent the elite. And finally, a fourth quarter, slightly more confident about the country’s future, is interested in profound modifications to governance and French politics.”  Nicolas Tenzer writes from Paris that “whoever becomes the next president will have to cope with this divided France, large sections of which distrust open-society values, Europe and the free market.” If Macron, who is so far favored in polling, has a chance of obtaining a governing mandate, Tenzer continues, “he will have to demonstrate that Europe and globalization can bring justice and fairness and that France can mend its divided society.” But, “if Macron’s center can’t mend this divide,” he warns, “populists will be waiting in the wings.” Other highlights this week include: France’s Election Is About So Much More Than Just Populism How The Coming Elections In France And Germany Can Save The West The Oceans Are Drowning In Plastic — And No One’s Paying Attention Women Are The Lifeline To Those Without Access To Water In Kenya Puffing Across The ‘One Belt, One Road’ Rail Route To Nowhere WHO WE ARE     EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at HuffPost, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar(First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

28 апреля, 22:44

Weekend Roundup: In France, Reality Has Escaped Its Institutions

The first round of France’s presidential elections last weekend demonstrated that the clear-cut division of loyalties to the old mainstream parties ― the left and right political divide born during the French Revolution ― has collapsed in France. In the industrial era, the left always stood for social protection from the insecurities spawned by the market, while the right championed the blood, soil and tradition of “a certain idea of France,” as Charles de Gaulle once put it. All that has now been fatally disrupted by globalization and rapid technological change. Alain Touraine, the country’s “dean” of sociology, captured the moment well at a Berggruen Institute meeting in Lisbon last week. “Reality has escaped its institutions,” he quipped. And not just in France. As in the election of U.S. President Donald Trump in America and the Brexit vote in the United Kingdom, this partisan dissipation has been accompanied by the consolidation of a territorial rift between rural and deindustrialized zones of France on the one hand and the globally integrated, cosmopolitan coastal zones and cities on the other.   The French elections, as Pascal Perrineau writes from Paris, pitted “patriots” against “globalists” worried about a Brexit-like split from Europe that far-right candidate Marine Le Pen has promised. He also notes that Le Pen’s anti-immigrant, anti-elite and anti-globalization narrative, which also embraces a strong welfare state, attracted significant numbers of working-class voters once faithful to the left.   Surprisingly, Le Pen appealed widely to young voters as well in her campaign against the centrist “En Marche!” vision of Emmanuel Macron, who came out on top in the first round. Together, Le Pen and Jean-Luc Mélenchon, on the opposite extreme of the spectrum, garnered more than 50 percent of the youth vote. Mélenchon attracted that support in part through cutting-edge social media and hologram appearances at rallies, as well as through his calls for a 100 percent marginal tax rate on the rich and the limiting of CEO pay to 20 times that of the lowest-paid employee. His campaign exploited longstanding fears over the “Uberization” of the economy by Macron’s pro-Europe, pro-market proposals for American-style deregulation and a “flexible” labor market that would only create a new “precariat class” of insecure, part-time, low-paid workers with few benefits. Unlike the other competing candidates and parties, Mélenchon has so far refused to support Macron against Le Pen in the final vote on May 7, throwing open a desperate contest to win over his constituency. Anne Sinclair reacts to these results and lays out the new political landscape as it now stands as the country prepares for the runoff election. “One quarter of French people dream of a gentler and less precarious life,” she writes. “Another quarter prioritize taxes and debt reduction. A third quarter is seeking national security and a populist leader who doesn’t represent the elite. And finally, a fourth quarter, slightly more confident about the country’s future, is interested in profound modifications to governance and French politics.”  Nicolas Tenzer writes from Paris that “whoever becomes the next president will have to cope with this divided France, large sections of which distrust open-society values, Europe and the free market.” If Macron, who is so far favored in polling, has a chance of obtaining a governing mandate, Tenzer continues, “he will have to demonstrate that Europe and globalization can bring justice and fairness and that France can mend its divided society.” But, “if Macron’s center can’t mend this divide,” he warns, “populists will be waiting in the wings.” Other highlights this week include: France’s Election Is About So Much More Than Just Populism How The Coming Elections In France And Germany Can Save The West The Oceans Are Drowning In Plastic — And No One’s Paying Attention Women Are The Lifeline To Those Without Access To Water In Kenya Puffing Across The ‘One Belt, One Road’ Rail Route To Nowhere WHO WE ARE     EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at HuffPost, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar(First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

21 апреля, 23:44

Weekend Roundup: Amid Great Cultural Shifts, Voting Settles Little

In an era of profound cultural transformation, elections and referendums have very real consequences ― such as the repeal of environmental regulations or crackdowns on press freedom. But as much as they reveal how markedly divided societies are at this historical moment, they settle little. For those who are nostalgic for an ideal past, the challenges of a complex future wrought by globalization, digital disruption and increasing cultural diversity remain unresolved. For those looking ahead, there is no going back. The present political reaction is only the first act, not the last. It is the beginning, not the end, of the story of societies in fluid transition. The recent Turkish referendum, like Brexit and U.S. President Donald Trump’s election, fits a pattern of a territorial divide. Residents in large cities and coastal zones linked to global integration and cosmopolitan culture represented just under half of the vote; rural, small-town and Rust Belt regions linked more to the traditions and economic structures of the past were just over half. But there is also a major difference. The populist, nationalist narrative that won the day in Great Britain and the United States championed the “left behind” and splintered the unresponsive mainstream political parties. In Turkey, the day was won by a conservative, pious and upwardly mobile constituency already empowered by some 15 years of rule by President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s Justice and Development Party. The cultural duel there, backed up by neo-Islamist and nationalist statism, will thus be more intense than elsewhere. In an interview following the historic vote in her country, novelist Elif Shafak says, “The referendum has not solved anything. If anything, it deepened the existing cultural and ideological divisions.” She also laments the decline of Turkey’s long experiment as a majority-Muslim country attempting to balance culture, secularism and Western democracy. “This is the most significant turning point in Turkey’s modern political history,” she declares. “It is a shift backwards; the end of parliamentary democracy. It is also a dangerous discontinuation of decades of Westernization, secularism and modernization; the discontinuation of Atatürk’s modern Turkey.” Writing from Istanbul, Behlül Özkan explains the details of the constitutional referendum, how the playing field was tilted in Erdoğan’s favor and how it will have massive implications for Turkey’s future. He also emphasizes the historic importance of Turkey’s reverse. Özkan cites the political theorist Samuel Huntington who, in an essay decades ago on transitions from authoritarian rule, once defined Turkey as a clear example of a one-party system becoming more open and competitive under the constitution put in place by Mustafa Kemal Atatürk. It is rare in history to move in the other direction, as Erdoğan has now accomplished. Also writing from Istanbul, Alev Scott believes Turkey is in for “a decade of paranoia under a modern-day Sultan” who was unnerved by the slim margin of his victory. Noting a widely circulated photograph of the president at his moment of triumph, she saw a man not “celebrating victory” but “a man alarmed by near-defeat.” Even as critics within Turkey and others abroad expressed concern over the extinguishing of democracy, Trump again showed his affinity for strongman politics by calling to congratulate Erdoğan on his victory. Yet, as with other countries from India to Argentina, there is likely another element as well to this potentially budding bromance. Sam Stein and Igor Bobic report on ethical issues raised by Trump’s business ties with Turkey. In 2012, Erdoğan joined Trump and his family to mark the opening of Trump Towers Istanbul.  Here are a few additional highlights from The WorldPost this week: 11 Things To Know About North Korea’s Secret Nuclear Program North Korea’s Simple But Deadly Artillery Holds Seoul And U.S. Hostage Bill Clinton’s Secretary Of Defense Likes Trump’s North Korea Strategy Photo Series Show The People Of North Korea You Rarely Get To See 4 Reasons Why France’s Presidential Election Is So Important France’s Youth Are Turning To The Far-Right National Front Can American Democracy Survive The Era Of Inequality? Trump Shouldn’t Mess With The Clean Air Act, American Lung Association Warns Amazing Photos Capture How Flowers Look Under Ultraviolet Light  WHO WE ARE     EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar(First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherlandand Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

21 апреля, 23:44

Weekend Roundup: Amid Great Cultural Shifts, Voting Settles Little

In an era of profound cultural transformation, elections and referendums have very real consequences ― such as the repeal of environmental regulations or crackdowns on press freedom. But as much as they reveal how markedly divided societies are at this historical moment, they settle little. For those who are nostalgic for an ideal past, the challenges of a complex future wrought by globalization, digital disruption and increasing cultural diversity remain unresolved. For those looking ahead, there is no going back. The present political reaction is only the first act, not the last. It is the beginning, not the end, of the story of societies in fluid transition. The recent Turkish referendum, like Brexit and U.S. President Donald Trump’s election, fits a pattern of a territorial divide. Residents in large cities and coastal zones linked to global integration and cosmopolitan culture represented just under half of the vote; rural, small-town and Rust Belt regions linked more to the traditions and economic structures of the past were just over half. But there is also a major difference. The populist, nationalist narrative that won the day in Great Britain and the United States championed the “left behind” and splintered the unresponsive mainstream political parties. In Turkey, the day was won by a conservative, pious and upwardly mobile constituency already empowered by some 15 years of rule by President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s Justice and Development Party. The cultural duel there, backed up by neo-Islamist and nationalist statism, will thus be more intense than elsewhere. In an interview following the historic vote in her country, novelist Elif Shafak says, “The referendum has not solved anything. If anything, it deepened the existing cultural and ideological divisions.” She also laments the decline of Turkey’s long experiment as a majority-Muslim country attempting to balance culture, secularism and Western democracy. “This is the most significant turning point in Turkey’s modern political history,” she declares. “It is a shift backwards; the end of parliamentary democracy. It is also a dangerous discontinuation of decades of Westernization, secularism and modernization; the discontinuation of Atatürk’s modern Turkey.” Writing from Istanbul, Behlül Özkan explains the details of the constitutional referendum, how the playing field was tilted in Erdoğan’s favor and how it will have massive implications for Turkey’s future. He also emphasizes the historic importance of Turkey’s reverse. Özkan cites the political theorist Samuel Huntington who, in an essay decades ago on transitions from authoritarian rule, once defined Turkey as a clear example of a one-party system becoming more open and competitive under the constitution put in place by Mustafa Kemal Atatürk. It is rare in history to move in the other direction, as Erdoğan has now accomplished. Also writing from Istanbul, Alev Scott believes Turkey is in for “a decade of paranoia under a modern-day Sultan” who was unnerved by the slim margin of his victory. Noting a widely circulated photograph of the president at his moment of triumph, she saw a man not “celebrating victory” but “a man alarmed by near-defeat.” Even as critics within Turkey and others abroad expressed concern over the extinguishing of democracy, Trump again showed his affinity for strongman politics by calling to congratulate Erdoğan on his victory. Yet, as with other countries from India to Argentina, there is likely another element as well to this potentially budding bromance. Sam Stein and Igor Bobic report on ethical issues raised by Trump’s business ties with Turkey. In 2012, Erdoğan joined Trump and his family to mark the opening of Trump Towers Istanbul.  Here are a few additional highlights from The WorldPost this week: 11 Things To Know About North Korea’s Secret Nuclear Program North Korea’s Simple But Deadly Artillery Holds Seoul And U.S. Hostage Bill Clinton’s Secretary Of Defense Likes Trump’s North Korea Strategy Photo Series Show The People Of North Korea You Rarely Get To See 4 Reasons Why France’s Presidential Election Is So Important France’s Youth Are Turning To The Far-Right National Front Can American Democracy Survive The Era Of Inequality? Trump Shouldn’t Mess With The Clean Air Act, American Lung Association Warns Amazing Photos Capture How Flowers Look Under Ultraviolet Light  WHO WE ARE     EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar(First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherlandand Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

08 апреля, 02:50

Weekend Roundup: For China And The U.S., The Solution Is In The Problem

Harvard’s Graham Allison worries that China and the U.S. risk falling into the “Thucydides Trap” ― named after the historian who chronicled the conflict between ancient Athens and Sparta ― in which rivalry between rising and established powers inevitably leads to war. More often than not, Allison’s research shows, similar rivalries throughout history have held to that pattern. The great question in this era is whether the world’s two largest economies can embark on a new departure, or if they are fated to replay an all too familiar past.  The first face-to-face meeting this week of Chinese President Xi Jinping and U.S. President Donald Trump is an opening indicator of which path will be taken. One summit does not make a relationship. But it does set a tone. That Donald Trump has changed his tune from charging “rape” by China on the campaign trail to inviting President Xi for a lavish repast at Mar-a-Lago is a sign that convergent interests may out of necessity forge a different future than history would suggest.  The interwoven relationship that has tightly tethered the U.S. and Chinese economies over the past three decades is the basis both of the present conflict and for resolving it. Hundreds of millions of Chinese have escaped poverty and climbed the income ladder by supplying cheap goods and produce to the likes of Walmart, Costco and Home Depot or assembling Apple iPhones and other electronics that are ubiquitous in the daily lives of Americans. This accounts for the huge trade deficit with China ― though the main reason for U.S. trade imbalances globally is simply that, since the 1970s, Americans consume more as a nation than they save and invest. As the made-for-export low-wage factory of the world, China has surely taken up jobs that might have been created in the U.S. Yet China, too, is a major importer of components for what it produces, reportedly spending more on importing microchips than oil, to take but one example. Increasingly, the fortunes of leading U.S. industries like Hollywood and Boeing depend on Chinese markets. If “the globalists gutted the American working class and created a middle class in Asia,” as White House adviser Steve Bannon has declared, then therein lies the solution. Having achieved relative prosperity built upon the American-led open trading order that President Trump says he is seeking to dismantle, China now has the income and the intent to shift to a domestic consumption-driven economy less reliant on exports to the U.S. As Shen Dingli writes from Shanghai, that means the present trade imbalance can best be addressed by China through increasing imports from the U.S. rather than cutting exports. The enormous financial resources China has accumulated from its trade surplus with the U.S., David Shambaugh suggests from Singapore, could be plowed back into the U.S. to finance the very kind of infrastructure projects Trump has promoted. If Trump can manage to restore a manufacturing base in the U.S. that is not mostly automated, it will reinforce the trajectory toward a more stable balance between the American and Chinese economies. Further, China is plotting an economic future that largely looks away from the U.S. ― through regional free trade agreements in East Asia, building out a revived Silk Road trading route that stretches across Eurasia from Beijing to Istanbul and deepening commercial ties with Africa. In short, if the U.S. and China can manage the bumps over the next few years, the root of economic conflict will resolve itself over time. But there’s a big hurdle they’ll have to get over first. For the two leaders, dealing with North Korea’s nuclear and missile program is a continuing conundrum. The likely course ahead appears to be a hybrid of harsher sanctions ― which the U.S is pushing ― followed in time by direct talks with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, which China is pressing for, according to top Chinese diplomat Fu Ying.  As Xi sat down with Trump in Florida, the American president launched his first direct military strike against Syrian President Bashar Assad’s airfield, where the planes which allegedly delivered this week’s deadly Syrian gas attack were based. Former NATO commander James Stavridis calls the move “proportional, tactically sound [and] professionally executed” and says it “sends a reasonable coherent strategic signal.” That signal, he suggests, was not only to Russia and Syria, but also to China and North Korea. The follow-up message Secretary of State Rex Tillerson should carry on his visit to Moscow next week, the former admiral adds, is that it must “restrain” its Syrian ally. China’s intertwined relationship with the U.S. is also getting entangled in the immigration debate. While most of that debate has focused on Mexicans and Muslims, a new schism has broken out between second and third generation Asian Americans and immigrants who have arrived in recent years from a bolder and more prosperous Middle Kingdom. Frank Wu, who chairs the prestigious Committee of 100 top Chinese-American entrepreneurs, scorns the new immigrants “from an ascendant Asia.”: “Some of our cousins, distant kin who have shown up here, are alarming. They are bigots who do not care about democracy. They believe themselves to be better than other people of color ― it hardly is worth pointing out since it is so obvious. They even suppose, not all that secretly, that they will surpass whites.” Responding furiously to this characterization from Shanghai, Rupert Li fires back that, “The Chinese-American elite were appalled by the watershed of support for Donald Trump among new Chinese arrivals.” If “they do not feel solidarity with disadvantaged groups,” he goes on to say, it is “not because they are bigoted, but because they do not consider themselves disadvantaged.”  Reflecting on events elsewhere in the world, Scott Malcomson reports on the latest turmoil in Hungary around the government’s effort to impose crippling restrictions on the Central European University, founded with the help of the Hungarian-born billionaire George Soros, and other institutions that receive foreign funding. As Malcomson sees it, the anti-foreigner animus of Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban is “self-destructive” because it isolates the country and will undermine what it needs to progress. Muhammad Sahimi worries that the tough stance of the Trump administration on Iran only boosts the chances of the hard-liners ousting reformist President Hassan Rouhani from power in upcoming elections and putting a conservative, Assad-supporting cleric in his place. Erin Fracolli and Elisa Epstein contend that what they call Trump’s “Muslim ban” harms women by identifying “honor killings” as an Islam problem in the same way he conflates the Muslim religion with terrorism in his rhetoric about “radical Islamic terrorism.”  Pax Technica author Phil Howard reports on his new research that shows “more than half the political news and information being shared by social media users in Michigan [a pivotal state that helped Trump triumph in the recent U.S. president election] was not from trusted sources.” He contrasts that experience with an election in Germany where, “for every four stories sourced to a professional news organization, there was one piece of junk.” He concludes: “Social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter don’t generate junk news, but they do serve it up to us. They are the mandatory point of passage for this junk, which means they could also be the choke point for it.” Finally, our Singularity series this week looks at how CRISPR gene editing for crops can feed the 9.7 billion people our planet is expecting to host by 2050. WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

08 апреля, 02:50

Weekend Roundup: For China And The U.S., The Solution Is In The Problem

Harvard’s Graham Allison worries that China and the U.S. risk falling into the “Thucydides Trap” ― named after the historian who chronicled the conflict between ancient Athens and Sparta ― in which rivalry between rising and established powers inevitably leads to war. More often than not, Allison’s research shows, similar rivalries throughout history have held to that pattern. The great question in this era is whether the world’s two largest economies can embark on a new departure, or if they are fated to replay an all too familiar past.  The first face-to-face meeting this week of Chinese President Xi Jinping and U.S. President Donald Trump is an opening indicator of which path will be taken. One summit does not make a relationship. But it does set a tone. That Donald Trump has changed his tune from charging “rape” by China on the campaign trail to inviting President Xi for a lavish repast at Mar-a-Lago is a sign that convergent interests may out of necessity forge a different future than history would suggest.  The interwoven relationship that has tightly tethered the U.S. and Chinese economies over the past three decades is the basis both of the present conflict and for resolving it. Hundreds of millions of Chinese have escaped poverty and climbed the income ladder by supplying cheap goods and produce to the likes of Walmart, Costco and Home Depot or assembling Apple iPhones and other electronics that are ubiquitous in the daily lives of Americans. This accounts for the huge trade deficit with China ― though the main reason for U.S. trade imbalances globally is simply that, since the 1970s, Americans consume more as a nation than they save and invest. As the made-for-export low-wage factory of the world, China has surely taken up jobs that might have been created in the U.S. Yet China, too, is a major importer of components for what it produces, reportedly spending more on importing microchips than oil, to take but one example. Increasingly, the fortunes of leading U.S. industries like Hollywood and Boeing depend on Chinese markets. If “the globalists gutted the American working class and created a middle class in Asia,” as White House adviser Steve Bannon has declared, then therein lies the solution. Having achieved relative prosperity built upon the American-led open trading order that President Trump says he is seeking to dismantle, China now has the income and the intent to shift to a domestic consumption-driven economy less reliant on exports to the U.S. As Shen Dingli writes from Shanghai, that means the present trade imbalance can best be addressed by China through increasing imports from the U.S. rather than cutting exports. The enormous financial resources China has accumulated from its trade surplus with the U.S., David Shambaugh suggests from Singapore, could be plowed back into the U.S. to finance the very kind of infrastructure projects Trump has promoted. If Trump can manage to restore a manufacturing base in the U.S. that is not mostly automated, it will reinforce the trajectory toward a more stable balance between the American and Chinese economies. Further, China is plotting an economic future that largely looks away from the U.S. ― through regional free trade agreements in East Asia, building out a revived Silk Road trading route that stretches across Eurasia from Beijing to Istanbul and deepening commercial ties with Africa. In short, if the U.S. and China can manage the bumps over the next few years, the root of economic conflict will resolve itself over time. But there’s a big hurdle they’ll have to get over first. For the two leaders, dealing with North Korea’s nuclear and missile program is a continuing conundrum. The likely course ahead appears to be a hybrid of harsher sanctions ― which the U.S is pushing ― followed in time by direct talks with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, which China is pressing for, according to top Chinese diplomat Fu Ying.  As Xi sat down with Trump in Florida, the American president launched his first direct military strike against Syrian President Bashar Assad’s airfield, where the planes which allegedly delivered this week’s deadly Syrian gas attack were based. Former NATO commander James Stavridis calls the move “proportional, tactically sound [and] professionally executed” and says it “sends a reasonable coherent strategic signal.” That signal, he suggests, was not only to Russia and Syria, but also to China and North Korea. The follow-up message Secretary of State Rex Tillerson should carry on his visit to Moscow next week, the former admiral adds, is that it must “restrain” its Syrian ally. China’s intertwined relationship with the U.S. is also getting entangled in the immigration debate. While most of that debate has focused on Mexicans and Muslims, a new schism has broken out between second and third generation Asian Americans and immigrants who have arrived in recent years from a bolder and more prosperous Middle Kingdom. Frank Wu, who chairs the prestigious Committee of 100 top Chinese-American entrepreneurs, scorns the new immigrants “from an ascendant Asia.”: “Some of our cousins, distant kin who have shown up here, are alarming. They are bigots who do not care about democracy. They believe themselves to be better than other people of color ― it hardly is worth pointing out since it is so obvious. They even suppose, not all that secretly, that they will surpass whites.” Responding furiously to this characterization from Shanghai, Rupert Li fires back that, “The Chinese-American elite were appalled by the watershed of support for Donald Trump among new Chinese arrivals.” If “they do not feel solidarity with disadvantaged groups,” he goes on to say, it is “not because they are bigoted, but because they do not consider themselves disadvantaged.”  Reflecting on events elsewhere in the world, Scott Malcomson reports on the latest turmoil in Hungary around the government’s effort to impose crippling restrictions on the Central European University, founded with the help of the Hungarian-born billionaire George Soros, and other institutions that receive foreign funding. As Malcomson sees it, the anti-foreigner animus of Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban is “self-destructive” because it isolates the country and will undermine what it needs to progress. Muhammad Sahimi worries that the tough stance of the Trump administration on Iran only boosts the chances of the hard-liners ousting reformist President Hassan Rouhani from power in upcoming elections and putting a conservative, Assad-supporting cleric in his place. Erin Fracolli and Elisa Epstein contend that what they call Trump’s “Muslim ban” harms women by identifying “honor killings” as an Islam problem in the same way he conflates the Muslim religion with terrorism in his rhetoric about “radical Islamic terrorism.”  Pax Technica author Phil Howard reports on his new research that shows “more than half the political news and information being shared by social media users in Michigan [a pivotal state that helped Trump triumph in the recent U.S. president election] was not from trusted sources.” He contrasts that experience with an election in Germany where, “for every four stories sourced to a professional news organization, there was one piece of junk.” He concludes: “Social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter don’t generate junk news, but they do serve it up to us. They are the mandatory point of passage for this junk, which means they could also be the choke point for it.” Finally, our Singularity series this week looks at how CRISPR gene editing for crops can feed the 9.7 billion people our planet is expecting to host by 2050. WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

28 марта, 17:57

Зачем Германия мешает "мягкому" Brexit?

Москва, 28 марта - "Вести.Экономика". Все говорит о том, что Германия усложнит для Великобритании переговоры по вопросу Brexit, сразу после того как будет запущена статья 50 и начнется формальный двухлетний процесс переговоров по вопросу выхода Великобритании из ЕС.

28 марта, 15:58

Зачем Германия мешает "мягкому" Brexit?

Все говорит о том, что Германия усложнит для Великобритании переговоры по вопросу Brexit, сразу после того как будет запущена статья 50 и начнется формальный двухлетний процесс переговоров по вопросу выхода Великобритании из ЕС.

18 марта, 04:00

Weekend Roundup: As The West Fragments, China Cements A Path Ahead

This week we witnessed two contrasting systems of governance at work. In the Netherlands, we watched the divisive system of Western multi-party democracy struggle to contain volatile populism. In China, the annual gathering of the “two sessions” ― the National People’s Congress and the National Committee of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference ― demonstrated the consensus-driven nature of China’s one-party system by reaffirming ongoing reforms. While the West is fragmenting, China is cementing its path forward. The flaws in both systems are closely related to their strengths. While rough-and-tumble political battles may rage within the great tent of China’s 88 million member Communist Party, the aim of its political process is to unify the body politic in order to put a steady wind under the wings of policy decisions that, to be effective, must be carried out without a break in continuity over the long term. It is this core attribute of Chinese governance that has raised some 600 million people out of poverty in only 30 years, not to speak of other impressive accomplishments such as building a vast high-speed rail network along with other infrastructure to modernize a backward country in record time. Within this strength, of course, resides China’s chief flaw: erring on the repressive side of order over freedom to avoid fraying of the consensus. By contrast, the Western adversarial system of competitive elections divides the body politic against itself at the cost of consensus and long-term continuity in governance. In the Netherlands, the surging anti-immigrant partisans of Geert Wilders were kept in check only by the governing centrist party migrating rightward and the splintering of the rest of the vote across many parties through proportional representation. Some 28 parties competed in this election, many of them “pop-up parties” focused on one issue. Within this strength of diverse participation lies its flaw: the growing inability to forge a governing consensus out of the exploding cacophony of voices and interests. And, as we’ve seen in the United States on policies ranging from Obamacare to climate change, when all-out competitive partisanship destroys consensus among the body politic, the democratic transfer of power can mean a complete rupture from policies endorsed by most voters only four years earlier. Writing from Copenhagen about the Dutch elections, Flemming Rose, the Danish editor who sparked worldwide protests by publishing cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad, condemns the anti-Islam extremism of Geert Wilders, who has called for banning the Quran. Marking the difference between liberal democracy and the authoritarian bent of populism, Rose writes that the “essence of tolerance” means “you do not ban, intimidate, threaten or use violence against speech that you deeply dislike or hate.”  Kaya Genc reflects from Istanbul on the anti-Islam climate in Europe in the context of the Dutch election, the Turkey-Netherlands spat and the “barbarian” stereotype of Turks he experienced while a graduate student in Amsterdam. “As someone deeply weary of jingoism and the political rhetoric of patriotism, I had long disliked Turkish identity politics,” he recalls of his mindset as a student. “And yet, it was also in the Netherlands that I’d realized the uncannily inescapable power of national and religious identity ― of the misery of being pigeonholed into categories inside which I couldn’t help but appear to Europeans.” Maastricht University’s Jacques Paulus Koenis takes a deeper look at voter discontent in the Netherlands. “The so-called ‘losers of globalization’ are not the only ones who vote for Wilders these days,” he writes. “Nor do these voters in many cases seriously believe that Wilders should rule the country. What matters is that he is tapping into the anxieties of many voters.” As Koenis sees it, those citizens believe that Europe’s intrusive political elites and new migrants are “undermining Dutch culture.” He concludes: “Nostalgia is what moves them into the belief that new Dutch dikes are needed: to keep an ever-more-threatening outside world out of this low country.”  Meanwhile, back at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, delegates from around China who gathered for the annual “two sessions” of that vast nation’s legislative and consultative bodies are looking ahead, not back with nostalgia. Reflecting on those gatherings, Fred Hu sees “no earth-shattering bold initiatives,” but only the three “C’s” of “caution, consistency and continuity.” In the face of global uncertainty, not least the rising protectionist sentiment in the U.S. that would dismantle the trading system upon which China’s prosperity was built, Hu writes from Beijing that China is prudently targeting “a growth rate realistically achievable by the expansion of domestic demand alone.” Akshay Shah, also writing from Beijing, argues that China’s economy won’t surpass the U.S. for at least another 10 to 15 years.  Jeremy Goldkorn describes how the annual meetings that took place this week in Beijing play an important role in shaping the political agenda, albeit guided by the Communist Party, while also educating public opinion on key issues of policy through their highly-publicized proceedings. As Goldkorn reports, one impassioned topic of debate over a new civil code would be familiar to most Americans: balancing the rights of women with those of the fetus. Writing from Hong Kong, Jean-Pierre Cabestan has few kind words and many harsh ones for China’s system of governance. Echoing populist sentiment sweeping the West, he writes that “the unchecked powers and accumulated privileges of the ruling elite have exacerbated a sense of injustice.” As Cabestan sees it, “the [Chinese Communist Party] no longer represents the workers and peasants” and corruption has not diminished, despite President Xi Jinping’s ballyhooed campaign, but only “become more discreet.” This interactive graphic prepared by WorldPost editor Peter Mellgard using a U.S. government data base visualizes China’s jailed, murdered or missing political prisoners. In an episode of “My Life, My China” produced by WorldPost’s partner in Shanghai, Guancha.cn, Ye Qinglin couldn’t disagree more with Cabestan’s sweeping negativity on his country and the political prisoner data that comes along with that. In this video Ye describes how he rejected a lucrative offer from the BBC, for whom he had worked, to make a documentary about “miserable conditions” of coal miners being exploited or peasants whose lands were seized to make way for the Olympics. Offended, he returned home for good in 2005, shed “Western standards” and began reporting instead on the “real China” about which he says there are many more positive stories to tell. Part of that real China is an effort by a small city in Shandong Province to go carbon neutral. As another reporter, David Biello writes, the men and women who govern Rizhao are seeking to change the course of “heedless growth” that has blanketed the country in pollution to make their city one of the first in China to achieve a “circular economy” where waste is turned into clean-burning fuel. Writing from Hong Kong, Tom Phillips tells U.S. President Donald Trump that he should heed the lessons from China’s bad experience of building the celebrated Great Wall. It was built on xenophobic principles, he says, and ultimately doomed an entire dynasty. As Trump’s Muslim-focused travel ban was blocked yet again, Christopher Mathias and Omar Kasrawi tell the tale of a gay refugee lawyer who helped fight it. When asked what the ban means to him as a refugee, Luis Mancheno, who fled from Ecuador to the U.S. for safety, said: “Closing the door to the people that need help the most is one of the cruelest, anti-American things that this government could have done. If I wasn’t allowed to come here as a refugee, I wouldn’t be alive today.”  Mouhanad A. Al-Rifay has a similar gratitude for America. Now based in Trump’s Washington, Al-Rifay came to the United States with his family as an asylum seeker in 2005 after direct death threats were made against them by Syrian President Bashar Assad’s regime. Though the U.S. president’s ban made him worry that he might have to flee hatred in his new home, the new American citizen says the nationwide outcry against this and other xenophobia have made him feel more safe and thankful than ever before.  Rami Adham, the so-called “toy smuggler” from Aleppo now based in Finland, is also thankful to have escaped the horrors of Syria, but returns to help ease the pain of those who are still there “living in a nightmare” with toys and other aid. On the eve of the 6th anniversary of the country’s uprising, he offered a mixed tale of hope and despair from Idlib ― where coming “to America is the last thing on people’s minds” ― and called on Trump and populist leaders in Europe to put an end to the long conflict. “While you have lived in beautiful towers engraved with your name, the people you are trying to keep out have been living under the dictatorship of one regime ... that has dictated their future by killing hundreds of thousands of those closest to them,” he says. The Future of Life Institute’s Ariel Conn this week explores whether AI will worsen income inequality as workers are demoted or displaced. Most agree, she writes, that it will exacerbate the problem. Finally, our Singularity series this week reports on a major advance in the creation of synthetic life as scientists for the first time have succeeded in creating what is commonly known as Baker’s yeast from scratch. WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

04 марта, 01:26

Weekend Roundup: U.S. Founders Entrusted Elites To Save Democracy From Itself

The word “democracy” does not appear in the U.S. Constitution. Nor in the Bill of Rights or the Declaration of Independence. That is because, as most Americans today would likely be surprised to discover, America’s Founding Fathers not only distrusted democracy but, based on their close reading of Greek and Roman history, were actually hostile to the notion that it was the best system for governing society. James Madison, the fourth U.S. president and a key author of the Federalist Papers, famously declared: “Democracy is the most vile form of government ... democracies have ever been spectacles of turbulence and contention; have ever been found incompatible with personal security or the rights of property; and have in general been as short in their lives as they have been violent in their deaths.” John Adams, the second American president, wrote: “Democracy never lasts long. It soon wastes, exhausts and murders itself. There never was a democracy yet that did not commit suicide.” Taking into account this central lesson of antiquity, the founders instead designed a mixed constitutional republic that, while rooted in consent of the governed, delegated authority to elites ― representative, indirectly elected and appointed bodies ― that could “refine and enlarge the public views” as ballast against the popular passions of prejudice and the narrow horizons of self-interested constituencies. For the founders, popular sovereignty unchecked by the cool and reasoned deliberation of the meritorious few would invite majoritarian intolerance of individual and minority rights, degenerate into mob rule and summon tyranny to restore order. “No political truth is certainly of greater intrinsic value,” Madison wrote in The Federalist Papers No. 47. In an interview with The WorldPost this week, political scientist Francis Fukuyama addresses the conundrum presented to the founders’ idea of governance in the face of 21st century populism. “Populism exists,” he says, “because institutions are elite-driven.” While “institutions in the past have always been controlled by the elites,” he continues, “through the presence of the internet they are losing their power. Maybe democracies don’t work too well without a certain degree of control from elites.” I would add that the great danger today is conflation by fervent populists of corrupt, out-of-touch and unresponsive elites ― that rightly should be overthrown ― with a learned and experienced elite that any large society needs to govern. As a governing ethos, know-nothingness will get you nowhere. Yet, as Pankaj Mishra observes in another WorldPost interview, the very foundation upon which elites might rehabilitate their authority has eroded. The Indian author takes the debate to both a deeper and a more global level by examining how the ressentiment against the cosmopolitan caste that has been gestating in the developing world for decades has now erupted in a mutiny against the governing narrative in “the heart of the modern West.” If the Western “truths” that have dominated the world in modern times at the expense of alternative worldviews are now themselves unraveling, where do we go next? “We are now recognizing that our modern civilization has always been incredibly fragile,” Mishra says, “since it has no recourse to any transcendental truth, as distinct from certain agreed-upon truths. And so while political and economic crises may come and go ― Trump’s presidency may implode tomorrow ― the moral and epistemological breakdown we witness today is more enduring and destructive. I would argue that the naïve people, the free-marketeers and globalizers, responsible for this state of affairs did not know what they were doing ― that they were dismantling a whole system of interlocking and necessary fictions that societies and individuals have needed since the death of God to give a degree of meaning, purpose and stability to their lives.”  The consequence, Mishra argues, is the universalization of nihilism in which the whole notion of “consensual truth” is collapsing. “Nihilism today is the single greatest threat to the modern world since its founding principles of reason, science and progress were formulated,” he concludes. It is not surprising, then, in his view, that “the subjectivization of ‘facts’” and the “fragmentation of ‘truth’” are filling up the vacuum. They are the remainder of the West’s heyday. Nowhere is the truth these days more malleable than in Russia. Writing from Moscow, Ilya Yashin marks the second anniversary this week of the assassination of his friend and opposition leader, Boris Nemstov. Yashin sees a dangerous campaign to revise recent history and roll back post-Soviet advances in the media and the rule of law in the nationalist revival under Russian President Vladimir Putin. Nick Robins-Early reports that Russian disinformation efforts have a lopsided advantage over Europeans trying to defend the integrity of their discourse as elections loom. He also highlights a speech by Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban this week in which the leader expressed a new angle on nativism ― that “’ethnic homogeneity’ is key for economic success, and that ‘too much mixing causes problems.’” In a wide-ranging essay, Nicolas Berggruen examines the role of opposition movements. While raucous protests in and of themselves may make a point, he says, they also can create a sense of chaos that “is the greatest gift to parties in power, especially dictators.” Social movements that succeed, by contrast, are characterized by a broadly shared narrative, a plan, organization and leadership, Berggruen argues. This week the Berggruen Institute also hosted a discussion in Los Angeles with Sapiens and Homo Deus author Yuval Harari. The Israeli historian discussed what it means to be human in an era when we are attaining the power of gods to change our own species and create a new one ― AI. “History began when humans invented gods, and will end when humans become gods,” he says.  Former WorldPost China Correspondent Matt Sheehan looks outside the box on the troubled relations between Washington and Beijing. “The engine room of the U.S.-China relationship,” he writes, “has moved from the White House to City Hall.” While the talk in Washington is of tariffs, American mayors are wooing Chinese investors and immigrants for their local projects. Writing from Shanghai, Zhang Weiwei argues that political legitimacy comes fundamentally from the competence of leadership, as in the case of the Chinese Communist Party, that fulfills its contract with the people by delivering prosperity and security ― whether they were elected or not.   Eric Olander and Cobus van Staden see a Trump-inspired shift to China coming to Africa as the continent looks to Beijing for stability in the absence of a clear American Africa policy. Finally, our Singularity series this week asks a question about our pets that we may soon be asking about our children: should we genetically engineer dogs to make them healthier? WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

04 марта, 01:26

Weekend Roundup: U.S. Founders Entrusted Elites To Save Democracy From Itself

The word “democracy” does not appear in the U.S. Constitution. Nor in the Bill of Rights or the Declaration of Independence. That is because, as most Americans today would likely be surprised to discover, America’s Founding Fathers not only distrusted democracy but, based on their close reading of Greek and Roman history, were actually hostile to the notion that it was the best system for governing society. James Madison, the fourth U.S. president and a key author of the Federalist Papers, famously declared: “Democracy is the most vile form of government ... democracies have ever been spectacles of turbulence and contention; have ever been found incompatible with personal security or the rights of property; and have in general been as short in their lives as they have been violent in their deaths.” John Adams, the second American president, wrote: “Democracy never lasts long. It soon wastes, exhausts and murders itself. There never was a democracy yet that did not commit suicide.” Taking into account this central lesson of antiquity, the founders instead designed a mixed constitutional republic that, while rooted in consent of the governed, delegated authority to elites ― representative, indirectly elected and appointed bodies ― that could “refine and enlarge the public views” as ballast against the popular passions of prejudice and the narrow horizons of self-interested constituencies. For the founders, popular sovereignty unchecked by the cool and reasoned deliberation of the meritorious few would invite majoritarian intolerance of individual and minority rights, degenerate into mob rule and summon tyranny to restore order. “No political truth is certainly of greater intrinsic value,” Madison wrote in The Federalist Papers No. 47. In an interview with The WorldPost this week, political scientist Francis Fukuyama addresses the conundrum presented to the founders’ idea of governance in the face of 21st century populism. “Populism exists,” he says, “because institutions are elite-driven.” While “institutions in the past have always been controlled by the elites,” he continues, “through the presence of the internet they are losing their power. Maybe democracies don’t work too well without a certain degree of control from elites.” I would add that the great danger today is conflation by fervent populists of corrupt, out-of-touch and unresponsive elites ― that rightly should be overthrown ― with a learned and experienced elite that any large society needs to govern. As a governing ethos, know-nothingness will get you nowhere. Yet, as Pankaj Mishra observes in another WorldPost interview, the very foundation upon which elites might rehabilitate their authority has eroded. The Indian author takes the debate to both a deeper and a more global level by examining how the ressentiment against the cosmopolitan caste that has been gestating in the developing world for decades has now erupted in a mutiny against the governing narrative in “the heart of the modern West.” If the Western “truths” that have dominated the world in modern times at the expense of alternative worldviews are now themselves unraveling, where do we go next? “We are now recognizing that our modern civilization has always been incredibly fragile,” Mishra says, “since it has no recourse to any transcendental truth, as distinct from certain agreed-upon truths. And so while political and economic crises may come and go ― Trump’s presidency may implode tomorrow ― the moral and epistemological breakdown we witness today is more enduring and destructive. I would argue that the naïve people, the free-marketeers and globalizers, responsible for this state of affairs did not know what they were doing ― that they were dismantling a whole system of interlocking and necessary fictions that societies and individuals have needed since the death of God to give a degree of meaning, purpose and stability to their lives.”  The consequence, Mishra argues, is the universalization of nihilism in which the whole notion of “consensual truth” is collapsing. “Nihilism today is the single greatest threat to the modern world since its founding principles of reason, science and progress were formulated,” he concludes. It is not surprising, then, in his view, that “the subjectivization of ‘facts’” and the “fragmentation of ‘truth’” are filling up the vacuum. They are the remainder of the West’s heyday. Nowhere is the truth these days more malleable than in Russia. Writing from Moscow, Ilya Yashin marks the second anniversary this week of the assassination of his friend and opposition leader, Boris Nemstov. Yashin sees a dangerous campaign to revise recent history and roll back post-Soviet advances in the media and the rule of law in the nationalist revival under Russian President Vladimir Putin. Nick Robins-Early reports that Russian disinformation efforts have a lopsided advantage over Europeans trying to defend the integrity of their discourse as elections loom. He also highlights a speech by Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban this week in which the leader expressed a new angle on nativism ― that “’ethnic homogeneity’ is key for economic success, and that ‘too much mixing causes problems.’” In a wide-ranging essay, Nicolas Berggruen examines the role of opposition movements. While raucous protests in and of themselves may make a point, he says, they also can create a sense of chaos that “is the greatest gift to parties in power, especially dictators.” Social movements that succeed, by contrast, are characterized by a broadly shared narrative, a plan, organization and leadership, Berggruen argues. This week the Berggruen Institute also hosted a discussion in Los Angeles with Sapiens and Homo Deus author Yuval Harari. The Israeli historian discussed what it means to be human in an era when we are attaining the power of gods to change our own species and create a new one ― AI. “History began when humans invented gods, and will end when humans become gods,” he says.  Former WorldPost China Correspondent Matt Sheehan looks outside the box on the troubled relations between Washington and Beijing. “The engine room of the U.S.-China relationship,” he writes, “has moved from the White House to City Hall.” While the talk in Washington is of tariffs, American mayors are wooing Chinese investors and immigrants for their local projects. Writing from Shanghai, Zhang Weiwei argues that political legitimacy comes fundamentally from the competence of leadership, as in the case of the Chinese Communist Party, that fulfills its contract with the people by delivering prosperity and security ― whether they were elected or not.   Eric Olander and Cobus van Staden see a Trump-inspired shift to China coming to Africa as the continent looks to Beijing for stability in the absence of a clear American Africa policy. Finally, our Singularity series this week asks a question about our pets that we may soon be asking about our children: should we genetically engineer dogs to make them healthier? WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

25 февраля, 01:21

Weekend Roundup: A Hard Look At The Long Past And The Near Future

Sorting out the present global turmoil understandably demands our attention. But fathoming the lessons of the long past and anticipating the near future is no less important in framing the consequential choices we make today. Warning to the reader: what follows will likely disturb the safe space of those with a Panglossian outlook. A decided pessimism prevails among today’s key thinkers who look at the times ahead through the prism of historical experience. This week, Stanford University classics historian Walter Scheidel outlines the theme of his new book, The Great Leveler: Violence and the History of Inequality from the Stone Age to the Twenty-First Century. “For hundreds and perhaps thousands of years,” Scheidel writes, “peace, stability and development have rewarded those at the top of the food chain more than anybody else. Profits from business, connections and power multiplied in the hands of the few and passed between generations. But the inverse is also true: Every time the gap between rich and poor narrowed ― during the two world wars, for example ― there was massive violence, a shock to the established order.” “Yet,” he continues, “inequality” is “resilient” ― it “regularly advances once violent shock retreats.” Despite our idealistic hopes, Scheidel concludes, there is no reason to believe the future will be any different than the past: “Once genetic and cybernetic enhancements of the human body migrate from the domain of science fiction to real-life labs and clinics, the well-off will inevitably be in the best position to take advantage of these offerings, both for themselves and their offspring.” In an interview, Cambridge University astrophysicist Martin Rees ― famous for asking whether we are living through humankind’s “final century” ― tallies the promise and perils ahead. Above all, Rees is concerned about the uses and misuses of biotechnology in the coming decades. “We are already seeing that it’s becoming easier to modify the genome,” he says, “and we heard about experiments on the influenza virus to make it more virulent and transmissible. These techniques are developing very fast and have huge potential benefits but unfortunately also downsides. They are easily accessible and handled. It’s the kind of equipment that’s available at many university labs and many companies. And so the risk of error or terror in these areas is quite substantial, while regulation is very hard. It’s not like regulating nuclear activity, which requires huge special purpose facilities. Biohacking is almost a student-competitive sport.” Like Scheidel, Rees’ reading of history casts a dark shadow on the future. As he puts it, “what can be done, will be done.” And in the near term, Rees see the main challenge as intelligent robots replacing workers with living wages. “We will have to accept a big redistribution in the way the labor market is deployed,” he warns. “And in order to ensure we don’t develop even more inequality, there has to be a massive redistribution of wealth too. The money earned by robots can’t stay with a small elite ― Silicon Valley people, for instance.” Rees’ advice for the short and long-term future: “There is a great saying, ‘fortune favors the prepared mind.’” Back in the present, defenders of liberal democracy are preparing for the worst. Human Right Watch Executive Director Kenneth Roth writes with alarm that, “I’ve spent years defending human rights around the world, but I’ve never been this worried about the future of the United States.” Roth warns that, “Experience elsewhere teaches us that [autocratic governments] can arrive with extraordinary speed, signaled not by tanks surrounding the presidential palace but by the erosion of democratic norms.” Writing from Hong Kong, Chandran Nair has had enough of America “bullying” everyone else, especially now that President Donald Trump is the culprit in the pulpit. “In response,” Nair writes in a defiant call to action, “the world should now get tough with America, and let it know that the global majority will no longer be pushed around.”  Graham Fuller, a former vice chairman of the CIA’s National Intelligence Council, sees some value in Trump’s penchant to candidly acknowledge what everyone knows to be true but won’t say. Though perhaps not quite as the president meant it when he recently said that he is open to a “one-state solution” to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Fuller agrees that “the two-state solution in practice is essentially a fraud.” Drawing on his long experience in the Middle East, he writes, “honest observers know full well that the mantra of preserving ‘the peace process’ for the two-state solution is now little more than a cover by hard-line Zionists for full Israeli annexation of Palestinian lands.” The impacts of Trump’s America are also being felt in Africa. As China widens the scope of its activities there and the U.S. steps back from the world, Eric Olander and Cobus van Staden find that many are scrutinizing whether Beijing is a partner or predator on the continent.  Turkish journalist Ilgin Yorulmaz talks with Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf, the man most known for his role in a controversial plan to build an Islamic community center near ground zero in New York. He says Muslims in America should create an “American Islam” in order to assimilate with other like-minded people of faith to combat the extremist rhetoric in their respective religions. He also notes that his Cordoba House is, “training imams who are culturally integrated into the American life and can deal with the issues of it.”  Writing from Berlin, Yermi Brenner looks at how the marginalized Roma minority community in Germany continues to struggle against racism, invisibility and the threat of deportation over seven decades after a significant fraction of its population was murdered during the Holocaust. Reporting on the tensions between South Africans and Nigerian immigrants and shopkeepers in Johannesburg, Sipho Hlongwane reminds us that xenophobia is not limited to America or Europe these days. Finally, our Singularity series this week showcases a “one-cent lab-on-a-chip” that “can diagnose cancer and infections.” WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

25 февраля, 01:21

Weekend Roundup: A Hard Look At The Long Past And The Near Future

Sorting out the present global turmoil understandably demands our attention. But fathoming the lessons of the long past and anticipating the near future is no less important in framing the consequential choices we make today. Warning to the reader: what follows will likely disturb the safe space of those with a Panglossian outlook. A decided pessimism prevails among today’s key thinkers who look at the times ahead through the prism of historical experience. This week, Stanford University classics historian Walter Scheidel outlines the theme of his new book, The Great Leveler: Violence and the History of Inequality from the Stone Age to the Twenty-First Century. “For hundreds and perhaps thousands of years,” Scheidel writes, “peace, stability and development have rewarded those at the top of the food chain more than anybody else. Profits from business, connections and power multiplied in the hands of the few and passed between generations. But the inverse is also true: Every time the gap between rich and poor narrowed ― during the two world wars, for example ― there was massive violence, a shock to the established order.” “Yet,” he continues, “inequality” is “resilient” ― it “regularly advances once violent shock retreats.” Despite our idealistic hopes, Scheidel concludes, there is no reason to believe the future will be any different than the past: “Once genetic and cybernetic enhancements of the human body migrate from the domain of science fiction to real-life labs and clinics, the well-off will inevitably be in the best position to take advantage of these offerings, both for themselves and their offspring.” In an interview, Cambridge University astrophysicist Martin Rees ― famous for asking whether we are living through humankind’s “final century” ― tallies the promise and perils ahead. Above all, Rees is concerned about the uses and misuses of biotechnology in the coming decades. “We are already seeing that it’s becoming easier to modify the genome,” he says, “and we heard about experiments on the influenza virus to make it more virulent and transmissible. These techniques are developing very fast and have huge potential benefits but unfortunately also downsides. They are easily accessible and handled. It’s the kind of equipment that’s available at many university labs and many companies. And so the risk of error or terror in these areas is quite substantial, while regulation is very hard. It’s not like regulating nuclear activity, which requires huge special purpose facilities. Biohacking is almost a student-competitive sport.” Like Scheidel, Rees’ reading of history casts a dark shadow on the future. As he puts it, “what can be done, will be done.” And in the near term, Rees see the main challenge as intelligent robots replacing workers with living wages. “We will have to accept a big redistribution in the way the labor market is deployed,” he warns. “And in order to ensure we don’t develop even more inequality, there has to be a massive redistribution of wealth too. The money earned by robots can’t stay with a small elite ― Silicon Valley people, for instance.” Rees’ advice for the short and long-term future: “There is a great saying, ‘fortune favors the prepared mind.’” Back in the present, defenders of liberal democracy are preparing for the worst. Human Right Watch Executive Director Kenneth Roth writes with alarm that, “I’ve spent years defending human rights around the world, but I’ve never been this worried about the future of the United States.” Roth warns that, “Experience elsewhere teaches us that [autocratic governments] can arrive with extraordinary speed, signaled not by tanks surrounding the presidential palace but by the erosion of democratic norms.” Writing from Hong Kong, Chandran Nair has had enough of America “bullying” everyone else, especially now that President Donald Trump is the culprit in the pulpit. “In response,” Nair writes in a defiant call to action, “the world should now get tough with America, and let it know that the global majority will no longer be pushed around.”  Graham Fuller, a former vice chairman of the CIA’s National Intelligence Council, sees some value in Trump’s penchant to candidly acknowledge what everyone knows to be true but won’t say. Though perhaps not quite as the president meant it when he recently said that he is open to a “one-state solution” to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Fuller agrees that “the two-state solution in practice is essentially a fraud.” Drawing on his long experience in the Middle East, he writes, “honest observers know full well that the mantra of preserving ‘the peace process’ for the two-state solution is now little more than a cover by hard-line Zionists for full Israeli annexation of Palestinian lands.” The impacts of Trump’s America are also being felt in Africa. As China widens the scope of its activities there and the U.S. steps back from the world, Eric Olander and Cobus van Staden find that many are scrutinizing whether Beijing is a partner or predator on the continent.  Turkish journalist Ilgin Yorulmaz talks with Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf, the man most known for his role in a controversial plan to build an Islamic community center near ground zero in New York. He says Muslims in America should create an “American Islam” in order to assimilate with other like-minded people of faith to combat the extremist rhetoric in their respective religions. He also notes that his Cordoba House is, “training imams who are culturally integrated into the American life and can deal with the issues of it.”  Writing from Berlin, Yermi Brenner looks at how the marginalized Roma minority community in Germany continues to struggle against racism, invisibility and the threat of deportation over seven decades after a significant fraction of its population was murdered during the Holocaust. Reporting on the tensions between South Africans and Nigerian immigrants and shopkeepers in Johannesburg, Sipho Hlongwane reminds us that xenophobia is not limited to America or Europe these days. Finally, our Singularity series this week showcases a “one-cent lab-on-a-chip” that “can diagnose cancer and infections.” WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

11 февраля, 03:37

Weekend Roundup: Disarming America’s Soft Power

Presidential historian Daniel Franklin writes this week that U.S. President Donald Trump could be a once-in-an-era “reconstructive president” in the mold of Andrew Jackson, FDR and Ronald Reagan. Like those former leaders, says Franklin, he has upended the status quo by realigning partisan constituencies and departing entirely from the previous governing consensus, a shift that can be progressive or regressive. More than just having won an election, Trump is out to effect a “regime change” that will be in place for a long time to come. “There is a very good possibility that Trump will succeed,” Franklin writes. “It is hard to fight a reconstructive president. By and large Americans want to be led. My own research suggests that there is a bias in our minds towards bold leadership, no matter where it takes us. Furthermore, there is plenty of evidence to suggest that with human beings the facts bend to perception rather than the other way around.” Writing from Santiago, Chile, Andrés Velasco thinks that Latin America’s experience with populism also suggests that Trump’s protectionist policies will first gain momentum and produce results long before their “toxic” impact becomes clear. One of the most consequential victims of America’s radical change of course is its unique status as a beacon for a certain set of values in the world through its “soft power” appeal as a diverse nation of immigrants that has managed to live together in liberty under the rule of law. That image of America has already been fairly dashed by the package of policies and rhetoric during the first three weeks of Donald Trump’s presidency. The rest of the world is warily watching the continuing assault on what the president calls the “dishonest media,” a smear chillingly close to the Nazi-era term “Lügenpresse”, or “lying press.” Many beyond U.S. borders were shocked by the blanket ban on visas from several majority-Muslim countries, which is already being contested on the streets and in the U.S. courts. Former security officials see it as a gift to terrorist recruiters. Sara Afzal surveys the attitudes toward the ban of Iranians both in the U.S. and Iran. Yet, perhaps more menacing than the ban itself has been the president’s contemptuous denigration of the independent judiciary that is hearing the case, even belittling respected jurists who don’t agree with him as “so-called judges” and less qualified than “bad high school students.”  Paul Gowder sees two factions emerging in this battle ― the “authoritarian” camp led by the president himself and the “constitutional” camp that includes the new Supreme Court nominee, Neil Gorsuch, who has called Trump’s comments on the judiciary “disheartening” and “demoralizing.” If the “reconstructive president” succeeds, what values will America stand for in the world at the end of this road of regime change? Soft power is arduously hard to attain but easy to lose. So far, the insistence of the U.S. courts in checking executive power actually further bolsters America’s positive image despite the new administration’s efforts. Anastasya Manuilova has seen this same steady erosion of a free press and judicial independence under President Vladimir Putin in Russia. Writing from Moscow, she surveys those who protested against Putin in 2011 for their advice to Americans. One suggestion the Russians had: “Hold your leaders accountable and don’t stop protesting. No protest is too small.” Wary of both Trump’s hints over abandoning allies in Europe and the Russian bear breathing down their necks, Naomi O’Leary reports from Narva, Estonia on how that country is training civilians to prepare for self-defense.  Benjamin von Rooj and Jeffrey Wasserstrom argue that, despite his high-profile appearance as a defender of global cooperation recently in Davos, Chinese President Xi Jinping’s increasingly authoritarian turn disqualifies his nation from taking up the “moral leadership” in the world that the Trump administration has relinquished. Paradoxically, the lack of an independent judiciary is one of the reasons they cite in dismissing a leading role for China. “Last month,” they write, “China’s highest judge came out with an unusually sharp warning against Western legal influence.” They quote the chief justice of the Supreme People’s Court of China as saying, “We should resolutely resist erroneous influence from the West: ‘constitutional democracy,’ ‘separation of powers’ and ‘independence of the judiciary.’ We must make clear our stand and dare to show the sword.” China scholar Minxin Pei also posits that Xi’s anti-corruption campaign, carried out by the Communist Party’s disciplinary inspection commission, will falter and ultimately fail without the kind of independent judiciary China’s top judge denounces. “A more independent legal system,” he writes, “not an extrajudicial body, must lead the charge against corruption in order to preserve the procedural integrity and protect the constitutional rights of the accused.” Pei also adds, “effective policing of corrupt officials is impossible without a genuinely free press.”  The free press is an issue in today’s America as well, not only because of Trump’s taunts, but because of the way “alternative facts,” hate speech and fake news spread so rapidly across social media. Frank Pasquale is concerned that extremists are “gaming” Google’s search engine and others posting algorithms. To make the tech giants more accountable he proposes five solutions: limit obscure content that is damaging and not in the public interest; label, monitor and explain hate-driven search results; audit logs of data fed into algorithmic systems; possibly ban certain content; and permit limited outside annotations of defamatory posts and hire more humans to judge complaints. The Future of Life Institute’s Ariel Conn this week explores how privacy can be protected in the era of big data. She quotes an IBM executive as saying, “It’s absolutely crucial that individuals should have the right to manage access to the data they generate.”  As all these controversies play out, Syria continues its downward spiral. Writing from Idlib, Syria, Lina Shamy relives the harrowing years leading up to Aleppo’s destruction. Her written account is accompanied by photos and an audio narration of the course her life has taken since the 2011 uprising against Syrian President Bashar Assad and the brutal civil war that ensued. Finally, our Singularity series this week show how a simple new invention enables robots to make clothing. WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor.   EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

11 февраля, 03:37

Weekend Roundup: Disarming America’s Soft Power

Presidential historian Daniel Franklin writes this week that U.S. President Donald Trump could be a once-in-an-era “reconstructive president” in the mold of Andrew Jackson, FDR and Ronald Reagan. Like those former leaders, says Franklin, he has upended the status quo by realigning partisan constituencies and departing entirely from the previous governing consensus, a shift that can be progressive or regressive. More than just having won an election, Trump is out to effect a “regime change” that will be in place for a long time to come. “There is a very good possibility that Trump will succeed,” Franklin writes. “It is hard to fight a reconstructive president. By and large Americans want to be led. My own research suggests that there is a bias in our minds towards bold leadership, no matter where it takes us. Furthermore, there is plenty of evidence to suggest that with human beings the facts bend to perception rather than the other way around.” Writing from Santiago, Chile, Andrés Velasco thinks that Latin America’s experience with populism also suggests that Trump’s protectionist policies will first gain momentum and produce results long before their “toxic” impact becomes clear. One of the most consequential victims of America’s radical change of course is its unique status as a beacon for a certain set of values in the world through its “soft power” appeal as a diverse nation of immigrants that has managed to live together in liberty under the rule of law. That image of America has already been fairly dashed by the package of policies and rhetoric during the first three weeks of Donald Trump’s presidency. The rest of the world is warily watching the continuing assault on what the president calls the “dishonest media,” a smear chillingly close to the Nazi-era term “Lügenpresse”, or “lying press.” Many beyond U.S. borders were shocked by the blanket ban on visas from several majority-Muslim countries, which is already being contested on the streets and in the U.S. courts. Former security officials see it as a gift to terrorist recruiters. Sara Afzal surveys the attitudes toward the ban of Iranians both in the U.S. and Iran. Yet, perhaps more menacing than the ban itself has been the president’s contemptuous denigration of the independent judiciary that is hearing the case, even belittling respected jurists who don’t agree with him as “so-called judges” and less qualified than “bad high school students.”  Paul Gowder sees two factions emerging in this battle ― the “authoritarian” camp led by the president himself and the “constitutional” camp that includes the new Supreme Court nominee, Neil Gorsuch, who has called Trump’s comments on the judiciary “disheartening” and “demoralizing.” If the “reconstructive president” succeeds, what values will America stand for in the world at the end of this road of regime change? Soft power is arduously hard to attain but easy to lose. So far, the insistence of the U.S. courts in checking executive power actually further bolsters America’s positive image despite the new administration’s efforts. Anastasya Manuilova has seen this same steady erosion of a free press and judicial independence under President Vladimir Putin in Russia. Writing from Moscow, she surveys those who protested against Putin in 2011 for their advice to Americans. One suggestion the Russians had: “Hold your leaders accountable and don’t stop protesting. No protest is too small.” Wary of both Trump’s hints over abandoning allies in Europe and the Russian bear breathing down their necks, Naomi O’Leary reports from Narva, Estonia on how that country is training civilians to prepare for self-defense.  Benjamin von Rooj and Jeffrey Wasserstrom argue that, despite his high-profile appearance as a defender of global cooperation recently in Davos, Chinese President Xi Jinping’s increasingly authoritarian turn disqualifies his nation from taking up the “moral leadership” in the world that the Trump administration has relinquished. Paradoxically, the lack of an independent judiciary is one of the reasons they cite in dismissing a leading role for China. “Last month,” they write, “China’s highest judge came out with an unusually sharp warning against Western legal influence.” They quote the chief justice of the Supreme People’s Court of China as saying, “We should resolutely resist erroneous influence from the West: ‘constitutional democracy,’ ‘separation of powers’ and ‘independence of the judiciary.’ We must make clear our stand and dare to show the sword.” China scholar Minxin Pei also posits that Xi’s anti-corruption campaign, carried out by the Communist Party’s disciplinary inspection commission, will falter and ultimately fail without the kind of independent judiciary China’s top judge denounces. “A more independent legal system,” he writes, “not an extrajudicial body, must lead the charge against corruption in order to preserve the procedural integrity and protect the constitutional rights of the accused.” Pei also adds, “effective policing of corrupt officials is impossible without a genuinely free press.”  The free press is an issue in today’s America as well, not only because of Trump’s taunts, but because of the way “alternative facts,” hate speech and fake news spread so rapidly across social media. Frank Pasquale is concerned that extremists are “gaming” Google’s search engine and others posting algorithms. To make the tech giants more accountable he proposes five solutions: limit obscure content that is damaging and not in the public interest; label, monitor and explain hate-driven search results; audit logs of data fed into algorithmic systems; possibly ban certain content; and permit limited outside annotations of defamatory posts and hire more humans to judge complaints. The Future of Life Institute’s Ariel Conn this week explores how privacy can be protected in the era of big data. She quotes an IBM executive as saying, “It’s absolutely crucial that individuals should have the right to manage access to the data they generate.”  As all these controversies play out, Syria continues its downward spiral. Writing from Idlib, Syria, Lina Shamy relives the harrowing years leading up to Aleppo’s destruction. Her written account is accompanied by photos and an audio narration of the course her life has taken since the 2011 uprising against Syrian President Bashar Assad and the brutal civil war that ensued. Finally, our Singularity series this week show how a simple new invention enables robots to make clothing. WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. 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01 февраля, 18:53

Лондонский институт пророчит третью волну кризиса в ЕС

Привлеченные сотрудники Лондонской школы экономических и политических наук полагают, что введение мер по государственной поддержке банковского сектора в Италии может запустить третью волну госвмешательства в Евросоюзе. В Лондонской школе экономических и политических наук задаются вопросом: запустит ли поддержка Италией собственных банков новую волну государственного вмешательства в Европейском союзе? Статья под таким заголовком опубликована на официальном сайте Института. Авторы - бывший старший экономист Минфина Италии Лоренцо Кодогно и журналист ведущего итальянского финансово-экономического издания "Il Sole 24 Ore" Мара Монти. Итак, 21 декабря 2016 года, пишут авторы, парламент Италии одобрил увеличение лимита заимствования в государственном секторе до 20 млрд евро (1,2% ВВП) для поддержки финансовых учреждений. В Банке Италии заявили, что это - необходимый шаг, так как многие банки сталкиваются с рядом проблем: низкие потенциал роста и инфляция, слабая диверсификация бизнес-моделей и другие. 23 декабря правительство страны постановило создать фонд для поддержки банковского сектора - до 20 млрд евро. Средства обеспечат приток капитала и ликвидность проблемных финансовых учреждений, защитят вкладчиков. Проблемы некоторых слабых банков будут таким образом решены. Первым извлечет выгоду из этого третий по величине банк - Monte dei Paschi di Siena (MPS). 22 декабря в банке заявили, что не могут к концу года завершить докапитализацию на 5 млрд евро, в соответствии с указаниями Европейского Центробанка (ЕЦБ). В результате MPS на следующий день получает экстренную государственную поддержку, а 26 декабря объявляет об увеличении запроса капитала до 8,8 млрд евро, которые поступят уже из средств нового, созданного правительством Фонда. "Это последняя жертва европейского банковского кризиса, который начался в 2007 году и продолжается в различных формах и по сей день", - говорится в материале. Кризис оказал значительное влияние на банки во всем Евросоюзе, и для снижения негативных последствий власти ЕС одобрили государственную помощь финансовым учреждениям: рекапитализацию, меры по сокращению активов, предоставление гарантий, а также другие меры по поддержанию ликвидности. Первые две категории в сумме показывают фактические денежные средства, выделяемые на поддержку банковского сектора. Другие меры - только условные обязательства. Во всем ЕС общая сумма рекапитализации достигла 802,1 млрд евро, объем фактически использованных средств - 453, 3 млрд за период с 2008 по 2014 годы. Сумма рекапитализации и кризисных фондов в 2014 году составила 641,8 млрд евро или 4,6% от ВВП Евросоюза. На обеспечение ликвидности разрешили выделить до 229,7 млрд евро, а использовали только 105 млрд евро. Больше всех использовали фонды рекапитализации в Великобритании - 100,1 млрд евро за период с 2008 по 2014 годы. В то же время в Германии потратили 80 млрд евро на меры по обесцениванию активов. Авторы, изучив фактические суммы, пришли к выводу, что Берлин потратился на поддержку финансового сектора больше всех - 144,1 млрд евро или 4,8% от ВВП. Суммируя рекапитализацию и обесцененные активы Германии, Великобритании, Ирландии, Бельгии, Нидерландов, Дании, Люксембурга, Австрии и Франции получилось 92% от господдержки, использованной в ЕС в 2008-2010 годах. Во время первой фазы кризиса объемы поддержки были ограниченными: 4,1 млрд евро займов в Италии (в основном, для MPS в 2009 году), 13,7 млрд для Испании, 3,1 млрд - Португалии, 3,8 млрд - Греции. Италия сейчас, отмечают авторы, единственная страна, которая применяет меры государственной поддержки банков, которые уже не разрешаются по европейским правилам. Поэтому для внедрения "предохранительной рекапитализации" используются европейские Директивы по реструктуризации и санации банков. Не ясно, будет ли 20 млрд евро достаточно Италии для интервенции в банковском секторе. Авторы полагают, что существует вероятность того, что дополнительная помощь итальянским банкам со стороны государства повысит сильные оценки на финансовых рынках и привлечет больше инвесторов в восстановление экономики. В других странах менее вероятно, что банки смогут сокращать запасы без государственного вмешательства. То есть, итальянский пример может запустить третью волну госвмешательства в странах, не справляющихся с обслуживанием невозвратных кредитов, и с более низкой вероятностью того, что вливания капитала через некоторое время произведут положительную доходность. Так, в 2008-2009 годах массовое государственное вмешательство в банковский сектор пострадавших, в основном, Германии, Великобритании, Ирландии, Бельгии, Голландии, Дании, Люксембурга, Австрии и Франции привели к меньшим экономическим последствиям. Вторая волна началась с кризиса в Греции. Европейские политики захотели разорвать связь между государствами и банками и заявили: "больше ни разу". Это привело к тому, что в 2013 году повторно ввели правила государственной помощи финансовому сектору, а затем и Директивы по реструктуризации и санации банков, которые вступили в силу в январе 2016 года. Государственное вмешательство ограничили до такой степени, что в Испании, например, европейские деньги стали буквально необходимостью. Положение с тех пор изменилось, и европейские рамки начали сжиматься, заставляя инвесторов и вкладчиков платить за любое будущее кризиса. Ситуация продолжала ухудшаться до сегодняшнего кризиса в Италии, что относится к остаточным явлениям предыдущей волны. "Сегодняшние проблемы в банковском секторе в Италии являются управляемыми и, вероятно, потребуется значительно меньше государственных денег, чем в прошлом, и в других странах. Тем не менее, запас невозвратных кредитов намного выше в других периферийных странах, и, таким образом, больше жертв не ожидается в течение 2017 года", - заключили авторы.(https://sm-news.ru/news/a...)