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Марио Монти
10 января, 11:23

FTSE 100 hits another record high; Davos founder criticises populism – as it happened

Sterling recovers after hitting 10-week low against the dollar as investors fret about the lack of details about BrexitFTSE 100 posts nine day record breaking runWEF’s Schwab criticises populism as Davos loomsPound was down against euro and dollar again todayCity bosses warn of Brexit job losses 5.55pm GMT While the FTSE 100 was breaking new records, European markets were more subdued but still managed to end the day in positive territory, for the most part. The final scores showed: 4.41pm GMT The FTSE 100 has closed at a record high for the ninth day running, breaking a record which has stood for nearly 20 years.The index finished up 0.53% at a new peak of 7275.47, bettering the eight day winning streak recorded in May 1997 as Tony Blair’s Labour won the general election. Continue reading...

07 января, 03:11

Weekend Roundup: America’s Crisis Of Social Intelligence

If the recent U.S. presidential election campaign was about defining American reality, little has been decided. The ongoing inability to arrive at a shared worldview or even to agree on basic facts, abetted by a media that thrives on adversity to monetize attention, is deadly for the discourse in any democracy. This crisis of social intelligence in which the perception of reality is unmoored from objective observation is even more consequential than the highly damaging quarrel between the official U.S. intelligence agencies and President-elect Donald Trump over Russian influence meddling. But the two are linked. None of the intelligence professionals I know would ever consider themselves infallible. Yet they do strive mightily to establish the facts and resist partisan pressures to slant their findings. Professional intelligence analysis seeks to root out false signals, disinformation, unfounded rumor and subjective opinion. It is, in effect, the opposite of peer-driven social media which now has the most influence over American hearts and minds including, apparently, over the incoming commander-in-chief. While the joint report on the Russian hacks released last week by the FBI and the Department of Homeland Security was scored by some as less than conclusive, former NATO commander James Stavridis and cybersecurity expert Dave Weinstein believe it was highly effective. “Publicly laying this level of detail out sets a dramatic precedent that could serve a significant blow to Russia’s current and future cyberoperations in the U.S. and elsewhere,” they write. “The technical details of the report constitute an intelligence windfall for ordinary network defenders who have been starving for rich real-time threat information from the federal government to protect their systems against sophisticated actors.” A further report released Friday by U.S. intelligence agencies concludes that Russia aimed “to undermine public faith in the US democratic process, denigrate Secretary Clinton, and harm her electability and potential presidency” and that “Putin and the Russian government developed a clear preference for President-elect Trump.” Writing from Moscow, Maria Snegovaya reports that most commentators there have greeted President Barack Obama’s recently announced sanctions in response to Russian hacking with “mockery and derision.” Official Russia, she says, has offered the usual retort: deny then distort.  If identifying and shutting down hackers has become a key task of intelligence agencies in these cyber times, the new challenge for education is to provide young people with the tools of social intelligence so they can tell fact from fabrication on social media. Stanford professor Sam Wineburg lays out the steps educators need to take to help students discern what is fake news or not. “The tools we’ve invented are handling us,“ he says, “not the other way around.” Teacher Lynn Kelley tells her students they fall victim to fake news when they lack the critical distance to be aware of their own biases and assumptions or when they are unable to evaluate claims without the relevant historical knowledge. Natalie Jackson reports on a poll that says most Americans think tweets are not the way a president should communicate.  The scientific consensus on climate change is perhaps the most contested fact by the new powers to be in Washington. These stunning motion graphics compiled by James Warner illustrate the toll a warming climate took on the planet in 2016. Dominique Mosbergen reports that, indeed, 2016 was the hottest year on record.  Nicolas Berggruen and I suggest how the incoming U.S. administration can promote renewable energy while creating jobs and security for Americans by jointly investing with China and Mexico in the infrastructure of a “solar border” instead of a wall. Guy Standing argues that a universal basic income would be a bulwark against far-right populism because it provides a secure economic base in people’s lives. “The response to these darkening times,” he writes, “must be to devise and rally support for a new income distribution system.” In other global developments, yet another terror attack hit Istanbul on New Year’s Eve at a fashionable nightclub on the banks of the Bosphorus. Turkish journalist Ilgin Yorulmaz reports that, despite the aims of the terrorists, the responses to the attack are serving to unite a divided country. Mercy Corps’ Michael Bowers looks ahead to the humanitarian crises that should garner more attention in 2017 – in Yemen, South Sudan and Lake Chad. Ali Rodriguez reports that the economic situation has become so dire in Venezuela that even talented artists committed to the opposition can’t afford to stay and are fleeing. Former Iranian National Security Council member Seyed Hossein Mousavian sees the potential for hope in the incoming U.S. administration. “While it might sound counterintuitive,” he writes, “Republican control of Congress and the presidency presents an opportunity for successful U.S.- Iran diplomacy. The U.S. government is now able to act in unison, enabling for novel approaches towards the region that may have previously been politically impossible.” In his piece, Mousavian also lists what he believes President-elect Donald Trump should know about Iran. One point is that America’s military presence in the Middle East has created instability there. Interestingly, while chaos gripping much of the Mideast is leading to disengagement by world powers, Eric Olander and Cobus van Staden explore why China is actually looking to invest more in the region. In recent years, China was also always the poster child for the worst pollution in the world that came along with rapid growth. Now that China is trying to clean up its act, and India has joined the club of rapid growth, it is facing its own challenges. Bhargav Krishna writes from New Delhi that, “India’s under-funded public health system is straining to cope with the increasing burden of pollution-driven illnesses.” Writing from Hong Kong Wang Xiangwei reports that President Xi Jinping, recently donned “a core leader,” denounced resistance to his reforms by local officials at a Politburo meeting this week after which his comments were splashed across national media. Former Chinese Vice Foreign Minister He Yafei argues that, despite Brexit and the Trump election, globalization is not doomed; it is just shifting East with China in a leading position. Taking a comprehensive strategic view of world events, Zbigniew Brzezinski proposes that the only effective response to the present crisis of global power is trilateral cooperation among the U.S., China and Russia. He warns that, “The U.S. should not act towards China as if it were already an enemy; significantly, it should not favor India as America’s principal ally in Asia. This would almost guarantee a closer connection between China and Russia. Nothing is more dangerous to the U.S. than such a close connection.” Our Singularity series this week looks at the technological developments to watch in 2017 – artificial intelligence, cybersecurity, decentralized peer-to-peer networks, biosynthetic labs and autonomous vehicles. Finally, our latest column by the Future of Life Institute reminds us that, in many ways, 2016 was a year of hope with advances in AI and health as well as new moves to reduce the global number of nuclear weapons. WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera), Dileep Padgaonkar (Times of India) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khannaare Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

30 декабря 2016, 21:32

Year-End Roundup: In 2016, The World Passed The Tipping Point Into A Perilous New Era

In the 2015 WorldPost Year-End Roundup, we observed that we were then “on the cusp of a tipping point” in the race between a world coming together and one falling apart. In 2016, we have indeed tipped over into a new era. The profound upheavals of this year were anticipated in an essay we published in March titled “Why the World Is Falling Apart.” In that piece I wrote, “The fearful and fearsome reaction against growing inequality, social dislocation and loss of identity in the midst of vast wealth creation, unprecedented mobility and ubiquitous connectivity, is a mutiny, really, against globalization so audacious and technological change so rapid that it can barely be absorbed by our incremental nature. In this accelerated era,” I continued, “future shock can feel like repeated blows in the living present to individuals, families and communities alike.” Revolt Against Global Elites  Economics and technology forged the worldwide convergence we have seen with globalization over recent decades. But as people lose any sense of control over their fate in this process, culture and politics engender the opposite ― a divergent search for shelter in the familiar ways of life that register a dignity of recognition among one’s own kind and constitute identity against the swell of anonymous forces.  The determination to “take back control” across the Western democracies among those dispossessed by change was explosively expressed in 2016 in a widespread revolt against the elite custodians of the status quo through Brexit, the Trump victory and the ongoing anti-establishment insurgency in Europe.  The “Great Reaction of 2016” may well have been justified because of the decay of democracies captured by organized special interests. Too many were left behind by unresponsive insiders. Yet the populist character of this political awakening threatens more chaos ahead rather than fixing what ails today’s vexed societies. “Populism appeals to the ‘will of people,’ Julian Baggini wrote in a piece for us last year, “but is actually profoundly undemocratic. Democracy is about the negotiation of competing interests, the balancing of different values. Populism, in contrast, is a kind of mob rule. Where there is complexity, it offers simple solutions. Instead of seeking common ground, it looks to exaggerate the differences between them and us. The unquestioned righteousness of its own cause and means to its ends leads to the demonization of those it opposes.” The Turn Toward Autocracy and Nativism The close cousin of populist politics is the affinity for rule by strongmen who fashion themselves as tribunes of the people. In the wake of the coup attempt in Turkey earlier this year, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan has tightened the screws in the place once thought to be the model of democracy with Islamic characteristics. In an interview right after the failed coup, Turkish novelist Elif Shafak lamented the new course of events: “There was already a rise in illiberal democracy in Turkey. There was already a rise in authoritarianism. The country was already sliding backwards and now this! The ballot box in itself,” she said in words that apply to the West as well, “is not enough to render a system a ‘democracy.’ A true democracy needs separation of powers, rule of law, freedom of speech, women’s rights, LGBT rights, free and diverse media and independent academia. Without all these institutions and values you can only have ‘majoritarianism.’ And majoritarianism is not the same thing as democracy.”  Writing from New Delhi, Shashi Tharoor placed a similar slide in India toward autocratic rule, intolerance and nationalist assertion in the global context: “The global backlash against the forces that have defined the first decade and a half of the 21st century has taken on a nativist hue everywhere,” he said. “In Europe and America, this has involved racist hostility to immigrants and minorities (whether ethnically or religious defined). In India, too, the ruling party rose through demonizing Muslims and stigmatizing political and social dissenters. Since such negative messaging requires a positive counterpart, nationalism has filled the breach, as a majoritarian narrative has sought to subsume each country’s diverse political tendencies into an artificial mandated unity masquerading as patriotism.” Social Media, Russian Hacks and Surveillance Capitalism The newfound prevalence of social media has been part and parcel of this year’s momentous shift. As we reported in our 2016 Global Thought Leaders analysis, the passionate political environment of 2016 appears to have marked the inflection point when the influence of individuals sharing information with their peers on social media surpassed that of established media platforms. “This shift matches the inversion of the old pyramid in which the authority and influence of elites in both society and the media held the most sway over the majority of the population,” we noted in early December. “The separation of authoritative knowledge from influence in a world where the social medium is not only the message, but the route to power,” we continued, “is a menacing turn for society.“ The internet activist Wael Ghonim, whose Facebook posts helped spark the Arab Spring in Egypt, concurs. While social media did not create the passions behind hate speech and intolerance, he said in a WorldPost interview in October, “there is no doubt that the algorithmic structure of social media amplified and abetted the turn to mobocracy. The internet has empowered the masses and introduced a more decentralized medium for communicating with each other.” But,” he asked, “is this so-called ‘liquid democracy’ without any form of meritocracy that sorts out the wheat from the chaff a good thing for society?” For Ghonim, the spread of a post-fact discourse of peer-driven mobocracy creates a new challenge. “While once social media was seen as a liberating means to speak truth to power,” he said, “now the issue is how to speak truth to social media.” A related, and equally menacing, facet of the incoming era is the emergence of a new “code war” that reached fresh heights this year through Russian influence meddling in the U.S. presidential election. Writing from Moscow, Fyodor Lukyanov reflected that the U.S. is just now getting a taste of its own medicine after intervening in other countries, including by trying to influence democratic elections, for decades.  Zbigniew Brzezinski has no doubts Russian President Vladimir Putin was directly involved in seeking to influence the U.S. election since he is in absolute control of the state, including the intelligence agencies. While acknowledging the U.S. has meddled for years in other democracies, Brzezinski nonetheless recognized that, “The new methods give activities of this sort a wider scope than ever before. And thus they are indeed more influential and effective than ever before. That is new and, of course, deeply troubling.” Toomas Ilves, the former president of Estonia, expects more cyberattacks from Russia as elections loom in Europe in the coming year. “The conundrum that Europe will face,” he wrote from Tallinn recently, “is whether or not to use illiberal methods to safeguard the liberal state. … Because of cyberattacks and fake news, we can already imagine the problem all democratic societies will face in future elections: how to limit lies when they threaten democracy.” Oliver Stone, who is preparing a new film based on his conversations with President Putin, has his doubts about Russia’s involvement. But he, too, agreed that we are now embarked on a “digital arms race” due in his view to the first use by the U.S. of offensive digital weapons, like the Stuxnet virus that disabled Iran’s nuclear centrifuges. In a WorldPost interview in September that focused mostly on his film “Snowden,” the Hollywood director worried as much about the invasion of privacy by the private sector as by the state. “Companies like Google profit enormously from data mining of your personal searches, behavior and habits,” he said. “There is more money in selling that data than in selling a product. It’s surveillance capitalism. It really is a new kind of totalitarianism.” AI, Algorithms and the Religious Imagination Another game-changing development in technology that continued to advance rapidly in 2016 is artificial intelligence, or AI. In April, the Berggruen Institute gathered top scientists and philosophers in Palo Alto to discuss the promises and perils of AI. While many saw enormous benefits in the short term, for example through the diagnostic capacity of big data for health care, the longer term was more concerning. Bill Joy, who helped develop the “Java Language Specification” software, warned, as but one example, that sophisticated new gene editing technology has the potential to “eliminate genetic diversity.”  Sapiens author Yuval Harari followed up this theme in an interview we published in May: “The whole of science is converging on this master idea of processing data in an algorithmic way, and this will cause the whole of economics and politics to converge on the same idea,” he argued. “The whole of biology since Darwin can be summarized in three words: ‘Organisms are algorithms.’ Simultaneously, computer scientists have been learning how to create better and better electronic algorithms. Now these two waves … are merging around this master concept of the algorithm, and their merger will create a tsunami that will wash over everything in its way.” In a reflection on the peril to the person from these developments, neuroscientist Antonio Damasio vigorously resisted the idea that being can be reduced to an algorithm. In a related essay, I pondered how scientific advances are resurrecting the religious imagination. “The more scientific discovery reveals,” I wrote, “ the more we realize it can’t answer the great existential questions.”  Interdependence Works Both Ways 2016 also demonstrated just how connected the world really is. We saw how China’s economic slump is testing Brazil’s democracy. The deep recession there due to slack demand by China for the South American nation’s commodities exposed the political cracks in the system, illustrating that the interdependence which giveth can also take away. As the revered former president of Brazil, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, wrote in the wake of the now-ousted President Dilma Rousseff’s impeachment, the cracks in the country’s democracy result from the same causes as in the advanced nations. “At the core of this crisis is the widening gap between people’s aspirations and the capacity of political institutions to respond to the demands of society,” he wrote. “It is one of the ironies of our age that this deficit of trust in political institutions coexists with the rise of citizens capable of making the choices that shape their lives and influence the future of their societies.” In another example of how what happens in one part of the world impacts others far away, the recapture of Aleppo by Syrian President Bashar Assad and his Russian allies in December after years of horrific civil war coincided with the Christmastime attack in Berlin by a suspect who was believed to be an asylum-seeker with ties to Islamist terror groups. This tragic event likely tipped the scales decisively in favor of anti-European Union and anti-immigrant political forces which have been gaining momentum in reaction to the massive refugee influx, including of Syrians fleeing the carnage at home. As a WorldPost editorial summarized the situation: “The European idea, which has been losing luster for years, looks to be the latest and most consequential casualty of a world in turmoil that stretches from the rubble of Aleppo to the World War II memorial ruins of the Kaiser Wilhelm church, near where the Christmas market attack took place in Berlin.” Where Hope Remains The temptation to blame refugees for Europe’s woes must take in the broader picture, Pope Francis told our outgoing Vatican correspondent Sébastien Maillard, in an interview. He called on Europe to “rediscover its capacity to integrate” plural cultures. But the Holy Father didn’t mince words about the dynamic he sees behind terrorism and the refugee crisis. “In the face of Islamic terrorism,” he told Maillard, who is also an editor of Le Croix, “it would therefore be better to question ourselves about the way in [which] an overly Western model of democracy has been exported to countries such as Iraq, where a strong government previously existed. Or in Libya, where a tribal structure exists. We cannot advance without taking these cultures into account. As a Libyan said recently, ‘We used to have one Gaddafi, now we have 50.’” When politics divides instead of unites, walls off instead of embraces, spiritual authorities like Pope Francis and artists or musicians like Yo-Yo Ma step into the breach to sustain our humanity. As we wrote in June, highlighting the release of the Silk Road Ensemble documentary, “The Music of Strangers,” the famed cellist is the pope’s spiritual cousin in this cause, sounding the healing chord of fellowship instead of enmity. More than a musician, he, too, is a guiding spirit who rises to the challenge of a world unraveling. “To be able to put oneself in another’s shoes without prejudgment is an essential skill,” Yo-Yo Ma once told The WorldPost. “Empathy comes when you understand something deeply through arts and literature and can thus make unexpected connections. These parallels bring you closer to things that would otherwise seem far away. Empathy is the ultimate quality that acknowledges our identity as members of one human family.” Finally, this year we celebrated Charles Taylor, who was awarded the 2016 Berggruen Prize for ideas that shape the world, as the “anti-xenophobe philosopher.” In an overview, Berggruen Institute president, Craig Calhoun, summarized the key works of the Canadian philosopher. And in a related editorial we wrote about how the man is an important figure for our time, and indeed, for this year: “It is Taylor’s thinking on the recognition of irreducible diversity in an interdependent world of plural identities ― and how societies can cope with this reality ― that gives him urgency in this era of Trump, Brexit, the burkini ban and the rise of the anti-immigrant right in Europe.”  WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. CORRESPONDENTS: Sophia Jones in Istanbul. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera), Dileep Padgaonkar (Times of India) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khannaare Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

30 декабря 2016, 21:32

Year-End Roundup: In 2016, The World Passed The Tipping Point Into A Perilous New Era

In the 2015 WorldPost Year-End Roundup, we observed that we were then “on the cusp of a tipping point” in the race between a world coming together and one falling apart. In 2016, we have indeed tipped over into a new era. The profound upheavals of this year were anticipated in an essay we published in March titled “Why the World Is Falling Apart.” In that piece I wrote, “The fearful and fearsome reaction against growing inequality, social dislocation and loss of identity in the midst of vast wealth creation, unprecedented mobility and ubiquitous connectivity, is a mutiny, really, against globalization so audacious and technological change so rapid that it can barely be absorbed by our incremental nature. In this accelerated era,” I continued, “future shock can feel like repeated blows in the living present to individuals, families and communities alike.” Revolt Against Global Elites  Economics and technology forged the worldwide convergence we have seen with globalization over recent decades. But as people lose any sense of control over their fate in this process, culture and politics engender the opposite ― a divergent search for shelter in the familiar ways of life that register a dignity of recognition among one’s own kind and constitute identity against the swell of anonymous forces.  The determination to “take back control” across the Western democracies among those dispossessed by change was explosively expressed in 2016 in a widespread revolt against the elite custodians of the status quo through Brexit, the Trump victory and the ongoing anti-establishment insurgency in Europe.  The “Great Reaction of 2016” may well have been justified because of the decay of democracies captured by organized special interests. Too many were left behind by unresponsive insiders. Yet the populist character of this political awakening threatens more chaos ahead rather than fixing what ails today’s vexed societies. “Populism appeals to the ‘will of people,’ Julian Baggini wrote in a piece for us last year, “but is actually profoundly undemocratic. Democracy is about the negotiation of competing interests, the balancing of different values. Populism, in contrast, is a kind of mob rule. Where there is complexity, it offers simple solutions. Instead of seeking common ground, it looks to exaggerate the differences between them and us. The unquestioned righteousness of its own cause and means to its ends leads to the demonization of those it opposes.” The Turn Toward Autocracy and Nativism The close cousin of populist politics is the affinity for rule by strongmen who fashion themselves as tribunes of the people. In the wake of the coup attempt in Turkey earlier this year, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan has tightened the screws in the place once thought to be the model of democracy with Islamic characteristics. In an interview right after the failed coup, Turkish novelist Elif Shafak lamented the new course of events: “There was already a rise in illiberal democracy in Turkey. There was already a rise in authoritarianism. The country was already sliding backwards and now this! The ballot box in itself,” she said in words that apply to the West as well, “is not enough to render a system a ‘democracy.’ A true democracy needs separation of powers, rule of law, freedom of speech, women’s rights, LGBT rights, free and diverse media and independent academia. Without all these institutions and values you can only have ‘majoritarianism.’ And majoritarianism is not the same thing as democracy.”  Writing from New Delhi, Shashi Tharoor placed a similar slide in India toward autocratic rule, intolerance and nationalist assertion in the global context: “The global backlash against the forces that have defined the first decade and a half of the 21st century has taken on a nativist hue everywhere,” he said. “In Europe and America, this has involved racist hostility to immigrants and minorities (whether ethnically or religious defined). In India, too, the ruling party rose through demonizing Muslims and stigmatizing political and social dissenters. Since such negative messaging requires a positive counterpart, nationalism has filled the breach, as a majoritarian narrative has sought to subsume each country’s diverse political tendencies into an artificial mandated unity masquerading as patriotism.” Social Media, Russian Hacks and Surveillance Capitalism The newfound prevalence of social media has been part and parcel of this year’s momentous shift. As we reported in our 2016 Global Thought Leaders analysis, the passionate political environment of 2016 appears to have marked the inflection point when the influence of individuals sharing information with their peers on social media surpassed that of established media platforms. “This shift matches the inversion of the old pyramid in which the authority and influence of elites in both society and the media held the most sway over the majority of the population,” we noted in early December. “The separation of authoritative knowledge from influence in a world where the social medium is not only the message, but the route to power,” we continued, “is a menacing turn for society.“ The internet activist Wael Ghonim, whose Facebook posts helped spark the Arab Spring in Egypt, concurs. While social media did not create the passions behind hate speech and intolerance, he said in a WorldPost interview in October, “there is no doubt that the algorithmic structure of social media amplified and abetted the turn to mobocracy. The internet has empowered the masses and introduced a more decentralized medium for communicating with each other.” But,” he asked, “is this so-called ‘liquid democracy’ without any form of meritocracy that sorts out the wheat from the chaff a good thing for society?” For Ghonim, the spread of a post-fact discourse of peer-driven mobocracy creates a new challenge. “While once social media was seen as a liberating means to speak truth to power,” he said, “now the issue is how to speak truth to social media.” A related, and equally menacing, facet of the incoming era is the emergence of a new “code war” that reached fresh heights this year through Russian influence meddling in the U.S. presidential election. Writing from Moscow, Fyodor Lukyanov reflected that the U.S. is just now getting a taste of its own medicine after intervening in other countries, including by trying to influence democratic elections, for decades.  Zbigniew Brzezinski has no doubts Russian President Vladimir Putin was directly involved in seeking to influence the U.S. election since he is in absolute control of the state, including the intelligence agencies. While acknowledging the U.S. has meddled for years in other democracies, Brzezinski nonetheless recognized that, “The new methods give activities of this sort a wider scope than ever before. And thus they are indeed more influential and effective than ever before. That is new and, of course, deeply troubling.” Toomas Ilves, the former president of Estonia, expects more cyberattacks from Russia as elections loom in Europe in the coming year. “The conundrum that Europe will face,” he wrote from Tallinn recently, “is whether or not to use illiberal methods to safeguard the liberal state. … Because of cyberattacks and fake news, we can already imagine the problem all democratic societies will face in future elections: how to limit lies when they threaten democracy.” Oliver Stone, who is preparing a new film based on his conversations with President Putin, has his doubts about Russia’s involvement. But he, too, agreed that we are now embarked on a “digital arms race” due in his view to the first use by the U.S. of offensive digital weapons, like the Stuxnet virus that disabled Iran’s nuclear centrifuges. In a WorldPost interview in September that focused mostly on his film “Snowden,” the Hollywood director worried as much about the invasion of privacy by the private sector as by the state. “Companies like Google profit enormously from data mining of your personal searches, behavior and habits,” he said. “There is more money in selling that data than in selling a product. It’s surveillance capitalism. It really is a new kind of totalitarianism.” AI, Algorithms and the Religious Imagination Another game-changing development in technology that continued to advance rapidly in 2016 is artificial intelligence, or AI. In April, the Berggruen Institute gathered top scientists and philosophers in Palo Alto to discuss the promises and perils of AI. While many saw enormous benefits in the short term, for example through the diagnostic capacity of big data for health care, the longer term was more concerning. Bill Joy, who helped develop the “Java Language Specification” software, warned, as but one example, that sophisticated new gene editing technology has the potential to “eliminate genetic diversity.”  Sapiens author Yuval Harari followed up this theme in an interview we published in May: “The whole of science is converging on this master idea of processing data in an algorithmic way, and this will cause the whole of economics and politics to converge on the same idea,” he argued. “The whole of biology since Darwin can be summarized in three words: ‘Organisms are algorithms.’ Simultaneously, computer scientists have been learning how to create better and better electronic algorithms. Now these two waves … are merging around this master concept of the algorithm, and their merger will create a tsunami that will wash over everything in its way.” In a reflection on the peril to the person from these developments, neuroscientist Antonio Damasio vigorously resisted the idea that being can be reduced to an algorithm. In a related essay, I pondered how scientific advances are resurrecting the religious imagination. “The more scientific discovery reveals,” I wrote, “ the more we realize it can’t answer the great existential questions.”  Interdependence Works Both Ways 2016 also demonstrated just how connected the world really is. We saw how China’s economic slump is testing Brazil’s democracy. The deep recession there due to slack demand by China for the South American nation’s commodities exposed the political cracks in the system, illustrating that the interdependence which giveth can also take away. As the revered former president of Brazil, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, wrote in the wake of the now-ousted President Dilma Rousseff’s impeachment, the cracks in the country’s democracy result from the same causes as in the advanced nations. “At the core of this crisis is the widening gap between people’s aspirations and the capacity of political institutions to respond to the demands of society,” he wrote. “It is one of the ironies of our age that this deficit of trust in political institutions coexists with the rise of citizens capable of making the choices that shape their lives and influence the future of their societies.” In another example of how what happens in one part of the world impacts others far away, the recapture of Aleppo by Syrian President Bashar Assad and his Russian allies in December after years of horrific civil war coincided with the Christmastime attack in Berlin by a suspect who was believed to be an asylum-seeker with ties to Islamist terror groups. This tragic event likely tipped the scales decisively in favor of anti-European Union and anti-immigrant political forces which have been gaining momentum in reaction to the massive refugee influx, including of Syrians fleeing the carnage at home. As a WorldPost editorial summarized the situation: “The European idea, which has been losing luster for years, looks to be the latest and most consequential casualty of a world in turmoil that stretches from the rubble of Aleppo to the World War II memorial ruins of the Kaiser Wilhelm church, near where the Christmas market attack took place in Berlin.” Where Hope Remains The temptation to blame refugees for Europe’s woes must take in the broader picture, Pope Francis told our outgoing Vatican correspondent Sébastien Maillard, in an interview. He called on Europe to “rediscover its capacity to integrate” plural cultures. But the Holy Father didn’t mince words about the dynamic he sees behind terrorism and the refugee crisis. “In the face of Islamic terrorism,” he told Maillard, who is also an editor of Le Croix, “it would therefore be better to question ourselves about the way in [which] an overly Western model of democracy has been exported to countries such as Iraq, where a strong government previously existed. Or in Libya, where a tribal structure exists. We cannot advance without taking these cultures into account. As a Libyan said recently, ‘We used to have one Gaddafi, now we have 50.’” When politics divides instead of unites, walls off instead of embraces, spiritual authorities like Pope Francis and artists or musicians like Yo-Yo Ma step into the breach to sustain our humanity. As we wrote in June, highlighting the release of the Silk Road Ensemble documentary, “The Music of Strangers,” the famed cellist is the pope’s spiritual cousin in this cause, sounding the healing chord of fellowship instead of enmity. More than a musician, he, too, is a guiding spirit who rises to the challenge of a world unraveling. “To be able to put oneself in another’s shoes without prejudgment is an essential skill,” Yo-Yo Ma once told The WorldPost. “Empathy comes when you understand something deeply through arts and literature and can thus make unexpected connections. These parallels bring you closer to things that would otherwise seem far away. Empathy is the ultimate quality that acknowledges our identity as members of one human family.” Finally, this year we celebrated Charles Taylor, who was awarded the 2016 Berggruen Prize for ideas that shape the world, as the “anti-xenophobe philosopher.” In an overview, Berggruen Institute president, Craig Calhoun, summarized the key works of the Canadian philosopher. And in a related editorial we wrote about how the man is an important figure for our time, and indeed, for this year: “It is Taylor’s thinking on the recognition of irreducible diversity in an interdependent world of plural identities ― and how societies can cope with this reality ― that gives him urgency in this era of Trump, Brexit, the burkini ban and the rise of the anti-immigrant right in Europe.”  WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. CORRESPONDENTS: Sophia Jones in Istanbul. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera), Dileep Padgaonkar (Times of India) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khannaare Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

25 декабря 2016, 19:15

Италия присоединяется к всемирному бунту против диктатуры банкиров

Италия — последняя страна, взбунтовавшаяся против интересов банков лондонского Сити и Уолл-стрит. 4 декабря её избиратели нанесли третий удар, после "брексита" в Великобритании и избрания Дональда Трампа в США, во всемирном восстании "забытых граждан"[1] против политического истеблишмента, ответственного за экономический кризис и войны, которые ввергают миллионы людей в бедность и отчаяние и приводят их к смерти.

24 декабря 2016, 06:02

Weekend Roundup: The Berlin Attack Has Sealed The Political Fate Of Europe

Europe was already reeling from major terror attacks in Brussels, Paris and Nice as well as Brexit and the defeat of the political establishment in the Italian referendum before this week. With anti-immigrant parties standing ambitiously in the wings waiting for events to further boost them into power, the worst thing that could have happened, the shoe waiting to drop, was a terror attack at Christmas time in Germany by an asylum-seeker linked to Islamist terror groups. It is just that which took place in Berlin this week.  That the inevitable has now occurred likely seals the political fate of Europe. Public opinion will surely turn decisively against the open-arms refugee policy of German Chancellor Angela Merkel — the most prominent defender of the troubled European project of integration and the free movement of people. Merkel’s coalition partner (yet mainstream opponent) Horst Seehofer of the Bavarian Christian Social Union, has already laid down the challenge. “We owe it to the victims, to those affected and to the whole population to rethink our immigration and security policy and to change it.” As Nick Robins-Early reports, the Alternative for Germany party and other anti-immigrant groups are already capitalizing on the incident. One AfD leader called those killed “Merkel’s dead.” Alex Görlach hopes that Merkel’s considerable political skills can save the day by adjusting the Europe-wide refugee policy in the wake of this week’s tragedy. That she is also the only European leader who can stand up to the next American president, Görlach notes, could be a political asset. Yet, even if the chancellor survives, the damage has already been done. The European idea, which has been losing luster for years, looks to be the latest and most consequential casualty of a world in turmoil that stretches from the rubble of Aleppo to the World War II memorial ruins of the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church, near where the Christmas market attack took place in Berlin. Writing from Germany, Stefan Schmidt argues that his fellow citizens should resist calls to blame anyone but the perpetrator while continuing to embrace the values of an open, but inevitably vulnerable, society. In a similar vein, Sebastian Christ writes from Berlin that, “We can’t give in to those who want to force their hate-filled world view on us. ... On top of everything, we must continue to hold on to freedom for ourselves. I will definitely continue going to Christmas markets in Berlin.”  Picking up on the theme in the back of everyone’s mind about Muslims at Christmas, Dean Obeidallah fondly remembers his Muslim father, born near Jesus’ birthplace of Bethlehem, hanging Christmas lights on their home in New Jersey as a child. He also surveys other American Muslims who partake in the holiday, including Aasif Mandvi.  Unfortunately, the attack in Germany wasn’t the only attack we saw this week. Another act that shocked the world took place in Ankara, where the Russian ambassador to Turkey was assassinated. John Tures, who has studied the different motivations and effectiveness of “lone wolf” versus “wolf pack” terrorists linked to organized extremists, argues that preventing future attacks, whether of the kind in Berlin or Ankara, requires being able to distinguish between these two threats. Details are still emerging about the attack in Ankara, but it appears to be an apparent act of revenge over the Kremlin’s key role in the brutal assault on Aleppo in recent weeks. As Alex Motyl writes, more such attacks can be expected due to Putin’s Syria policy. “Anti-Russian terrorism is the new normal,” he says. Turkish journalist Ilgin Yorulmaz ponders the timing of the assassination in Ankara, which came on the eve of a tripartite meeting of Russia, Turkey and Iran concerning Syria, and reports that some suspect a geopolitical aim. “A strong NATO member,” she writes, “Turkey may have found a new ally in Russia, and possibly even Iran, to become a game changer in the Middle East.” This week also saw the last evacuations out of Aleppo. Dr. Ahmad Tarakji, whose organization has been working on the ground in the besieged city, offers a detailed account of the humanitarian catastrophe there, which he says is far from over after the forced relocations. “The world has failed the people of Aleppo time and time again,” he writes, “but it’s not too late to act now to help those seeking refuge somewhere else. The international community must do everything in its power to protect these most vulnerable of people. They continue to suffer while the world is standing idly by.” Writing from Moscow before the Syrian regime claimed control over all of Aleppo, Vladimir Frolov proposes that the best course for the Kremlin now would be, “declaring victory in Aleppo, scaling down its military operations against the rebels, refocusing its air war on ISIS in a new collaborative effort with the U.S. and pressuring the Assad regime into a political settlement.”  Returning to the hot issue of Russian influence meddling in the affairs of democracies, Toomas Hendrik Ilves knows from whence he speaks. In 2007, the former president of Estonia experienced a Kremlin-led cyberattack on his government, banking and news media servers. He expects more such attacks in Europe as elections loom. “The conundrum that Europe will face in the coming year,” he writes from Tallinn, “is whether or not to use illiberal methods to safeguard the liberal state. … Because of cyberattacks and fake news, we can already imagine the problem all democratic societies will face in future elections: how to limit lies when they threaten democracy?” In an exclusive interview, former U.S. National Security Adviser Zbigniew Brzezinski claims Russian President Vladimir Putin was directly involved in the effort to tip the recent American election scales in Trump’s favor. “Yes. Russian intelligence was involved, no question,” he says, “Yes. Putin plays that kind of direct role. Russian intelligence is not some independent agency. It is an agency of the state organized for specific political purposes. Putin absolutely controls the state apparatus. No doubts there.” He also warns that “stupid irritations” over Taiwan risk derailing America’s most important foreign policy relationship with Beijing. “A world in which America and China are cooperating,” Brzezinski underscores, “is a world in which American influence is maximized.”  One of the hottest issues in the U.S. presidential campaign was Donald Trump’s pledge to build a wall with Mexico. Writing from Mexico City, Homero Aridjis and James Ramey offer a highly innovative proposal: Instead of Trump’s wall, they want to build a border of solar panels. “It would have a civilizing effect in a dangerous area,” they contend. “Since solar plants use security measures to keep intruders out, the solar border would serve as a de facto virtual fence, reducing porousness of the border while producing major economic, environmental and security benefits on both sides.” Such an installation, they continue, “would make trafficking drugs, arms and people all the more difficult for criminal cartels. In Mexico, the solar border would create a New Deal-like source of high-tech construction and technology jobs all along the border, which could absorb a significant number of would-be migrant workers on their way to cross into the U.S. illegally, at great physical risk.” Rolling back globalization to stem joblessness and inequality was another prime issue in the recent presidential election campaign. Branko Milanovic takes up this challenge, arguing that reversing globalization would only reduce growth rates in both the advanced and emerging economies, to no one’s benefit. “A more promising avenue for dealing with inequality in rich countries for the 21st century,” he writes, “is to reduce inequality in human and financial capital endowments. This implies, first, reversing the currently extraordinary high concentration of capital assets by giving the middle classes fiscal and other incentives to invest and own assets and, second, equalizing access to high-quality education that is increasingly monopolized by the rich.” A special Highline investigative report we publish this week traces the corporations and criminals profiting handsomely from the refugee crisis. As we get closer to the end of the year, we take a look at 52 photos from around the world that summed up 2016. Finally, in our Singularity series, we explore why the octobot may just be the beginning for soft robotics. WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. CORRESPONDENTS: Sophia Jones in Istanbul. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera), Dileep Padgaonkar (Times of India) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khannaare Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

24 декабря 2016, 06:02

Weekend Roundup: The Berlin Attack Has Sealed The Political Fate Of Europe

Europe was already reeling from major terror attacks in Brussels, Paris and Nice as well as Brexit and the defeat of the political establishment in the Italian referendum before this week. With anti-immigrant parties standing ambitiously in the wings waiting for events to further boost them into power, the worst thing that could have happened, the shoe waiting to drop, was a terror attack at Christmas time in Germany by an asylum-seeker linked to Islamist terror groups. It is just that which took place in Berlin this week.  That the inevitable has now occurred likely seals the political fate of Europe. Public opinion will surely turn decisively against the open-arms refugee policy of German Chancellor Angela Merkel — the most prominent defender of the troubled European project of integration and the free movement of people. Merkel’s coalition partner (yet mainstream opponent) Horst Seehofer of the Bavarian Christian Social Union, has already laid down the challenge. “We owe it to the victims, to those affected and to the whole population to rethink our immigration and security policy and to change it.” As Nick Robins-Early reports, the Alternative for Germany party and other anti-immigrant groups are already capitalizing on the incident. One AfD leader called those killed “Merkel’s dead.” Alex Görlach hopes that Merkel’s considerable political skills can save the day by adjusting the Europe-wide refugee policy in the wake of this week’s tragedy. That she is also the only European leader who can stand up to the next American president, Görlach notes, could be a political asset. Yet, even if the chancellor survives, the damage has already been done. The European idea, which has been losing luster for years, looks to be the latest and most consequential casualty of a world in turmoil that stretches from the rubble of Aleppo to the World War II memorial ruins of the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church, near where the Christmas market attack took place in Berlin. Writing from Germany, Stefan Schmidt argues that his fellow citizens should resist calls to blame anyone but the perpetrator while continuing to embrace the values of an open, but inevitably vulnerable, society. In a similar vein, Sebastian Christ writes from Berlin that, “We can’t give in to those who want to force their hate-filled world view on us. ... On top of everything, we must continue to hold on to freedom for ourselves. I will definitely continue going to Christmas markets in Berlin.”  Picking up on the theme in the back of everyone’s mind about Muslims at Christmas, Dean Obeidallah fondly remembers his Muslim father, born near Jesus’ birthplace of Bethlehem, hanging Christmas lights on their home in New Jersey as a child. He also surveys other American Muslims who partake in the holiday, including Aasif Mandvi.  Unfortunately, the attack in Germany wasn’t the only attack we saw this week. Another act that shocked the world took place in Ankara, where the Russian ambassador to Turkey was assassinated. John Tures, who has studied the different motivations and effectiveness of “lone wolf” versus “wolf pack” terrorists linked to organized extremists, argues that preventing future attacks, whether of the kind in Berlin or Ankara, requires being able to distinguish between these two threats. Details are still emerging about the attack in Ankara, but it appears to be an apparent act of revenge over the Kremlin’s key role in the brutal assault on Aleppo in recent weeks. As Alex Motyl writes, more such attacks can be expected due to Putin’s Syria policy. “Anti-Russian terrorism is the new normal,” he says. Turkish journalist Ilgin Yorulmaz ponders the timing of the assassination in Ankara, which came on the eve of a tripartite meeting of Russia, Turkey and Iran concerning Syria, and reports that some suspect a geopolitical aim. “A strong NATO member,” she writes, “Turkey may have found a new ally in Russia, and possibly even Iran, to become a game changer in the Middle East.” This week also saw the last evacuations out of Aleppo. Dr. Ahmad Tarakji, whose organization has been working on the ground in the besieged city, offers a detailed account of the humanitarian catastrophe there, which he says is far from over after the forced relocations. “The world has failed the people of Aleppo time and time again,” he writes, “but it’s not too late to act now to help those seeking refuge somewhere else. The international community must do everything in its power to protect these most vulnerable of people. They continue to suffer while the world is standing idly by.” Writing from Moscow before the Syrian regime claimed control over all of Aleppo, Vladimir Frolov proposes that the best course for the Kremlin now would be, “declaring victory in Aleppo, scaling down its military operations against the rebels, refocusing its air war on ISIS in a new collaborative effort with the U.S. and pressuring the Assad regime into a political settlement.”  Returning to the hot issue of Russian influence meddling in the affairs of democracies, Toomas Hendrik Ilves knows from whence he speaks. In 2007, the former president of Estonia experienced a Kremlin-led cyberattack on his government, banking and news media servers. He expects more such attacks in Europe as elections loom. “The conundrum that Europe will face in the coming year,” he writes from Tallinn, “is whether or not to use illiberal methods to safeguard the liberal state. … Because of cyberattacks and fake news, we can already imagine the problem all democratic societies will face in future elections: how to limit lies when they threaten democracy?” In an exclusive interview, former U.S. National Security Adviser Zbigniew Brzezinski claims Russian President Vladimir Putin was directly involved in the effort to tip the recent American election scales in Trump’s favor. “Yes. Russian intelligence was involved, no question,” he says, “Yes. Putin plays that kind of direct role. Russian intelligence is not some independent agency. It is an agency of the state organized for specific political purposes. Putin absolutely controls the state apparatus. No doubts there.” He also warns that “stupid irritations” over Taiwan risk derailing America’s most important foreign policy relationship with Beijing. “A world in which America and China are cooperating,” Brzezinski underscores, “is a world in which American influence is maximized.”  One of the hottest issues in the U.S. presidential campaign was Donald Trump’s pledge to build a wall with Mexico. Writing from Mexico City, Homero Aridjis and James Ramey offer a highly innovative proposal: Instead of Trump’s wall, they want to build a border of solar panels. “It would have a civilizing effect in a dangerous area,” they contend. “Since solar plants use security measures to keep intruders out, the solar border would serve as a de facto virtual fence, reducing porousness of the border while producing major economic, environmental and security benefits on both sides.” Such an installation, they continue, “would make trafficking drugs, arms and people all the more difficult for criminal cartels. In Mexico, the solar border would create a New Deal-like source of high-tech construction and technology jobs all along the border, which could absorb a significant number of would-be migrant workers on their way to cross into the U.S. illegally, at great physical risk.” Rolling back globalization to stem joblessness and inequality was another prime issue in the recent presidential election campaign. Branko Milanovic takes up this challenge, arguing that reversing globalization would only reduce growth rates in both the advanced and emerging economies, to no one’s benefit. “A more promising avenue for dealing with inequality in rich countries for the 21st century,” he writes, “is to reduce inequality in human and financial capital endowments. This implies, first, reversing the currently extraordinary high concentration of capital assets by giving the middle classes fiscal and other incentives to invest and own assets and, second, equalizing access to high-quality education that is increasingly monopolized by the rich.” A special Highline investigative report we publish this week traces the corporations and criminals profiting handsomely from the refugee crisis. As we get closer to the end of the year, we take a look at 52 photos from around the world that summed up 2016. Finally, in our Singularity series, we explore why the octobot may just be the beginning for soft robotics. WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. CORRESPONDENTS: Sophia Jones in Istanbul. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera), Dileep Padgaonkar (Times of India) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khannaare Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

17 декабря 2016, 05:26

Weekend Roundup: Russian Intrusion in the U.S. Election Signals a New 'Code War'

Russian hackers have been implicated by the CIA and FBI in an audacious effort to sway voters in the recent U.S. presidential election in the direction of Donald Trump. Like other key events in U.S. history, such as Pearl Harbor or 9/11, the revelation of the Russian cyber intrusion is a wake-up call. It signals that a new “code war” is underway through the weaponization of information.  The irony can’t be missed, of course, that the CIA, which itself sought to influence democratic elections around the world from the earliest days of the Cold War, is calling out the Russians. Former CIA director Bill Colby once regaled me with tales of his years as a young operative in Italy, paying off journalists and channeling laundered funds to the Christian Democrats in elections during the 1950s to (successfully) defeat the Communists at the polls. The CIA also clandestinely funded the Liberal Democratic Party in Japan to oppose leftist forces there during that same era. It also intervened to sway voters in elections from South Vietnam to Chile. As one top U.S. intelligence official said to me this week, we are seeing “old tactics with new tools” ― but this time turned against America. How the outrage against Russia will affect the pragmatic accommodation to Russian President Vladimir Putin’s regime already signaled by President-elect Trump and his appointed secretary of state, Rex Tillerson, is unclear. Troublesome as it has once again become for the West, Russia remains a major nuclear power with whom it is no less necessary to deal with than during the height of the totalitarian Soviet state. A thawing of hostility would break the steady drift of Russia and China aligning as an axis against the West. Trump’s “America First” policy, which promises to disengage from the liberal interventionism that presumes to tutor mankind on its pilgrimage to perfection, could, on this score, make the world more stable. In response to the hysteria in America about the Russian hacking, writing from Moscow, Fyodor Lukyanov contends that Putin is giving America a taste of its own political-meddling medicine. Alina Polyakova believes we will likely see similar clandestine efforts by Russia to sway voters in upcoming French and German elections. Russian journalist Maria Snegovaya surveys the view from Russia on the alleged hacks and finds that despite the uproar they’ve caused in America, Russians are generally unconcerned by the revelations.  But to Nina L. Khrushcheva, writing from Moscow, the similarities between Trump’s cabinet and the Cold War-era film “The Manchurian Candidate” ― about a plot to use a brainwashed man to upend American politics ― are too close for comfort. As she suggests, influence meddling is of an entirely different order when done to America ― the iconic democracy, world’s largest economy and most powerful military ― by the humiliated successor to its old Soviet adversary. Former NATO Supreme Allied Commander Admiral James Stavridis argues the U.S. must stand up firmly to this new challenge with a “robust, rapid and proportional” response. From London, Julian Baggini asserts that a consolidating “populist international” binds the anti-establishment revolt across Western democracies together with the strongman approach to governance favored by Putin. Writing from Singapore, Kishore Mahbubani and Danny Quah contend that the populist upheavals across the West reflect the rise of the emerging economies, especially in Asia, that are placing stress on the old trans-Atlantic powers that once ran the world on their own terms. Russia has returned as a player in the new world disorder on another stage ― Syria. Moscow facilitated a brutal blow in eastern Aleppo this week against the opposition to Syrian President Bashar Assad. As Maha Sarfraz laments, “never again” has happened once more. Rabeh Ghadban describes how deadly and heart-wrenching the persisting hope among Syrians has been. Meanwhile, relations between China and the U.S. since Trump have worsened. Earlier this month, Trump’s call with Taiwan predictably stirred tensions. This week, China held its first ever live-fire drills with an aircraft carrier and warships, and a Chinese warship seized an American underwater drone in the South China Sea. Writing from Hong Kong, Jun Mai reports that Chinese President Xi Jinping has called on professors and students at China’s universities to increase their allegiance to the Community Party. On the climate change front, the filling out of Trump’s cabinet with climate deniers presents a daunting challenge to the environmental movement. Bill McKibben  argues that it would now be most effective to shift the focus from politics toward a strategy of pushing investors to divest from fossil fuels. This week, the Future of Life Institute’s Ariel Conn discusses the “King Midas problem” of how to create artificial intelligence with goals and values that align with those of the people it interacts with. Finally, our Singularity series examines the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots, comprised of more than 60 nongovernmental organizations working to ban fully autonomous weapons. WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. CORRESPONDENTS: Sophia Jones in Istanbul. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera), Dileep Padgaonkar (Times of India) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khannaare Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

10 декабря 2016, 08:00

Демократия на Западе — фейк?

Правительство Соединённых Штатов и их марионетки в НАТО уже как десятилетие убивают мусульманских мужчин, женщин и детей во имя того, чтобы принести им демократию. Но есть ли демократия на самом Западе? Скептики обращают внимание на то, что президент Джордж У. Буш был приведён к власти Верховным судом, а исход ряда других выборов решался электронными машинами […]

08 декабря 2016, 18:03

What Trump Could Learn From Berlusconi

More than just sharing the former Italian prime minister’s wealth and flashiness, Trump, too, could stumble if he alienates the political system he’s inheriting.

05 декабря 2016, 13:56

Во все тяжкие, или Mamma Mia: чем для Италии закончится отставка демократа Ренци

Глава итальянского правительства Маттео Ренци объявил об уходе в отставку. Поводом стали итоги референдума о внесении изменений в конституцию — более 60% избирателей выступили против. Эксперты уже поговаривают о том, что ситуация обернется для страны «Италэкзитом».

03 декабря 2016, 00:40

Weekend Roundup: Populists Grow Stronger Once in Power

Populists, caudillos and strongmen in power don’t fail at the outset, they gain strength. That is because their personalist rule delivers up front to the constituencies that brought them to the top, often challenging bothersome institutional constraints along the way. They worry about the consequences later. The real troubles begin when the consequences arrive, revealing how the short term has eaten the long term. Then the bad overtakes the good. As the classicist Phillip Freeman has written in The WorldPost, this has been true going back to Clodius in the Roman republic, whose popularity soared as he handed out free grain to the plebeians. But the divisive character of his mercurial rule drove the republic to the point of civil war and opened the way for the dictatorship of Caesar to restore order. In the 1950s in Argentina, Juan and Eva Peron fostered many programs to elevate the poor descamisados (shirtless ones) until corruption, debt and inflation overwhelmed any gains and the military ultimately stepped in to stem the chaos. In Venezuela, Hugo Chavez unquestionably lifted the welfare of the poor the elites had ignored through programs like misiones sociales, but in the end squandered immense oil resources, became heavily indebted to China and whose policies now, under the rule of his successor Nicolás Maduro, have ignited 500 percent, if not more, inflation. Store shelves are empty, medicines are scarce, daily protests fill the streets and citizens that see little hope are fleeing economic collapse by the boatload.  This pattern also fits Fidel Castro. Though he arrived in power by the bullet instead of the ballot, his rallying cry was populist, nationalist and above all, personalist. He accomplished near universal literacy and free health care for all in that tiny Caribbean island. In the end, though, his caudillo-like rule crushed dissent and personal liberties while his Soviet-style economy, abetted by the U.S. blockade, drove the nation into an impoverished cul-de-sac. History has not absolved Castro or any of the others who took the populist path to power. Whether Donald Trump fits this pattern, as former Mexican President Vicente Fox argues, remains to be seen. As president-elect, Trump has claimed to have saved some 800 to 1,000 jobs in Indiana from moving to Mexico. His pledge of a $1 trillion dollar infrastructure surge has so far helped boost the stock market and will surely create significant new employment with far reaching multiplier effects if it comes to pass.  Since no populist politician has ever before occupied the top office of the world’s most powerful nation in modern times, we don’t know what to expect. America is a profoundly pluralist and ethnically diverse society bound by constitutional constraints more hallowed than elsewhere. This context bears little resemblance to where populism has been empowered before. The flashing red light that cannot escape concern, however, is the very personalist style of operation that brought Donald Trump to power through scapegoating invective against the outside world and perceived enemies within. If troubles appear later on, will he revert to the path that brought him to where he is or abide by the norms of civility and restraint that have limited the authority of every previous American president? All who want America to succeed are obliged to give Trump the benefit of the doubt for now since the democratic ballot box has put him in the White House. But that red light needs to remain flashing every step of the way.  Emily Peck contends that Donald Trump has “his eye on the wrong ball” by blaming trade for job losses. As true as that may have been in the past, the real threat of job displacement in the future, she writes, comes from Amazon’s takeover of the economy. Ryszard Petru and Guy Verhofstadt, the European Union’s top negotiator on Brexit, take on the populist wave heading to the European continent in the wake of Trump’s victory in the America. “One of the greatest delusions spread by populists on both the left and right,” they argue, “is that turning inwards will empower us. The reality is that in an inter-connected world, no one European country can influence global trade rules. And make no mistake: if we abandon shaping the environment around us, others will shape us.” Writing from Paris, Anne Sinclair worries that “the political future of France has never been more uncertain.” “Time will reveal,” she writes, “if Marine Le Pen will be able to cause the greatest political earthquake in France since the Liberation.” Following Fidel’s death at 90 last week, several contributions evaluate his life and times. Mark Beeson looks as the triumphs and failures of the Cuban revolution in the context of the struggle against inequality across Latin America. Michelle Manning Barish brings a personal family perspective to the Cuban experience. She warns against romanticizing the Cuban revolution, writing that, “the only people who know the real history of Castro in Cuba are the ones who lived it.” Based on recent conversations in Havana, Abraham Lowenthal cautions that a post-Castro Cuba is not likely to change quickly as a result of the Obama opening – and certainly not if Trump reverses course once in office.  In other global matters, Sam Stein and Jessica Schulberg report from Washington that foreign policy experts are lining up to press the incoming Trump administration to keep the Iran nuclear deal or risk a nuclear arms race in the Mideast. Former British Prime Minister Gordon Brown calls for an international investigation of the Russian-Syrian role in the deadly bombing of a school in the village of Haas which killed dozens of people, mostly children.  Eric Olander and Cobus van Staden report on how Rwanda is positioning itself as a hub for Chinese investment in Africa. Jeffie Lam of our South China Morning Post partner reports on the rise and fall of the independence movement in Hong Kong. Earlier in the week, the Post reported that Chris Patten, the last British governor of Hong Kong, told journalists that calls for independence should not be confused with the struggle for greater democracy, which he supports. Writing from Perth, Australia Helen Clark reports that Vietnam is looking to the combined weight of the Association of East Asian Nations, or ASEAN, as a way for smaller nations in the region to protect and promote their interests as the U.S. and China battle for influence. Stefano Baldolini writes from Italy that a “no” outcome of the referendum this weekend over key constitutional reforms that diminish the role of the Italian Senate and give more power to the prime minister could spark a new round of instability across Europe.  India is rapidly joining the renewable revolution. Elyse Wanshel reports that India has built the world’s largest solar plant in eight months, and it generates enough power for 150,000 homes.  The news is not so good elsewhere. Ryan Grenoble reports that, “There’s substantially less sea ice in the world than ever before. The Arctic ― and, for completely unrelated reasons, the Antarctic ― just closed out November with less ice than any other year in history.”  There is joy in life if you lighten up and let God’s mercy in. That is the takeaway, Carol Kuruvilla writes, for Pope Francis from his favorite film, “Babette’s Feast.” The film depicts an austere Protestant town of joyless inhabitants disrupted by a generous French cook in exile who brings them all together in happy fellowship around a meticulously prepared meal. Writing from Istanbul, novelist Kaya Genc describes how the ongoing political chaos in Turkey is re-energizing the arts scene. “Young Turks,” he writes, are “turning to art in trouble times.” Finally, our Singularity series this week examines the global contest, especially between the U.S. and China, over the most powerful supercomputer. The key to the prize, writes Peter Rejcek, is smart architecture, not speed. WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. CORRESPONDENTS: Sophia Jones in Istanbul. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera), Dileep Padgaonkar (Times of India) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khannaare Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

02 декабря 2016, 09:08

Евросоюз теряет Италию

Провал референдума 4 декабря может привести к власти евроскептиков

27 ноября 2016, 14:58

Берлускони допустил возможность выдвижения своей кандидатуры на выборах в Италии

Бывший премьер-министр Италии Сильвио Берлускони не исключил возможности, что сможет вновь выдвигать свою кандидатуру на выборах, об этом 80-летний политик заявил в интервью газете Messaggero, уточнив, что ожидает «справедливого решения» Европейского суда в Страсбурге. «Страсбург должен вынести вердикт. Я убежден, что будет совершенно однозначно установлено, что я не виновен ни в каком уходе от налогов. Тогда я смогу вновь баллотироваться, и правому центру не придется искать нового лидера», – приводит его слова ТАСС. Страсбургский суд рассматривает ходатайство адвокатов Берлускони, требующего отменить окончательный приговор итальянского Кассационного суда, согласно которому политик был в августе 2013 года признан виновным в финансовом мошенничестве и создании теневых фондов в его компании «Медиасет» и приговорен к четырем (сокращенным до года по амнистии) годам тюрьмы. В виду преклонного возраста обвиняемого отбывание срока за решеткой было заменено на общественно-полезные работы. В течение года Берлускони раз в неделю на протяжении четырех часов работал в доме престарелых. Окончательный приговор, согласно последним поправкам к законодательству, принятым во время правления технического правительства Марио Монти (пришедшего на смену кабинету подавшего в отставку в конце 2011 года Берлускони), лишил экс-премьера возможности участвовать в выборах и занимать государственные посты сроком, вдвое превышающем срок приговора (то есть восемь лет). Более того, после приговора Берлускони был исключен из сената (верхней палаты парламента), куда был избран в феврале 2013 года. 4 декабря в Италии пройдет всенародный референдум по вопросу о конституционной реформе, которая предусматривает внесение ряд изменений в основной закон страны. Основным разработчиком и сторонником этой реформы выступает нынешний глава правительства, секретарь левоцентристской Демократической партии (ДП) Маттео Ренци. В случае если инициатива премьера поддержана не будет, не исключено, что ему придется подать в отставку. Во всяком случае на этом будет настаивать вся оппозиция, в которую входит партия Берлускони «Вперед, Италия». Сам Берлускони ведет активную агитационную кампанию против реформы и призывает итальянцев отклонить ее, называя предложения Ренци антидемократическими. Экс-премьер в июле перенес серьезную операцию на открытом сердце и до сих пор проходит медицинские обследования. Кроме того, на место лидера правого центра претендует молодой глава партии «Лига Севера» (традиционно союзной с «Вперед, Италия») Маттео Сальвини, который также заявил о готовности баллотироваться в премьеры. В интервью Messaggero Берлускони подтвердил, что в случае поражения Ренци на референдуме его партия будет добиваться проведения досрочных выборов. Однако для этого необходимо сначала принять находящееся на стадии затянувшегося обсуждения новое избирательное законодательство, поскольку действующее было признано неконституционным.

19 ноября 2016, 03:04

Weekend Roundup: Will Donald Trump End the New Cold War?

The irony of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump’s “America First” policy is that it could end the budding new Cold War that has been developing between the West and Russia and China. His non-ideological, deal-making approach, which doesn’t challenge how the Russians and Chinese govern themselves, promises to lessen tensions that have been getting dangerously out of control. That in turn would weaken the tie that binds those two nations ever closer together in growing hostility against the West. Writing from Moscow, Fyodor Lukyanov sees the end of an era arriving with Trump. “The main difference from the previous administration,” says Lukyanov, “is that the ideological promotion of democracy and a certain model of development, which provided the conceptual and axiological justification for America’s global presence, is being rolled back. Russia,” he continues,  “welcomes the return of pragmatism to international relations and the retreat of liberal ideology.” Also writing from Moscow, Vladimir Frolov concurs: “A liberal, normative world order underpinned by U.S. leadership, could be replaced with the ‘art of the geopolitical deal’ between the great powers.” Yet, he also feels “a palpable sense of apprehension within the Kremlin.” Anastasya Manuilova reports from Moscow that Russians are divided over Trump, with many doubting he will keep his pledge to mend ties with Russia. “How [can] Trump start a new relationship with Russia if now he has become the president of [a] country where half of the population vot[ed] for Clinton with her much more hostile attitude towards us?” Anna, a 25-year-old facilities manager from Moscow, told her. “He can’t just ignore all these people, especially if they already started protesting against him.” Former NATO commander James Stavridis puts Russia and Israel in the column of “winners” in a new Trump administration, with trade and the traditional security alliances as “losers.” Harvard’s Simon Saradzhyan and William Tobey caution against expectations of any big change in the U.S.-Russia relationship. They point out the many obstacles from worries over Russian ambitions in the Middle East to constraints on U.S. ballistic missile defense systems demanded by Moscow as a condition for reviving nuclear security cooperation. Though in the short term conflict with China over trade is likely, Chinese-American relations could improve over the longer term as well. “The Chinese prefer a relationship with a United States that doesn’t try to remake the world,” Eric X. Li wrote from Shanghai this week in The New York Times. “The Chinese know how to compete and can deal with competitors. What the Chinese have always resented and resisted is an America that imposes its values and standards on everybody else. Mr. Trump’s America is likely to break from this pattern. He has shown no desire to tell other countries how to do things.”   Such pragmatic accommodation in a vacuum, however, comes at an obvious price. As the philosopher Charles Taylor fears, absent a commensurate will from the U.S. to build and sustain a rules-based order that fosters global cooperation, the world will likely devolve into a series of spheres of influence reminiscent of the age of empire. In that fraught arrangement, Taylor told WorldPost advisory board member Dileep Padgaonkar, “Each side gives the other a ‘free hand’ in their ‘own’ sphere. Trump’s version of ‘America First’ seems to imply not needing to placate allies. This in turn will add lustre to an internal politics of discrimination and exclusion. It may easily go along with scrapping international treaties, like the Paris accords on climate change.”  Writing from Stockholm, Goran Rosenberg agrees with Pope Francis that the vilification of others Trump has regularly practiced is itself a form of terrorism. “Every human being is capable of turning into a terrorist simply by just abusing language,” he quotes the pope saying in a recent interview in a Swedish publication. “You see,” the pope continues, “I am not speaking here about fighting a battle as in a war. I am speaking of a deceitful and hidden form of terrorism that uses words as bombs that explode, causing devastation in peoples’ lives. It is a sort of criminality and the root of it is original sin. It is a way of creating space for yourself by destroying others.” Rosenberg fears that Trump’s example encourages the darkest forces in Europe that are gaining ground every day. “Trump’s victorious election campaign,” he writes, “has poisoned the political climate of liberal democracies. We have been shown that defamation, hatred and lying can be a road to power.”  Writing from India, Sandip Roy makes the same point from the other side of the planet, likening Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi to Trump. “It’s not about Donald Trump,” he writes, “it’s about those he emboldens. It’s about those who bully in his name. And this is an issue we understand firsthand in India. A Narendra Modi in office chooses his words carefully, gives lofty high-minded speeches, talks about vikaas and Constitution. But those who are emboldened in his name are the ones who tell critics to ‘go to Pakistan.’” The appointment by Donald Trump of Steve Bannon as a key strategist only confirms Dean Obeidallah’s worst fear that Islamophobic bigotry has a place in the White House and that not enough media outlets are concerned about this part of the man’s troubling reality. Indeed, in a piece with her New York-based brother Paul Vale, Katherine Linzy of Louisville, Ky. says the anti-Muslim sentiments in places like her “solid red” town are exacerbated by some far-right voices in media. “Rural Kentuckians may go their entire lives without meeting a Muslim, but they’ve all been told radical Islam is coming to wipe them out,” she explains. “With media fear mongering as their only reference, prejudice is unsurprising, but it’s directed at nebulous groups not individuals; the same people who worry about radical Islam would be genuinely warm and welcoming if I brought a Muslim friend round for dinner.” Michael Dobson acknowledges the gauntlet thrown down by President-elect Trump, who once said he will “cancel” the Paris climate accord. Calling for resistance, Dobson writes that this is, “a moment of moral reckoning for the American people, one as profound as that of the Vietnam War or the conquest of Europe by fascism.” Carl Pope, former head of the Sierra Club, says cities globally can take up much of the battle on climate change through building out climate-friendly infrastructure. But that, he says, will take “financial creativity” to execute and fund.  A BuzzFeed News analysis of election coverage released this week came to an astonishing conclusion: “Top fake election news stories generated more total engagement on Facebook than top election stories from 19 major news outlets combined.” Sebastian Murdock reports on the baby steps Twitter and Google have taken to cull out fake information. Tucker Davey details how cybersecurity can get a boost from machine learning. Finally, our Singularity series this week looks at ominous new technology that makes media manipulation easy by enabling the rearrangement of words and phrases, or the invention of new phrases with the same voice pattern from something never actually spoken. WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. CORRESPONDENTS: Sophia Jones in Istanbul. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera), Dileep Padgaonkar (Times of India) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khannaare Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

12 ноября 2016, 04:45

Weekend Roundup: Democracy Disrupts Itself

When unresponsive elites forsake the common folk in governing systems anchored in popular sovereignty, demagogues who fashion themselves as tribunes of the people ride the rage to power and wreck it all. As the classicist Philip Freeman observes, that has been the pattern going back more than two millennia to the demise of the Roman republic. So, too, he writes, Donald Trump’s victory could well mark the beginning of the end of the American republic.  The decay of democracy in the United States over recent decades has produced the worst of both worlds. Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton embodied an insider establishment captured by the big-money politics of organized special interests. Out of touch inside its smug bubble, her campaign failed to grasp the anger and resentment of the excluded. As Krystal Ball unsparingly writes, “the Democratic Party deserved to die.” Taking a page from the rise of fascism in Europe, Republican nominee Donald Trump poisonously exploited the very real travails of the left behind by blaming it all on the world outside and enemies within. Realizing the worst fears of the American Founding Fathers, the democratic ballot box has now unleashed the darkest forces within the body politic. A populist charlatan will soon take up residence in the White House. Trump’s triumph is not just the turn of another electoral cycle. It reveals a systemic crisis of American democracy. Without reinvigorated institutions and practices that temper passions while embracing diversity and engaging those who have been abandoned, the “Great Reaction” could endure for a long while. Just because Trump won the election, Dean Obeidallah says, the hatred and bigotry he spewed in the campaign cannot simply be absolved and forgotten. Based on their research, psychologists Michele Gelfand and Joshua Conrad Jackson report that, “the strongest Trump supporters were those who felt that America was under grave threat and believed that the country needed tighter rules and less tolerance toward anyone who seemed ‘un-American.’” Howard Fineman points out the paradox that, “Trump ran and won as a change agent who promised to restore the past.” Yet, as he also observes, “a new America will continue to develop; demographics and technology make it inevitable.” Because the U.S. is the leading global power, former Swedish Prime Minister Carl Bildt sees the “Great Reaction” reverberating around the planet, weakening the liberal order rooted in tolerance and openness and strengthening those lured by the siren of xenophobia and closed societies. Thomas Weber worries that we are witnessing an erosion of liberal democracy across the West by the kind of revolutionary upheavals that swept the world at the turn of the 20th century. Nick Robins-Early surveys how Trump’s election has plunged the rest of the world into uncertainty over the future of America’s alliances and commitment to global institutions. Philippe Legrain fears that Trump’s “America First,” anti-globalist agenda will add further momentum to a world already sinking into disorder, stoking an intensified clash of civilizations with the Muslim-majority world, inciting confrontation if not violence with Hispanic immigrants and fostering global recession through trade protectionism. And that is not to speak of abandoning the Iran nuclear deal as well as unhinging the balance of power in East Asia and Europe if the U.S. backs away from its security alliances. None of these possibilities, he notes, are likely to be mitigated by a Republican-dominated Congress that arrived on Trump’s coattails. What is missing from these analyses is that Trump’s “America First” policy is willing to let go of the outdated post-World War II international institutions and alliances in a way that the establishment was never willing to do. Paradoxically, that opens the path for a long overdue revamping of the world order to accommodate the rise of the emerging economies, most notably China. The key is making the transition without creating a vacuum. It is encouraging that a top aide to Trump has already said that not joining the China-led Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank was a “strategic mistake” for the U.S. that the new administration would seek to correct. Writing from Mexico City, Homero Aridjis describes the mood across the border. “This is a political earthquake for the Mexican government that will require a massive overhaul of every aspect of the relationship between our two countries,” he says. Yet Aridjis also sees a “timid optimism.” It is not impossible, Aridjis muses, that Trump, a deal-maker, could come to terms with Mexico on both trade and immigration. A Trump presidency is surely bad news, though, for the fight against climate change, Kate Sheppard writes, since he has baldly stated in the past that he considers it is all “bullshit” and a “hoax.” Nick Visser reports on the anxiety the U.S. election has introduced at the U.N. climate conference in Morocco this week that is working out the details of implementing the historic Paris accord. UNESCO chief Irina Bokova makes the case for carrying the climate change battle to the classroom. “We need greener societies,” she writes. “To succeed, fundamentally, we need green citizens.” Carolyn Gregoire reports on a groundbreaking experiment in which “psychobiotics” use gut bacteria to treat mental illness. Finally, our Singularity series this week takes you on a virtual ride in a fully autonomous Tesla.  WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. CORRESPONDENTS: Sophia Jones in Istanbul. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera), Dileep Padgaonkar (Times of India) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khannaare Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

05 ноября 2016, 03:19

American Democracy's Downside Parallels China's 'Bad Emperor' Problem

Donald Trump, a xenophobe and liar with no governing experience, could become the leader of the world’s most powerful nation after next week’s American election. That prospect scares the living daylights out of people around the planet, as these comments from HuffPost’s international editions indicate.  That the vile campaign Trump waged could carry him so far calls into question even Winston Churchill’s withering assessment that, “democracy is the worst system devised by wit of man, except for all the others.” The hoary contention in basic civics texts that “anyone” can become president of the United States turns out, unfortunately, to be all too true. There has to be a better way for a globally consequential nation to choose its leaders. Something is profoundly wrong if spewing out insulting tweets can pave the way to the doorstep of the White House. In a provocative essay earlier this year in The WorldPost, Beijing-based philosopher Daniel Bell argued that the meritocratic features of China’s one-party system produce more competent leaders than the United States. No one gets anywhere near the top without first being tested through long years of governing a number of Chinese provinces, he notes, many of which are larger and more populous than most European states. Following that approach, China’s Communist Party Central Committee convened last week to discuss who to promote up the ranks so they are positioned well ahead of time to take on a future leadership role. As Choi Chi-yuk reports from Hong Kong, the rising star who has emerged as a potential successor to President Xi Jinping is the party chief of Xinjiang region, Chen Quanguo. Apparently, he distinguished himself in the eyes of party elders through his hard-line rule during five years at his previous post in Tibet, Chi-yuk says. This system of selection that assures continuity in governance has enabled the Middle Kingdom to rise out of mass poverty more rapidly than any society in history. On the obvious downside, the stress on maintaining stability also entails suppression of ethnic autonomy and the crackdown on civil society. The party conclave last week further elevated President Xi Jinping to the status of “core leader,” prompting many to fear that a new Mao-like strongman is in the making. Cheng Li and Zachary Balin caution against this conclusion. Xi remains bound, they insist, by the norms of collective leadership and prohibitions against “adulation” that would foster a cult of personality. Hopefully they are right. But Xi’s steady accumulation of authority exposes the Achilles’ heel of China’s system: the “bad emperor” problem that could arise from the lack of formally institutionalized checks on the top leader. That American democracy may be producing a calamitous president of its own through the opposite path of popular elections suggests both systems are in need of reform. To take up Churchill’s implicit challenge, the alternative governing arrangement overall would combine elements of meritocratic selection with popular elections. That would place the odds on choosing the best leaders while constraining their power. HuffPost Reporters Dana Liebelson and Matt Ferner point out that, win or lose, Trump’s campaign has stirred reactionary forces that won’t now easily be contained. “Trump has unleashed forces ― forces much bigger than he is ― that simply can’t be put back into the bottle,”  they quote Richard Spencer, head of the National Policy Institute, a white nationalist think tank, as saying. Steven Greenhouse doubts that Trump will be able to deliver on his simplistic promises to create new American jobs if he reaches the White House. “There is no miracle policy for creating or bringing back millions of jobs,” he writes. “It’s a long slog that will take innovation, investment, smart policy and hard work, lots of it.” Akbar Ahmed muses over the irony that Trump’s Islamophobia ended up casting a spotlight on the contributions American Muslims have made, helping to normalize their image as citizens instead of only being defined by their religion and the negative stereotypes that have come to be associated with it. In neighboring Canada, meanwhile, an anti-Islamophobia motion was passed. World Reporter Jesselyn Cook reviews the “anti-Trump” Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s first year in office and reports that, according to one recent poll, 2 out of 3 Canadians are satisfied with his leadership. Turning to the world’s hot conflict zones, Christian Borys reports from Marinka, Ukraine that some soldiers on the front lines of the battle against Russian-backed separatists are beginning to doubt their cause. WorldPost Middle East Correspondent Sophia Jones reports from Debaga Camp, Iraq that civilians fleeing the self-proclaimed Islamic State are ending up in prison-like detention while they await security screening. French philosopher Bernard-Henri Lévy gives a dispatch from the front lines of the assault on Mosul, where he has been encamped with Kurdish Peshmerga fighters. As the post-coup crackdown tension continues to grow, Turkey’s justice minister tells Ilgin Yorulmaz that the purge in his country is not “100 percent over,” and that he believes America will ultimately extradite exiled cleric Fethullah Gülen because, “the U.S. will not choose a terrorist over Turkey.” Writing from Sanaa, Yemen, Mercy Corps’ Maia Baldauf describes what it’s like to be an aid worker on the ground amidst relentless bombings and heartbreaking health crises. “The scale of the conflict,” she says, “is staggering.” But even then, she says, there’s moments of warmth and reconciliation that provide hope for a better future ― if the international community lends a greater hand.  Writing from Manila, Rommel Banlaoi discusses how Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte is pursuing a deliberate strategy of ambiguity toward both the U.S. and China in order to leverage the benefits of each for his country.  Looking at the history of kung fu in Africa, Eric Olander and Cobus van Staden explore in their podcast how the Hong Kong-produced films ― and Bruce Lee ― have made an impact on the continent in ways far greater than other Chinese media.  Peter Katona worries that the “limp global response” to the rapid spread of the Zika virus portends a global health crisis. Last week the United Nations voted to begin negotiations on a global nuclear weapons ban. To remind us of the peril, The Future of Life Institute’s Ariel Conn interviews two experts on the devastating impact of nuclear weapons. Anthony Pagden reviews philosopher Charles Taylor’s new book, “The Language Animal,” citing Taylor’s argument about how language is an “alive” and “flexible” tool that absorbs, expresses and “enframes” new experience. Taylor will receive the Berggruen Prize on Dec. 1 at the New York Public Library and engage in a conversation there with CNN’s Fareed Zakaria. Finally, our Singularity series this week projects that when humans finally get to Mars, they may find an environment much like an Antarctic winter. WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. CORRESPONDENTS: Sophia Jones in Istanbul. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera), Dileep Padgaonkar (Times of India) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khannaare Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

29 октября 2016, 02:26

Weekend Roundup: How to Curb the Mobocratic Algorithm of Social Media

Wael Ghonim is the internet activist who helped spawn the Arab Spring in Egypt with his Facebook posts. During those heady days in Cairo, as he explains in an interview with The WorldPost, Ghonim came to realize that, “the algorithmic structure of social media amplified and abetted the turn to mobocracy” because it is designed to bring together those with common passions and sympathies irrespective of whether the information they share is truth, rumor or lies. In our present moment, says Ghonim, “Donald Trump is the living example of the damage mobocratic algorithms can do to the democratic process.” The challenge has thus shifted, he says. “While once social media was seen as a liberating means to speak truth to power,” Ghonim argues, “now the issue is how to speak truth to social media.” Since “people will be as shallow as platforms allow them to be,” he explains, Ghonim proposes that the big social media companies focus on creating a “meritocratic algorithm” that rewards credible information and dialogue, not just the broadcast of “sensational content” to the like-minded. As Nick Robins-Early reports, the Pirate Party in Iceland may soon have the chance, at least in coalition, to test social media in governance. If the anti-establishment party is elected in this weekend’s vote, among the pledges they’ve made is to change the constitution to a crowdsourced document. In a short essay based on a recent speech in Beijing, I note the irony of how the U.S. election campaign has helped achieve some of China’s cherished strategic aims. “By saying America might cast off the burden of allies,” I write, “U.S. Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has already planted the long seeds of doubt among leaders in Japan, South Korea, the Philippines and elsewhere in Asia. Rodrigo Duterte, the Philippine president, likely only says what many are thinking when he questions American staying power and recognizes the need to forge a closer relationship with China.” I also note that opposition to the Trans-Pacific Partnership, or TPP ― by both Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and Trump – has derailed President Barack Obama’s “pivot” to Asia by challenging its central plank. Writing from Manila, Richard Javad Heydarian reflects on Duterte’s declaration during a state visit to Beijing earlier that he would “separate” from his country’s long reliance on the United States. “The Duterte administration is intent on transforming China from an embittered territorial rival into a partner for national development,” Heydarian says. Our Hong Kong partner, the South China Morning Post, reports that an official paper in China, The People’s Tribune, editorializes that “China needs a Mao-like strongman leader, and President Xi Jinping fits the bill.” Indeed, this week the Chinese Communist Party Central Committee elevated Xi to the status of a “core” leader.  Dean Obeidallah observes another irony of the American presidential campaign. The Trump attack on Khizr Khan – the father of an American Muslim soldier killed in battle – has turned Khan into a proud emblem of tolerance and diversity who now appears in a new video ad for Hillary Clinton. “As an American Muslim,” Obeidallah writes, “I shed tears watching this video because for once my community isn’t being equated with terrorism.” Turning to the ongoing refugee crisis, this photo essay documents what it was like as the French government closed down the famous “Jungle” refugee camp in Calais this week and began dispersing the residents throughout France. In the chaos of the closure, Willa Frej reports, “children as young as 6 are being turned away to sleep in the street.” She also reports that one of the last open routes for refugees to Europe — the Mediterranean sea between Libya and Italy — is one of the most treacherous. The senator-mayor of Beauvais-sur-Matha, France, Corinne Imbert, writes: “The humanitarian situation had become a dire concern of the highest priority. In that sense, the dismantling of the ‘Jungle’ is a good thing. But one must wonder how in France, the land of human rights, such a place could have thrived for so long.” Markus Berktold, the mayor of Seeg, a small village in Bavaria, writes about how his small community of 3,000 is helping refugees to integrate. From Lampedusa, Italy Angela Giuffrida profiles Pietro Bartolo, a 60-year old doctor who, for most of the last two decades, has been the only physician treating refugees and migrants on the island. Giuffrida recounts some of the many harrowing tales of rescue and desperation from Bartolo’s recent book, “Salt Tears.” As American-led airstrikes pound targets nearby as part of the assault on Mosul to dislodge the self-proclaimed Islamic State, WorldPost Middle East Correspondent Sophia Jones talks with some of the Christian families who took refuge from ISIS at the ancient Mar Mattai Monastery in Iraq. “We are so tired,” one middle-aged man tells her. “It’s always war, war, war.” Writing from Abuja, Nigeria, Mercy Corp’s Ghilda Chrabieh reports on “the unseen hunger crisis” now afflicting the same people who survived the terror of militant group Boko Haram. Tom Saater documents the “humanitarian catastrophe” emerging there with striking photos from the ground. Margaret Levi looks back at the prescient thinking of Rosa Luxembourg, who, in her book “Accumulation of Capital,” theorized at the turn of the 20th century about globalization and the downward pressure on wages from technological innovation.  In a beautifully written essay, Calvin College’s James K.A. Smith recounts how his millennial students found their “’hitchhiker’s guide’ to a secular age” in the works of philosopher Charles Taylor, who was recently awarded the Berggruen Prize. In the essay Smith quotes novelist Julian Barnes as saying, “I don’t believe in God, but I miss Him.” And he says that Taylor’s meditations on secularism suggest to those pondering a leap of faith that it is, “better to pray in the ruins than settle for disenchantment.” Nick Visser reports that the long-sought transition to renewable energy is well underway. In 2015, he writes, “more than half of all of energy generation capacity added came from renewable sources.”  The Future of Life Institute’s Ariel Conn details a conference at New York University that explored, “the ethical questions behind artificial intelligence.” “Though most people involved in the field of artificial intelligence are excited about its development,” she writes, “many worry that without proper planning an advanced AI could destroy all of humanity.” Finally, Singularity this week looks at the impact of digital technology in the workplace. “While many focus on a massively automated future,” Raya Bidshahri explains, “technology has been changing the nature of work for years. Widespread connectivity and computing are rapidly decentralizing the workforce.” WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. CORRESPONDENTS: Sophia Jones in Istanbul. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera), Dileep Padgaonkar (Times of India) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khannaare Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

22 октября 2016, 17:25

Самые скромные мировые политики оказались в большом почете

Скромность не порок, она лишь украшает человека. В современном мире, в котором за деньги, кажется, можно купить всё, особенно ценятся люди, не поддающиеся «финансовому монстру». Для них все эти бумажки – так, мелочь, ведь счастья-то за них не приобретешь. Но особенно приятно наблюдать за личностями, которые в силу своего статуса могут позволить роскошную жизнь в каком-нибудь дорогущем особняке, целый гараж раритетных автомобилей и еще множество различных атрибутов богачей. Предлагаю вспомнить тех лидеров, президентов, чьей скромности можно только позавидовать.

18 октября 2016, 23:20

Самые скромные мировые политики оказались в большом почете

Скромность не порок, она лишь украшает человека. В современном мире, в котором за деньги, кажется, можно купить всё, особенно ценятся люди, не поддающиеся «финансовому монстру». Для них все эти бумажки – так, мелочь, ведь счастья-то за них не приобретешь. Но особенно приятно наблюдать за личностями, которые в силу своего статуса могут позволить роскошную жизнь в каком-нибудь дорогущем особняке, целый гараж раритетных автомобилей и еще множество различных атрибутов богачей. Предлагаю вспомнить тех лидеров, президентов, чьей скромности можно только позавидовать. Кичиться своим богатством, своим капиталом, в конце концов, мериться «золотыми горами» в высшем обществе всегда было и будет признаком плохого воспитания, дурного тона. А если этим занимается еще и лидер той или иной страны, то, к гадалке не ходи, понятно, какое к нему отношение сложится у простого народа. Быть ближе к стране, быть наравне с простым среднестатистическим гражданином для некоторых состоятельных и, по большому счету, не нуждающихся ни в чем личностей, сложно. Но, как показывает практика, «сложно, но можно». «Бедный» Бильбо Бэггинс На протяжении уже очень долгого времени это доказывал бывший президент Уругвая Хосе Альберто Мухика Кордано, жизнью которого одновременно и поражаешься, и восхищаешься. Есть к чему стремиться и у кого поучиться наслаждаться жизнью без всего этого денежного груза некоторым купающимся в «золоте» политикам. Путь его на президентский пост был тяжел и тернист: в свое время он даже провел в тюрьме 14 лет за свои леворадикальные партизанские «наклонности», затем три года, начиная с 2005 года, занимал пост Министра скотоводства, земледелия и рыболовства Уругвая, после этой недолгой карьеры Мухика стал сенатором. И, наконец, в 2010 году, получив большее количество голосов, чем его основной конкурент на пост президента страны, стал лидером Уругвая. Казалось бы, человек проделал такой долгий путь, такой сложный, что можно было бы немного и расслабиться на посту – жить в свое удовольствие, конечно же, выполняя свои основные обязанности президента. Но Мухика особо не соблазняли все эти богатства, вообще, в принципе, та популярность и известность, что он приобрел. Его интересовала исключительно служба народу, работа во благо страны. За свою скромность и вообще образ жизни в народе его так и прозвали «самым бедным президентом» («el presidente más pobre»). Все дело в том, что Мухика практически всю свою президентскую зарплату жертвовал на благотворительность, – из получаемых ежемесячно $12,5 тыс. себе он оставлял на жизнь лишь $1,25 тыс., которых, как уверял сам президент Уругвая, ему на жизнь вполне хватало. По данным на 2015 год, всего на жилищную программу Мухика направлял около $400 тыс., остальные деньги стали взносами в фонд правящей партии «Широкий фронт».  К слову, супруга Мухика, Лусия Тополански, часть своих доходов тоже жертвовала на благотворительность. Жизнь и быт уругвайского лидера была ничем непримечательна. Про него можно было с легкостью сказать, «все, как у обычных людей». Сельский дом на ферме в Монтевидео, колодец во дворе, откуда семья брала воду для домашнего хозяйства. Никаких прислуг, никаких носильщиков – глава семьи сам носил воду из колодца, а жена выращивает цветы на продажу. Фото: wsinform.com Конечно, Мухика мог жить и не «тужить» в официальной резиденции под охраной десятков телохранителей, с прислугой, но вместо этого он с женой предпочел остаться в своей родовой ферме. Если же говорить о самой дорогой покупке, которую когда-либо совершал Мухика, то за $1945 он приобрел «Фольксваген Жук» 1987 года выпуска. Никаких счетов в банке, никаких долгов – все это характеризовало жизнь президента Уругвая. Деньги не играли большой роли, не приносили особой радости, были лишь средством для скромной и тихой жизни. Настоящее счастье и удовольствие Мухика получал во время общения со своей собакой Мануэлой. Президент с большой буквы, чистого сердца, широкой души и безграничной щедрости. Про него до сих пор пишут очень много, говорят о нем. Мухикой действительно восхищаются, отмечая, что он добровольно живет в бедности, тем самым демонстрируя, что и политики могут жить просто, без лишней помпезности, глянца и шика. «Я так живу всю жизнь, – говорит Мухика, сидя в своем саду на старом стуле. На стуле подушка, которую облюбовала собака Мануэла.– Я очень хорошо живу с тем, что у меня есть. Меня называют самым бедным президентом, но я себя бедным не чувствую. Бедные – это те, кто работают только для того, чтобы жить в роскоши. Им все время хочется все больше и больше». The Guardian даже сравнивал Мухика с героем Бильбо Бэггинсом из романа-эпопеи Толкина «Властелин Колец» за его внешний вид: неэлегантный престарелый человек с кустистыми бровями, в поношенной одежде и старой обуви, который живет в своем скромном домике. Однако при всем при этом, то тепло вкупе с некой вздорностью, что исходила от уругвайского лидера, завораживала и, конечно же, располагала к нему. По последней декларации доходов, у семьи Мухика насчитывался один дом, два старых автомобиля «Фольксваген» и три трактора. Общее состояние составило всего $200 тыс. Вот и все, не так уж и много для счастья нужно в жизни. Им нужнее Немало скандалов было вокруг президента Парагвая Орасио Картеса, который занял свой пост в 2013 году. Однако, все это, кажется, осталось в прошлом, в далеком и не таком уж «светлом». Сейчас парагвайский лидер ведет абсолютно другую жизнь, правильную. Стоило ему только вступить в свою должность, как он тут же заявил, что отказывается от положенной ему президентской заработной платы, размер которой составляет порядка $10 тыс. Жалование будет пожертвовано детям, у которых нет крыши над головой, и тем, кто неизлечимо, увы, болен – в приют при церковном приходе Святого Рафаэля.Фото: tr.sputniknews.com Помимо того, что он делал доброе дело, выполнил первое обещание, что давал во время предвыборной гонки, он еще и себе обеспечил счастливую жизнь. По словам Картеса, деньги, что причитаются ему, должны достаться людям, которые «действительно в них нуждаются». В принципе, этот отказ особо-то не сказался на финансовом положении президента, ведь он – один из самых богатых людей Парагвая – в его владении 25 крупных компаний, большая часть из которых занимается производством табака, напитков и продуктов питания. Однако сам факт того, что президент принял такое решение в пользу нуждающихся, не может не восхищать. От своих зарплат отказывались, если не полностью, то частично, немало политических лидеров. К примеру, в 2009 году президент Литвы Даля Грибаускайте заявила, что ей будет вполне хватать половины положенного ей жалования, – вторая половина пойдет в казну государства. А в 2013 году президент Кипра Никос Анастасиадис самолично урезал себе размер заработной платы на 25%. На тот момент страна переживала огромные трудности финансового характера (банки разорялись, страна погрязла в кредитах, дефолт «дышал» в спину), понимая это, киприотский лидер и принял данное решение о сокращении своего жалования. И с кризисом сталкивалось немало стран. В 2012 году президент Греции Каролос Папульяс отказался от зарплаты с той целью, чтобы поддержать свое государство в столь сложное время. В 2014 году новоизбранный президент Словакии Андрей Киска решил отказаться от получения заработной платы на весь срок пребывания на посту главы государства. Население, конечно же, оценило поступок основателя некоммерческого фонда «Добрый Ангел», который помогает детям с онкологическими заболеваниями, отметив, что именно так и должен поступать человек, бескорыстно служащий родине.Фото: www.ibtimes.co.in Япония также может гордиться своими политиками. В 2011 году было принято решение сократить свою зарплату на 30% премьер-министром страны Йосихико Нода («вырученные» средства пойдут в бюджет страны, а это порядка $10 тыс.). Все дело в том, что в последующие 10 лет страну ожидало повышение налогов, за счет которых будет финансироваться восстановление регионов, пострадавших и разрушенных землетрясениями и цунами. Столь радикальные меры нужны были, чтобы сограждане отнеслись с пониманием к этим действительно необходимым повышениям. До Нода на посту премьер-министра находился Наото Кан, который после трагедии на АЭС «Фукусима-1» вообще отказался от своей зарплаты в пользу государственной казны до тех пор, пока ситуацию не урегулируют, ликвидируя все последствия. Сумма составила $20 тыс. (жалование премьер-министра) плюс $10 тыс. (зарплата депутата). Однако политик был вынужден уйти в отставку, но после себя он оставил стране в сумме около $160 тыс. Всяческие государственные неприятности подталкивали немало политиков отказаться от своих «кровно заработанных» средств. В 2011 году госдолг Италии неумолимо рос, на тот момент составив 2 трлн Евро. Чтобы поддержать граждан, премьер-министр Марио Монти отказался от зарплаты – около 18 тыс. евро. Отличились и российские политики. В 2013 году губернатор Тульской области Владимир Груздев отказался полностью от заработанных за год (!) средств на занимаемом посту в пользу инвалидов и регионального фонда возрождения культурного наследия «Тульский кремль». В месяц Груздев получал 48,1 тыс. руб., то есть на благотворительность ушло более 570 тыс. руб. Скромнее надо быть, скромнее История навсегда запомнит президента Венесуэлы Уго Чавеса, которого считали, вместе с Мухикой, одним из самых бедных мировых лидеров планеты. Он, точно также как и его коллега и друг, владел недорогим и простеньким автомобилем «Фольксваген Жук», который Чавес очень любил, пусть возраст машины и не был маленьким. К слову, Мухика неоднократно называл венесуэльского лидера «самым щедрым правителем». Пусть личность Чавеса была противоречивой, однако, по словам президента Уругвая, «для бедных из жизни ушел борец и романтик».Фото: niceimage.ru Возможно, о следующем лидере никто никогда и не слышал, однако о нем нельзя не упомянуть, ведь его образ жизни по праву называют честным и правильным. Итак, президент забытой Богом маленькой страны Буркина-Фасо Томас Исидом Санкара. Само название этого государства переводится с языка мооре, как «страна честных людей», и ему соответствовал этот лидер, что променял все свои блага на процветание Буркина-Фасо. На первом месте у него стояли ценности высшего порядка, за что его уважали, чем он отличался от многих африканских тиранов и диктаторов. На своей должности он не стал наживаться, но мог. Просто не было желания, не было такой цели. Что касается его имущества, то хвастаться было особо нечем: автомобиль «Пежо» (его приобрел молодой человек еще до прихода к власти), холодильник, морозильная камера в котором не работала, три гитары и четыре велосипеда. Положенную зарплату президент жертвовал в фонд помощи детям, которые были лишены семьи. Быт лидера был действительно очень скромным и даже бедным. Он даже не мог позволить себе кондиционер, без которого, кажется, прожить в такой жаркой стране, как Буркина-Фасо, просто нереально. Для Санкары это было роскошью. Страна жила крайне бедно, и Томасу было просто стыдно жить не так, как все. Многие политики стараются вести себя как все, как обычные граждане, особо не выделяясь. Их можно спокойно встретить в самолете в эконом-классе, продуктовых магазинах, магазинах одежды (экс-президент Финляндии Тарья Халонен), можно оказаться от известного политика в нескольких метрах, (бывший премьер-министр Великобритании Дэвид Кэмерон), который всю дорогу будет жевать чипсы с паприкой. Некоторые лидеры не скрывают своих домашних адресов, как, например, канцлер Германии Ангела Меркель, чей дом известен каждому. Далеко не все перебираются в роскошные резиденции, становясь президентом. Не сделал этого и латвийский лидер Раймонд Вейонис, о котором соседи очень хорошо отзываются. Сажает деревья, принимает участие в субботниках, в общем, все как у людей. «Да, наш сосед теперь президент, но главное — человек хороший. У меня однажды кран протёк — вода течёт, ну куда я пойду? Смотрю, он во дворе у машины. Говорит, сейчас зайду всё сделаю — зашёл и сделал. Ну, очень человечный он».Фото: news.rusrek.com Понятное дело, что многие из этих политиков особо не нуждаются в деньгах – их жизни обеспечены, и потратить какую-нибудь тысячу долларов не представляется сложным, да и вообще, эта сумма ничего особо не значит для них. Но для народа важно и это, он должен понимать, что их президент, их лидер, которого они выбрали, простой, понимающий и главное – «свой». Быть ближе к людям есть залог успешного президента, у которого будет самое важное – признание и уважение своей страны. Когда-то лидер курдской Демократической партии народов Селахатын Демитраш сказал очень правильные слова по поводу бедности политиков. Он назвал президента Турции самым бедным в мире среди своих коллег, ведь он лишен главного – любви народа. А без нее, как ни крути, действительно далеко не уедешь.