18 января, 16:15

Medtronic's FDA Nod for Riptide Aspiration System Boosts RTG

Medtronic (MDT) makes efforts to boost RTG business.

17 января, 16:16

Medtronic (MDT) Wins FDA Nod for New Clinician Programmer

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Medtronic's (MDT) latest FDA nod likely to boost Pain Therapies division.

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16 января, 16:21

Medtronic's ITB Therapy Superior to CMM for PSS Reduction

Medtronic (MDT) consistently tries efforts to boost Pain Therapies division, part of the Restorative Therapies Group.

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16 января, 13:48

Биохакеры ускорили создание искусственной поджелудочной

Компания Medtronic готовится к выпуску искусственной поджелудочной железы для больных диабетом, разработанной в тесном сотрудничестве с сообществом биохакеров.

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16 января, 04:00

Биохакеры ускорили создание искусственной поджелудочной

Компания Medtronic готовится к выпуску искусственной поджелудочной железы для больных диабетом, разработанной в тесном сотрудничестве с сообществом биохакеров.

12 января, 22:59

Пекин оказывает давление на иностранные компании

В пятницу администрация Гражданской авиации Китая потребовала извинений от Delta Air Lines за упоминание Тайваня и Тибета в качестве стран на своем веб-сайте.

12 января, 22:59

Пекин оказывает давление на иностранные компании

В пятницу администрация Гражданской авиации Китая потребовала извинений от Delta Air Lines за упоминание Тайваня и Тибета в качестве стран на своем веб-сайте.

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12 января, 14:37

China cracks down on foreign companies calling Taiwan, other regions countries

SHANGHAI (Reuters) - China's aviation authority on Friday demanded an apology from Delta Air Lines for listing Taiwan and Tibet as countries on its website, while another government agency took aim at Inditex-owned fashion brand Zara and medical device maker Medtronic Plc for similar issues.

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12 января, 14:18

China cracks down on foreign companies calling Taiwan, other parts of China countries

SHANGHAI (Reuters) - China's aviation authority on Friday demanded an apology from Delta Air Lines for listing Taiwan and Tibet as countries on its website, while another government agency took aim at Inditex-owned fashion brand Zara and medical device maker Medtronic Plc for similar issues.

12 января, 13:05

Self-Awareness Can Help Leaders More Than an MBA Can

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Jessica Durrant/Getty Images Vincent Siciliano, CEO of California-based New Resource Bank, was brought in to turn things around and restore the bank’s founding mission, which is to “serve values-driven businesses and nonprofits that are building a more sustainable world.” Within a few years, Vince had the bank back on track, but not everything was going as well as it seemed. After the successful transition, the leadership team decided to take the pulse of the organization, and discovered low levels of engagement and displeasure with senior leaders. Vince was surprised, but he assumed the discord was left over from the many changes the organization had gone through, so he chose not to take action — time would heal all. A year later, the bank sent out another employee survey. This time, the results were more specific: Morale was a significant issue, and the majority of people, including members of the senior leadership team, identified Vince as the root cause. Vince was crushed, and oscillated between anger, indignation, defensiveness, and blame. He wondered, “How could they say these things about me? Don’t they understand how far we’ve come under my leadership?” He could have stayed in this negative mindset, wallowing in self-pity and searching for excuses. Instead, after being a successful high-achiever throughout his career, he decided to confront an uncomfortable truth: He wasn’t the great leader he thought he was. He was leading by the book and trampling over the concerns of others who were not ready to move so fast or didn’t understand the reasons for the changes he had implemented. In our conversation with Vince, he said: “My ego had run amok. I was leading from my head and not from my heart.” He realized that, despite all the skills he had developed through his years of management education and professional development, he’d never been directed to take a long look in the mirror and ask questions about who he was, what he valued, and what it really meant to be a leader. Since then, the bank’s teamwork and employee opinion scores have dramatically increased, and now there is a high-performing team that focuses on both relationships and results. Vince’s experience is not unique. Self-awareness is not part of the standard curriculum in most management education programs. The majority of MBA degrees focus on strategy and spreadsheets — the things Vincent excelled at. But this focus blinded him to what was happening in his organization. Approximately 40% of CEOs are MBAs. Many large-scale studies have found that leadership based solely on MBA-trained logic is not always enough for delivering long-term financial and cultural results, and that it is often detrimental to an organization’s productivity. In one study, researchers compared the organizational performance of 440 CEOs who had been celebrated on the covers of magazines like BusinessWeek, Fortune, and Forbes. The researchers split the CEOs into two groups — those with an MBA and those without one — and then monitored their performance for up to seven years. Surprisingly, the performance of those with an MBA was significantly worse. Another study, published in the Journal of Business Ethics, looked at the results of more than 5,000 CEOs and came to a similar conclusion. To be clear, we’re not saying MBAs are not useful in leading an organization. But if the linear MBA-trained logic becomes the sole focus — at the cost of other skills, like self-awareness and understanding others and the culture — the leadership approach is out of balance. That was the case for Vince. He had all the numbers right. His strategy was clear. But people didn’t like working with him and were increasingly unhappy. He was managing based on prevailing business theories, but he didn’t know or understand himself. Because he lacked self-awareness, people found Vince inauthentic. Subsequently, they weren’t keen to follow him or support his leadership. Luckily for Vince, he was open to change, and through a journey of mindfulness and self-awareness coaching , he was able to become more of the leader he wanted to be. Bill George, a professor of leadership at Harvard Business School, and former CEO of Medtronic, says that self-awareness is the starting point of leadership. Self-awareness is the skill of being aware of our thoughts, emotions, and values from moment to moment. Through self-awareness, we can lead ourselves with authenticity and integrity — and in turn better lead others and our organizations. We conducted a survey of more than 1,000 leaders in more than 800 companies in over 100 countries, and found that leaders at the highest levels tend to have better self-awareness than leaders lower in the hierarchy. This could be because stronger self-awareness accelerates the promotion process, or because, like Vince, we’re nudged toward enhancing our self-awareness as our leadership responsibility increases. Further Reading The Mind of the Leader Leadership & Managing People Book Harvard Business Review 30.00 Add to Cart Save Share Fortunately for all of us, self-awareness can be enhanced. Simple steps can be taken to complement one’s traditional leadership skills with it. Adopt a Daily Mindfulness Practice Research published in Nature Neuroscience has found that a short daily mindfulness practice leads to changes in the structure and function of the brain that enhance self-awareness. In our work with a global IT company from Silicon Valley, we found that even just five weeks of 10 minutes of daily mindfulness training enhanced the participating leaders’ self-awareness up to 35%. Mindfulness training enables you to expand your awareness of what’s happening in the landscape of your mind from moment to moment. It helps you to notice and regulate your emotions, and it helps you to better understand the behavior, reactions, and emotions of the people you lead — and in turn create better relations and lead for more impact. (If you are curious about trying out a mindfulness practice, we provide more guidelines here.) Take Regular Breaks When we come under pressure, we default to doing what we have always done. We resort to habitual thinking and behavior. There is not much awareness in that, and little space for understanding yourself or the people you lead. Taking regular short breaks, of even just one minute, gets you out of habitual thinking and behavior. It provides you space for awareness to arise and to see things clearer. An awareness break is a break where you do nothing. You don’t check the news, your phone, or social media. All of that just occupies the space of your mind and does not allow for awareness to arise. Rather, you need to put down your phone, turn away from your computer, and simply look out the window, close your eyes, or walk down the hallway and back. Pay Real Attention to What Others Say When we are busy, our brains default to pattern recognition. It wants simplicity. And when others talk to you, your brain will automatically look for what it has heard before and eliminate what is new. That way, as in Vince’s case, you won’t hear others’ concerns and opinions, and you won’t have the finger on the cultural pulse. You risk getting insulated in your leadership bubble, where your brain only really listens to your inner voice. To avoid the brain’s default pattern recognition, make an effort to listen with two ears wide open, and mouth shut, when you are with others. Also, ignore the inner voice of your mind that comments on everything you hear. Be open. Be curious. And question your assumptions.

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29 декабря 2017, 17:11

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Comcast, Medtronic, Eni, Barclays and Air Products

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Comcast, Medtronic, Eni, Barclays and Air Products

29 декабря 2017, 14:31

To Find Meaning in Your Work, Change How You Think About It

Sam Austin/Unsplash A wonderful New York Times article from 2007 recounted the 20th annual “Operator’s Challenge” — aka the “Sludge Olympics” — a competition for New York sewage treatment workers. The participants compete to show skill in their work, and often do so with great passion. Emily Lloyd, the commissioner of the New York City Department of Environmental Protection, said of the work the competitors do, “It’s tough work. It’s frequently unpleasant work. And they’re terrific at it.” And as you read the article, you note the pride the competitors have in their work and the purpose they find in doing it well. One man, George Mossos, noting how anonymous their work can be, is quoted saying, “It’s enough to serve the public.” Why is it that some people can be extraordinarily well-paid and work in pampered settings but feel empty, while others can work in the sewers of New York City and feel fulfilled? Part of the answer is purpose. As I noted recently in a recent article, for most people, purpose is built not found. Working with a sense of purpose day-in and day-out is an act of will that takes thoughtfulness and practice. Having observed friends and colleagues working with and without purpose for years, I’d offer the following advice on how to consciously endow your work with purpose regardless of your profession. Connect work to service. When I was in graduate school, I once heard Bill George tell a story about how he’d highlight both patients and employees at the Medtronic annual meeting when he was CEO. He’d invite a person whose life had been saved by a defibrillator, for example, to speak to his assembled colleagues and tell them how their work had saved his life. He’d highlight someone in the Medtronic quality control department and explain how her dedication and rigor were saving thousands of lives. He’d connect his colleagues directly to the people they served. While everyone may not handle situations of life and death at work, we each do serve someone in what we do. Teachers can see every day the young lives they are shaping — and visualize the lasting impact they may have on the young lives they touch. Corporate accountants can connect themselves mentally to the larger work of their organizations and take pride and purpose in the customers they help. Who do you serve? Connecting our day-to-day jobs — consciously and concretely — to those we’re ultimately serving makes completing that work more purposeful. Craft your work – and make work a craft. Yale Professor Amy Wrzesniewski once did an in-depth study of hospital custodial staff to determine what helped certain members of the custodial team excel. Her results (recounted by David Zax) were fascinating. Wrzesniewski uncovered a practice among the happiest and most effective custodians she termed “job crafting.” These custodial workers, focused intensely on serving patients, would “[create] the work they wanted to do out of the work they’d been assigned—work they found meaningful and worthwhile.” One would rearrange artwork in rooms to stimulate comatose patients’ brains; others devoted time to learning about the chemicals they used for cleaning rooms and figuring out which were least likely to irritate patients’ conditions. They were pursuing excellence in service to others and would adapt their jobs to suit that purpose. They enhanced their assigned work to be meaningful to themselves and to those they serve. Wrzesniewski and her colleagues have even begun to think more deeply about exercises that can help anyone focus on crafting their work into something that gives them purpose while still getting the core of their job done. In another sense of the term, this crafting was also a demonstration of treating work as craft — focusing on the skill needed to complete one’s work and dedicating oneself to perfecting those skills. This atmosphere of constant improvement in service of craft — so ably demonstrated by the sewage treatment workers of New York — in itself seems to fill professional pursuits with greater purpose. Invest in positive relationships. Who we work with is as important as what we do. Psychologist Martin Seligman (among others) has written extensively on the importance of relationships to happiness and fulfillment (it’s a core element of his “PERMA” model for flourishing); and the now famous Harvard Grant Study found that happiness and even financial success are tied to the warmth of one’s relationships, with the study’s chief architect famously concluding, “Happiness is love. Full stop.” You and Your Team Series Making Work More Meaningful You’re Never Done Finding Purpose at Work Dan Pontefract The Research We’ve Ignored About Happiness at Work André Spicer and Carl Cederström What to Do When Your Heart Isn’t in Your Work Anymore Andy Molinsky While relationships necessarily (and appropriately) look different within the workplace than outside of it, they still matter. We’d all be served by identifying more ways to develop positive collegial relationships at work. Identify a newer or younger employee you’d like to empower, and offer to help them navigate your firm. Take the lead in scheduling an event that will allow you and your colleagues to know one another more fully. Simply take the time to reflect on a new colleague each day, trying to understand him or her and why you’re grateful to have the opportunity to work with them. Whatever your approach, efforts to enhance the positive relationships you have with others at work — often investing in serving them — can give work greater meaning. Remember why you work. Most of us don’t have the luxury of working solely for fun. We may enjoy our jobs, but we also work to earn money and pay bills. For most of us, work in and of itself is a meaningful act of service. Parents often work hard to invest in their children; and those without kids often help support aging parents or other relatives. Those without families often use their resources to support organizations they love in the community or their friends in times of need. It’s rare to find someone working with only their personal needs in mind. Who are you working for? Identify that person or group of people. When the hours are difficult or the tasks are unglamorous, remember that your work is an act of service for those you care about in your personal life. Keeping this front of mind will help you tie more purpose into your work, even when accomplishing the most tedious of tasks. Purpose isn’t magic — it’s something we must consciously pursue and create. With the right approach, almost any job can be meaningful.

28 декабря 2017, 21:16

Top Analyst Reports for Comcast, Medtronic & Eni

Top Analyst Reports for Comcast, Medtronic & Eni

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26 декабря 2017, 17:20

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Bio-Rad Laboratories, Mazor Robotics, Tactile Systems, Eli Lilly and DexCom

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Bio-Rad Laboratories, Mazor Robotics, Tactile Systems, Eli Lilly and DexCom

22 декабря 2017, 22:33

4 MedTech Stocks to Explode in 2018

Standing at the threshold of 2018 it is imperative for the investors to find the means which can dilute the macroeconomic woes and help them gain more.

22 декабря 2017, 17:01

Medtronic (MDT) Down 1.5% Since Earnings Report: Can It Rebound?

Medtronic (MDT) reported earnings about a month ago. What's next for the stock? We take a look at earnings estimates for some clues.

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19 декабря 2017, 16:16

How Safe Is Medtronic's Dividend?

The medical device manufacturer has a long history of rising dividends, but can its growth continue?

04 декабря 2017, 16:13

3 Top Fidelity Mutual Funds to Buy

Below we share with you three top-ranked Fidelity mutual funds. Each has earned a Zacks Mutual Fund Rank #1 (Strong Buy)

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27 ноября 2017, 13:31

Medtronic сохраняет перспективы роста

Medtronic plc Рекомендация Держать Целевая цена $ 89 Текущая цена $ 82,34 Потенциал роста/снижения 8,1% Краткое описание эм