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Марио Монти
03 декабря, 00:40

Weekend Roundup: Populists Grow Stronger Once in Power

Populists, caudillos and strongmen in power don’t fail at the outset, they gain strength. That is because their personalist rule delivers up front to the constituencies that brought them to the top, often challenging bothersome institutional constraints along the way. They worry about the consequences later. The real troubles begin when the consequences arrive, revealing how the short term has eaten the long term. Then the bad overtakes the good. As the classicist Phillip Freeman has written in The WorldPost, this has been true going back to Clodius in the Roman republic, whose popularity soared as he handed out free grain to the plebeians. But the divisive character of his mercurial rule drove the republic to the point of civil war and opened the way for the dictatorship of Caesar to restore order. In the 1950s in Argentina, Juan and Eva Peron fostered many programs to elevate the poor descamisados (shirtless ones) until corruption, debt and inflation overwhelmed any gains and the military ultimately stepped in to stem the chaos. In Venezuela, Hugo Chavez unquestionably lifted the welfare of the poor the elites had ignored through programs like misiones sociales, but in the end squandered immense oil resources, became heavily indebted to China and whose policies now, under the rule of his successor Nicolás Maduro, have ignited 500 percent, if not more, inflation. Store shelves are empty, medicines are scarce, daily protests fill the streets and citizens that see little hope are fleeing economic collapse by the boatload.  This pattern also fits Fidel Castro. Though he arrived in power by the bullet instead of the ballot, his rallying cry was populist, nationalist and above all, personalist. He accomplished near universal literacy and free health care for all in that tiny Caribbean island. In the end, though, his caudillo-like rule crushed dissent and personal liberties while his Soviet-style economy, abetted by the U.S. blockade, drove the nation into an impoverished cul-de-sac. History has not absolved Castro or any of the others who took the populist path to power. Whether Donald Trump fits this pattern, as former Mexican President Vicente Fox argues, remains to be seen. As president-elect, Trump has claimed to have saved some 800 to 1,000 jobs in Indiana from moving to Mexico. His pledge of a $1 trillion dollar infrastructure surge has so far helped boost the stock market and will surely create significant new employment with far reaching multiplier effects if it comes to pass.  Since no populist politician has ever before occupied the top office of the world’s most powerful nation in modern times, we don’t know what to expect. America is a profoundly pluralist and ethnically diverse society bound by constitutional constraints more hallowed than elsewhere. This context bears little resemblance to where populism has been empowered before. The flashing red light that cannot escape concern, however, is the very personalist style of operation that brought Donald Trump to power through scapegoating invective against the outside world and perceived enemies within. If troubles appear later on, will he revert to the path that brought him to where he is or abide by the norms of civility and restraint that have limited the authority of every previous American president? All who want America to succeed are obliged to give Trump the benefit of the doubt for now since the democratic ballot box has put him in the White House. But that red light needs to remain flashing every step of the way.  Emily Peck contends that Donald Trump has “his eye on the wrong ball” by blaming trade for job losses. As true as that may have been in the past, the real threat of job displacement in the future, she writes, comes from Amazon’s takeover of the economy. Ryszard Petru and Guy Verhofstadt, the European Union’s top negotiator on Brexit, take on the populist wave heading to the European continent in the wake of Trump’s victory in the America. “One of the greatest delusions spread by populists on both the left and right,” they argue, “is that turning inwards will empower us. The reality is that in an inter-connected world, no one European country can influence global trade rules. And make no mistake: if we abandon shaping the environment around us, others will shape us.” Writing from Paris, Anne Sinclair worries that “the political future of France has never been more uncertain.” “Time will reveal,” she writes, “if Marine Le Pen will be able to cause the greatest political earthquake in France since the Liberation.” Following Fidel’s death at 90 last week, several contributions evaluate his life and times. Mark Beeson looks as the triumphs and failures of the Cuban revolution in the context of the struggle against inequality across Latin America. Michelle Manning Barish brings a personal family perspective to the Cuban experience. She warns against romanticizing the Cuban revolution, writing that, “the only people who know the real history of Castro in Cuba are the ones who lived it.” Based on recent conversations in Havana, Abraham Lowenthal cautions that a post-Castro Cuba is not likely to change quickly as a result of the Obama opening – and certainly not if Trump reverses course once in office.  In other global matters, Sam Stein and Jessica Schulberg report from Washington that foreign policy experts are lining up to press the incoming Trump administration to keep the Iran nuclear deal or risk a nuclear arms race in the Mideast. Former British Prime Minister Gordon Brown calls for an international investigation of the Russian-Syrian role in the deadly bombing of a school in the village of Haas which killed dozens of people, mostly children.  Eric Olander and Cobus van Staden report on how Rwanda is positioning itself as a hub for Chinese investment in Africa. Jeffie Lam of our South China Morning Post partner reports on the rise and fall of the independence movement in Hong Kong. Earlier in the week, the Post reported that Chris Patten, the last British governor of Hong Kong, told journalists that calls for independence should not be confused with the struggle for greater democracy, which he supports. Writing from Perth, Australia Helen Clark reports that Vietnam is looking to the combined weight of the Association of East Asian Nations, or ASEAN, as a way for smaller nations in the region to protect and promote their interests as the U.S. and China battle for influence. Stefano Baldolini writes from Italy that a “no” outcome of the referendum this weekend over key constitutional reforms that diminish the role of the Italian Senate and give more power to the prime minister could spark a new round of instability across Europe.  India is rapidly joining the renewable revolution. Elyse Wanshel reports that India has built the world’s largest solar plant in eight months, and it generates enough power for 150,000 homes.  The news is not so good elsewhere. Ryan Grenoble reports that, “There’s substantially less sea ice in the world than ever before. The Arctic ― and, for completely unrelated reasons, the Antarctic ― just closed out November with less ice than any other year in history.”  There is joy in life if you lighten up and let God’s mercy in. That is the takeaway, Carol Kuruvilla writes, for Pope Francis from his favorite film, “Babette’s Feast.” The film depicts an austere Protestant town of joyless inhabitants disrupted by a generous French cook in exile who brings them all together in happy fellowship around a meticulously prepared meal. Writing from Istanbul, novelist Kaya Genc describes how the ongoing political chaos in Turkey is re-energizing the arts scene. “Young Turks,” he writes, are “turning to art in trouble times.” Finally, our Singularity series this week examines the global contest, especially between the U.S. and China, over the most powerful supercomputer. The key to the prize, writes Peter Rejcek, is smart architecture, not speed. WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. CORRESPONDENTS: Sophia Jones in Istanbul. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera), Dileep Padgaonkar (Times of India) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khannaare Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

02 декабря, 09:08

Евросоюз теряет Италию

Провал референдума 4 декабря может привести к власти евроскептиков

27 ноября, 14:58

Берлускони допустил возможность выдвижения своей кандидатуры на выборах в Италии

Бывший премьер-министр Италии Сильвио Берлускони не исключил возможности, что сможет вновь выдвигать свою кандидатуру на выборах, об этом 80-летний политик заявил в интервью газете Messaggero, уточнив, что ожидает «справедливого решения» Европейского суда в Страсбурге. «Страсбург должен вынести вердикт. Я убежден, что будет совершенно однозначно установлено, что я не виновен ни в каком уходе от налогов. Тогда я смогу вновь баллотироваться, и правому центру не придется искать нового лидера», – приводит его слова ТАСС. Страсбургский суд рассматривает ходатайство адвокатов Берлускони, требующего отменить окончательный приговор итальянского Кассационного суда, согласно которому политик был в августе 2013 года признан виновным в финансовом мошенничестве и создании теневых фондов в его компании «Медиасет» и приговорен к четырем (сокращенным до года по амнистии) годам тюрьмы. В виду преклонного возраста обвиняемого отбывание срока за решеткой было заменено на общественно-полезные работы. В течение года Берлускони раз в неделю на протяжении четырех часов работал в доме престарелых. Окончательный приговор, согласно последним поправкам к законодательству, принятым во время правления технического правительства Марио Монти (пришедшего на смену кабинету подавшего в отставку в конце 2011 года Берлускони), лишил экс-премьера возможности участвовать в выборах и занимать государственные посты сроком, вдвое превышающем срок приговора (то есть восемь лет). Более того, после приговора Берлускони был исключен из сената (верхней палаты парламента), куда был избран в феврале 2013 года. 4 декабря в Италии пройдет всенародный референдум по вопросу о конституционной реформе, которая предусматривает внесение ряд изменений в основной закон страны. Основным разработчиком и сторонником этой реформы выступает нынешний глава правительства, секретарь левоцентристской Демократической партии (ДП) Маттео Ренци. В случае если инициатива премьера поддержана не будет, не исключено, что ему придется подать в отставку. Во всяком случае на этом будет настаивать вся оппозиция, в которую входит партия Берлускони «Вперед, Италия». Сам Берлускони ведет активную агитационную кампанию против реформы и призывает итальянцев отклонить ее, называя предложения Ренци антидемократическими. Экс-премьер в июле перенес серьезную операцию на открытом сердце и до сих пор проходит медицинские обследования. Кроме того, на место лидера правого центра претендует молодой глава партии «Лига Севера» (традиционно союзной с «Вперед, Италия») Маттео Сальвини, который также заявил о готовности баллотироваться в премьеры. В интервью Messaggero Берлускони подтвердил, что в случае поражения Ренци на референдуме его партия будет добиваться проведения досрочных выборов. Однако для этого необходимо сначала принять находящееся на стадии затянувшегося обсуждения новое избирательное законодательство, поскольку действующее было признано неконституционным.

19 ноября, 03:04

Weekend Roundup: Will Donald Trump End the New Cold War?

The irony of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump’s “America First” policy is that it could end the budding new Cold War that has been developing between the West and Russia and China. His non-ideological, deal-making approach, which doesn’t challenge how the Russians and Chinese govern themselves, promises to lessen tensions that have been getting dangerously out of control. That in turn would weaken the tie that binds those two nations ever closer together in growing hostility against the West. Writing from Moscow, Fyodor Lukyanov sees the end of an era arriving with Trump. “The main difference from the previous administration,” says Lukyanov, “is that the ideological promotion of democracy and a certain model of development, which provided the conceptual and axiological justification for America’s global presence, is being rolled back. Russia,” he continues,  “welcomes the return of pragmatism to international relations and the retreat of liberal ideology.” Also writing from Moscow, Vladimir Frolov concurs: “A liberal, normative world order underpinned by U.S. leadership, could be replaced with the ‘art of the geopolitical deal’ between the great powers.” Yet, he also feels “a palpable sense of apprehension within the Kremlin.” Anastasya Manuilova reports from Moscow that Russians are divided over Trump, with many doubting he will keep his pledge to mend ties with Russia. “How [can] Trump start a new relationship with Russia if now he has become the president of [a] country where half of the population vot[ed] for Clinton with her much more hostile attitude towards us?” Anna, a 25-year-old facilities manager from Moscow, told her. “He can’t just ignore all these people, especially if they already started protesting against him.” Former NATO commander James Stavridis puts Russia and Israel in the column of “winners” in a new Trump administration, with trade and the traditional security alliances as “losers.” Harvard’s Simon Saradzhyan and William Tobey caution against expectations of any big change in the U.S.-Russia relationship. They point out the many obstacles from worries over Russian ambitions in the Middle East to constraints on U.S. ballistic missile defense systems demanded by Moscow as a condition for reviving nuclear security cooperation. Though in the short term conflict with China over trade is likely, Chinese-American relations could improve over the longer term as well. “The Chinese prefer a relationship with a United States that doesn’t try to remake the world,” Eric X. Li wrote from Shanghai this week in The New York Times. “The Chinese know how to compete and can deal with competitors. What the Chinese have always resented and resisted is an America that imposes its values and standards on everybody else. Mr. Trump’s America is likely to break from this pattern. He has shown no desire to tell other countries how to do things.”   Such pragmatic accommodation in a vacuum, however, comes at an obvious price. As the philosopher Charles Taylor fears, absent a commensurate will from the U.S. to build and sustain a rules-based order that fosters global cooperation, the world will likely devolve into a series of spheres of influence reminiscent of the age of empire. In that fraught arrangement, Taylor told WorldPost advisory board member Dileep Padgaonkar, “Each side gives the other a ‘free hand’ in their ‘own’ sphere. Trump’s version of ‘America First’ seems to imply not needing to placate allies. This in turn will add lustre to an internal politics of discrimination and exclusion. It may easily go along with scrapping international treaties, like the Paris accords on climate change.”  Writing from Stockholm, Goran Rosenberg agrees with Pope Francis that the vilification of others Trump has regularly practiced is itself a form of terrorism. “Every human being is capable of turning into a terrorist simply by just abusing language,” he quotes the pope saying in a recent interview in a Swedish publication. “You see,” the pope continues, “I am not speaking here about fighting a battle as in a war. I am speaking of a deceitful and hidden form of terrorism that uses words as bombs that explode, causing devastation in peoples’ lives. It is a sort of criminality and the root of it is original sin. It is a way of creating space for yourself by destroying others.” Rosenberg fears that Trump’s example encourages the darkest forces in Europe that are gaining ground every day. “Trump’s victorious election campaign,” he writes, “has poisoned the political climate of liberal democracies. We have been shown that defamation, hatred and lying can be a road to power.”  Writing from India, Sandip Roy makes the same point from the other side of the planet, likening Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi to Trump. “It’s not about Donald Trump,” he writes, “it’s about those he emboldens. It’s about those who bully in his name. And this is an issue we understand firsthand in India. A Narendra Modi in office chooses his words carefully, gives lofty high-minded speeches, talks about vikaas and Constitution. But those who are emboldened in his name are the ones who tell critics to ‘go to Pakistan.’” The appointment by Donald Trump of Steve Bannon as a key strategist only confirms Dean Obeidallah’s worst fear that Islamophobic bigotry has a place in the White House and that not enough media outlets are concerned about this part of the man’s troubling reality. Indeed, in a piece with her New York-based brother Paul Vale, Katherine Linzy of Louisville, Ky. says the anti-Muslim sentiments in places like her “solid red” town are exacerbated by some far-right voices in media. “Rural Kentuckians may go their entire lives without meeting a Muslim, but they’ve all been told radical Islam is coming to wipe them out,” she explains. “With media fear mongering as their only reference, prejudice is unsurprising, but it’s directed at nebulous groups not individuals; the same people who worry about radical Islam would be genuinely warm and welcoming if I brought a Muslim friend round for dinner.” Michael Dobson acknowledges the gauntlet thrown down by President-elect Trump, who once said he will “cancel” the Paris climate accord. Calling for resistance, Dobson writes that this is, “a moment of moral reckoning for the American people, one as profound as that of the Vietnam War or the conquest of Europe by fascism.” Carl Pope, former head of the Sierra Club, says cities globally can take up much of the battle on climate change through building out climate-friendly infrastructure. But that, he says, will take “financial creativity” to execute and fund.  A BuzzFeed News analysis of election coverage released this week came to an astonishing conclusion: “Top fake election news stories generated more total engagement on Facebook than top election stories from 19 major news outlets combined.” Sebastian Murdock reports on the baby steps Twitter and Google have taken to cull out fake information. Tucker Davey details how cybersecurity can get a boost from machine learning. Finally, our Singularity series this week looks at ominous new technology that makes media manipulation easy by enabling the rearrangement of words and phrases, or the invention of new phrases with the same voice pattern from something never actually spoken. WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. CORRESPONDENTS: Sophia Jones in Istanbul. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera), Dileep Padgaonkar (Times of India) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khannaare Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

12 ноября, 04:45

Weekend Roundup: Democracy Disrupts Itself

When unresponsive elites forsake the common folk in governing systems anchored in popular sovereignty, demagogues who fashion themselves as tribunes of the people ride the rage to power and wreck it all. As the classicist Philip Freeman observes, that has been the pattern going back more than two millennia to the demise of the Roman republic. So, too, he writes, Donald Trump’s victory could well mark the beginning of the end of the American republic.  The decay of democracy in the United States over recent decades has produced the worst of both worlds. Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton embodied an insider establishment captured by the big-money politics of organized special interests. Out of touch inside its smug bubble, her campaign failed to grasp the anger and resentment of the excluded. As Krystal Ball unsparingly writes, “the Democratic Party deserved to die.” Taking a page from the rise of fascism in Europe, Republican nominee Donald Trump poisonously exploited the very real travails of the left behind by blaming it all on the world outside and enemies within. Realizing the worst fears of the American Founding Fathers, the democratic ballot box has now unleashed the darkest forces within the body politic. A populist charlatan will soon take up residence in the White House. Trump’s triumph is not just the turn of another electoral cycle. It reveals a systemic crisis of American democracy. Without reinvigorated institutions and practices that temper passions while embracing diversity and engaging those who have been abandoned, the “Great Reaction” could endure for a long while. Just because Trump won the election, Dean Obeidallah says, the hatred and bigotry he spewed in the campaign cannot simply be absolved and forgotten. Based on their research, psychologists Michele Gelfand and Joshua Conrad Jackson report that, “the strongest Trump supporters were those who felt that America was under grave threat and believed that the country needed tighter rules and less tolerance toward anyone who seemed ‘un-American.’” Howard Fineman points out the paradox that, “Trump ran and won as a change agent who promised to restore the past.” Yet, as he also observes, “a new America will continue to develop; demographics and technology make it inevitable.” Because the U.S. is the leading global power, former Swedish Prime Minister Carl Bildt sees the “Great Reaction” reverberating around the planet, weakening the liberal order rooted in tolerance and openness and strengthening those lured by the siren of xenophobia and closed societies. Thomas Weber worries that we are witnessing an erosion of liberal democracy across the West by the kind of revolutionary upheavals that swept the world at the turn of the 20th century. Nick Robins-Early surveys how Trump’s election has plunged the rest of the world into uncertainty over the future of America’s alliances and commitment to global institutions. Philippe Legrain fears that Trump’s “America First,” anti-globalist agenda will add further momentum to a world already sinking into disorder, stoking an intensified clash of civilizations with the Muslim-majority world, inciting confrontation if not violence with Hispanic immigrants and fostering global recession through trade protectionism. And that is not to speak of abandoning the Iran nuclear deal as well as unhinging the balance of power in East Asia and Europe if the U.S. backs away from its security alliances. None of these possibilities, he notes, are likely to be mitigated by a Republican-dominated Congress that arrived on Trump’s coattails. What is missing from these analyses is that Trump’s “America First” policy is willing to let go of the outdated post-World War II international institutions and alliances in a way that the establishment was never willing to do. Paradoxically, that opens the path for a long overdue revamping of the world order to accommodate the rise of the emerging economies, most notably China. The key is making the transition without creating a vacuum. It is encouraging that a top aide to Trump has already said that not joining the China-led Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank was a “strategic mistake” for the U.S. that the new administration would seek to correct. Writing from Mexico City, Homero Aridjis describes the mood across the border. “This is a political earthquake for the Mexican government that will require a massive overhaul of every aspect of the relationship between our two countries,” he says. Yet Aridjis also sees a “timid optimism.” It is not impossible, Aridjis muses, that Trump, a deal-maker, could come to terms with Mexico on both trade and immigration. A Trump presidency is surely bad news, though, for the fight against climate change, Kate Sheppard writes, since he has baldly stated in the past that he considers it is all “bullshit” and a “hoax.” Nick Visser reports on the anxiety the U.S. election has introduced at the U.N. climate conference in Morocco this week that is working out the details of implementing the historic Paris accord. UNESCO chief Irina Bokova makes the case for carrying the climate change battle to the classroom. “We need greener societies,” she writes. “To succeed, fundamentally, we need green citizens.” Carolyn Gregoire reports on a groundbreaking experiment in which “psychobiotics” use gut bacteria to treat mental illness. Finally, our Singularity series this week takes you on a virtual ride in a fully autonomous Tesla.  WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. CORRESPONDENTS: Sophia Jones in Istanbul. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera), Dileep Padgaonkar (Times of India) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khannaare Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

05 ноября, 03:19

American Democracy's Downside Parallels China's 'Bad Emperor' Problem

Donald Trump, a xenophobe and liar with no governing experience, could become the leader of the world’s most powerful nation after next week’s American election. That prospect scares the living daylights out of people around the planet, as these comments from HuffPost’s international editions indicate.  That the vile campaign Trump waged could carry him so far calls into question even Winston Churchill’s withering assessment that, “democracy is the worst system devised by wit of man, except for all the others.” The hoary contention in basic civics texts that “anyone” can become president of the United States turns out, unfortunately, to be all too true. There has to be a better way for a globally consequential nation to choose its leaders. Something is profoundly wrong if spewing out insulting tweets can pave the way to the doorstep of the White House. In a provocative essay earlier this year in The WorldPost, Beijing-based philosopher Daniel Bell argued that the meritocratic features of China’s one-party system produce more competent leaders than the United States. No one gets anywhere near the top without first being tested through long years of governing a number of Chinese provinces, he notes, many of which are larger and more populous than most European states. Following that approach, China’s Communist Party Central Committee convened last week to discuss who to promote up the ranks so they are positioned well ahead of time to take on a future leadership role. As Choi Chi-yuk reports from Hong Kong, the rising star who has emerged as a potential successor to President Xi Jinping is the party chief of Xinjiang region, Chen Quanguo. Apparently, he distinguished himself in the eyes of party elders through his hard-line rule during five years at his previous post in Tibet, Chi-yuk says. This system of selection that assures continuity in governance has enabled the Middle Kingdom to rise out of mass poverty more rapidly than any society in history. On the obvious downside, the stress on maintaining stability also entails suppression of ethnic autonomy and the crackdown on civil society. The party conclave last week further elevated President Xi Jinping to the status of “core leader,” prompting many to fear that a new Mao-like strongman is in the making. Cheng Li and Zachary Balin caution against this conclusion. Xi remains bound, they insist, by the norms of collective leadership and prohibitions against “adulation” that would foster a cult of personality. Hopefully they are right. But Xi’s steady accumulation of authority exposes the Achilles’ heel of China’s system: the “bad emperor” problem that could arise from the lack of formally institutionalized checks on the top leader. That American democracy may be producing a calamitous president of its own through the opposite path of popular elections suggests both systems are in need of reform. To take up Churchill’s implicit challenge, the alternative governing arrangement overall would combine elements of meritocratic selection with popular elections. That would place the odds on choosing the best leaders while constraining their power. HuffPost Reporters Dana Liebelson and Matt Ferner point out that, win or lose, Trump’s campaign has stirred reactionary forces that won’t now easily be contained. “Trump has unleashed forces ― forces much bigger than he is ― that simply can’t be put back into the bottle,”  they quote Richard Spencer, head of the National Policy Institute, a white nationalist think tank, as saying. Steven Greenhouse doubts that Trump will be able to deliver on his simplistic promises to create new American jobs if he reaches the White House. “There is no miracle policy for creating or bringing back millions of jobs,” he writes. “It’s a long slog that will take innovation, investment, smart policy and hard work, lots of it.” Akbar Ahmed muses over the irony that Trump’s Islamophobia ended up casting a spotlight on the contributions American Muslims have made, helping to normalize their image as citizens instead of only being defined by their religion and the negative stereotypes that have come to be associated with it. In neighboring Canada, meanwhile, an anti-Islamophobia motion was passed. World Reporter Jesselyn Cook reviews the “anti-Trump” Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s first year in office and reports that, according to one recent poll, 2 out of 3 Canadians are satisfied with his leadership. Turning to the world’s hot conflict zones, Christian Borys reports from Marinka, Ukraine that some soldiers on the front lines of the battle against Russian-backed separatists are beginning to doubt their cause. WorldPost Middle East Correspondent Sophia Jones reports from Debaga Camp, Iraq that civilians fleeing the self-proclaimed Islamic State are ending up in prison-like detention while they await security screening. French philosopher Bernard-Henri Lévy gives a dispatch from the front lines of the assault on Mosul, where he has been encamped with Kurdish Peshmerga fighters. As the post-coup crackdown tension continues to grow, Turkey’s justice minister tells Ilgin Yorulmaz that the purge in his country is not “100 percent over,” and that he believes America will ultimately extradite exiled cleric Fethullah Gülen because, “the U.S. will not choose a terrorist over Turkey.” Writing from Sanaa, Yemen, Mercy Corps’ Maia Baldauf describes what it’s like to be an aid worker on the ground amidst relentless bombings and heartbreaking health crises. “The scale of the conflict,” she says, “is staggering.” But even then, she says, there’s moments of warmth and reconciliation that provide hope for a better future ― if the international community lends a greater hand.  Writing from Manila, Rommel Banlaoi discusses how Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte is pursuing a deliberate strategy of ambiguity toward both the U.S. and China in order to leverage the benefits of each for his country.  Looking at the history of kung fu in Africa, Eric Olander and Cobus van Staden explore in their podcast how the Hong Kong-produced films ― and Bruce Lee ― have made an impact on the continent in ways far greater than other Chinese media.  Peter Katona worries that the “limp global response” to the rapid spread of the Zika virus portends a global health crisis. Last week the United Nations voted to begin negotiations on a global nuclear weapons ban. To remind us of the peril, The Future of Life Institute’s Ariel Conn interviews two experts on the devastating impact of nuclear weapons. Anthony Pagden reviews philosopher Charles Taylor’s new book, “The Language Animal,” citing Taylor’s argument about how language is an “alive” and “flexible” tool that absorbs, expresses and “enframes” new experience. Taylor will receive the Berggruen Prize on Dec. 1 at the New York Public Library and engage in a conversation there with CNN’s Fareed Zakaria. Finally, our Singularity series this week projects that when humans finally get to Mars, they may find an environment much like an Antarctic winter. WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. CORRESPONDENTS: Sophia Jones in Istanbul. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera), Dileep Padgaonkar (Times of India) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khannaare Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

29 октября, 02:26

Weekend Roundup: How to Curb the Mobocratic Algorithm of Social Media

Wael Ghonim is the internet activist who helped spawn the Arab Spring in Egypt with his Facebook posts. During those heady days in Cairo, as he explains in an interview with The WorldPost, Ghonim came to realize that, “the algorithmic structure of social media amplified and abetted the turn to mobocracy” because it is designed to bring together those with common passions and sympathies irrespective of whether the information they share is truth, rumor or lies. In our present moment, says Ghonim, “Donald Trump is the living example of the damage mobocratic algorithms can do to the democratic process.” The challenge has thus shifted, he says. “While once social media was seen as a liberating means to speak truth to power,” Ghonim argues, “now the issue is how to speak truth to social media.” Since “people will be as shallow as platforms allow them to be,” he explains, Ghonim proposes that the big social media companies focus on creating a “meritocratic algorithm” that rewards credible information and dialogue, not just the broadcast of “sensational content” to the like-minded. As Nick Robins-Early reports, the Pirate Party in Iceland may soon have the chance, at least in coalition, to test social media in governance. If the anti-establishment party is elected in this weekend’s vote, among the pledges they’ve made is to change the constitution to a crowdsourced document. In a short essay based on a recent speech in Beijing, I note the irony of how the U.S. election campaign has helped achieve some of China’s cherished strategic aims. “By saying America might cast off the burden of allies,” I write, “U.S. Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has already planted the long seeds of doubt among leaders in Japan, South Korea, the Philippines and elsewhere in Asia. Rodrigo Duterte, the Philippine president, likely only says what many are thinking when he questions American staying power and recognizes the need to forge a closer relationship with China.” I also note that opposition to the Trans-Pacific Partnership, or TPP ― by both Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and Trump – has derailed President Barack Obama’s “pivot” to Asia by challenging its central plank. Writing from Manila, Richard Javad Heydarian reflects on Duterte’s declaration during a state visit to Beijing earlier that he would “separate” from his country’s long reliance on the United States. “The Duterte administration is intent on transforming China from an embittered territorial rival into a partner for national development,” Heydarian says. Our Hong Kong partner, the South China Morning Post, reports that an official paper in China, The People’s Tribune, editorializes that “China needs a Mao-like strongman leader, and President Xi Jinping fits the bill.” Indeed, this week the Chinese Communist Party Central Committee elevated Xi to the status of a “core” leader.  Dean Obeidallah observes another irony of the American presidential campaign. The Trump attack on Khizr Khan – the father of an American Muslim soldier killed in battle – has turned Khan into a proud emblem of tolerance and diversity who now appears in a new video ad for Hillary Clinton. “As an American Muslim,” Obeidallah writes, “I shed tears watching this video because for once my community isn’t being equated with terrorism.” Turning to the ongoing refugee crisis, this photo essay documents what it was like as the French government closed down the famous “Jungle” refugee camp in Calais this week and began dispersing the residents throughout France. In the chaos of the closure, Willa Frej reports, “children as young as 6 are being turned away to sleep in the street.” She also reports that one of the last open routes for refugees to Europe — the Mediterranean sea between Libya and Italy — is one of the most treacherous. The senator-mayor of Beauvais-sur-Matha, France, Corinne Imbert, writes: “The humanitarian situation had become a dire concern of the highest priority. In that sense, the dismantling of the ‘Jungle’ is a good thing. But one must wonder how in France, the land of human rights, such a place could have thrived for so long.” Markus Berktold, the mayor of Seeg, a small village in Bavaria, writes about how his small community of 3,000 is helping refugees to integrate. From Lampedusa, Italy Angela Giuffrida profiles Pietro Bartolo, a 60-year old doctor who, for most of the last two decades, has been the only physician treating refugees and migrants on the island. Giuffrida recounts some of the many harrowing tales of rescue and desperation from Bartolo’s recent book, “Salt Tears.” As American-led airstrikes pound targets nearby as part of the assault on Mosul to dislodge the self-proclaimed Islamic State, WorldPost Middle East Correspondent Sophia Jones talks with some of the Christian families who took refuge from ISIS at the ancient Mar Mattai Monastery in Iraq. “We are so tired,” one middle-aged man tells her. “It’s always war, war, war.” Writing from Abuja, Nigeria, Mercy Corp’s Ghilda Chrabieh reports on “the unseen hunger crisis” now afflicting the same people who survived the terror of militant group Boko Haram. Tom Saater documents the “humanitarian catastrophe” emerging there with striking photos from the ground. Margaret Levi looks back at the prescient thinking of Rosa Luxembourg, who, in her book “Accumulation of Capital,” theorized at the turn of the 20th century about globalization and the downward pressure on wages from technological innovation.  In a beautifully written essay, Calvin College’s James K.A. Smith recounts how his millennial students found their “’hitchhiker’s guide’ to a secular age” in the works of philosopher Charles Taylor, who was recently awarded the Berggruen Prize. In the essay Smith quotes novelist Julian Barnes as saying, “I don’t believe in God, but I miss Him.” And he says that Taylor’s meditations on secularism suggest to those pondering a leap of faith that it is, “better to pray in the ruins than settle for disenchantment.” Nick Visser reports that the long-sought transition to renewable energy is well underway. In 2015, he writes, “more than half of all of energy generation capacity added came from renewable sources.”  The Future of Life Institute’s Ariel Conn details a conference at New York University that explored, “the ethical questions behind artificial intelligence.” “Though most people involved in the field of artificial intelligence are excited about its development,” she writes, “many worry that without proper planning an advanced AI could destroy all of humanity.” Finally, Singularity this week looks at the impact of digital technology in the workplace. “While many focus on a massively automated future,” Raya Bidshahri explains, “technology has been changing the nature of work for years. Widespread connectivity and computing are rapidly decentralizing the workforce.” WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. CORRESPONDENTS: Sophia Jones in Istanbul. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera), Dileep Padgaonkar (Times of India) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khannaare Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

22 октября, 17:25

Самые скромные мировые политики оказались в большом почете

Скромность не порок, она лишь украшает человека. В современном мире, в котором за деньги, кажется, можно купить всё, особенно ценятся люди, не поддающиеся «финансовому монстру». Для них все эти бумажки – так, мелочь, ведь счастья-то за них не приобретешь. Но особенно приятно наблюдать за личностями, которые в силу своего статуса могут позволить роскошную жизнь в каком-нибудь дорогущем особняке, целый гараж раритетных автомобилей и еще множество различных атрибутов богачей. Предлагаю вспомнить тех лидеров, президентов, чьей скромности можно только позавидовать.

18 октября, 23:20

Самые скромные мировые политики оказались в большом почете

Скромность не порок, она лишь украшает человека. В современном мире, в котором за деньги, кажется, можно купить всё, особенно ценятся люди, не поддающиеся «финансовому монстру». Для них все эти бумажки – так, мелочь, ведь счастья-то за них не приобретешь. Но особенно приятно наблюдать за личностями, которые в силу своего статуса могут позволить роскошную жизнь в каком-нибудь дорогущем особняке, целый гараж раритетных автомобилей и еще множество различных атрибутов богачей. Предлагаю вспомнить тех лидеров, президентов, чьей скромности можно только позавидовать. Кичиться своим богатством, своим капиталом, в конце концов, мериться «золотыми горами» в высшем обществе всегда было и будет признаком плохого воспитания, дурного тона. А если этим занимается еще и лидер той или иной страны, то, к гадалке не ходи, понятно, какое к нему отношение сложится у простого народа. Быть ближе к стране, быть наравне с простым среднестатистическим гражданином для некоторых состоятельных и, по большому счету, не нуждающихся ни в чем личностей, сложно. Но, как показывает практика, «сложно, но можно». «Бедный» Бильбо Бэггинс На протяжении уже очень долгого времени это доказывал бывший президент Уругвая Хосе Альберто Мухика Кордано, жизнью которого одновременно и поражаешься, и восхищаешься. Есть к чему стремиться и у кого поучиться наслаждаться жизнью без всего этого денежного груза некоторым купающимся в «золоте» политикам. Путь его на президентский пост был тяжел и тернист: в свое время он даже провел в тюрьме 14 лет за свои леворадикальные партизанские «наклонности», затем три года, начиная с 2005 года, занимал пост Министра скотоводства, земледелия и рыболовства Уругвая, после этой недолгой карьеры Мухика стал сенатором. И, наконец, в 2010 году, получив большее количество голосов, чем его основной конкурент на пост президента страны, стал лидером Уругвая. Казалось бы, человек проделал такой долгий путь, такой сложный, что можно было бы немного и расслабиться на посту – жить в свое удовольствие, конечно же, выполняя свои основные обязанности президента. Но Мухика особо не соблазняли все эти богатства, вообще, в принципе, та популярность и известность, что он приобрел. Его интересовала исключительно служба народу, работа во благо страны. За свою скромность и вообще образ жизни в народе его так и прозвали «самым бедным президентом» («el presidente más pobre»). Все дело в том, что Мухика практически всю свою президентскую зарплату жертвовал на благотворительность, – из получаемых ежемесячно $12,5 тыс. себе он оставлял на жизнь лишь $1,25 тыс., которых, как уверял сам президент Уругвая, ему на жизнь вполне хватало. По данным на 2015 год, всего на жилищную программу Мухика направлял около $400 тыс., остальные деньги стали взносами в фонд правящей партии «Широкий фронт».  К слову, супруга Мухика, Лусия Тополански, часть своих доходов тоже жертвовала на благотворительность. Жизнь и быт уругвайского лидера была ничем непримечательна. Про него можно было с легкостью сказать, «все, как у обычных людей». Сельский дом на ферме в Монтевидео, колодец во дворе, откуда семья брала воду для домашнего хозяйства. Никаких прислуг, никаких носильщиков – глава семьи сам носил воду из колодца, а жена выращивает цветы на продажу. Фото: wsinform.com Конечно, Мухика мог жить и не «тужить» в официальной резиденции под охраной десятков телохранителей, с прислугой, но вместо этого он с женой предпочел остаться в своей родовой ферме. Если же говорить о самой дорогой покупке, которую когда-либо совершал Мухика, то за $1945 он приобрел «Фольксваген Жук» 1987 года выпуска. Никаких счетов в банке, никаких долгов – все это характеризовало жизнь президента Уругвая. Деньги не играли большой роли, не приносили особой радости, были лишь средством для скромной и тихой жизни. Настоящее счастье и удовольствие Мухика получал во время общения со своей собакой Мануэлой. Президент с большой буквы, чистого сердца, широкой души и безграничной щедрости. Про него до сих пор пишут очень много, говорят о нем. Мухикой действительно восхищаются, отмечая, что он добровольно живет в бедности, тем самым демонстрируя, что и политики могут жить просто, без лишней помпезности, глянца и шика. «Я так живу всю жизнь, – говорит Мухика, сидя в своем саду на старом стуле. На стуле подушка, которую облюбовала собака Мануэла.– Я очень хорошо живу с тем, что у меня есть. Меня называют самым бедным президентом, но я себя бедным не чувствую. Бедные – это те, кто работают только для того, чтобы жить в роскоши. Им все время хочется все больше и больше». The Guardian даже сравнивал Мухика с героем Бильбо Бэггинсом из романа-эпопеи Толкина «Властелин Колец» за его внешний вид: неэлегантный престарелый человек с кустистыми бровями, в поношенной одежде и старой обуви, который живет в своем скромном домике. Однако при всем при этом, то тепло вкупе с некой вздорностью, что исходила от уругвайского лидера, завораживала и, конечно же, располагала к нему. По последней декларации доходов, у семьи Мухика насчитывался один дом, два старых автомобиля «Фольксваген» и три трактора. Общее состояние составило всего $200 тыс. Вот и все, не так уж и много для счастья нужно в жизни. Им нужнее Немало скандалов было вокруг президента Парагвая Орасио Картеса, который занял свой пост в 2013 году. Однако, все это, кажется, осталось в прошлом, в далеком и не таком уж «светлом». Сейчас парагвайский лидер ведет абсолютно другую жизнь, правильную. Стоило ему только вступить в свою должность, как он тут же заявил, что отказывается от положенной ему президентской заработной платы, размер которой составляет порядка $10 тыс. Жалование будет пожертвовано детям, у которых нет крыши над головой, и тем, кто неизлечимо, увы, болен – в приют при церковном приходе Святого Рафаэля.Фото: tr.sputniknews.com Помимо того, что он делал доброе дело, выполнил первое обещание, что давал во время предвыборной гонки, он еще и себе обеспечил счастливую жизнь. По словам Картеса, деньги, что причитаются ему, должны достаться людям, которые «действительно в них нуждаются». В принципе, этот отказ особо-то не сказался на финансовом положении президента, ведь он – один из самых богатых людей Парагвая – в его владении 25 крупных компаний, большая часть из которых занимается производством табака, напитков и продуктов питания. Однако сам факт того, что президент принял такое решение в пользу нуждающихся, не может не восхищать. От своих зарплат отказывались, если не полностью, то частично, немало политических лидеров. К примеру, в 2009 году президент Литвы Даля Грибаускайте заявила, что ей будет вполне хватать половины положенного ей жалования, – вторая половина пойдет в казну государства. А в 2013 году президент Кипра Никос Анастасиадис самолично урезал себе размер заработной платы на 25%. На тот момент страна переживала огромные трудности финансового характера (банки разорялись, страна погрязла в кредитах, дефолт «дышал» в спину), понимая это, киприотский лидер и принял данное решение о сокращении своего жалования. И с кризисом сталкивалось немало стран. В 2012 году президент Греции Каролос Папульяс отказался от зарплаты с той целью, чтобы поддержать свое государство в столь сложное время. В 2014 году новоизбранный президент Словакии Андрей Киска решил отказаться от получения заработной платы на весь срок пребывания на посту главы государства. Население, конечно же, оценило поступок основателя некоммерческого фонда «Добрый Ангел», который помогает детям с онкологическими заболеваниями, отметив, что именно так и должен поступать человек, бескорыстно служащий родине.Фото: www.ibtimes.co.in Япония также может гордиться своими политиками. В 2011 году было принято решение сократить свою зарплату на 30% премьер-министром страны Йосихико Нода («вырученные» средства пойдут в бюджет страны, а это порядка $10 тыс.). Все дело в том, что в последующие 10 лет страну ожидало повышение налогов, за счет которых будет финансироваться восстановление регионов, пострадавших и разрушенных землетрясениями и цунами. Столь радикальные меры нужны были, чтобы сограждане отнеслись с пониманием к этим действительно необходимым повышениям. До Нода на посту премьер-министра находился Наото Кан, который после трагедии на АЭС «Фукусима-1» вообще отказался от своей зарплаты в пользу государственной казны до тех пор, пока ситуацию не урегулируют, ликвидируя все последствия. Сумма составила $20 тыс. (жалование премьер-министра) плюс $10 тыс. (зарплата депутата). Однако политик был вынужден уйти в отставку, но после себя он оставил стране в сумме около $160 тыс. Всяческие государственные неприятности подталкивали немало политиков отказаться от своих «кровно заработанных» средств. В 2011 году госдолг Италии неумолимо рос, на тот момент составив 2 трлн Евро. Чтобы поддержать граждан, премьер-министр Марио Монти отказался от зарплаты – около 18 тыс. евро. Отличились и российские политики. В 2013 году губернатор Тульской области Владимир Груздев отказался полностью от заработанных за год (!) средств на занимаемом посту в пользу инвалидов и регионального фонда возрождения культурного наследия «Тульский кремль». В месяц Груздев получал 48,1 тыс. руб., то есть на благотворительность ушло более 570 тыс. руб. Скромнее надо быть, скромнее История навсегда запомнит президента Венесуэлы Уго Чавеса, которого считали, вместе с Мухикой, одним из самых бедных мировых лидеров планеты. Он, точно также как и его коллега и друг, владел недорогим и простеньким автомобилем «Фольксваген Жук», который Чавес очень любил, пусть возраст машины и не был маленьким. К слову, Мухика неоднократно называл венесуэльского лидера «самым щедрым правителем». Пусть личность Чавеса была противоречивой, однако, по словам президента Уругвая, «для бедных из жизни ушел борец и романтик».Фото: niceimage.ru Возможно, о следующем лидере никто никогда и не слышал, однако о нем нельзя не упомянуть, ведь его образ жизни по праву называют честным и правильным. Итак, президент забытой Богом маленькой страны Буркина-Фасо Томас Исидом Санкара. Само название этого государства переводится с языка мооре, как «страна честных людей», и ему соответствовал этот лидер, что променял все свои блага на процветание Буркина-Фасо. На первом месте у него стояли ценности высшего порядка, за что его уважали, чем он отличался от многих африканских тиранов и диктаторов. На своей должности он не стал наживаться, но мог. Просто не было желания, не было такой цели. Что касается его имущества, то хвастаться было особо нечем: автомобиль «Пежо» (его приобрел молодой человек еще до прихода к власти), холодильник, морозильная камера в котором не работала, три гитары и четыре велосипеда. Положенную зарплату президент жертвовал в фонд помощи детям, которые были лишены семьи. Быт лидера был действительно очень скромным и даже бедным. Он даже не мог позволить себе кондиционер, без которого, кажется, прожить в такой жаркой стране, как Буркина-Фасо, просто нереально. Для Санкары это было роскошью. Страна жила крайне бедно, и Томасу было просто стыдно жить не так, как все. Многие политики стараются вести себя как все, как обычные граждане, особо не выделяясь. Их можно спокойно встретить в самолете в эконом-классе, продуктовых магазинах, магазинах одежды (экс-президент Финляндии Тарья Халонен), можно оказаться от известного политика в нескольких метрах, (бывший премьер-министр Великобритании Дэвид Кэмерон), который всю дорогу будет жевать чипсы с паприкой. Некоторые лидеры не скрывают своих домашних адресов, как, например, канцлер Германии Ангела Меркель, чей дом известен каждому. Далеко не все перебираются в роскошные резиденции, становясь президентом. Не сделал этого и латвийский лидер Раймонд Вейонис, о котором соседи очень хорошо отзываются. Сажает деревья, принимает участие в субботниках, в общем, все как у людей. «Да, наш сосед теперь президент, но главное — человек хороший. У меня однажды кран протёк — вода течёт, ну куда я пойду? Смотрю, он во дворе у машины. Говорит, сейчас зайду всё сделаю — зашёл и сделал. Ну, очень человечный он».Фото: news.rusrek.com Понятное дело, что многие из этих политиков особо не нуждаются в деньгах – их жизни обеспечены, и потратить какую-нибудь тысячу долларов не представляется сложным, да и вообще, эта сумма ничего особо не значит для них. Но для народа важно и это, он должен понимать, что их президент, их лидер, которого они выбрали, простой, понимающий и главное – «свой». Быть ближе к людям есть залог успешного президента, у которого будет самое важное – признание и уважение своей страны. Когда-то лидер курдской Демократической партии народов Селахатын Демитраш сказал очень правильные слова по поводу бедности политиков. Он назвал президента Турции самым бедным в мире среди своих коллег, ведь он лишен главного – любви народа. А без нее, как ни крути, действительно далеко не уедешь.

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18 октября, 16:32

Former Italian premier Monti comes out against referendum

Former Italian Premier Mario Monti came out Tuesday against a constitutional referendum on which the government’s current leader has staked his future, lending weight to the “no” campaign seeking to force early elections.

15 октября, 00:36

Weekend Roundup: Aleppo Is The 21st-Century Guernica

A fertile crossroads of trade and culture for millennia, Aleppo today is a victim of the unfathomable suffering that results when ancient enmities meet modern weapons and poisonous post-Cold War geopolitics. Its ongoing decimation by Russian and Syrian air bombardment ranks the city as an emblem of human brutality in our time comparable to the Nazi air assault on the Basque town of Guernica in 1937 iconified by Pablo Picasso in his famous painting. These images of a thriving Aleppo before the war document the stunning toll of conflict.  Yet, the carnage continues as every cease-fire and proposal for a no-fly zone or safe evacuation corridor for civilians goes nowhere because no one is in control. “We live in a period in which we no longer have a unipolar or bipolar world,” the incoming United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres has said. “We don’t even have a multipolar world; it’s kind of a chaotic world where power relations have become unclear. When power relations are unclear, impunity and unpredictability tend to prosper.” This observation underscores the realist perspective that there is no justice without order, and no order without the use of force. The bottom line lesson of history is that either the just use force and establish their order, or the unjust do ― or no one can and everyone pays the price.   Along with Russia, Iran is also a key player in the Syrian conflict as a supporter of Syrian President Bashar Assad. Seyed Hossein Mousavian, a former member of Iran’s National Security Council, warns that America’s slowness in implementing the recent nuclear accords is pushing Iran even closer to Russia and other countries in the Eastern bloc, risking consequences across the Mideast and beyond. WorldPost Middle East Correspondent Sophia Jones reports from the front lines at Qayyarah Airfield West in Iraq on the final preparations for an all-out assault to liberate Mosul from the self-described Islamic State. Given the wide range of factions involved in the pending offensive ― “U.S.-backed Iraqi government forces, Sunni Muslim tribal fighters, Kurdish Peshmerga, lran-linked Shiite militias, Turkmen fighters and Turkish forces” ― Jones says many wonder “who will control Mosul after ISIS ... and whether the city will descend once more into sectarian violence.” She notes that, just as nearly 15 years ago when it first invaded Iraq, the U.S. is more focused on winning the battle ahead than what comes after. The collateral impact of the massive wave of refugees from a war-torn Mideast seeking shelter in Europe, conjoined with longer-standing immigration issues, has reawakened nationalist and nativist sentiments. Scott Malcomson casts the reaction pithily: “The specter of patriotism is haunting Europe.” Like Trump in the U.S., he says, Brexit signals a revolt against the cosmopolitan elites who have been the custodians of integration and globalization. “Too many people in positions of power,” Malcomson quotes the new British Prime Minister Theresa May as saying, “behave as though they have more in common with international elites than with the people down the road, the people they employ, the people they pass in the street. But if you believe you’re a citizen of the world, you’re a citizen of nowhere. You don’t understand what the very word ‘citizenship’ means.” Writing from Berlin, Alexander Görlach argues for a more universalist path. Today’s Europe, and Germany in particular, he argues, needs a new “inclusive” narrative for the future that supplants the resurgent appeal to blood and soil belonging. His candidate for that narrative centers around the rule of law that binds individuals and community, irrespective of origins. “Constitutionalism is the finest exhibition of modern European Enlightenment principles,” he writes. Writing from Lviv, Ukraine, Christian Borys examines how Poland’s profoundly conservative Catholic culture that once played such a key role in liberating Poland from communist rule when John Paul II was pope, is now proving a bulwark against the liberal norms of an integrated Europe. The conflict came to a head last week when massive protests by women forced the authoritarian-leaning Law and Justice Party government to reject a proposed ban on abortion.  In a seemingly endless cycle, North Korea explodes a more powerful nuclear device or launches a longer range missile, new sanctions are enacted by world powers and then Kim Jong Un only ratchets it up yet again with a new and more powerful provocation. Jane Harman, a former member of the U.S. House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, proposes to break this cycle by offering direct negotiations between Washington and Pyongyang aimed at securing a freeze on missile and bomb development. “The United States has an underappreciated ace in its deck,” Harman writes. “North Korea has been trying to talk to us since 1974. Only the United States ― the supposed existential threat that justifies its nuclear and ballistic missile programs ― can fully address Pyongyang’s security concerns.” Three Nobel laureates for peace ― José Ramos-Horta, Muhammad Yunus and Kailash Satyarthi ― call for a new treaty banning the possession of nuclear weapons to be proposed to the U.N. General Assembly this month. The aim of this treaty, they say, is to, “create a powerful new norm about nuclear weapons, defining them not as the status symbols of great nations, but as the badges of shame of rogue nations.” As the unpredictable president of the Philippines, Rodrigo Duterte, prepares to visit China later this month, Richard Javad Heydarian ponders what Duterte’s proposal for an “alliance” and “close friendship” with China means for the long-standing alliance with the U.S.. As the race to the White House hits its final stretch, this week WorldPost partner, the South China Morning Post, explores why recent Chinese immigrants to the U.S. are supporting U.S. Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump.  Following last week’s award of the first $1 million Berggruen Prize to Charles Taylor, Berggruen Institute President Craig Calhoun provides a guide to the Canadian philosopher’s thinking on a wide range of topics from “the self” and “authenticity and recognition” to religion in a secular age. Daniel A. Bell recalls Taylor’s talents as a transformative teacher at McGill University in Montreal. Gordon Brown, a former British prime minister and U.N. special envoy for global education, calls for a new commitment to the empowerment of girls worldwide, some 500 million of whom, he says, will probably leave school this year without secondary-level qualifications. “Girls have different needs,” he writes, “to stay in school without the threat of child marriage, to stay in school without being forced into domestic service, to be seen for what they are and will be ― the leaders of families.” In these moving photos, we take a look back at how Brazil’s youth once battled to save their own schools.  Tobias Rees reviews the first “AI 100 Report” by a Stanford group looking out 100 years ahead to gauge the impact of artificial intelligence on society. The most important message, Rees writes, is, “don’t be afraid!” He continues: “On every page, in so many different ways, the readers are assured that whatever they may have read about AI in the popular press, whatever they may have seen in a movie ― it is likely wrong. The report insists that singularities, that is, machines that are self-conscious and begin, as if they were unique, singular beings, to think and act themselves, are likely never going to exist.” Science writer Bahar Gholipour invites you to take a virtual reality tour of Pluto. These breathtaking images from an international action photography contest will get your blood pumping. Finally, our Singularity series this week examines what happens when you create a chatbot to memorialize a friend who has died. WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. CORRESPONDENTS: Sophia Jones in Istanbul. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa),Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera), Dileep Padgaonkar (Times of India) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk,Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy,Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen,Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair,Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing,Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

15 октября, 00:36

Weekend Roundup: Aleppo Is The 21st-Century Guernica

A fertile crossroads of trade and culture for millennia, Aleppo today is a victim of the unfathomable suffering that results when ancient enmities meet modern weapons and poisonous post-Cold War geopolitics. Its ongoing decimation by Russian and Syrian air bombardment ranks the city as an emblem of human brutality in our time comparable to the Nazi air assault on the Basque town of Guernica in 1937 iconified by Pablo Picasso in his famous painting. These images of a thriving Aleppo before the war document the stunning toll of conflict.  Yet, the carnage continues as every cease-fire and proposal for a no-fly zone or safe evacuation corridor for civilians goes nowhere because no one is in control. “We live in a period in which we no longer have a unipolar or bipolar world,” the incoming United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres has said. “We don’t even have a multipolar world; it’s kind of a chaotic world where power relations have become unclear. When power relations are unclear, impunity and unpredictability tend to prosper.” This observation underscores the realist perspective that there is no justice without order, and no order without the use of force. The bottom line lesson of history is that either the just use force and establish their order, or the unjust do ― or no one can and everyone pays the price.   Along with Russia, Iran is also a key player in the Syrian conflict as a supporter of Syrian President Bashar Assad. Seyed Hossein Mousavian, a former member of Iran’s National Security Council, warns that America’s slowness in implementing the recent nuclear accords is pushing Iran even closer to Russia and other countries in the Eastern bloc, risking consequences across the Mideast and beyond. WorldPost Middle East Correspondent Sophia Jones reports from the front lines at Qayyarah Airfield West in Iraq on the final preparations for an all-out assault to liberate Mosul from the self-described Islamic State. Given the wide range of factions involved in the pending offensive ― “U.S.-backed Iraqi government forces, Sunni Muslim tribal fighters, Kurdish Peshmerga, lran-linked Shiite militias, Turkmen fighters and Turkish forces” ― Jones says many wonder “who will control Mosul after ISIS ... and whether the city will descend once more into sectarian violence.” She notes that, just as nearly 15 years ago when it first invaded Iraq, the U.S. is more focused on winning the battle ahead than what comes after. The collateral impact of the massive wave of refugees from a war-torn Mideast seeking shelter in Europe, conjoined with longer-standing immigration issues, has reawakened nationalist and nativist sentiments. Scott Malcomson casts the reaction pithily: “The specter of patriotism is haunting Europe.” Like Trump in the U.S., he says, Brexit signals a revolt against the cosmopolitan elites who have been the custodians of integration and globalization. “Too many people in positions of power,” Malcomson quotes the new British Prime Minister Theresa May as saying, “behave as though they have more in common with international elites than with the people down the road, the people they employ, the people they pass in the street. But if you believe you’re a citizen of the world, you’re a citizen of nowhere. You don’t understand what the very word ‘citizenship’ means.” Writing from Berlin, Alexander Görlach argues for a more universalist path. Today’s Europe, and Germany in particular, he argues, needs a new “inclusive” narrative for the future that supplants the resurgent appeal to blood and soil belonging. His candidate for that narrative centers around the rule of law that binds individuals and community, irrespective of origins. “Constitutionalism is the finest exhibition of modern European Enlightenment principles,” he writes. Writing from Lviv, Ukraine, Christian Borys examines how Poland’s profoundly conservative Catholic culture that once played such a key role in liberating Poland from communist rule when John Paul II was pope, is now proving a bulwark against the liberal norms of an integrated Europe. The conflict came to a head last week when massive protests by women forced the authoritarian-leaning Law and Justice Party government to reject a proposed ban on abortion.  In a seemingly endless cycle, North Korea explodes a more powerful nuclear device or launches a longer range missile, new sanctions are enacted by world powers and then Kim Jong Un only ratchets it up yet again with a new and more powerful provocation. Jane Harman, a former member of the U.S. House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, proposes to break this cycle by offering direct negotiations between Washington and Pyongyang aimed at securing a freeze on missile and bomb development. “The United States has an underappreciated ace in its deck,” Harman writes. “North Korea has been trying to talk to us since 1974. Only the United States ― the supposed existential threat that justifies its nuclear and ballistic missile programs ― can fully address Pyongyang’s security concerns.” Three Nobel laureates for peace ― José Ramos-Horta, Muhammad Yunus and Kailash Satyarthi ― call for a new treaty banning the possession of nuclear weapons to be proposed to the U.N. General Assembly this month. The aim of this treaty, they say, is to, “create a powerful new norm about nuclear weapons, defining them not as the status symbols of great nations, but as the badges of shame of rogue nations.” As the unpredictable president of the Philippines, Rodrigo Duterte, prepares to visit China later this month, Richard Javad Heydarian ponders what Duterte’s proposal for an “alliance” and “close friendship” with China means for the long-standing alliance with the U.S.. As the race to the White House hits its final stretch, this week WorldPost partner, the South China Morning Post, explores why recent Chinese immigrants to the U.S. are supporting U.S. Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump.  Following last week’s award of the first $1 million Berggruen Prize to Charles Taylor, Berggruen Institute President Craig Calhoun provides a guide to the Canadian philosopher’s thinking on a wide range of topics from “the self” and “authenticity and recognition” to religion in a secular age. Daniel A. Bell recalls Taylor’s talents as a transformative teacher at McGill University in Montreal. Gordon Brown, a former British prime minister and U.N. special envoy for global education, calls for a new commitment to the empowerment of girls worldwide, some 500 million of whom, he says, will probably leave school this year without secondary-level qualifications. “Girls have different needs,” he writes, “to stay in school without the threat of child marriage, to stay in school without being forced into domestic service, to be seen for what they are and will be ― the leaders of families.” In these moving photos, we take a look back at how Brazil’s youth once battled to save their own schools.  Tobias Rees reviews the first “AI 100 Report” by a Stanford group looking out 100 years ahead to gauge the impact of artificial intelligence on society. The most important message, Rees writes, is, “don’t be afraid!” He continues: “On every page, in so many different ways, the readers are assured that whatever they may have read about AI in the popular press, whatever they may have seen in a movie ― it is likely wrong. The report insists that singularities, that is, machines that are self-conscious and begin, as if they were unique, singular beings, to think and act themselves, are likely never going to exist.” Science writer Bahar Gholipour invites you to take a virtual reality tour of Pluto. These breathtaking images from an international action photography contest will get your blood pumping. Finally, our Singularity series this week examines what happens when you create a chatbot to memorialize a friend who has died. WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. CORRESPONDENTS: Sophia Jones in Istanbul. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa),Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera), Dileep Padgaonkar (Times of India) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk,Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy,Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen,Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair,Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing,Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

08 октября, 03:39

Weekend Roundup: Charles Taylor Is An Anti-Xenophobe Philosopher For Our Times

Every once in a while, a philosopher emerges from quiet labors in the vineyards of the text to speak with striking relevance to our turbulent times. Charles Taylor, who this week was awarded the first Berggruen Prize for influential ideas, is such a scholar. The  philosopher’s long body of work (he’s 84) ranges widely from meditations on secularization to alternative modernities to the authenticity of the expressive individual. But it is Taylor’s thinking on the recognition of irreducible diversity in an interdependent world of plural identities ― and how societies can cope with this reality ― that gives him urgency in this era of Trump, Brexit, the burkini ban and the rise of the anti-immigrant right in Europe. Taylor’s approach does not deny clashes of cultures, whether of the French-speaking Quebecois with the English-speaking majority in his native Canada or pious Muslims in predominantly secular societies. Rather it acknowledges the frictions head-on through what he calls “a language of perspicuous contrast,” or  the clearly expressed delineation of differences as the basis for reconciliation and “reasonable accommodation” of each to the other. This “intercultural” undertaking contrasts with the identity pillars of multiculturalism that encourage separation instead of integration. “To have this bland neo-liberal view that there are no major cultural contradictions at all, and things will all go swimmingly, that we’ll all just globalize. This is the absolute nadir of blindness,” he said in a recent interview in Philosophy Today. “That’s what we have to aim at,” Taylor continued in that interview, “if we want to get these differences out into a sphere where there can be a rational and calm discussion of how to live together with tension between different groups. It’s only by coming to such a language that we can have a discussion that doesn’t degenerate into a kind of stigmatizing of the other. ... We need it very badly in our diverse societies.” Taylor walks the talk. He led the effort to keep Quebec as part of Canada through recognition of its distinctive character in a key 1995 referendum. More recently, he co-chaired a commission appointed by the provincial government of Quebec on how to accommodate immigrants. The intercultural tensions roiling Europe found expression this week in a referendum in Hungary over whether to reject or accept European Union quotas requiring member states to shelter a minimum number of refugees. The majority of those voting rejected the EU quota, but the voter turnout fell short of the 50 percent threshold of eligible voters needed to make the vote valid. Patrick Martin-Genier, a professor at Sciences Po in Paris, notes with concern that the referendum campaign, like the Brexit campaign in Britain, was characterized by “an avalanche of foul and racist discourse.” Though not legally binding, he says, it has nonetheless created a poisonous political atmosphere and encourages other states to follow suit. “It is high time to rebuild Europe,” Martin-Genier concludes, “excluding these countries who, under unethical leaders, are deliberately deciding to forsake and destroy the founding values of the European Union.” Cas Mudde thinks Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban made a political mistake by so thoroughly touting a referendum that failed at the polls. “Though Hungary’s leader might be a master in exciting and expressing widespread prejudices,” Mudde writes, “he is as vulnerable to overreach and popular dissatisfaction as other politicians. But without serious opposition, he will remain unchallenged, even in the wake of defeats.”  Andras Simonyi is hopeful: “This was a serious warning [to Orban] that the patience of the Hungarian people is running out,” he says. “This is a victory of the Hungarian people, the majority of whom, against all odds, embrace Europe, openness, solidarity and democracy.” Another hopeful sign on the global horizon is that one of the world’s top diplomats most experienced in dealing with the refugee crisis, Antonio Guterres, has been picked to take over as the new secretary-general of the United Nations. The former Portuguese prime minister stepped down last year as the head of the U.N.’s refugee agency. He outlined his vision for the U.N. in an op-ed for The WorldPost earlier this year. The other shocker on the referendum front this week was the rejection by Colombian voters of a recently concluded peace deal that sought to end the long war between the government and the the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia rebels. Miguel Urban is worried. “The shocking ‘no’ vote puts the peace process at risk, fragments the population even further, and badly injures the legitimacy of the government at this key moment,” he writes. From Perth, Australia, Helen Clark draws on an interview with former Australian Defense Minister Kim Beazley and taps into how a Trump presidency might hurt the legitimacy of U.S. government relations with its Australian ally and its “pivot” to Asia.  In a new collaboration with the Hong Kong-based South China Morning Post, we examine the future of Mongolia’s legendary nomads as that country modernizes.  In their Q & A series on China in Africa, Eric Olander and Cobus van Staden this week discuss how China’s policy of “non-interference” in the affairs of other states is being tested in Africa, especially by conflicts in Sudan and South Sudan. In a powerful dispatch from Qayyarah, Iraq, WorldPost Middle East Correspondent Sophia Jones talks to women who are reclaiming their lives after two years until brutal rule by the self-proclaimed Islamic State. “Now, we are free,” they tell her. As bombs continue to drop in neighboring Syria and Russia and U.S. cease-fire efforts collapse, World Reporter Nick Robins-Early profiles the Syrian rescue workers known as the White Helmets, who though lost out on the Nobel Peace Prize this time, are admired around the world for their work. World Reporter Jesselyn Cook points out a hypocritical promotional video from the Assad government, which urges tourists to flock to the war-torn country.  Finally, our Singularity series this week looks at the likely prospect that, if life is ever found on Jupiter, it may well be discovered by robots. WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. CORRESPONDENTS: Sophia Jones in Istanbul. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa),Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera), Dileep Padgaonkar (Times of India) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk,Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy,Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen,Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair,Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing,Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

01 октября, 02:22

Weekend Roundup: When Negotiating With Terrorists Works

Former U.S. President George W. Bush once said, “No nation can negotiate with terrorists, for there is no way to make peace with those whose only goal is death.” Numerous leaders have made similar statements. And yet, democratic governments have negotiated with internationally designated terrorist groups, including with the Irish Republican Army, the Basque separatist group ETA and ― making history this week ― the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC. On Monday, the Colombian government and the FARC signed a peace deal promising to end a 52-year war. The Colombian people will vote on the agreement Sunday and are expected to approve it. Both the FARC and the government committed human rights violations and inflicted terror for decades. Many are celebrating the deal as the long-overdue end of a conflict that has left about 220,000 people dead and more than 6 million displaced from their homes. Others are criticizing the deal as too soft on the rebels who, if they confess their crimes, will avoid serving their sentences in jail and will instead have to carry out acts of reparation to their victims. So when does it make sense to negotiate with terrorists? Several factors facilitated negotiating with the FARC. First, the group was in a weakened, war-weary state after a brutal U.S.-backed Colombian military offensive that started in 2000. Also, the FARC doesn’t have an apocalyptic goal like, say, the so-called Islamic State. Although its ideology took a backseat to the drug trade over the years, the FARC was born under a banner of rural land distribution reform for the poor. In response, as a part of the pending deal, the government pledged to better support rural communities and to improve land accessibility. In other words, negotiating with terrorists entails the psychologically and politically challenging concession that, in some cases, they are not simply criminals but also warriors with a cause that can be partially accommodated. Former U.K. Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher wanted the IRA regarded as common criminals. But the government needed to treat the group with more dignity than that before a peace deal could be negotiated. One fear is that validating terrorists’ political goals also validates their violent means. However, this fear may be unmerited as long as the terrorists make enough concessions (maybe because they’re so weakened) that it’s clear they’re not being validated. Instead, the violent means to their end is being proven wrong, which, of course, is their crucial concession. Sergio Munoz Bata asserts that U.S. military aid to Colombia ― through an initiative called Plan Colombia ― helped the country gain the upper hand against its FARC rebels, making negotiations possible. However, Bata notes, Plan Colombia was accompanied by egregious human rights violations and a failure to curb the drug trade and thus must be evaluated in its totality. Reporting a WorldPost feature from remote southern Colombia, Sibylla Brodzinsky details the hopes and fears of a FARC squad commander as he prepares to leave behind guns and the drug trade to join society as a law-abiding citizen. Sara Elkamel, in collaboration with HuffPost international editions, brings us the voices of Colombians from various parts of the world who fled the civil war; they share a mix of hope and skepticism ahead of Sunday’s referendum vote. World Bank President Jim Yong Kim explains how peace in Colombia could lead to inclusive economic growth. World Reporter Nick Robins-Early explores the logistical challenges of implementing the ambitious deal. A man well acquainted with the challenges of negotiating peace, former Israeli president and Nobel Peace Prize winner Shimon Peres died at the age of 93 this week. WorldPost Editor-in-Chief Nathan Gardels contends that Peres never stopped searching for new solutions to old problems ― the ongoing Israeli-Palestinian conflict chief among them. From New Jersey, reporter Willa Frej finds that refugee resettlement agencies ― struggling to meet the U.S. quota ― have left some refugees living in poor conditions. U.S. President Barack Obama had promised to resettle 85,000 refugees by the end of the federal government’s 2016 fiscal year, which ends Friday. The U.S. came close to meeting its goal, with 83,661 refugees resettled, including more than 10,000 Syrians. Still, Turkish leaders, among many others, are adamant that the U.S. and Europe are not doing nearly enough to help the 4.8 million refugees of the Syrian war, Ilgin Yorulmaz reports. From Amman, Dominic Graham of Mercy Corps laments that Aleppo residents are in desperate need of humanitarian aid, especially baby formula, but his organization can’t deliver any of it because ongoing airstrikes and ground clashes continue to make roads impassable. Presidential candidates Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton faced off in the first debate this week. Howard Fineman, who’s been traveling to presidential debates since 1988, dubs Trump’s showing the “worst debate performance in modern times.” “It was so bad that in a normal year, it would disqualify him from getting anywhere near the White House,” Fineman estimates. “But this is 2016, a year so weird, unsettled and unsettling, that even the spectacle of an unprepared and almost incoherent Trump, reeling from blow after blow from Clinton, may not be enough to slow him down.” Berggruen Institute fellow Sam Fleischacker tells us that “for a large number of Americans, Trump represents a heroic rebel against what they see as a massive conspiracy — among scientists, historians, journalists and policy experts — that governs what is taken as ‘fact’ in America.” President Rafael Correa of Ecuador calls for the global community to work together to put an end to tax havens as they expand and drive inequality. In a photo piece, reporter Roque Planas shows us what the search for Mexico’s missing 43 students looks like, two years later. Reporter Kate Abbey-Lambertz describes a “smog vacuum” that aims to clean China’s air and turn the pollution it collects into jewelry. Eric Olander and Cobus van Staden share with us a short film that puts a face to the prejudice felt by Chinese in Africa and Africans in China. From New Delhi, Jeong In-seo reports on the “terminator train” that India has launched to combat dengue and chikungunya. To curb mosquito breeding, trucks spray insecticide on bodies of water along railway tracks. Finally, our Singularity series this week looks at an embryo study that expands our understanding of how life begins.                                                    WHO WE AREEDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor.   CORRESPONDENTS: Sophia Jones in Istanbul.   EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera), Dileep Padgaonkar (Times of India) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun).   VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa.   CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy),Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large.   The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea.   Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine.   ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as the Advisory Council— as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama,Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo,Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian.   From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti,Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out.   -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

24 сентября, 02:49

Weekend Roundup: When Better Angels Lose Their Wings

In an enlightened dialogue, the Dalai Lama tells Archbishop Desmond Tutu that his years as a refugee have taught him to identify with the plight of so many others today. "This recognition that we are all connected," says Tutu, "is the birth of empathy and compassion." However noble this sentiment, the world can look a lot different to a German burgher trying to provide for his family and preserve the character of his community than it does to two religious leaders conversing in the misty hills of Dharamsala. As much as we may feel global, we react local.  At the Global Progress 2016 conference in Montreal recently, Germany's vice chancellor, Sigmar Gabriel, concisely captured the backlash roiling politics in his country and the rest of Europe. "As the average citizens see it," he said, "first the authorities spent billions on bailing out the banks, and now are spending generously on refugees from Syria and elsewhere -- meanwhile cutting back on pensions, unemployment payments and other social benefits through austerity policies. 'What about us?' they ask." That attitude may not make saints of citizens, but neither does it make them sinners. As German Chancellor Angela Merkel is discovering through repeated blows at the polls, when the wages of war outstrip the means of empathy, people retreat into their own suffering and better angels lose their wings. Bad faith results from good intentions if the capacity to fulfill moral claims is lacking. Writing from Germany, Tobias Lill worries that if Merkel does not take action soon to relieve the anxiety of her citizens, the anti-immigrant Alternative for Germany party could soon arrive in power. "When vast swaths of the country have lost faith in establishment parties," he says, "it can quickly lead to crisis." The key to avoiding such a crisis, he argues, is providing better support for working families. The refugee crisis was front and center this week at the United Nations General Assembly. As Willa Frej reports, U.S. President Barack Obama convened a summit of leaders from more than 50 nations who pledged $4.5 billion in aid to groups helping refugees to find education and work. The U.N. Development Programme administrator, Helen Clark, calls for a greater focus on "prevention and mediation" of conflicts before they turn into full fledged wars while "promoting inclusive economic growth and sustainable livelihoods" in the troubled nations from which refugees and migrants flee. Mercy Corps' Neal Keny-Guyer argues that "conflict causes violent extremism more than violent extremism causes conflict." Christine Lagarde, managing director of the International Monetary Fund, outlines the enormous economic costs of conflict in the Mideast and North Africa, stressing the importance of keeping "core government institutions functioning in times of conflict" in order "to maintain life-saving services." Gordon Brown, the former British prime minister and U.N. special envoy for global education, is concerned that a "lost generation" is in the making as an estimated 265 million displaced children worldwide are out of school. Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto, whose country has been one of the primary targets of Donald Trump's xenophobic campaign, argues that agreements reached at the U.N. this week "must aim at strengthening the state's capabilities for the protection of migrants and their human rights, while recognizing their contributions to economic development and achieving their social inclusion, in order to eradicate intolerance and racism." WorldPost Middle East Correspondent Sophia Jones, in Istanbul, and Danae Leivada, in Athens, report on the deplorable conditions at the Moria refugee detention center on the island of Lesbos, which was engulfed in fire this week. The mayor, they report, has not ruled out the possibility that the blaze was ignited by members of the neo-fascist Golden Dawn party, whom Greek journalists have also accused of attacking them at an anti-refugee protest, HuffPost Greece's Marialena Perpiraki reports. Martin Schulz, president of the European Parliament, writes that even though the U.K. and the European Union are parting ways, they can still find a way to work together. But, he warns, "We cannot shape a new European future at such a time of fragility by indulging in nostalgia -- none of us, including the U.K., can bring back the past." Anastasya Manuilova reports from Moscow on why Russian sanctions against Western food imports has not dented popular support for President Vladimir Putin, as demonstrated once again in elections this week. She cites a key study that says most Russians perceive Putin's import ban as "a sign of strength" in standing up to Europe and the U.S.. Foreign Affairs Reporter Akbar Shahid Ahmed reports on a speech at the Harvard Club in New York by Turkey's first lady, Emine Erdogan, about the recent coup attempt. She asked Americans to imagine how they would react if the Brooklyn Bridge was seized by terrorists. Writing from Beijing, Wang Jisi, one of China's leading experts on America, argues that the "new normal" of U.S.-China relations is an ongoing contest over framing the new rules of a world order in transition. Admiral Harry Harris, commander of the U.S. Pacific Command, makes no bones about his objective of military domination of the western Pacific. "If we have to fight tonight," he says, "I don't want it to be a fair fight. If it's a knife fight, I want to bring a gun. If it's a gun fight, I want to bring in the artillery -- and all of our partners with their artillery." Writing from Manila, Richard Javed Heydarian charts the latest antics of the "fiercely independent-minded" president, Rodrigo Duterte. Heydarian notes that on a trip to Jakarta, the president was seen as "criticizing America and its lack of commitment to the Philippines, while praising Chinese assistance to the Philippines." That has made some wonder, he says, "whether there would be irreversible consequences for bilateral relations [with the U.S.], among the oldest and most intimate in human history." In the wake of the New York and New Jersey bombings, Afghan-born suspect Ahmad Rahami's father said he had told federal agents about his son's interest in terrorist organizations a few years ago. Daniel Koehler explains why he believes the United States needs "deradicalization" counseling that provides concerned parents like Rahami and authorities with an option to derail a terrorist attack other than prematurely calling the police or keeping a young person's unsettling turn a secret. Ed Dolan explains why business leaders seem wary of a Donald Trump presidency. "The biggest corporations," he surmises, "are trembling at the prospect that this populist outsider would break the cozy relationship they have had with government for as long as they can remember." Dominique Mosbergen reports on another focus at the U.N. this week. "The General Assembly is meeting to tackle a global health crisis that's estimated to 'kill more people than cancer' does now in the coming decades," she writes. "Antibiotic resistance causes the deaths of at least 700,000 people annually. That number is expected to balloon to 10 million by 2050." She also reports from Singapore on the staggering health toll the ever more regular haze is taking on populations across Southeast Asia. Finally, our Singularity series this week looks at an experiment in which a man's thoughts are able through induced chemical reactions to control nanobots inside a cockroach. WHO WE ARE EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost's news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. CORRESPONDENTS: Sophia Jones in Istanbul. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera), Dileep Padgaonkar (Times of India) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the "whole mind" way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute's 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as the Advisory Council -- as well as regular contributors -- to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

15 сентября, 13:54

Европа охвачена страхом развала

«Впервые за мой сознательный опыт европейского сотрудничества мне кажется, что проект может на самом деле провалиться», — пишет Франс Тиммерманс (Frans Timmermans), второй человек в Европейской комиссии, в своей книге «Братство».На прошедшем в начале сентября в Италии Форуме Амброзетти нидерландский социал-демократ несколько смягчил свое заявление, однако факта это не меняет: Европейский Союз столкнулся с таким множеством кризисов, что может от них не оправиться.

02 сентября, 22:51

Weekend Roundup: China Can Make the G-20 Matter

The world economy can't grow without China. And China can't continue growing unless the rest of the world does. This recognition of mutual dependence was the key theme that emerged last November in a discussion in Beijing between China's President Xi Jinping and members of the Berggruen Institute's 21st Century Council. As former Mexican President Ernesto Zedillo argued at that meeting, the G-20 -- which brings together advanced and emerging economies representing 85 percent of world GDP and 75 percent of trade -- is the one global body capable of addressing this shared challenge. As host of this year's summit in Hangzhou, President Xi fully agreed, saying he wants to "cement" the role of the G-20 as the governing body which coordinates common policies that foster global growth. The central issue at the summit, as International Monetary Fund Managing Director Christine Lagarde points out, will concern ways to invigorate economies beyond exhausted monetary policies which have reached their limit, unable to move the needle on stagnant or weak growth around the world despite even negative interest rates in some places. Above all, the hope is that nations gathered in China on September 4-5 will agree to a coordinated global effort to stimulate growth through greater public investment as well as through enhancing productivity by the innovative application of new information technologies to industry. As John Ross writes from Beijing, India and China are among the fastest growing economies in the world today precisely because of major state investments in infrastructure. Writing from Singapore, Kishore Mahbubani says the G-20 needs "a kick in the butt" to get moving, suggesting that President Obama propose that the U.S. join China's new Asia Infrastructure Investment Bank and that China, in turn, agree to invest in high-speed rail in the U.S. at preferential rates. Also writing from Beijing, Fred Hu, too, argues for the G-20 to commit to "expanding infrastructure investment" along with declaring resistance to trade protectionism and reaffirming commitments to climate change mitigation as agreed to at the U.N. Paris summit in January. Fu Ying, the powerful chair of the foreign affairs committee of China's National People's Congress, hopes that U.S.-China cooperation in rebooting the global economy at the G-20 spills over to help avoid a new great power conflict and resolve contentious security issues in the South China Sea. Al Gore once wrote that at the G-20 summits, "the clothes have no emperor," in a snide allusion to the stilted group photos of business-suited leaders who rarely rise to the occasion. The aspiration this year is that China's leaders, who oversee the world's second largest economy, can put some clothes on the emperor and convince the rest of the G-20 nations to agree on a path out of the prolonged slump that afflicts the world as a whole. Writing from Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, Dien Luong chronicles the controversial return of Monsanto, which manufactured Agent Orange used by the U.S. in the war there 55 years ago, this time with GMOs promoted by the U.S. government. In a modified excerpt from his new book, Uri Bar-Joseph reveals how an Egyptian spy -- code-named "the Angel" -- once stopped the deadliest terror plot against Israel in history. In Europe, the debate over banning the burqa and the burkini continues to escalate, with French Prime Minister Manuel Valls saying that the bare-breasted symbol of France, Marianne, "isn't veiled because she's free. That is the republic!" Writing from Paris, philosopher Bernard-Henri Levy declares that it is up to the imams and other Muslim leaders in France "to remind their followers and members that democracy, like France itself, must be considered as a whole and that by returning to a time when the practitioners of all the major religions believed that it was permissible to hide their women, it is democracy as a whole that is threatened." Writing from Germany about the images of French police enforcing the burkini ban on a Nice beach, Benjamin Reuter fears "Europe is losing the values that made so many Europeans -- and especially young people -- proud to be European: freedom and tolerance." Cecilia Brainard surveys Philippine citizens on their view of President Rodrigo Duterte's violent crackdown on the illicit drug trade. She finds the country divided between those who admire and revile Duterte and reflects her own doubts. "These blatant killings bother me in the absence of the rule of law," she writes. "The drug menace requires a war to fight it, but for how long? And should any vigilante be allowed to kill?" This week, The Huffington Post opened its latest global edition in Mexico City, just as Donald Trump made a surprise visit to Mexico and met with President Enrique Peña Nieto. Soon after, he delivered a speech in Arizona doubling down on his proposal to deport undocumented workers and build a new border wall. "His policy stances could represent a huge threat to Mexico, and I am not prepared to keep my arms crossed and do nothing," Peña Nieto said after the meeting. "There's no better time than now to bring HuffPost to Mexico," Arianna Huffington writes. "At a time when Donald Trump is running on a platform that includes literally putting up a wall between the U.S. and Mexico, while calling Mexicans killers and rapists, it's more important than ever to open up the conversation between our two countries, build bridges and counteract this false and dangerous narrative." In one of the first posts from the new Mexico edition, Teresa Villa reports that thousands of Venezuelans have taken to the streets in Caracas to demand that President Nicolas Maduro step down. Robots are now headed from the office to the garden. As our Singularity series this week notes, a new open-source robotic system can grow food for you in your own backyard. Just press the button, and your robot farmer will get to work. WHO WE ARE EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost's news coverage. Nick Robins-Early is a World Reporter. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. CORRESPONDENTS: Sophia Jones in Istanbul. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera), Dileep Padgaonkar (Times of India) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the "whole mind" way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute's 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as the Advisory Council -- as well as regular contributors -- to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

27 августа, 02:29

Weekend Roundup: Anti-Global Backlash Is Realigning Politics Across the West

The great sociologist Max Weber postulated that the birth act of modern capitalism was the secession of business from the household and thus the web of moral and ethical obligations that intimate form of human organization entailed. Zygmunt Bauman has called globalization the "'second secession'" in which unleashed capitalism has "'flown away'" from the constraints of the nation-state, in effect the larger household. Now, national households are clawing back their claims, reasserting sovereignty in an anti-globalization backlash that is profoundly realigning politics. "Across the West," Nouriel Roubini writes, "establishment parties of the right and the left are being disrupted -- if not destroyed from the inside. Within such parties, the losers from globalization are finding champions of anti-globalization that are challenging the formal mainstream orthodoxy. Thus, the traditional distinction between center-right and center-left is breaking down." In the U.S. and Britain, he notes, working class voters traditionally aligned with the left, are joining the ranks of Trump and Brexit. In continental Europe, discontent with immigration and austerity has given rise to new parties on both the far right and the far left. "A new political alignment,' Roubini concludes, "erases the old left and right paradigms of labor versus capital, workers versus business, taxes and regulation versus free enterprise. Instead, the new alignment will be organized around pro and anti-global integration forces." As Roubini points out, support for globalization these days comes mainly from the emerging economies, which have largely benefited from foreign investment and access to global markets. While inequality has grown within the West, he notes, it has diminished on a global scale. To the extent global integration has touched Brazil, pride rises with greater prosperity. As the Olympics wound down, Adriana Caitano vents her anger in an open letter from Brazil "to people who love to come here to enjoy the beaches and stare at women in bikinis, but disrespect the country that hosts them." She imagines what the "American swimmers [involved in the faux robbery scandal] must have thought: Of course it would be very possible for four foreign, white, tall, Olympians to be assaulted in Rio de Janeiro. Who would not believe it? This underdeveloped country can't even clean a pool the right way. They would never be able to find the truth. So we'll just go back to the American dream with our medals." One can't speak these days of bikinis in Brazil without bringing to mind the controversy over banning the burkini in France, where local police this week forced a woman on a Nice beach to show more skin in her bathing wardrobe. Willa Frej reports on a man in France who has been paying the fines for women ticketed under the burkini ban. Nick Robins-Early examines what many regard as the weak reasoning behind the ban. And, indeed, by week's end, France's highest administrative court, the Council of State, suspended the ban in an initial ruling in a case brought by a human rights group. At the same time, former French President Nicolas Sarkozy, who is running for office again, pledged he would implement a nationwide ban on the burkini if elected. During a visit to the beach in Izmir Province, Turkey, Ilgin Yorulmaz surveys opinion in that Muslim-majority country with a modern secular history. "With historical ties to France," she reports, "Turks are divided over their opinions of the burkini both in France and in their own country." Despite Canada's historic links to France, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has made clear his country doesn't share France's secular fundamentalism. "We should be past tolerance," he says, and move toward embracing diversity. In a post from HuffPost Maghreb, Akram Belkaïd calls for, "open debate about this implicit requirement of total assimilation" behind the burkini ban. Writing from Germany where a debate is underway about banning the burqa, Christian Democratic Union politician Ruprecht Polenz similarly argues that, "underlying the burqa debate is the fear that we can never eliminate the differences in our society." The repercussions of the Turkish coup continue to roil the geopolitical landscape. As U.S. Vice President Joe Biden visited Turkey this week in an effort to temper rising anti-Americanism fueled by a belated and tepid response by U.S. authorities to the failed coup, President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan doubled down on the demand to hand over Fethullah Gülen, who lives in the U.S. and whom he sees as the culprit behind the attempted overthrow of the government. Reviewing these developments, David Hearst asks, "Is America losing Turkey?" Doug Bandow thinks that it would be a good idea if America did lose Turkey. "The growth of Putinism in Ankara today is a terrible embarrassment, with no corresponding security benefit for America as compensation," he writes. "The U.S. should change its approach to reflect changing circumstances. Turkey's membership in NATO no longer serves America's and Europe's interests." Farah Mohamed examines the impact of the coup attempt on the long-festering conflict between Greeks and Turks in Cyprus. Resolution of that conflict is seen by many as a key stepping stone in Turkey's bid to join the European Union, a relationship now even more fraught as Europe is deeply wary of Erdoğan's even sharper post-coup turn toward authoritarianism. As one Cypriot told Mohamed, some islanders, "feel caught up in a fight that does not belong to them." In an essay titled "Why China Fears a 'Color Revolution' Incited by the West," I argue that the U.S. should appreciate the resonances of China's history as a unitary state present in today's one-party system. By recognizing that system's legitimacy, the U.S. would allay the suspicion of China's leaders that it is seeking to foment regime change through the promotion and support of human rights activists. I further argue that, for the first time in the long history of China's "institutional civilization," an autonomous civil society is emerging because everyone now has the same information as those who rule them. "Whether China ends up on the wrong side of history or not depends on its ability to find a balance between rule from the top and an emergent civil society from below," I conclude. "We in the West should encourage China's effort to forge a new equilibrium out of its own experience, not seek to project our legacy onto their future." Writing from Beijing, Peiran Wei asks, "Why are Chinese companies, which have long been playing catch-up with their U.S. counterparts, now leading the way?" Finally, our Singularity series this week looks at how Harvard scientists have "radically rewritten" the E. coli genome, heralding a major step forward in synthetic biology. WHO WE ARE EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost's news coverage. Nick Robins-Early is a World Reporter. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. CORRESPONDENTS: Sophia Jones in Istanbul. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera), Dileep Padgaonkar (Times of India) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the "whole mind" way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute's 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as the Advisory Council -- as well as regular contributors -- to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

27 августа, 02:29

Weekend Roundup: Anti-Global Backlash Is Realigning Politics Across the West

The great sociologist Max Weber postulated that the birth act of modern capitalism was the secession of business from the household and thus the web of moral and ethical obligations that intimate form of human organization entailed. Zygmunt Bauman has called globalization the "'second secession'" in which unleashed capitalism has "'flown away'" from the constraints of the nation-state, in effect the larger household. Now, national households are clawing back their claims, reasserting sovereignty in an anti-globalization backlash that is profoundly realigning politics. "Across the West," Nouriel Roubini writes, "establishment parties of the right and the left are being disrupted -- if not destroyed from the inside. Within such parties, the losers from globalization are finding champions of anti-globalization that are challenging the formal mainstream orthodoxy. Thus, the traditional distinction between center-right and center-left is breaking down." In the U.S. and Britain, he notes, working class voters traditionally aligned with the left, are joining the ranks of Trump and Brexit. In continental Europe, discontent with immigration and austerity has given rise to new parties on both the far right and the far left. "A new political alignment,' Roubini concludes, "erases the old left and right paradigms of labor versus capital, workers versus business, taxes and regulation versus free enterprise. Instead, the new alignment will be organized around pro and anti-global integration forces." As Roubini points out, support for globalization these days comes mainly from the emerging economies, which have largely benefited from foreign investment and access to global markets. While inequality has grown within the West, he notes, it has diminished on a global scale. To the extent global integration has touched Brazil, pride rises with greater prosperity. As the Olympics wound down, Adriana Caitano vents her anger in an open letter from Brazil "to people who love to come here to enjoy the beaches and stare at women in bikinis, but disrespect the country that hosts them." She imagines what the "American swimmers [involved in the faux robbery scandal] must have thought: Of course it would be very possible for four foreign, white, tall, Olympians to be assaulted in Rio de Janeiro. Who would not believe it? This underdeveloped country can't even clean a pool the right way. They would never be able to find the truth. So we'll just go back to the American dream with our medals." One can't speak these days of bikinis in Brazil without bringing to mind the controversy over banning the burkini in France, where local police this week forced a woman on a Nice beach to show more skin in her bathing wardrobe. Willa Frej reports on a man in France who has been paying the fines for women ticketed under the burkini ban. Nick Robins-Early examines what many regard as the weak reasoning behind the ban. And, indeed, by week's end, France's highest administrative court, the Council of State, suspended the ban in an initial ruling in a case brought by a human rights group. At the same time, former French President Nicolas Sarkozy, who is running for office again, pledged he would implement a nationwide ban on the burkini if elected. During a visit to the beach in Izmir Province, Turkey, Ilgin Yorulmaz surveys opinion in that Muslim-majority country with a modern secular history. "With historical ties to France," she reports, "Turks are divided over their opinions of the burkini both in France and in their own country." Despite Canada's historic links to France, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has made clear his country doesn't share France's secular fundamentalism. "We should be past tolerance," he says, and move toward embracing diversity. In a post from HuffPost Maghreb, Akram Belkaïd calls for, "open debate about this implicit requirement of total assimilation" behind the burkini ban. Writing from Germany where a debate is underway about banning the burqa, Christian Democratic Union politician Ruprecht Polenz similarly argues that, "underlying the burqa debate is the fear that we can never eliminate the differences in our society." The repercussions of the Turkish coup continue to roil the geopolitical landscape. As U.S. Vice President Joe Biden visited Turkey this week in an effort to temper rising anti-Americanism fueled by a belated and tepid response by U.S. authorities to the failed coup, President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan doubled down on the demand to hand over Fethullah Gülen, who lives in the U.S. and whom he sees as the culprit behind the attempted overthrow of the government. Reviewing these developments, David Hearst asks, "Is America losing Turkey?" Doug Bandow thinks that it would be a good idea if America did lose Turkey. "The growth of Putinism in Ankara today is a terrible embarrassment, with no corresponding security benefit for America as compensation," he writes. "The U.S. should change its approach to reflect changing circumstances. Turkey's membership in NATO no longer serves America's and Europe's interests." Farah Mohamed examines the impact of the coup attempt on the long-festering conflict between Greeks and Turks in Cyprus. Resolution of that conflict is seen by many as a key stepping stone in Turkey's bid to join the European Union, a relationship now even more fraught as Europe is deeply wary of Erdoğan's even sharper post-coup turn toward authoritarianism. As one Cypriot told Mohamed, some islanders, "feel caught up in a fight that does not belong to them." In an essay titled "Why China Fears a 'Color Revolution' Incited by the West," I argue that the U.S. should appreciate the resonances of China's history as a unitary state present in today's one-party system. By recognizing that system's legitimacy, the U.S. would allay the suspicion of China's leaders that it is seeking to foment regime change through the promotion and support of human rights activists. I further argue that, for the first time in the long history of China's "institutional civilization," an autonomous civil society is emerging because everyone now has the same information as those who rule them. "Whether China ends up on the wrong side of history or not depends on its ability to find a balance between rule from the top and an emergent civil society from below," I conclude. "We in the West should encourage China's effort to forge a new equilibrium out of its own experience, not seek to project our legacy onto their future." Writing from Beijing, Peiran Wei asks, "Why are Chinese companies, which have long been playing catch-up with their U.S. counterparts, now leading the way?" Finally, our Singularity series this week looks at how Harvard scientists have "radically rewritten" the E. coli genome, heralding a major step forward in synthetic biology. WHO WE ARE EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost's news coverage. Nick Robins-Early is a World Reporter. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. CORRESPONDENTS: Sophia Jones in Istanbul. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera), Dileep Padgaonkar (Times of India) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the "whole mind" way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute's 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as the Advisory Council -- as well as regular contributors -- to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

20 августа, 02:00

Weekend Roundup: What the Burkini Ban Reveals

In the wake of the terrorist attacks in Nice and elsewhere in the country, several towns along the sunny beaches in the south of France where a scantily clad Brigitte Bardot once frolicked have banned the burkini. This ban on covering up reveals not only a cleavage between conservative Islamic norms and the liberal West, but between the concepts of secularism within the West itself as well. Notably, sympathy with the ban has united the otherwise querulous left and right in France. The Socialist Prime Minister Manuel Valls says he sees behind fashion concepts like the burkini, "the idea that by their nature women are immodest, impure, that they should therefore be completely covered. It is not compatible with the values of France and the republic." The minister for families, children and women's rights calls the burkini, "profoundly archaic" and meant to, "hide women's bodies in order to control them." And the right-wing National Front leader, Marine Le Pen, writes, "France does not lock up a woman's body, France does not hide half of its population under the fallacious and hateful pretext that the other half feels it will be tempted." In this, they all agree with what the Turkish sociologist Nilüfer Göle has been saying for decades: "Islamist politics seeks to curb the free public space by limiting women's visibility through veiling, which is essentially an effort to control women's sexuality by regulating the social encounter between the sexes. ... Hence, in a Muslim context, the existence of a democratic public space depends on the social encounter between the sexes and on the eroticization of the public sphere." In a contribution from HuffPost Maghreb, Ikram Ben Aissa takes the opposite view. "Citizens should be free to wear what they choose!" she exclaims. "When will Muslims in Europe be respected and treated as equal citizens? When will we stop marginalizing millions of European Muslim citizens, especially women?" In a contribution from HuffPost Germany, Austro-Egyptian journalist Menerva Hammad endorses that view. "It's 2016," she writes. "Can't we allow women the freedom to choose what to wear? Wouldn't that be the ultimate form of emancipation? Just because many female celebrities opt for revealing clothes and sing about feminism doesn't mean that they're free. Freedom starts inside your head, and not on top of it." She recalls a different experience in America, where she went swimming in a burkini. "I had a really good time swimming in Texas. No one gave me awkward looks or said anything condescending. Nobody cared who was wearing what." In pointing out the difference between French laïcité and American secularism, she touched on the cleavage within the West. I discussed this dissonance in an interview with then-Turkish President Abdullah Gül during the Arab Spring in 2012 when then-Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan had told the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood not to fear secularism: What is unfortunate for the Arab and Maghreb countries is that their interpretation of secularism has been based on the French model, which is a Jacobin model of imposing a kind of irreligiousness. When you speak of secularism to Muslim communities of the region, it is misunderstood because of this French implication. In practice, the implementation of secularism in the Arab and Maghreb countries has meant fighting against Islam in the name of secularism. ... On the other hand if you use the Anglo-Saxon interpretation of secularism, as practiced in the United States or the United Kingdom, it is something that people should feel comfortable with. All it means is a separation of the state and religion, of the state maintaining the same distance from all religions and acting as the custodian for all beliefs. It is based on respect for all faiths and the coexistence of plural beliefs. The French republic, and its secular fundamentalism, was born out of a revolt against the Catholic Church aligned with the monarchy. The American republic was born out of desire for religious freedom. So it is perhaps no surprise that modern France, which hosts a Muslim population of nearly 5 million, largely hailing from its former North Africa colonies, has become the sharpest edge, the prime battleground, of the clash of civilizations it seeks to avoid. Writing from Berlin, Alexander Görlach rejects the notion that Europe has failed because it is run by out-of-touch elites, as populists on both the right and left argue loudly. "The EU has no elite problem, but rather a problem, particularly in Western Europe, with a thoroughly sedated, consumerist and apathetic population," he says. In an interview with HuffPost, Nobel economist Joe Stiglitz says the euro was flawed from the start. Writing from Rio de Janeiro, Angela Almeida and John Surico chronicle events puts on by a group of artists protesting both the Olympics and austerity measures by Brazil's interim president, Michel Temer. The group, which calls itself Ocupa MinC because it occupies abandoned and defunded Ministry of Culture buildings, worries that the Olympics, "could end up costing Brazil well over the budget of $4.6 billion." "One poll," the authors report, "found that 50 percent of Brazilians were against the Games." The group's members, "argue that the mega-event exposed the vast inequality between the Rio that visitors see and the Rio that the government left behind for the people who actually live here ― a sentiment that has led to widespread protests during the Games." The world continues to spin beyond all the attention focused on the Olympics. Writing from Manila, Richard Javad Heydarian says, "there is growing reason to expect a potentially seismic shift in Philippine foreign policy under the new administration." As the new president, Rodrigo Duterte, rapidly consolidates power, Heydarian argues he is, "in a strong position to introduce a significant foreign policy reset, particularly with respect to China and the United States. Unlike his predecessor, Benigno Aquino, he has extended an olive branch to China, deploying former President Fidel Ramos to conduct backdoor negotiations with the Asian powerhouse." In an interview, former Pakistani Prime Minister Shaukat Aziz says China's multi-billion dollar investment in Pakistan to link up trade routes to the Arabian Sea as part of its new Silk Road project is a "game-changer" for his country. Eric Olander and Cobus van Staden report this week that the quality and reliability of Chinese-built infrastructure in Africa defies the stereotype of "shoddy work." Ian Armstrong worries that the recent decision by the U.S. and South Korea to deploy a new missile defense system will provoke China, which sees it as a strategic threat that would make its defenses vulnerable, to develop more advanced weaponry to counter it, igniting a new arms race in Asia. In an interview, Li Zhifei, founder and CEO of Mobvi, a Beijing-based artificial intelligence startup, talks about the innovation ecosystem in Silicon Valley and Beijing, and why Chinese and U.S. tech companies can't seem to crack each other's markets. In what seems like a rare positive development coming out of Syria, Rowaida Abdelaziz reports on the story of an 11-year-old boy suffering from pain caused by meningitis who was unable to get the treatment he needed in the besieged town of Madaya. Hours after she reported on his condition, the boy was evacuated and is now receiving help. This week, WorldPost co-publisher Nicolas Berggruen talked with CNN's Fareed Zakaria about his investment in ideas, including a $1 million Nobel-type prize for philosophy that will be awarded for the first time this year. Finally, our Singularity series examines how IBM's artificial neurons are bringing us another step closer to powerful brain-like computers. WHO WE ARE EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost's news coverage. Nick Robins-Early is a World Reporter. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. CORRESPONDENTS: Sophia Jones in Istanbul. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera), Dileep Padgaonkar (Times of India) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the "whole mind" way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute's 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as the Advisory Council -- as well as regular contributors -- to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.