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Выбор редакции
21 апреля, 14:23

McKesson stock price target cut to $140 from $155 at Leerink

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news.

Выбор редакции
21 апреля, 13:31

В Арканзасе казнили первого человека за 12 лет

В американском штате Арканзас казнили первого преступника за 12 лет. Вокруг этой истории в начале года разгорелся крупный скандал, так как компанию McKesson, поставлявшую в тюрьму препараты для смертельной инъекции, не проинформировали о целях использования продукта.

20 апреля, 03:32

Arkansas Judge Again Blocks State From Using Drug For Lethal Injections

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); A judge in Arkansas has blocked the state from using its supply of a drug used in lethal injections, due to the drug supplier objecting that the state misleadingly obtained its product. Pulaski County Circuit Judge Alice Gray on Wednesday granted a temporary restraining order that drug supplier McKesson Corp. filed Tuesday. The temporary restraining order is the second one the company has filed related to Arkansas’ use of pancuronium bromide for its death penalty protocol. The drug, which paralyzes the prisoner, is the second step in the state’s three-drug cocktail for the procedure.  Wednesday’s court order effectively blocks the state from carrying out any executions for as long as it’s in place. The state is trying to execute eight prisoners in 11 days before its supply of midazolam, the first lethal injection drug, expires by month’s end.  A spokesman for Attorney General Leslie Rutledge (R) said in a statement her office will appeal Gray’s order to the Arkansas Supreme Court. The state has already been thwarted in its attempt to carry out what have been criticized as “conveyor belt”-like executions between April 17 and April 27. The state has not held an execution in 12 years. Two prisoners received individual stays before the execution timeline started; a third was granted a stay within 24 hours of his death warrant expiring. A fourth prisoner, who is scheduled for execution Thursday night, was granted a stay on Wednesday just minutes before Gray’s order was handed down.  McKesson Corp. last week filed a nearly identical temporary restraining order, which was upheld by a different Pulaski County Circuit judge. The drug supplier filed to dismiss its temporary restraining order just days later following an order by a federal appeals court judge to halt the executions. The company said the federal ruling made their order unnecessary. The federal order was later reversed, putting the executions back on track. Meanwhile, the judge who granted the company’s first temporary restraining order was removed from all capital punishment-related cases in Pulaski County after his participation in an anti-death penalty demonstration drew criticism. McKesson does not approve of its drugs for use in executions. On Wednesday, the company said in a statement that it wants to “prevent the use of our product for something other than a legitimate medical purpose. McKesson is committed to ensuring that its property is only used in a manner consistent with our supplier agreement.” In its filing, McKesson demanded the Arkansas Department of Corrections return the 10 vials of the drug it has. The company said it has already refunded the department and demands the drugs be impounded. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Выбор редакции
19 апреля, 02:16

Company sues Arkansas, charging fraud over lethal injection drugs

(Reuters) - A major U.S. pharmaceutical firm sued Arkansas again over capital punishment on Tuesday, claiming prison officials fraudulently obtained a muscle relaxant to administer in several executions and demanding the drug in question be confiscated from the state.

18 апреля, 03:52

Arkansas Court Blocks Executions As State Pushes Ahead With 'Conveyor Belt' Lethal Injections

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); A flurry of court rulings on Arkansas’ unprecedented attempt to execute eight prisoners in an 11-day span has temporarily spared the lives of two prisoners, while leaving the lives of other condemned killers in limbo.  The Arkansas Supreme Court, in a 4-3 decision on Monday, granted stays of execution for Bruce Ward and Don Davis. Both had been scheduled to die Monday, the first of what critics call the state’s “conveyor belt” plan for multiple executions.  “There will be no executions tonight. We are deeply grateful that the Arkansas Supreme Court has issued stays of execution for Bruce Ward and Don Davis,” Scott Braden, assistant federal defender in Arkansas, said in an email statement. State Attorney General Leslie Rutledge said she would immediately appeal. I will appeal Bruce Ward and Don Davis' stays of execution granted by the State Supreme Court to #SCOTUS this evening. #arpx #ARExecutions— Leslie Rutledge (@AGRutledge) April 17, 2017 Later, Rutledge’s office said she wouldn’t appeal Ward’s stay “at this time.” Gov. Asa Hutchinson (R) criticized the state Supreme Court for sparing the two men. .@AsaHutchinson issues following statement on today's legal movements on tonight's possible execution #ARnews #ARpx pic.twitter.com/8cdILMV2sn— Greg Yarbrough (@GregYarbrough) April 17, 2017 Soon after the state Supreme Court ruling, a federal appeals court lifted stays for five of the condemned inmates that had been put in place on Saturday. That case challenges the state’s method of performing the executions. A stay for prisoner Jason McGehee was granted in a separate case on Friday. In Monday’s ruling, the U.S. Eight Circuit Court of Appeals said the five inmates had ample time already to file objections to the execution protocol, and only acted at the last minute. Judge Jane Kelly, in a dissent, argued the the case was about more than which drugs are used to put inmates to death, and questioned whether Arkansas was in line with the Eight Amendment’s “evolving standards of decency.” The state is aggressively moving to thin its death row before its supply of midazolam ― a controversial sedative in the lethal-injection cocktail ― expires in April. Hutchinson has said he’s unsure where the state can get more. type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related... + articlesList=58ebaadae4b0c89f91203057 Despite the federal appeals ruling, a state court ruling remains in place that blocks the state Department of Corrections from using pancuronium bromide ― a second drug in the lethal three-drug mixture. The state temporary restraining order was granted Friday by Pulaski County Circuit Judge Wendell Griffen, who has since become controversial for attending a death penalty protest hours after his ruling.  Drugmaker McKesson Medical-Surgical sought the order to prevent the state from using the drug after learning the corrections department had obtained it for executions, which the company doesn’t permit. A day after winning the restraining order, the company filed to withdraw its petition, saying the federal ruling that stayed the executions made the state court order unnecessary.  Griffen drew criticism from Republican lawmakers for taking part in Friday’s protest. Griffen faces potential disciplinary action and was removed from all death penalty-related criminal and civil cases in Pulaski County.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

16 апреля, 23:49

Judge Who Blocked Use Of Execution Drug Blasted For Anti-Death Penalty Protest

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Amid the legal battle over Arkansas’ plan to execute as many as eight prisoners in 11 days, one of the judges that ruled against the state has angered death penalty supporters with a dramatic protest of capital punishment. On Friday, Pulaski County Circuit Judge Wendell Griffen issued a temporary restraining order blocking Arkansas from using its supply of vecuronium bromide, one of three drugs in its lethal injection cocktail. Griffen granted the order after McKesson Medical-Surgical, which does not want its product used in executions, petitioned to stop the state on the grounds that the drug had been misleadingly obtained. Within an hour of issuing that order, Griffen joined anti-death penalty protesters gathered outside Republican Gov. Asa Hutchinson’s mansion in Little Rock. Griffen was dressed as an inmate and bound to a cot with ropes to look like a condemned prisoner on a gurney.   RIGHT NOW: Judge Wendell Griffen protesting #Arkansas #executions in front of Governor's Mansion by laying on a gurney. #ARNews pic.twitter.com/16Myw4vHiu— Mitchell McCoy (@MitchellMcCoy) April 14, 2017 Arkansas Republicans including U.S. Sen. Tom Cotton and state Sen. Trent Garner quickly criticized Griffen’s protest. On Saturday, Garner called for the judge to resign or face impeachment.  Judge Griffen should resign immediately, or face impeachment. His actions are a disgrace and unacceptable. #arpx #arleg #impeachment https://t.co/NYJLqT9Wqj— Senator Trent Garner (@Garner4Senate) April 15, 2017 Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge (R) raised the issue of Griffen’s protest in a motion to have his temporary restraining order thrown out and him removed from the case. The state argued that Griffen couldn’t be considered even “remotely impartial” when it comes to the death penalty. “As a public opponent of capital punishment, Judge Griffen should have recused himself from this case,” a spokesman for Rutledge said in a statement. “Attorney General Rutledge intends to file an emergency request with the Arkansas Supreme Court to vacate the order as soon as possible.” The state also took issue with a recent post on Griffen’s personal blog, which interweaves justice and religion. The judge wrote: Premeditated and deliberate killing of defenseless persons ― including defenseless persons who have been convicted of murder ― is not morally justifiable. Using medications designed for treating illness and preserving life to engage in such premeditated and deliberate killing is not morally justifiable.  type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related Coverage + articlesList=58f16b81e4b0bb9638e42e51 Griffen, a former Baptist minister and a lawyer, has faced criticism for his off-the-bench commentary before. He criticized the University of Arkansas’ lack of racial diversity in 2002 and attacked President George W. Bush for the government’s response to Hurricane Katrina and the Iraq War in 2005. The latter may have been part of the reason he lost his re-election bid for the Arkansas Court of Appeals a few years later. In 2011, he won a seat on the state’s 6th Circuit court. “We have never, in my knowledge, been so afraid to admit that people can have personal beliefs yet can follow the law, even when to follow the law means they must place their personal feelings aside,” Griffen told The Associated Press on Saturday. Griffen’s ruling on Friday had put another wrench in the state’s plan to start the series of eight executions on Monday and complete them before its supply of one hard-to-obtain lethal injection drug expired. Two of the eight prisoners had already been granted stays of execution when a federal judge on Saturday halted those of the remaining inmates on grounds that the state’s hasty schedule denied them due process.  McKesson Medical-Surgical moved to lift Griffen’s temporary restraining order following the federal court ruling, arguing that the order had become unnecessary.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Выбор редакции
16 апреля, 07:58

Производитель инъекции для казни в США отказывается поставлять препарат

Из-за проблем с одним из производителей была отложена казнь семерых человек

Выбор редакции
16 апреля, 07:51

NBC News: в США отложили семь казней из-за проблем со смертельной инъекцией

В американском штате Арканзас не могут казнить семерых преступников из-за позиции компании McKesson, поставляющей один из компонентов смертельной инъекции. Об этом сообщает NBC News.В McKesson заявили, что не хотят, чтобы их продукцией кого-то убивали. Компания считала, что вещество будет применяться в медицинских целях, поэтому и подписала договор. Узнав об истинном предназначении их продукции, представители McKesson через суд добились запретительного приказа, вследствие чего казнь семерых осужденных за убийство мужчин была отложена.

15 апреля, 18:08

U.S. Judge Halts Arkansas Plan For Rapid Series Of Executions

By Steve Barnes LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (Reuters) - A U.S. federal judge on Saturday temporarily blocked plans by Arkansas to carry out a rapid series of executions this month, after the inmates argued the state’s rush to the death chamber was unconstitutional and reckless. Arkansas, which has not carried out an execution in 12 years, planned to begin the lethal injections of at least six convicted murderers on Monday and complete the executions before the end of April. Since the U.S. Supreme Court reinstated the death penalty in 1976, no state has ever put as many inmates to death in as short a period. The ruling on Saturday by a federal court in Little Rock threatens that plan, as did an order on Friday by an Arkansas state judge. The federal judge, however, provided officials with an opportunity to address her concerns at a hearing on Monday. Arkansas had scheduled the fast-paced series of executions in order to beat the expiration date on its batch of one of the three drugs used in its lethal injection cocktail. U.S. District Judge Kristine Baker, in a 101-page ruling, found the state’s plan would deny the inmates their legal rights by depriving them of adequate counsel because prison officials allow only a single lawyer to be present for any execution. If the attorney had to rush out to file an emergency petition, it would deprive the inmate of a lawyer to witness the execution, Baker said. “The court finds that plaintiffs are entitled to a preliminary injunction based on their challenge to (the state’s) viewing policies, in their current form, as unreasonable restrictions of plaintiffs’ right to counsel and right of access to the courts,” Baker wrote. Baker ordered lawyers for the state and the death row prisoners to return to court on Monday with a revised plan for viewing the executions and having defense counsel present. Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge vowed to appeal the temporary restraining order. “It is unfortunate that a U.S. District Judge has chosen to side with the convicted prisoners in one of their many last-minute attempts to delay justice,” Judd Deere, a spokesman for Rutledge, said in a statement.   CONDEMNED PRISONERS The lawsuit behind the injunction was filed on behalf of nine condemned prisoners. One of them was never put into the execution schedule for April. Two others won stays of execution from state courts, leaving six of the original petitioners currently in line for their executions to be carried out. The state’s mixture of drugs used in executions has brought legal challenges, and Baker’s ruling on Saturday also raised questions about whether one of them, midazolam, was effective enough at preventing pain during executions. Arkansas employs potassium chloride in combination with vecuronium bromide and midazolam. The latter drug is intended to render the inmate unconscious before the other two chemicals are administered to paralyze the lungs and stop the heart. Governor Asa Hutchinson has said the state must act quickly because its midazolam supply expires at the end of the month. John Williams, attorney for some of the death row prisoners welcomed Baker’s ruling, saying it was legally sound and reasonable. “The unnecessarily compressed execution schedule using the risky drug midazolam denies prisoners their right to be free from the risk of torture,” he said in a statement. Critics have contended that the drug does not achieve the level of unconsciousness required for surgery, making it unsuitable for executions. Supporters have said it is effective, and the U.S. Supreme Court has authorized its use. On Friday, Arkansas Circuit Court Judge Wendell Griffen, an outspoken opponent of capital punishment, issued an order on Friday blocking the state from using vecuronium bromide after a petition from its maker, McKesson Medical-Surgical Inc. The company, along with other pharmaceutical makers, objects to its drug being used in executions. Rutledge filed an emergency petition with the Arkansas Supreme Court on Saturday seeking to overturn Griffen’s order.   (Reporting by Steve Barnes; Writing by Alex Dobuzinskis; Editing by Alistair Bell) -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Выбор редакции
15 апреля, 17:41

Arkansas executions: health giant sues state as federal judge issues injunction

Medical supply company McKesson says state deceptively purchased drugs for lethal injection, becoming first in history to sue a death penalty state for misuseCourts grant stays to remaining seven men set to die in Arkansas executionsProfiles of the eight death row inmatesA US healthcare giant has accused the state of Arkansas of effectively lying to it over the sale of a pharmaceutical drug that the Republican governor had been poised to use in a historic killing spree of eight prisoners in 11 days.The medical supply company McKesson has become the first private company in US legal history to sue a death penalty state for the misuse of its products in executions. Its unprecedented action has succeeded – for now – in frustrating the ambition of the Republican governor, Asa Hutchinson, to stage what critics have called a “conveyor belt” of death. Continue reading...

Выбор редакции
15 апреля, 12:04

15.04.2017 12:04 : В США отложили смертную казнь из-за споров с производителем яда

Исполнение решения суда дожидаются семь человек. Проблемы возникли у тюремщиков в штате Арканзас. В пятницу там должны были казнить семерых мужчин, осужденных за убийство. Им должны были сделать укол обезболивающего, а потом ввести еще два вещества, которые вызывают остановку сердца и прекращают работу легких. Поставщиком одного из препаратов стала компания McKesson, которая вмешалась в процедуру. Ее представителям не объяснили, как именно будет использоваться средство, и теперь фирма требует вернуть партию назад. Как пишет ТАСС, суды штаты постановили отложить казнь преступников, пока не будет урегулирован спор. С похожими трудностями сталкиваются и в других американских штатах. Решают их по-разному. В Юте, например, разрешили расстреливать осуждены в случае нехватки инъекций. За последние 40 лет в США были казнены около полутора тысяч человек.

Выбор редакции
15 апреля, 10:59

В США отложили казни семи человек из-за протестов со стороны медицинской компании

Во время подписания договора с властями Арканзаса в фармацевтической компании McKesson предполагали, что инъекции будут использоваться в медицинских целях

Выбор редакции
15 апреля, 10:18

В США приостановлено действие судебного решения о смертной казни семерых осужденных

В пятницу суды в американском штате Арканзас отложили смертные казни семи человек из-за протестов со стороны фармацевтической компании McKesson - производителя одного из отравляющих веществ, применяемого для смертельной инъекции. Сначала суд приостановил решение по делу 60-летнего Брюсе Варда, виновного в убийстве продавца магазина. Его адвокаты предоставили доказательства того, что он страдает шизофренией. В Арканзасе собирались казнить сразу семерых преступников, осужденных за убийства, г… ЧИТАТЬ ДАЛЕЕ: http://ru.euronews.com/2017/04/15/legal-rulings-halt-arkansas-assembly-line-executions euronews: самый популярный новостной канал в Европе. Подписывайтесь! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=euronewsru euronews доступен на 13 языках: https://www.youtube.com/user/euronewsnetwork/channels На русском: Сайт: http://ru.euronews.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/euronews Twitter: http://twitter.com/euronewsru Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/101036888397116664208/100240575545901894719/posts?pageId=101036888397116664208 VKontakte: http://vk.com/ru.euronews

Выбор редакции
15 апреля, 09:13

Власти США не могут казнить преступников из-за проблем с поставками смертельной инъекции

Власти США не могут привести в исполнение приговор о смертной казни из-за моральных принципов поставщика смертельной инъекции, который не желает, чтобы производимое им вещество применяли для убийства людей.

Выбор редакции
15 апреля, 08:16

Производители инъекции для смертной казни больше не хотят убивать

В США не могут привести в исполнение смертный приговор, вынесенный семерым заключенным, из-за проблем с поставками одной из частей инъекции, которая используется для приведение приговора в действие.

Выбор редакции
15 апреля, 08:07

СМИ: Власти США отложили казни семи человек из-за проблем со смертельной инъекцией

Власти штата Арканзас не могут казнить людей из-за позиции поставщика одной из частей инъекции, используемой в процессе казни.Как сообщает NBC, компания McKesson, которая производит вещество, с помощью которого планировалось привести приговоры в исполнение, не хочет, чтобы их препаратом кого-то убивали.Договор же о поставках был подписан в связи с тем, что в фирме полагали, что вещество будет использоваться в медицинских целях. Узнав об истинном предназначении их товара, представители компании добились запретительного судебного приказа.В настоящее время компания утверждает, что Департамент исправительных учреждений Арканзаса обманул их и теперь от властей требуют вернуть препарат фирме. Взамен предприятие вернёт обратно деньги.В итоге семь казней мужчин, осужденных за убийства, были временно перенесены.(https://russian.rt.com/wo...)

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15 апреля, 07:54

Казни семи человек отложили в США из-за разбирательств с производителем яда

Семь смертных казней были отложены в пятницу судами американского штата Арканзас по причине протестов компании McKesson — производителя одной из инъекций, которая планировалась к использованию при исполнении смертных приговоров. Данная информация приводится в поступивших в архив постановлениях. Исполнение семи смертных приговоров для осуждённых за убийства мужчин планировалось произвести в этом месяце путём ввода обезболивающего и ещё двух веществ. Первое предназначено для прекращения работы лёгких, а второе — для остановки сердца. Как сообщили в McKesson, власти штата, покупая препарат, не сообщили компании о том, с какой целью они приобретают яд. Производитель, в свою очередь, думал, что средство используется в медицинских целях. Компания требует от властей штата отмены сделки и возврата препарата. Высший и окружной суды Арканзаса отложили казни семи осуждённых до окончания разбирательств.

Выбор редакции
15 апреля, 07:01

В США приостановлено действие судебного решения о смертной казни семерых осужденных

В пятницу суды в американском штате Арканзас отложили смертные казни семи человек из-за протестов со стороны фармацевтической компании McKesson – производителя одного из отравляющих веществ, применя

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15 апреля, 06:41

Казнь семи человек отложена в США из-за спора с поставщиком яда

Спор с компанией McKesson, которая производит в США вещества для смертельных инъекций преступникам, вынудил власти штата Арканзас отложить казни семи заключенных, говорится в судебных постановлениях. Все семь казней должны были состояться в апреле. Приговоренные к смерти были осуждены за убийства. Смертельная инъекция состоит из двух компонентов: первый нужен для угнетения сердечной деятельности, а второй для остановки работы легких. Один из этих препаратов власти закупили у McKesson, но не давали компании разъяснений, зачем он нужен. Компания, в свою очередь, полагала, что вещества были закуплены в медицинских целях, передает ТАСС. После выяснения целей закупок McKesson потребовала отмены сделки и возврата препарата, однако этого пока сделано не было. Суд постановил отложить казни заключенных, пока не будет окончено разбирательство. США в последние годы столкнулись с дефицитом препаратов для смертельных инъекций. Во многом это связано с прекращением поставок из Европы, которая выступает против смертной казни. Власти разных штатов принимают решения об альтернативных способах умерщвления преступников. В штате Юта, к примеру, было разрешено расстреливать заключенных в случае нехватки препаратов для казни. Смертная казнь разрешена в 31-м штате США. С 1976 года, когда США вернулись к смертной казни, было казнено 1448 человек.

15 апреля, 04:10

Arkansas Courts Put Seven Executions On Hold

By Steve Barnes LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (Reuters) - The state of Arkansas on Friday ran into a pair of new legal obstacles to its plan to carry out lethal injections on seven murderers in an unprecedented series of executions before the end of the month. The Arkansas Supreme Court granted an emergency stay of execution for Bruce Ward, 60, who was convicted of killing a convenience store clerk, and less than two hours later the executions of six other murderers were put on hold when an Arkansas circuit judge issued a temporary restraining order. The judge’s restraining order barred the state from administering one of three drugs it planned to use in the executions, which are scheduled to begin on Monday and stretch over 11 days. Attorney General Leslie Rutledge plans to file an emergency request for the Supreme Court to vacate that order, a spokesman said, allowing the injections to commence. The state, which has not carried out an death sentence in 12 years, scheduled the fast-paced executions in order to beat the expiration date on its batch of one of the drugs used in its lethal injection cocktail. An eighth inmate who had been scheduled to die also won a stay earlier, removing him from the list for April execution. Lawyers for all of the convicts have asked a federal court in Little Rock to block the executions, arguing the state’s rush to the death chamber was unconstitutional and reckless. The U.S. judge has yet to issue a ruling on the broader case. The state Supreme Court offered no comment in staying Ward’s execution. His lawyers had argued he was schizophrenic and the court should take that into consideration before any final decision on his execution. “He deserves a day in court for that, but in Arkansas the rules do not permit that,” Scott Braden, a lawyer with the Arkansas Federal Defender Office, said after the stay was granted. The attorney general was evaluating how to proceed in Ward’s case, a spokesman said in a statement. Arkansas uses potassium chloride in combination with vecuronium bromide and midazolam. The latter drug is intended to render the inmate unconscious before the other two chemicals are administered to paralyse the lungs and stop the heart. Governor Asa Hutchinson has said the state must act quickly because the efficacy date for midazolam expires at the end of the month. But Judge Wendell Griffen, an outspoken opponent of capital punishment, issued an order blocking the state from using a second drug, vecuronium bromide, after a petition from its maker, McKesson Medical-Surgical Inc. The company said the Arkansas prison system failed to return a supply of the drug when it learned the state intended to use it for executions, a violation of an understanding between the two, according to McKesson. “As a public opponent of capital punishment, Judge Griffen should have recused himself from this case,” said Judd Deere, spokesman for the attorney general. Two other drug makers on Thursday asked a federal court to block Arkansas from using their drugs for upcoming executions, claiming that doing so would violate contractual controls and create a public health risk, court documents showed. The companies did not disclose which of their drugs Arkansas will use during the executions.   (Additional reporting by Brendan O’Brien in Milwaukee and Jon Herskovitz in Austin, Texas; Writing by Frank McGurty; Editing by Cynthia Osterman and Bill Trott) -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.