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Molson Coors Brewing
Выбор редакции
10 июня, 00:15

TRADE WARS: Trump’s jobs plan could make your beer more expensive. Tim Weiner, senior commodity…

TRADE WARS: Trump’s jobs plan could make your beer more expensive. Tim Weiner, senior commodity risk manager at Molson Coors Brewing Co. and its MillerCoors LLC unit, believes this may very well happen after the commander-in-chief expedited an investigation into the price of all aluminum coming into the US earlier this year. “If there are […]

01 мая, 19:32

May Day Strikes Hit Cities Around The Country

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Workers in cities from coast to coast took the day off Monday to hit the streets and protest the Donald Trump administration for what organizers hoped would be the largest May Day demonstration in the U.S. in years. The mass protest ― coordinated by labor, immigration and other progressive groups ― served as another early test of the grassroots momentum against the new White House and its right-wing policies. It came on the heels of a climate march that drew tens of thousands to Washington on Saturday. “Remember, this is just the beginning,” Sharon Bridgeforth, board president of community organizing group Together Colorado, reminded protesters in Denver Monday. “Our families are in jeopardy. Our families are hurting.” A crowd of more than 100 union members, community activists and others had spent the morning marching through the city’s downtown.  “We’ll be back,” they called back to Bridgeforth.  Backers of the May Day protests saw the day as an ideal opportunity to challenge the Trump administration over its immigration crackdown. The president has promised to ramp up deportations of undocumented workers, strip federal funding from so-called sanctuary cities, and build a wall along the U.S. border with Mexico. Zeferina Perez, a 59-year-old who came from Mexico two decades ago, said she wanted to show that American businesses cannot function without immigrant labor. She said it stung to see her community vilified on the national stage when immigrants were working hard for meager wages and often exploited to begin with. “We need to demonstrate to everyone that immigrants are important to this country,” said Perez, who was passing out protest leaflets in D.C. ahead of Monday. “We’re willing to take any job that they give us. We only want to work and take care of our families.” In California, protesters faced off with local law enforcement while rallying against the immigration crackdown.     Alameda County Board of Supervisors shutdown. #NoBanNoWallNoRaids #MayDay2017 pic.twitter.com/TZ3QBtLm1s— Karissa Gerhke (@KarissaGerhke) May 1, 2017 Four people in Oakland, California, were arrested after shutting down the entryway of a county government building, according to the Mercury News. Protesters held a “die-in,” chained themselves together and climbed on a low roof of the building. In San Francisco, people formed a wall at the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement building to block its entrance. Los Angeles protesters began gathering before daylight Monday ahead of several marches taking place across the city. #BREAKING #HappeningNow Wilshire & Alvarado #LosAngeles workers & families launch #MayDay #resistLA #NoBanNoWallNoRaids #ShutitDownMay1st pic.twitter.com/PE6tMHcL2w— SEIU 721 (@SEIU721) May 1, 2017 Happening Now! This is what democracy looks like.Join us at MacArthur Park at 11 AM.#ResistLA pic.twitter.com/MyJS92r4EU— CHIRLA (@CHIRLA) May 1, 2017 Teachers in Philadelphia took sick days and protested over their lack of a contract, blocking traffic as they marched down North Broad St. Students joined them, protesting outside one school during a break. Cars honking as 100s of #phled teachers march down N Broad Street. "No contract, no peace," teachers chant. pic.twitter.com/L08F9nr4gE— Kristen Graham (@newskag) May 1, 2017 Fighting 4 Schools in the City of Brotherly Love. #beyondthemoment #themajority #phled #mayday #undiasinimmigrantes pic.twitter.com/DwNYlKcnep— Philly We Rise (@phillywerise) May 1, 2017 .@USchoolPhilly educators at 440 supported by one f our amazing families. #PHLed #PFTContractNow #MayDay4Philly pic.twitter.com/uZW8aNPERa— Charlie McGeehan (@CMcGeeIII) May 1, 2017 In downtown Denver, people gathered to protest Trump and fight for better working conditions for all people, immigrants included. Eva Martinez, representing Service Employees International Union local chapter 105, told HuffPost in Spanish she came out to send a “message to Trump that we are together and we are strong and we’re going to fight.” The crowd took a winding march through the city to deliver a letter to Molson Coors Brewing Co. headquarters, calling on the beer giant to stop funding Trump, Sen. Cory Gardner (R-Colo.) and politicians “who endanger and attack our communities, including Latino communities, one of Coors’ biggest and fastest growing client bases.” “You promote hate and fear, we don’t want to drink your beer,” people chanted. In New York City, workers picketed outside B&H Photo after the company announced earlier this year it would shut down its two warehouses in the city, cutting more than 300 jobs.  B&H's largely Mexican warehouse workers are protesting union busting and terrible work conditions #MayDay2017 pic.twitter.com/sZl40QRLqU— Molly Crabapple (@mollycrabapple) May 1, 2017 Boycott @BHPhotoVideo ! Don't cross the picket line! pic.twitter.com/bNzg0Dj8ln— NY Worker Center Fed (@NYWorkerFed) May 1, 2017 Several businesses in different cities closed their doors to show their support for the May Day protests and immigrants’ rights. We choose to respect, defend and support human rights. #DayWithoutImmigrants #MayDay2017 pic.twitter.com/lDTLl9PTtM— Tacomania Inc (@TacomaniaInc) May 1, 2017 in solidarity with our neighbors #teresamarket and #DayWithoutImmigrants free coffee on us for all strikers #immigrantswelcomehere pic.twitter.com/qJTtLgRES6— Wildflower Pantry (@WFPBoston) May 1, 2017 The May Day holiday has radical roots in the American fight for an eight-hour workday, and it serves as an annual working-class celebration of labor in many foreign countries, including Mexico. The largest May Day demonstration in recent U.S. history occurred in 2006, when hundreds of thousands of immigrant workers went on strike to rally for immigrant rights. As they laid the groundwork for this May Day, organizers had that massive protest in mind ― echoing other recent, anti-Trump demonstrations, like the massive women’s march that followed Inauguration Day. “I think May 1 is the start of something, just as Jan. 21, with the women’s march, was the start of something,” said David Huerta, president of United Service Workers West, which is part of the Service Employees International Union. “We have to continue to voice our grievances with this administration and let them know there’s a resistance building. This isn’t just about immigrants or women. It’s about all of us who are being targeted.” Although large-scale U.S. strikes are at a historic low in modern times, Trump’s election has kindled hopes on the left of a massive general strike to shut things down. February’s “day without immigrants” managed to shut down restaurants and other businesses in certain cities. March’s “day without a woman” brought thousands to Trump’s doors in Washington mid-week, many of them forgoing work for a Wednesday. Nelson Lichtenstein, a labor historian at the University of California, Santa Barbara, said it remained to be seen whether the strikes have a legacy. “We may be entering an era of political strikes, in which unions and other groups set a date and an agenda, but in which lots of unaffiliated people join in,” Lichtenstein said. “The question is: Can these strikes be given any sort of institutional backbone, any impact other than a one-time event that needs to be recreated from start each time?” Aztec dancers performing in crowd of hundreds at Washington and Sansome streets in SF #MayDay2017 pic.twitter.com/rhOoAgcxhT— Evan Sernoffsky (@EvanSernoffsky) May 1, 2017 Unions like Huerta’s played a major role in May Day planning, advising workers on their rights if they wanted to strike and pressuring companies not to retaliate against anyone who takes part. Tech companies like Google and Facebook have agreed not to punish employees who are out for the day, and they’ve encouraged their contractors who employ low-wage janitors and food service workers ― many of them Latino immigrants ― to do the same. In Washington, a local immigrant rights group called Many Languages One Voice was canvassing the downtown business area asking employers to close for the day. If they were unwilling to do that, the group wanted them to commit to allowing employees to miss work without reprisal. The group handed managers pledge sheets to sign, and doled out information about the protests to workers, telling them not to work or shop on Monday. “We want folks to see that there’s a group on the ground that’s concerned about retaliation,” said Hannah Kane, an organizer with the immigrant rights group. Kane said more than two dozen restaurants, hair salons and other mostly independent businesses had agreed to shutter for the day. Her group planned to accompany workers back to work on Tuesday if they were concerned about being punished. There have been several short-lived protest strikes since Trump took office, including a temporary work stoppage by taxi drivers at JFK International Airport. That strike was a direct response to an executive order issued by Trump barring refugees from several Muslim-majority countries from entering the U.S. The “day without immigrants” in February closed restaurants and some schools in cities like Washington. Perez said she hoped that May Day would one day become the working-class celebration in the U.S. that it is in her native Mexico. “May Day is the worker’s day,” she said. “Here they don’t honor the work that immigrants do. We want people to respect us and our rights.” Kate Abbey-Lambertz and Ryan Grenoble contributed to this report. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

01 мая, 19:32

May Day Strikes Hit Cities Around The Country

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Workers in cities from coast to coast took the day off Monday to hit the streets and protest the Donald Trump administration for what organizers hoped would be the largest May Day demonstration in the U.S. in years. The mass protest ― coordinated by labor, immigration and other progressive groups ― served as another early test of the grassroots momentum against the new White House and its right-wing policies. It came on the heels of a climate march that drew tens of thousands to Washington, D.C., on Saturday. #BREAKING #HappeningNow 10,000 marching close down Wilshire Blvd #LosAngeles #ResistLA #MayDay #InternationalWorkersDay #MayDay2017 #resist pic.twitter.com/Sxj1Z5n0tf— SEIU 721 (@SEIU721) May 1, 2017 Backers of the May 1 protests saw the day as an ideal opportunity to challenge the Trump administration over its immigration crackdown. The president has promised to ramp up deportations of undocumented workers, strip federal funding from so-called sanctuary cities, and build a wall along the U.S. border with Mexico. Zeferina Perez, a 59-year-old who came from Mexico two decades ago, said she wanted to show that American businesses cannot function without immigrant labor. She said it stung to see her community vilified on the national stage when immigrants were working hard for meager wages and often exploited to begin with. “We need to demonstrate to everyone that immigrants are important to this country,” said Perez, who was passing out protest leaflets in D.C. ahead of Monday. “We’re willing to take any job that they give us. We only want to work and take care of our families.” Quantina Pringle, a 34-year-old restaurant server, spoke at a workers’ rally in the Mount Pleasant neighborhood of D.C. Pringle called for an end to sexual harassment in the restaurant industry, and a raise in the tipped minimum wage. (Servers in D.C. are paid $2.77 per hour before tips.) “I’m here for the people who have to balance their checkbooks off the attitudes of others,” said Pringle, who is a member of Restaurant Opportunities Center, a worker group that helped organize the May Day rallies. Pringle was accompanied by her boss, Imar Hutchins, who owns the Florida Avenue Grill. Hutchins’ restaurant is typically closed on Mondays, but he said he had shut it down for the “day without immigrants” in February as a show of solidarity. “I support my workers,” Hutchins said. “We try to make our restaurant the best place we can for our people.” In California, protesters faced off with local law enforcement on Monday while rallying against the immigration crackdown.   Alameda County Board of Supervisors shutdown. #NoBanNoWallNoRaids #MayDay2017 pic.twitter.com/TZ3QBtLm1s— Karissa Gerhke (@KarissaGerhke) May 1, 2017 Four people in Oakland, California, were arrested after shutting down the entryway of a county government building, according to the Mercury News. Protesters held a “die-in,” chained themselves together and climbed on a low roof of the building. In San Francisco, people formed a wall at the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement building to block its entrance. Los Angeles protesters began gathering before daylight Monday ahead of several marches taking place across the city. #BREAKING #HappeningNow Wilshire & Alvarado #LosAngeles workers & families launch #MayDay #resistLA #NoBanNoWallNoRaids #ShutitDownMay1st pic.twitter.com/PE6tMHcL2w— SEIU 721 (@SEIU721) May 1, 2017 Happening Now! This is what democracy looks like.Join us at MacArthur Park at 11 AM.#ResistLA pic.twitter.com/MyJS92r4EU— CHIRLA (@CHIRLA) May 1, 2017 Teachers in Philadelphia took sick days and protested over their lack of a contract, blocking traffic as they marched down North Broad Street. Students joined them, protesting outside a school during a break. Cars honking as 100s of #phled teachers march down N Broad Street. "No contract, no peace," teachers chant. pic.twitter.com/L08F9nr4gE— Kristen Graham (@newskag) May 1, 2017 Fighting 4 Schools in the City of Brotherly Love. #beyondthemoment #themajority #phled #mayday #undiasinimmigrantes pic.twitter.com/DwNYlKcnep— Philly We Rise (@phillywerise) May 1, 2017 .@USchoolPhilly educators at 440 supported by one f our amazing families. #PHLed #PFTContractNow #MayDay4Philly pic.twitter.com/uZW8aNPERa— Charlie McGeehan (@CMcGeeIII) May 1, 2017 In downtown Denver, a crowd of more than 100 union members, community activists and others spent the morning marching in protest of Trump and to fight for better working conditions for all people, immigrants included.  “Remember, this is just the beginning,” Sharon Bridgeforth, board president of community organizing group Together Colorado, told protesters. “Our families are in jeopardy. Our families are hurting.” “We’ll be back,” they called out to Bridgeforth.  Eva Martinez, representing Service Employees International Union local chapter 105, told HuffPost in Spanish that she came out to send a “message to Trump that we are together and we are strong and we’re going to fight.” The crowd took a winding march through the city to deliver a letter to Molson Coors Brewing Co. headquarters. The document called on the beer giant to stop funding Trump, Sen. Cory Gardner (R-Colo.) and politicians “who endanger and attack our communities, including Latino communities, one of Coors’ biggest and fastest growing client bases.” “You promote hate and fear, we don’t want to drink your beer,” people chanted. In New York City, workers picketed outside B&H Photo after the company announced earlier this year it would shut down its two warehouses in the city, cutting more than 300 jobs.  Later in the day, New Yorkers rallied at Union Square, including a large showing of immigrants and their children skipping work or school to protest. Vicky Barrios, a social worker and organizer for immigrant rights group Movimiento Cosecha, said “this country would fall and collapse” without immigrants like her parents. “I don’t think we should be scared on a daily basis about either being harassed, humiliated, harmed or deported,” Barrios told HuffPost. “I don’t think that’s how we’re suppose to live.” Victor Toro, 74, has been living illegally in New York since he escaped the dictatorship of Chilean Gen. Augusto Pinochet in the 1980s. He considers himself a “proud undocumented immigrant.”  “For me, Trump isn’t the problem,” said Toro, founder of La Peña, a cultural and political center in the Bronx. “The problem is the capitalist state that’s implanted here in the United States that’s sometimes led by Republicans and other times Democrats. Both are the same thing. The people have to open their eyes. When the Democrats were in power they expelled more than 2 million undocumented immigrants, and no one did anything against Obama. We want to create an autonomous movement.” Boycott @BHPhotoVideo ! Don't cross the picket line! pic.twitter.com/bNzg0Dj8ln— NY Worker Center Fed (@NYWorkerFed) May 1, 2017 In Chicago, a historic union stronghold and sanctuary city, dozens of groups representing interests ranging from labor rights to immigration reform joined a midday protest. Hundreds of people packed into the city’s Union Park, itself a longtime rallying site for the U.S. labor movement. “When it comes to our rights as workers, it doesn’t matter your racial, ethnic, religious status. These things cut across those lines,” said Abraham Diaz, of Arise Chicago, a group that advocates for labor-friendly local policy like paid sick leave and a living wage. “And they’re under attack in this administration.” @bellwak @SarahJindra Yep! pic.twitter.com/jHcZCu4ccV— Jessyca Malina (@jessycamalina) May 1, 2017 Miguel Mora of AFSCME 2854 said his group’s core message is that government must better serve the community — which includes veterans, disabled people, children and the elderly, as well as middle-class workers. Mora’s union has been fighting for a contract since June 2015. He said rhetoric from politicians like Trump and Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner (R) is inconsistent with their anti-labor views. “[They’re] attacking the working people,” Mora said. “The idea that we make a lot of money or too much money is not true. I’m a father, and I can’t put my kids through college. We can’t make it in this economy.” Tony Johnston, president of the Cook County College Teachers Union, said his teachers were similarly fighting for a fair contract and were also standing in solidarity with immigrants rights on May Day.  “So many of our students are in that situation and they’re feeling vulnerable,” Johnston said of the new wave of policies in the Trump era. Several businesses in different cities closed their doors to show their support for the May Day protests and immigrants’ rights. We choose to respect, defend and support human rights. #DayWithoutImmigrants #MayDay2017 pic.twitter.com/lDTLl9PTtM— Tacomania Inc (@TacomaniaInc) May 1, 2017 in solidarity with our neighbors #teresamarket and #DayWithoutImmigrants free coffee on us for all strikers #immigrantswelcomehere pic.twitter.com/qJTtLgRES6— Wildflower Pantry (@WFPBoston) May 1, 2017 The May Day holiday has radical roots in the American fight for an eight-hour workday, and it serves as an annual working-class celebration of labor in many foreign countries, including Mexico. The largest May Day demonstration in recent U.S. history occurred in 2006, when hundreds of thousands of immigrant workers went on strike to rally for immigrant rights. As they laid the groundwork for this May Day, organizers had that massive protest in mind ― echoing other recent, anti-Trump demonstrations, like the massive women’s march that followed Inauguration Day. “I think May 1 is the start of something, just as Jan. 21, with the women’s march, was the start of something,” said David Huerta, president of United Service Workers West, which is part of the Service Employees International Union. “We have to continue to voice our grievances with this administration and let them know there’s a resistance building. This isn’t just about immigrants or women. It’s about all of us who are being targeted.” Although large-scale U.S. strikes are at a historic low in modern times, Trump’s election has kindled hopes on the left of a massive general strike to shut things down. February’s “day without immigrants” managed to shut down restaurants and other businesses in certain cities. March’s “day without a woman” brought thousands to Trump’s doors in Washington mid-week, many of them forgoing work for a Wednesday. Nelson Lichtenstein, a labor historian at the University of California, Santa Barbara, said it remained to be seen whether the strikes have a legacy. “We may be entering an era of political strikes, in which unions and other groups set a date and an agenda, but in which lots of unaffiliated people join in,” Lichtenstein said. “The question is: Can these strikes be given any sort of institutional backbone, any impact other than a one-time event that needs to be recreated from start each time?” Unions like Huerta’s played a major role in May Day planning, advising workers on their rights if they wanted to strike and pressuring companies not to retaliate against anyone who takes part. Tech companies like Google and Facebook have agreed not to punish employees who are out for the day, and they’ve encouraged their contractors who employ low-wage janitors and food service workers ― many of them Latino immigrants ― to do the same. In Washington, a local immigrant rights group called Many Languages One Voice was canvassing the downtown business area asking employers to close for the day. If they were unwilling to do that, the group wanted them to commit to allowing employees to miss work without reprisal. The group handed managers pledge sheets to sign, and doled out information about the protests to workers, telling them not to work or shop on Monday. “We want folks to see that there’s a group on the ground that’s concerned about retaliation,” said Hannah Kane, an organizer with group. Kane said more than two dozen restaurants, hair salons and other mostly independent businesses had agreed to shutter for the day. Her group planned to accompany workers back to work on Tuesday if they were concerned about being punished. There have been several short-lived protest strikes since Trump took office, including a temporary work stoppage by taxi drivers at JFK International Airport. That strike was a direct response to an executive order issued by Trump barring refugees from several Muslim-majority countries from entering the U.S. The “day without immigrants” in February closed restaurants and some schools in cities like Washington. Perez said she hoped that May Day would one day become the working-class celebration in the U.S. that it is in her native Mexico. “May Day is the worker’s day,” she said. “Here they don’t honor the work that immigrants do. We want people to respect us and our rights.” Chris D’Angelo contributed to this report. Dave Jamieson reported from Washington; Kate Abbey-Lambertz reported from Detroit; Ryan Grenoble reported from Denver; Carolina Moreno reported from New York; Kim Bellware reported from Chicago.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Выбор редакции
12 декабря 2016, 17:31

Molson Coors Brewing started at neutral with $107 stock price target at UBS

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news.

Выбор редакции
09 декабря 2016, 23:27

США: Легалайз привел к снижению потребление пива

В связи с легализацией рекреационной марихуаны объемы продажи пива в штатах Колорадо, Орегон и Вашингтон снизились примерно на 2%

01 ноября 2016, 21:21

What Lies Ahead for Consumer Staples ETFs?

Consumer Staples sector presents itself as a lucrative investment hub amid an uncertain backdrop.

Выбор редакции
27 июля 2016, 18:47

Molson Coors Brewing Co. shares down 5%

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news.

22 июля 2016, 19:55

Boston Beer (SAM) Beats on Q2 Earnings, Curtails 2016 View

Boston Beer Co. Inc. (SAM) posted better-than-expected earnings for second-quarter 2016, while sales were in line with estimates.

21 июля 2016, 19:43

Hoppy Days for Big Beer

The U.S. Justice Department approved a $108 billion merger between Anheuser-Busch InBev and SABMiller.

30 июня 2016, 19:10

US firms’ earnings at risk from Brexit, dollar’s rise

FOREIGN exchange volatility and economic uncertainty after Britain’s vote to leave the European Union have imperiled a projected profit rebound in the United States, where companies have been stuck in

27 июня 2016, 17:04

10 компаний США, которые пострадают от Brexit

После исторического голосования на референдуме в Великобритании, на котором было принято решение выйти из ЕС, рынки в панике. Американские индексы упали, почти все секторы находятся в красной зоне. Валюты падают, а золото растет.

27 июня 2016, 17:04

10 компаний США, которые пострадают от Brexit

После исторического голосования на референдуме в Великобритании, на котором было принято решение выйти из ЕС, рынки в панике. Американские индексы упали, почти все секторы находятся в "красной зоне". Валюты падают, а золото растет.

29 марта 2016, 00:09

HUFFPOST HILL - Cherry Blossoms, Gunfire

Workplace attendance was light around Washington today because hey, Jesus took three days, too. A deranged gunman exercised his Second Amendment right to ruin thousands of tourists' day. And Georgia's governor vetoed a bill that would have prohibited vendors at Hartsfield-Jackson and the state's six other employers to refuse service to gay people. This is HUFFPOST HILL for Monday, March 28th, 2016: DoIHaveToShelterInPlace.com: "A lockdown of Capitol Hill was lifted Monday afternoon after reports of shots fired at the U.S. Capitol closed the multi-building complex just before 3 p.m. The Capitol Police announced the Capitol was again open for official business, though the Capitol Visiter Center remained closed as of 4 p.m. A House alert email to Capitol Hill staffers after 3:30 p.m. informed them the House, Senate and Library of Congress buildings had been returned to normal operation, but noted, 'The U.S. Capitol Visitor Center will remain closed until further notice.' The Senate sergeant at arms issued a statement Monday afternoon as the reports began streaming in: “Shooter has been caught. One police officer shot, but not seriously. Remain sheltered in place.” [HuffPost] @hillhulse: Capitol Visitor Center was constructed in response to shooting in Capitol that killed two police officers in 1998. SPEAKING OF GUNS AND OUR REPRESENTATIVE GOVERNMENT - A Yosemite Sam-style wanton firing of guns into the air upon the official nomination of a Republican presidential candidate does seem appropriate, however. Katherine Faulders: "The petition to allow the open carry of firearms at the Quicken Loans Arena during the GOP convention in Cleveland in July has upwards of 44,000 signatures, with supporters arguing that the ban is an infringement upon their Second Amendment rights given that Ohio is an open carry state. ... The U.S. Secret Service said today that no firearms will be allowed at the Republican convention in Cleveland this July. Ohio’s open carry law allows private employers to prohibit the presence of firearms on their property or in motor vehicles owned by the employer. In this case, that private employer is the Quicken Loans Arena, which bans handguns, firearms and any other weapons on their premises. A spokesperson for the Secret Service told ABC News today that 'firearms will not be allowed in the Quicken Loans Arena' and 'only authorized law enforcement personnel working in conjunction with the Secret Service for a particular event may carry a firearm inside of the protected site.' 'Individuals determined to be carrying firearms will not be allowed past a predetermined outer perimeter checkpoint, regardless of whether they possess a ticket to the event,' Secret Service spokesman Robert Hoback said." [ABC News] TODAY'S TRUMP IDIOCY - Dave Weigel on Donald getting pwned by right-wing radio host Charlie Sykes: "After congratulating the candidate for the birth of a new grandson, Sykes asked him to close the book on the interminable story of his threat to bring Heidi Cruz into a fight over reputation and looks. 'Wouldn’t it be a good way to start off your Wisconsin campaign by saying that wives should be off-limits and that you apologize for mocking her looks?' asked Sykes. 'I think it’s true, Charlie, actually,' said Trump, apparently agreeing that wives were off limits, albeit in a confusing way. Later, he said he did not know Cruz’s wife but assumed she was 'incredible.' Given several chances, he just couldn’t clean up the story." Ugh. [WaPo] DELANEY DOWNER Jack Smith has a good report on a proposal to broaden Lifeline, best known as "Obamaphone" even though it started under Ronald Reagan: "Americans living in poverty are drastically less likely to have internet access, and [San Francisco resident Bridgid] Skiba is one of the 55 million Americans without broadband at home. They're also most in need of Wi-Fi when looking for more gainful employment…. Forty-eight percent of Americans making less than $25,000 a year are without a broadband connection — one of the tools they need most to achieve financial stability. In 2016, broadband isn't a privilege — it's a necessity. Access to it can make or break someone's ability to find a job, reeducate herself or keep in touch with loved ones. In order to bring it to more people, the government is proposing a radical addition to American welfare benefits. On the morning of Thursday, March 31, at an open meeting, the FCC will vote on whether or not to expand an old program called Lifeline to give families a $9.25 monthly subsidy toward putting broadband in their home." [Mic.com] Like HuffPost Hill? Then pre-order Eliot's book's, The Beltway Bible: A Totally Serious A-Z Guide To Our No-Good, Corrupt, Incompetent, Terrible, Depressing, and Sometimes Hilarious Government. Does somebody keep forwarding you this newsletter? Get your own copy. It's free! Sign up here. Send tips/stories/photos/events/fundraisers/job movement/juicy miscellanea to [email protected] Follow us on Twitter - @HuffPostHill GEORGIA GOVERNOR VETOES ANTI-GAY BILL - We'd make a RINO joke here, but who the hell is actually an R these days? Jen Bendery and Elise Foley: "Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal (R) vetoed a bill Monday morning that would have allowed open discrimination against gay people, a huge victory for the LGBT community and for businesses that had been threatening to boycott the state if Deal signed the laww. 'Georgia is a welcoming state. It is full of loving, kind and generous people. And that is what we should want,' Deal said during a press conference. 'I intend to do my part to keep it that way. For that reason, I will veto House Bill 757.' The bill would have prevented the government from taking action against organizations or people with 'a sincerely held religious belief regarding lawful marriage between... a man and a woman.' It would have opened the door to all kinds of discrimination against same-sex couples. A state-contracted counselor, for example, could refuse to provide services to people in a same-sex marriage. Taxpayer-funded adoption and foster care agencies could refuse to place children in their homes. Government employees, a la Kim Davis, could refuse to file official forms for same-sex couples." [HuffPost] GOP CANDIDATES VYING FOR COLORADO INSIDER DELEGATES - This being Colorado, anyone who gains access to the smoke-filled backroom might want to bring some Pringles. Eli Stokols: "When Colorado Republicans scrapped their binding straw poll as part of the state’s March 1 caucuses, it looked like they were forfeiting their relevance in the GOP’s front-loaded nomination process. Now, they’re back in the game. With a still unsettled three-way primary fight appearing to be headed for a contested convention in July, Colorado’s GOP assemblies over the next week offer Donald Trump and Ted Cruz a major opportunity to win a significant pile of delegates chosen almost completely by party insiders. Now, it’s up to the three candidates to convince the party to pick delegates who promise to vote in their favor…'It’s chaos. It’s a cluster. It’s the ultimate insider’s game,' said Josh Penry, a GOP operative in Denver who chaired Marco Rubio’s campaign in Colorado. 'There are so many delegates in play.' Cruz confirmed Monday that he will attend the Colorado GOP’s state assembly on April 9. And Trump and John Kasich are also tentatively planning to attend the confab of roughly 6,000 party activists in Colorado Springs, where 27 of the state’s 34 delegates to the RNC convention will be elected." [Politico] CLINTON THINKS A TRUMP SUPREME COURT WOULD NOT BE CLASSY - Amanda Terkel: "Hillary Clinton will make the case that the Supreme Court is at the center of the 2016 election in a speech Wednesday, warning what will happen if Donald Trump becomes president and is allowed to choose new justices. 'Based on his positions on a number of issues, there is good reason to believe a Trump nominee would seek to roll back our rights, further empower corporations, and undo so much of the progress we’ve achieved,' a Clinton aide said in an email, providing an advance look at the remarks the Democratic presidential candidate is set to deliver at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The former secretary of state will argue that the 'core pillars of the progressive movement' are at risk of being overturned by the court during a single term if a Republican wins the White House in November. " [HuffPost] Sam Stein and Jason Cherkis interviewed Anthony Weiner about losing: "The new revelations turned his campaign into a media circus. The weeks that followed were agonizing, filled with tense interactions with voters, suffocating news coverage, and declining poll numbers. He even got into a shouting match with a customer at a Kosher bakery…'I was just falling apart at that point. I mean, I was just falling apart,' he said. 'Now admittedly the guy — he was a racist asshole and he said something very nasty about my wife and I snapped. But yes, it was a function of me just kind of being at my wits’ end.' ... 'I would be a better elected official than a lot of these people are,' Weiner said of the possibility of yet another comeback. 'But I think I’m practical enough to realize it is not going to happen'" [HuffPost] 'I SHOWERED WITH DONALD TRUMP' - "Lately, people who know I went to military school with Donald Trump have been asking, “Did you ever take a shower with him?” They want to know, of course, if he is as well endowed as he claims. Although I must have been in the same gang shower with him many times, the truth is I never looked. And as far as I know, nobody else did, either. In fact, as I’ve confessed elsewhere, I have only positive memories of Donald from my school years. Once at military school, when I really needed it, he helped me out of a difficult jam with a brutish barracks commandant who was his role model and whose influence we see in Trump the bullying presidential candidate." [Daily Beast] BECAUSE YOU'VE READ THIS FAR - Here are photos from this year's White House Easter Egg Roll FOMO-STOCK: WEALTHY CONSERVATIVES GATHER AT WORLD FORUM - Matt Ferner: "[T]here is a public list of attendees [at this year's American Enterprise Institute’s World Forum]... thanks to congressional disclosure rules. Flimsy as they are, they do require members who have AEI pay for their trip to the luxurious golf resort on Sea Island, Georgia, to submit a full agenda of the weekend’s activities and a list of attendees. Among the more interesting attendees were the Dalai Lama, former Vice President Dick Cheney, former presidential candidate Ross Perot and former George W. Bush administration official Karl Rove. Billionaires present included Philip Anschutz (whose reported net worth is over $10 billion), President and CEO of Chick-fil-A Dan Cathy, former chairman of the Molson Coors Brewing Company Pete Coors, executive chairman of Hyatt Hotels Thomas Pritzker and co-founder of the Carlyle Group Dan D’Aniello." [HuffPost] COMFORT FOOD - A short film of people describing their most George Costanza-ish breakups. - A history of the lens flare. - Mean teenage girls read Donald Trump's tweets. TWITTERAMA @edzitron: a-woke me up, before ya go go don’t go and call me a bernie bro @swin24: woman outside talking to press about #capitolshooting: "say we're here lobbying for HR 2759, hashtag medicare... I'm not kidding" @emmaroller: Read my book forthcoming in 2018 "The Reddit Election: How Pepe the Frog Explains the Rising American Electorate" Got something to add? Send tips/quotes/stories/photos/events/fundraisers/job movement/juicy miscellanea to Eliot Nelson ([email protected]) or Arthur Delaney ([email protected]). Follow us on Twitter @HuffPostHill (twitter.com/HuffPostHill). -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

25 марта 2016, 01:54

Here's Who Went To A Top-Secret Meeting Of America's Most Powerful People

WASHINGTON -- There's one big rule for the American Enterprise Institute's annual World Forum: Don't talk about the World Forum. The whole meeting is formally off the record, including who shows up and what they talk about (*cough* Donald Trump *cough*). Last year, Bloomberg wrote a story about the meeting titled "AEI's World Forum: So Secretive We Couldn't Even Get a Snow Update." But now, there is a public list of attendees, thanks to congressional disclosure rules. Flimsy as they are, they do require members who have AEI pay for their trip to the luxurious golf resort on Sea Island, Georgia, to submit a full agenda of the weekend's activities and a list of attendees. Among the more interesting attendees were the Dalai Lama, former Vice President Dick Cheney, former presidential candidate Ross Perot and former George W. Bush administration official Karl Rove.  Billionaires present included Philip Anschutz (whose reported net worth is over $10 billion), President and CEO of Chick-fil-A Dan Cathy, former chairman of the Molson Coors Brewing Company Pete Coors, executive chairman of Hyatt Hotels Thomas Pritzker and co-founder of the Carlyle Group Dan D'Aniello. There were also a number of tech executives, including Apple CEO Tim Cook, Google co-founder Larry Page, Napster creator and Facebook investor Sean Parker and Tesla Motors and SpaceX honcho Elon Musk. Some media personalities in attendance were Fox News host Bret Baier, radio host Hugh Hewitt, Wall Street Journal editorial page editor Paul Gigot, The Weekly Standard editor Bill Kristol, National Review editor Rich Lowry, Wall Street Journal columnist Peggy Noonan and New York Times publisher Arthur Sulzberger. And here's a lengthy list of members of Congress who attended: House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.), Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn (R-Texas), House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.), House GOP Conference Chairwoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-Wash.), Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.), Sen. Joni Ernst (R-Iowa), Sen. Cory Gardner (R-Colo.), Sen. Deb Fischer (R-Neb.), Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah), Sen. David Perdue (R-Ga.), Sen. Ben Sasse (R-Neb.), Sen. Tim Scott (R-S.C.), House Financial Services Chairman Jeb Hensarling (R-Texas), House Energy and Commerce Chairman Fred Upton (R-Mich.), Rep. Peter Roskam (R-Ill.), Rep. John Delaney (D-Md.), Rep. Diane Black (R-Tenn.), Rep. Marsha Blackburn (R-Tenn.) and Rep. Buddy Carter (R-Ga.). -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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11 ноября 2015, 13:32

Molson Coors может стать полноправным владельцем MillerCoors

По сведениям из осведомленных источников, канадская пивоваренная компания Molson Coors Brewing близка к заключению соглашения о приобретении оставшегося пакета акций в американском совместном предприятии MillerCoors, созданном совместно с фирмой SABMiller. Источники заявляют, что в рамках сделки Molson Coors выкупит 58% акций MillerCoors примерно за $12 млрд.

Выбор редакции
10 ноября 2015, 23:53

Molson Coors может стать полноправным владельцем MillerCoors

По сведениям из осведомленных источников, канадская пивоваренная компания Molson Coors Brewing близка к заключению соглашения о приобретении оставшегося пакета акций в американском совместном предприятии MillerCoors, созданном совместно с фирмой SABMiller. Источники заявляют, что в рамках сделки Molson Coors выкупит 58% акций MillerCoors примерно за $12 млрд.

10 ноября 2015, 22:20

Molson Coors nears deal to buy rest of Miller Coors for $10 bln-WSJ

Molson Coors Brewing Co is nearing a deal to buy the rest of its U.S. joint venture with SABMiller Plc, MillerCoors LLC, for more than $10 billion, the Wall Street Journal reported. An agreement is expected ...

06 ноября 2015, 23:46

Obama Rejects Keystone Pipeline, Approves Keystone Light Pipeline

"The White House is gonna be fucking lit, bro." Fresh off Friday's decision to reject the Keystone Pipeline, Commander in Chief Barack Obama held a second press conference to announce his approval of the Keystone Light Pipeline. The pipeline, which will span 1,490 miles from Colorado to Washington, D.C., will directly import Molson Coors Brewing Company's Keystone Light branded beer into a pool in the White House's backyard. Credit: Andy McDonald/Huffington Post The president went on to say the lack of cans will prevent shotgunning any beers, but felt that his beer bong would suffice. "Okay, like literally the only bummer is we won't ever get those fucking sick ass orange cans. But a goddamn pool of Keystone Light? Gonna turn up like no one has ever turned up before, bi-otch." The Senate agreed to the tax-dollar funded pipeline, though they noted that they would have preferred a different beer. "I know it's not like, Smirnoff Ice or whatever you pussies usually drink, but it's cheap as shit and we're going to get way more bang for the buck with it. In this economy, our nation can't be using tax dollars for any pricey shit." Obama went on to remind us that Smirnoff Ice's would be throughout the party, though strictly so that he could "Ice the shit out of Joey Biden." -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.